Where are Britain's loneliest places in lockdown?
07/04/2021 | news | education | 515
Loneliness in the pandemic has been more intense for young people in poor, urban areas.
1
07/04/2021 14:02:51 70 5
bbc
I'm so glad the ONS have commissioned this work to highlight such a large number of people who feel this way, and not just one single demographic is prevalent. Hopefully this will start to knock down some perceptions of this scourge.
62
07/04/2021 15:57:11 47 8
bbc
What do you think you're achieving here? Coming here, posting entirely sensible and reasonable comments, making objective assumptions. How very dare you?!
67
07/04/2021 16:14:22 11 4
bbc
What are you doing? You've come here, pointing out sensible things, making valid points. You even ended on a positive!
2
07/04/2021 14:04:11 11 15
bbc
Dont think the place matters in lockdown if you're sticking to the rules you shouldn't see anyone anyway
153
07/04/2021 17:07:16 5 3
bbc
Luckily everyone doesn't have your selfish and cowardly attitude or the economy really would be in trouble!!
382
07/04/2021 19:16:31 0 0
bbc
There is really only one place the rules need to be stuck right now. This disproportionate ruination of the majority of the nations lives to save the careers of those who failed to prepare for an entirely foreseeable situation has really gone far enough.
3
EdK
07/04/2021 14:05:47 17 10
bbc
I would suggest that 16-24 year olds have a very different perception to loneliness to that of the older generations - for a start, I'd imagine the vast majority of them are still living at home..
61
07/04/2021 15:55:42 2 10
bbc
Your imagination doesn't tally with observable reality.
4
Dan
07/04/2021 14:06:14 16 42
bbc
Lockdown is the most evil eugenics program to ever hit Britain.
It has cost tens of thousands of lives, young and old and is set to cost tans of thousands more even without further draconian police state actions by this technocratic cabal that dare call itself our government according to ONS figures and a Bristol University Study.
And there is ZERO scientific basis behind them as pandemic control.
9
07/04/2021 14:09:13 34 10
bbc
Nice rant. Shame it is all rubbish
13
DG
07/04/2021 14:11:46 8 3
bbc
Nice buzzword bingo, impressive how many words you've used with no understanding of their meaning to try and sound smart. Eugenics program my aunt sally.
18
07/04/2021 14:16:36 5 2
bbc
Lots of interesting words and phrases that could have been saved, as it is all drivel!
23
07/04/2021 14:19:33 12 1
bbc
Could be the next president of Brazil here ??
30
07/04/2021 14:22:14 5 0
bbc
'technocratic' - this government? You need to be expert in something to be a technocrat.
5
07/04/2021 14:06:26 15 11
bbc
I presume some awful smug sociopath will be along shortly, to denounce loneliness as something "snowflakey" ?
60
07/04/2021 15:54:34 8 6
bbc
Your presumption is sadly realised.

Plenty of folk here display a worrying lack of empathy.

It's amazing how many people commenting here, claiming the article is wrong. I didn't know HYS had so many professional sociologists and psychologists. We are truly blessed to have these critical thinkers here, with their degrees from YouTube University, and Facebook College.
6
js
07/04/2021 14:06:42 5 7
bbc
Fuel poverty driven EWDs are excess winter deaths that wouldn’t have occurred except that those who die couldn’t afford to heat their homes. Had they been able to, they might have lived for years longer. So an EWD caused by fuel poverty can rob someone of years of life.
28
07/04/2021 14:21:41 6 0
bbc
I think you are commenting on the wrong article. This is about loneliness, not fuel poverty
7
07/04/2021 14:07:42 236 11
bbc
You can feel lonely around a hundred people and yet perfectly happy alone. Loneliness has nothing to do with number of people physically around you, it's about deep connections.
69
07/04/2021 16:21:11 89 279
bbc
This has all been caused by the government's monumental overreaction to coronavirus and these ridiculous and unnecessary lockdowns.

We'll be paying for this for decades. Shame on this government.
102
07/04/2021 16:35:59 10 4
bbc
Completely agree.

A story revolving around unimportant click bait survey figures that could have actually focused on important social issues instead.
149
07/04/2021 17:02:25 8 19
bbc
Completely agree. Time to go and nurture those deep connections....from two metres away.....wearing a mask.....fearing for my life....
236
07/04/2021 18:00:31 0 1
bbc
To be fair, the article is not saying anything to the contrary.
345
07/04/2021 18:55:22 1 0
bbc
Well put. It is the difference between true friends and mere acquaintances.
395
07/04/2021 19:16:27 0 0
bbc
You’re absolutely right, well said
514
08/04/2021 22:53:11 0 0
bbc
Cant believe the level of ignorance of some of the comments here. Scientific predictions at the beginning of this put the upper limit on the number of people killed by Covid without preventative action at about 50 million globally.
- That isn't even including mutations.

The evidence is quite clear - the more complete the lockdown in a country the less people (by proportion) have died there.
8
07/04/2021 14:08:12 72 10
bbc
Interesting. As a "standoffish" southerner I am often told how much more friendly and inclusive people are "up north" yet the ONS top 3 for loneliness are all in the NE or NW. Seems like as with most things friendliness and inclusiveness are all about individuals rather than areas.
16
DWM
07/04/2021 14:15:21 50 1
bbc
Worth mentioning that the top 3 lowest places with the lowest levels of loneliness are also “up north”.
24
07/04/2021 14:19:41 17 0
bbc
You could actually look at it as the other way round - people used to high social contact and strong communities feeling more lonely because the lockdown has prevented them from seeing family and friends and feeling part of that community. Impossible to tell but you have to bare in mind these results are from a pandemic where social lives are restricted so many factors will influence loneliness
37
07/04/2021 14:27:49 10 4
bbc
Outside of a Pandemic where socializing is allowed and things are normal, then yes northerners are friendlier..
100
07/04/2021 16:35:00 10 6
bbc
In fairness this pandemic has restricted contact to phone and computer screens, which is the southerner's favourite and often only means of contact. It is unlikely that anyone in, say, London is going to be adversely affected by this shift.

It's a bit more face-to-face up north; not being able to actually see or socialise in a normal environment is likely to trigger some loneliness.
282
07/04/2021 18:29:04 6 5
bbc
It's loneliness DURING Covid and so a lot of people have lost their support and social networks.

Older northerners are least likely to use social media to keep in touch and so, subsequently, experienced greater loneliness in the last year.

Whereas the South is as miserable as it ever was
4
Dan
07/04/2021 14:06:14 16 42
bbc
Lockdown is the most evil eugenics program to ever hit Britain.
It has cost tens of thousands of lives, young and old and is set to cost tans of thousands more even without further draconian police state actions by this technocratic cabal that dare call itself our government according to ONS figures and a Bristol University Study.
And there is ZERO scientific basis behind them as pandemic control.
9
07/04/2021 14:09:13 34 10
bbc
Nice rant. Shame it is all rubbish
10
07/04/2021 14:10:43 31 8
bbc
what a crock, anyone can be lonely at any time anywhere....
11
07/04/2021 14:11:05 17 8
bbc
I love be alone i dont like yobs
Gosh, you sound like great company. Removed
12
07/04/2021 14:11:05 18 38
bbc
I don't know about "lonely" but the emptiest places in the UK must be inside the skulls of the people that have imposed cruel and unneccessary restrictions on the lives of us all.
302
07/04/2021 18:37:07 3 5
bbc
The loneliest place is a hospital trolley/bed
1st - listening to the frightening sound of coughing and struggling for breath from the patients in A&E that are suspected to be infected with Covid-19
2nd - listening to scary first hand accounts of "when I was infected with Covid -19" from each of the staff who attend you
3rd - phoning to tell family and friends to stay away and don't risk a visit
4
Dan
07/04/2021 14:06:14 16 42
bbc
Lockdown is the most evil eugenics program to ever hit Britain.
It has cost tens of thousands of lives, young and old and is set to cost tans of thousands more even without further draconian police state actions by this technocratic cabal that dare call itself our government according to ONS figures and a Bristol University Study.
And there is ZERO scientific basis behind them as pandemic control.
13
DG
07/04/2021 14:11:46 8 3
bbc
Nice buzzword bingo, impressive how many words you've used with no understanding of their meaning to try and sound smart. Eugenics program my aunt sally.
14
07/04/2021 14:13:59 20 5
bbc
This is our culture. Atomised. Individualistic. Socially mobile. Free.
36
Rob
07/04/2021 14:26:50 37 7
bbc
Or aggressive, selfish, acquisitive and repressed - depends on your point of view.
39
07/04/2021 14:29:48 3 2
bbc
Agree. Very sad.
148
07/04/2021 17:02:11 4 0
bbc
Agree.
I've spent 30 years on and off travelling the World, and for me the friendliest places are materially the poorest but spiritually the richest.
Sadly these places aspire to have what we have, and it is not for us to deny them, but a new car and big tv on the wall isn't everything.
180
07/04/2021 17:25:39 1 1
bbc
Is our culture really individualistic?
We have been compelled to make huge individual sacrifices for others over the past year and there has been very little opposition.
An individualistic culture would surely not have done this
330
07/04/2021 18:48:43 0 0
bbc
Particularly London, but now coming to a place near you!
11
07/04/2021 14:11:05 17 8
bbc
I love be alone i dont like yobs
Gosh, you sound like great company. Removed
19
07/04/2021 14:17:18 4 2
bbc
I don't "love be alone", personally.

Not that I would understand such a gibberish sentence.
26
Rob
07/04/2021 14:20:27 0 3
bbc
Oh, he/she likes company, just not that of yobs.
8
07/04/2021 14:08:12 72 10
bbc
Interesting. As a "standoffish" southerner I am often told how much more friendly and inclusive people are "up north" yet the ONS top 3 for loneliness are all in the NE or NW. Seems like as with most things friendliness and inclusiveness are all about individuals rather than areas.
16
DWM
07/04/2021 14:15:21 50 1
bbc
Worth mentioning that the top 3 lowest places with the lowest levels of loneliness are also “up north”.
452
07/04/2021 22:37:51 0 0
bbc
Why worth mentioning, chip on your shoulder? Didn't get as far as reading Harvey's second line? No-one suggests northerners are all lonely. The comment was clearly saying your wider region is not a factor.
17
07/04/2021 14:15:56 13 0
bbc
Swindon. That is all.
22
Rob
07/04/2021 14:18:58 16 4
bbc
Swindon was a lonely place even before the lockdown. After all, who in their right mind would want to go there?
4
Dan
07/04/2021 14:06:14 16 42
bbc
Lockdown is the most evil eugenics program to ever hit Britain.
It has cost tens of thousands of lives, young and old and is set to cost tans of thousands more even without further draconian police state actions by this technocratic cabal that dare call itself our government according to ONS figures and a Bristol University Study.
And there is ZERO scientific basis behind them as pandemic control.
18
07/04/2021 14:16:36 5 2
bbc
Lots of interesting words and phrases that could have been saved, as it is all drivel!
Gosh, you sound like great company. Removed
19
07/04/2021 14:17:18 4 2
bbc
I don't "love be alone", personally.

Not that I would understand such a gibberish sentence.
20
07/04/2021 14:18:12 180 19
bbc
Unfortunately loneliness is now linked to social media. If someone sees others 'living their best lives' (even during lockdown) this can exacerbate feelings.

All someone needs is a good and satisfying set of hobbies to fill their time rather than living on their phones like most 16-24 year olds do.
38
07/04/2021 14:29:33 50 4
bbc
Agree.
46
07/04/2021 14:30:43 5 24
bbc
no that's jealousy luvvie
138
07/04/2021 16:57:21 7 22
bbc
Agreed.
I'm off to take your advice and start some new hobbies to achieve fulfillment! Oh wait, I'm not allowed to do anything until the impossible eradication of a virus.
Hmmm, conundrum.
Back to the smartphone I guess....
154
07/04/2021 17:08:16 4 0
bbc
I don't really think that's a definite. I make a point of talking to a different friend each day and every day, just check in and see how people are doing - and some of us are doing a video call weekly. It's definitely not excellent social contact and it was a bit weird at first, but it's better than nothing and has gotten better as everone gets used to video calls.
171
07/04/2021 17:22:15 4 4
bbc
Important to remember that a lot of 16-24 year olds have hobbies that require interactions with large numbers of people.
It is not trivial to enjoy such hobbies when they have been illegal for a year (so far)
182
07/04/2021 17:27:14 12 0
bbc
I generally stopped using social media for this reason. I'm part of the Facebook generation circa 2006 but when you log on and all you see are posts of holidays in exotic locations and you're stuck in a small flat and it's raining outside. Can't help but feel a little insecure - even though I realise that most of what I see on social media is heavily curated / fake
21
07/04/2021 14:18:20 4 6
bbc
Stupid article, loneliness is something that is felt, it is individual, it can be in a mid-city bedsit, or a remote farmhouse. The best way to gain a friend is to be one. stay in contact!
34
07/04/2021 14:26:14 7 1
bbc
It can still be "felt" more in some places than others.
17
07/04/2021 14:15:56 13 0
bbc
Swindon. That is all.
22
Rob
07/04/2021 14:18:58 16 4
bbc
Swindon was a lonely place even before the lockdown. After all, who in their right mind would want to go there?
27
07/04/2021 14:21:12 4 0
bbc
Let alone live there!
4
Dan
07/04/2021 14:06:14 16 42
bbc
Lockdown is the most evil eugenics program to ever hit Britain.
It has cost tens of thousands of lives, young and old and is set to cost tans of thousands more even without further draconian police state actions by this technocratic cabal that dare call itself our government according to ONS figures and a Bristol University Study.
And there is ZERO scientific basis behind them as pandemic control.
23
07/04/2021 14:19:33 12 1
bbc
Could be the next president of Brazil here ??
31
07/04/2021 14:22:32 3 1
bbc
Nice one
8
07/04/2021 14:08:12 72 10
bbc
Interesting. As a "standoffish" southerner I am often told how much more friendly and inclusive people are "up north" yet the ONS top 3 for loneliness are all in the NE or NW. Seems like as with most things friendliness and inclusiveness are all about individuals rather than areas.
24
07/04/2021 14:19:41 17 0
bbc
You could actually look at it as the other way round - people used to high social contact and strong communities feeling more lonely because the lockdown has prevented them from seeing family and friends and feeling part of that community. Impossible to tell but you have to bare in mind these results are from a pandemic where social lives are restricted so many factors will influence loneliness
25
js
07/04/2021 14:19:43 0 4
bbc
It as its benefits also, you are a mystery for people. That way, you get a little fame, people try to figure out what it is that you do while you're on your own.
33
07/04/2021 14:24:50 1 1
bbc
42
07/04/2021 14:21:41 0 1
bbc
I would be trying to sort out my translation software.
Gosh, you sound like great company. Removed
26
Rob
07/04/2021 14:20:27 0 3
bbc
Oh, he/she likes company, just not that of yobs.
32
07/04/2021 14:23:12 4 1
bbc
I don't know why she / he / it even mentioned "yobs" - totally irrelevant to this debate.

Probably a Daily Mail reader ?
22
Rob
07/04/2021 14:18:58 16 4
bbc
Swindon was a lonely place even before the lockdown. After all, who in their right mind would want to go there?
27
07/04/2021 14:21:12 4 0
bbc
Let alone live there!
484
08/04/2021 08:39:49 0 0
bbc
What is your problem with Swindon? I spend a lot of time there, although I do not live there, and find the folk to be much like anywhere else, ie some are lovely and some are not. Maybe it is a lonely place because of your, and the other posters, attitude to folk from Swindon.
6
js
07/04/2021 14:06:42 5 7
bbc
Fuel poverty driven EWDs are excess winter deaths that wouldn’t have occurred except that those who die couldn’t afford to heat their homes. Had they been able to, they might have lived for years longer. So an EWD caused by fuel poverty can rob someone of years of life.
28
07/04/2021 14:21:41 6 0
bbc
I think you are commenting on the wrong article. This is about loneliness, not fuel poverty
35
js
07/04/2021 14:26:43 1 2
bbc
I was lonely , so i posted a comment
29
07/04/2021 14:21:56 17 14
bbc
Loneliness is an inner state. If you are emotional needy you are going to feel lonely without a partner, if you are not, you will enjoy being alone
58
07/04/2021 15:49:18 5 8
bbc
That's a unique and interesting assumption. I'm sure we'd all be interested to know what studies and works you reviewed before publishing your conclusion here.
104
07/04/2021 16:36:38 5 1
bbc
Sure. My 85 year old father, who lost my mum after more than 50 years of marriage just weeks before the first lockdown began a year ago, and has had to shield ever since in the house they once shared together, has been feeling lonely because he is "emotionally needy". Jesus wept...
4
Dan
07/04/2021 14:06:14 16 42
bbc
Lockdown is the most evil eugenics program to ever hit Britain.
It has cost tens of thousands of lives, young and old and is set to cost tans of thousands more even without further draconian police state actions by this technocratic cabal that dare call itself our government according to ONS figures and a Bristol University Study.
And there is ZERO scientific basis behind them as pandemic control.
30
07/04/2021 14:22:14 5 0
bbc
'technocratic' - this government? You need to be expert in something to be a technocrat.
23
07/04/2021 14:19:33 12 1
bbc
Could be the next president of Brazil here ??
31
07/04/2021 14:22:32 3 1
bbc
Nice one
26
Rob
07/04/2021 14:20:27 0 3
bbc
Oh, he/she likes company, just not that of yobs.
32
07/04/2021 14:23:12 4 1
bbc
I don't know why she / he / it even mentioned "yobs" - totally irrelevant to this debate.

Probably a Daily Mail reader ?
355
07/04/2021 19:01:29 2 0
bbc
Still, a reader at least.

Better that than a 'selfie taker'.
25
js
07/04/2021 14:19:43 0 4
bbc
It as its benefits also, you are a mystery for people. That way, you get a little fame, people try to figure out what it is that you do while you're on your own.
33
07/04/2021 14:24:50 1 1
bbc
21
07/04/2021 14:18:20 4 6
bbc
Stupid article, loneliness is something that is felt, it is individual, it can be in a mid-city bedsit, or a remote farmhouse. The best way to gain a friend is to be one. stay in contact!
34
07/04/2021 14:26:14 7 1
bbc
It can still be "felt" more in some places than others.
28
07/04/2021 14:21:41 6 0
bbc
I think you are commenting on the wrong article. This is about loneliness, not fuel poverty
35
js
07/04/2021 14:26:43 1 2
bbc
I was lonely , so i posted a comment
14
07/04/2021 14:13:59 20 5
bbc
This is our culture. Atomised. Individualistic. Socially mobile. Free.
36
Rob
07/04/2021 14:26:50 37 7
bbc
Or aggressive, selfish, acquisitive and repressed - depends on your point of view.
8
07/04/2021 14:08:12 72 10
bbc
Interesting. As a "standoffish" southerner I am often told how much more friendly and inclusive people are "up north" yet the ONS top 3 for loneliness are all in the NE or NW. Seems like as with most things friendliness and inclusiveness are all about individuals rather than areas.
37
07/04/2021 14:27:49 10 4
bbc
Outside of a Pandemic where socializing is allowed and things are normal, then yes northerners are friendlier..
194
07/04/2021 17:31:04 10 10
bbc
I have found that northern friendliness claim to be largely a myth. They are generally the same as those of us in the south, just with more mushy peas and gravy on chips.
482
08/04/2021 08:33:34 0 0
bbc
Rubbish. People are people - it makes no difference where you come from. There are lovely folk in the south as well as some horrors. There are lovely folk in the north as well as some horrors, although one on the 'unfriendliest' places I have been is Yorkshire, which in on a par with London. Ignored for service in shops and pubs, insulted and sneered at, all because I have a West Country accent.
20
07/04/2021 14:18:12 180 19
bbc
Unfortunately loneliness is now linked to social media. If someone sees others 'living their best lives' (even during lockdown) this can exacerbate feelings.

All someone needs is a good and satisfying set of hobbies to fill their time rather than living on their phones like most 16-24 year olds do.
38
07/04/2021 14:29:33 50 4
bbc
Agree.
364
07/04/2021 19:03:40 0 3
bbc
What a simplistic comment - totally unhelpful and patronising. Maybe phones are the only friends some people have
14
07/04/2021 14:13:59 20 5
bbc
This is our culture. Atomised. Individualistic. Socially mobile. Free.
39
07/04/2021 14:29:48 3 2
bbc
Agree. Very sad.
40
07/04/2021 14:18:57 10 20
bbc
Loneliest place in Britain? A Tory voter's heart
43
07/04/2021 14:39:31 7 11
bbc
They have hearts ? News to me.
313
07/04/2021 18:42:55 0 0
bbc
So full of hate for people that think differently to you
41
07/04/2021 14:19:38 6 18
bbc
This is off topic for the UK, since we are on the verge of coming out of lockdown, but perhaps they're having this discussion over most of mainland Europe.

It must be very scary in lalaland waiting for the bogey man to get you, meanwhile the undemocratic eu sit on their hands and do nothing, except confiscate UK lorry drivers sandwiches, and looking for excuses for their next round of cockups.
25
js
07/04/2021 14:19:43 0 4
bbc
It as its benefits also, you are a mystery for people. That way, you get a little fame, people try to figure out what it is that you do while you're on your own.
42
07/04/2021 14:21:41 0 1
bbc
I would be trying to sort out my translation software.
40
07/04/2021 14:18:57 10 20
bbc
Loneliest place in Britain? A Tory voter's heart
43
07/04/2021 14:39:31 7 11
bbc
They have hearts ? News to me.
44
07/04/2021 14:40:48 3 9
bbc
Another spurious report from the ministry of propoganda sized upon by the state broadcaster as a "debate" topic to make the proles think they're involved in a political dialogue.

Breaking news, you're not contributing anything, why not instead ring next door's bell and ask them what they think instead!
45
07/04/2021 14:42:09 3 15
bbc
Whilst the epidemiologists get all the plaudits (& funding) these behavioural scientists need something to do so they write up this rubbish. The conclusion that people living alone are lonely, well no excrement Mr Holmes! I'd rather pay more for test & trace than pay for this kind of rubbish & pointless research. Get over it & get on with life if you can get out of beds you lazy so & so's
57
07/04/2021 15:47:00 8 0
bbc
What a delight. Such empathy and compassion. A beacon of light for all of us. Really; it's great that you took time to think about this rather than make lazy, incorrect assumptions.
81
07/04/2021 16:26:59 2 0
bbc
Did you know more soldiers died from suicide than they did in combat in Afghanistan?

All of Andy McNabs SAS troop killed themselves - all of them

Fancy calling them “lazy so and so’s”
20
07/04/2021 14:18:12 180 19
bbc
Unfortunately loneliness is now linked to social media. If someone sees others 'living their best lives' (even during lockdown) this can exacerbate feelings.

All someone needs is a good and satisfying set of hobbies to fill their time rather than living on their phones like most 16-24 year olds do.
46
07/04/2021 14:30:43 5 24
bbc
no that's jealousy luvvie
47
07/04/2021 14:52:39 9 10
bbc
7% of the population feeling lonely seems quite a small percentage given the dire warnings of a tsunami of mental health problems we hear so regularly. I realise it's a lot of individuals, but still a small percentage. I also wonder how many of the young people actually know the difference between being lonely & being bored. Keeping yourself occupied shouldn't rely on other people.
55
07/04/2021 15:45:17 3 4
bbc
Let's assume that the professionals and experts involved are able to distinguish between boredom and loneliness. I think it's a reasonable assumption.
89
07/04/2021 16:30:22 1 0
bbc
How patronising, and how uncomprehending, to ask whether young people know the difference between loneliness and boredom. As if coping with the upheavals caused by the pandemic was like coping with a wet Sunday afternoon in normal times. Evidently age does not always bring insight.
48
07/04/2021 15:04:11 33 2
bbc
"Urban areas, particularly those with declining industries, and higher rates of unemployment and crime, are more vulnerable to loneliness."

Crumbs. That is surprising
53
07/04/2021 15:38:09 48 4
bbc
"People who are living alone are more likely to be lonely, particularly those who are widowed or separated "

Another research gem.
403
07/04/2021 19:37:28 0 0
bbc
Even if the factors that correlate with loneliness aren't surprising, being able to quantify the impact of the different factors can be useful
49
07/04/2021 15:13:00 7 15
bbc
Shame on the British people for supporting what's been done to our young people! Those who should be at school or university have been crucified. Yet what little research has been done indicates that running schools and universities normally would have had very little effect on infection levels.

Decent people would want our young people to have the same opportunities that we enjoyed at their age.
54
07/04/2021 15:43:57 8 1
bbc
Shame on people who make appeals to emotion, ignoring the irrefutable facts.

"Decent people"; is this the new No True Scotsman?
50
js
07/04/2021 15:17:46 71 5
bbc
When I feel lonely i tend to walk around in a room or outside, not to a specific destination. So I walk anywhere, when i'm walking everything fades into the back ground, it clears my mind and makes me forget my loneliness. Walking also improves my mood when I'm sad. When I need to think I walk. So I got use to walking for many things. When I'm lonely I walk without thinking.
202
07/04/2021 17:41:40 26 2
bbc
Yes, I've always found that going outside for a walk (preferably involving some green space/countryside) makes me feel a lot better mentally and phsically- even if it's just a mile or so/ 30 minutes.
204
07/04/2021 17:42:34 3 0
bbc
It's sad that so many of us suffer from loneliness and depression.

Maybe as a society we should focus more on making sure people are happy.

Rather than having this constant obsession with money and the economy above all else!
51
07/04/2021 15:31:59 8 4
bbc
What a pointless research exercise !
68
07/04/2021 16:20:05 1 1
bbc
Busy work.
85
07/04/2021 16:28:17 0 0
bbc
Why? Because the evidence happens, on this occasion, to point towards whatever you already believed was true?

Or because you generally think that tracking the impact of the pandemic on the nation's mental health is a waste of time?
52
07/04/2021 15:33:07 9 6
bbc
I could have written that article without hours of "research". It is patently obvious.
As for the hotspots of loneliness - I don't think Covid will have shunted them up the list had it been concocted prior to lockdown. They are what they are.
63
07/04/2021 15:58:09 6 9
bbc
Feel free to publish your competing hypothesis for peer review.
48
07/04/2021 15:04:11 33 2
bbc
"Urban areas, particularly those with declining industries, and higher rates of unemployment and crime, are more vulnerable to loneliness."

Crumbs. That is surprising
53
07/04/2021 15:38:09 48 4
bbc
"People who are living alone are more likely to be lonely, particularly those who are widowed or separated "

Another research gem.
94
07/04/2021 16:32:57 8 1
bbc
To determine cause you must take all factors into account.
Let's say the results show high loneliness in cities and also high loneliness among single people. Do both cause it? Or do single people live more in cities? If so, which cause is it - being single or being in a city?
You have to study each factor, and analyse the data even if you think the answer is obvious, to have a scientific approach.
49
07/04/2021 15:13:00 7 15
bbc
Shame on the British people for supporting what's been done to our young people! Those who should be at school or university have been crucified. Yet what little research has been done indicates that running schools and universities normally would have had very little effect on infection levels.

Decent people would want our young people to have the same opportunities that we enjoyed at their age.
54
07/04/2021 15:43:57 8 1
bbc
Shame on people who make appeals to emotion, ignoring the irrefutable facts.

"Decent people"; is this the new No True Scotsman?
47
07/04/2021 14:52:39 9 10
bbc
7% of the population feeling lonely seems quite a small percentage given the dire warnings of a tsunami of mental health problems we hear so regularly. I realise it's a lot of individuals, but still a small percentage. I also wonder how many of the young people actually know the difference between being lonely & being bored. Keeping yourself occupied shouldn't rely on other people.
55
07/04/2021 15:45:17 3 4
bbc
Let's assume that the professionals and experts involved are able to distinguish between boredom and loneliness. I think it's a reasonable assumption.
Removed
45
07/04/2021 14:42:09 3 15
bbc
Whilst the epidemiologists get all the plaudits (& funding) these behavioural scientists need something to do so they write up this rubbish. The conclusion that people living alone are lonely, well no excrement Mr Holmes! I'd rather pay more for test & trace than pay for this kind of rubbish & pointless research. Get over it & get on with life if you can get out of beds you lazy so & so's
57
07/04/2021 15:47:00 8 0
bbc
What a delight. Such empathy and compassion. A beacon of light for all of us. Really; it's great that you took time to think about this rather than make lazy, incorrect assumptions.
29
07/04/2021 14:21:56 17 14
bbc
Loneliness is an inner state. If you are emotional needy you are going to feel lonely without a partner, if you are not, you will enjoy being alone
58
07/04/2021 15:49:18 5 8
bbc
That's a unique and interesting assumption. I'm sure we'd all be interested to know what studies and works you reviewed before publishing your conclusion here.
59
07/04/2021 15:53:51 325 3
bbc
If I see my 85 year old neighbour who lives alone outside I always make a point of having a chat asking if he needs anything doing - he may then talk the hind legs off a donkey but I may be the only person he talks to all day and having a friendly chat costs nothing
97
07/04/2021 16:33:55 161 5
bbc
Good on you. 5 minutes of your time cost you very little but means a lot to him.
133
07/04/2021 16:53:07 14 48
bbc
Careful, you could be seen to be violating the lockdown conditions. Talking to someone in person increases your risk of catching Covid by 169%.
You've basically condemned your neighbour to certain death.

At least that's the message I keep hearing from the media ¯_(?)_/¯
213
You
07/04/2021 17:46:25 12 2
bbc
Youre a good soul.
267
07/04/2021 18:19:12 26 3
bbc
"It could be" my old man , 85, who was widowed in 2017.
His neighbours wash his car, mow his lawn , walk his dog and leave homemade pies and jam on his doorstep.

It is appreciated beyond words.
404
07/04/2021 19:37:54 4 1
bbc
That’s a wonder thing to do. It’ll mean the world to your neighbour.
485
08/04/2021 08:42:03 1 0
bbc
Well done. That's the spirit.
5
07/04/2021 14:06:26 15 11
bbc
I presume some awful smug sociopath will be along shortly, to denounce loneliness as something "snowflakey" ?
60
07/04/2021 15:54:34 8 6
bbc
Your presumption is sadly realised.

Plenty of folk here display a worrying lack of empathy.

It's amazing how many people commenting here, claiming the article is wrong. I didn't know HYS had so many professional sociologists and psychologists. We are truly blessed to have these critical thinkers here, with their degrees from YouTube University, and Facebook College.
432
07/04/2021 20:23:53 0 0
bbc
I agree. It's quite easy to get a masters in narcissism when the pm is a perfect example of the condition.
475
08/04/2021 08:14:03 0 0
bbc
Loneliness is indeed a horrible thing to go through, as i know from personal experience. However, as yet there haven't been any posts on here denouncing it as 'snowflakey' so why are you claiming there has been? Some have criticised the lockdown, some have praised the research, but none as yet have said what you claim. Making stuff up does not help your very valid cause
3
EdK
07/04/2021 14:05:47 17 10
bbc
I would suggest that 16-24 year olds have a very different perception to loneliness to that of the older generations - for a start, I'd imagine the vast majority of them are still living at home..
61
07/04/2021 15:55:42 2 10
bbc
Your imagination doesn't tally with observable reality.
1
07/04/2021 14:02:51 70 5
bbc
I'm so glad the ONS have commissioned this work to highlight such a large number of people who feel this way, and not just one single demographic is prevalent. Hopefully this will start to knock down some perceptions of this scourge.
62
07/04/2021 15:57:11 47 8
bbc
What do you think you're achieving here? Coming here, posting entirely sensible and reasonable comments, making objective assumptions. How very dare you?!
52
07/04/2021 15:33:07 9 6
bbc
I could have written that article without hours of "research". It is patently obvious.
As for the hotspots of loneliness - I don't think Covid will have shunted them up the list had it been concocted prior to lockdown. They are what they are.
63
07/04/2021 15:58:09 6 9
bbc
Feel free to publish your competing hypothesis for peer review.
66
07/04/2021 16:12:54 4 2
bbc
It would be plagiarism. The above article says it all. I'm not disagreeing with it, just highlighting how pointless and obvious. it is. Chill out.
64
js
07/04/2021 16:05:34 51 7
bbc
I feel more alone in a crowd than I do alone in my home
We feel lonely, but the idle chit-chat that comes with everyday life at work, school, and out and about, can make you feel more isolated than just sitting in your room. There are people all around you; but they’re just exchanging pleasantries because polite society dictates this. Why go out in the world and be reminded of how alone you are?
65
07/04/2021 16:11:19 36 1
bbc
Sad but true. I moved to a new town late in 2019. Long way from "home". Then Covid happened. I've hardly seen my family, let alone friends. I used to chat to my neighbours, but they've moved now.

So yep, pleasantries with people you recognise from work or your locality is fine. But it doesn't alleviate the spectre of loneliness.
76
07/04/2021 16:25:13 3 0
bbc
Summed up perfectly!
107
07/04/2021 16:37:48 9 0
bbc
I used to wonder how someone could get to the position where the only person they actually spoke with face to face on a weekly basis was the person who rang up their purchases in a supermarket...after the last year I can see exactly how that happens, it is awful, I don't recommend it to anyone.
64
js
07/04/2021 16:05:34 51 7
bbc
I feel more alone in a crowd than I do alone in my home
We feel lonely, but the idle chit-chat that comes with everyday life at work, school, and out and about, can make you feel more isolated than just sitting in your room. There are people all around you; but they’re just exchanging pleasantries because polite society dictates this. Why go out in the world and be reminded of how alone you are?
65
07/04/2021 16:11:19 36 1
bbc
Sad but true. I moved to a new town late in 2019. Long way from "home". Then Covid happened. I've hardly seen my family, let alone friends. I used to chat to my neighbours, but they've moved now.

So yep, pleasantries with people you recognise from work or your locality is fine. But it doesn't alleviate the spectre of loneliness.
63
07/04/2021 15:58:09 6 9
bbc
Feel free to publish your competing hypothesis for peer review.
66
07/04/2021 16:12:54 4 2
bbc
It would be plagiarism. The above article says it all. I'm not disagreeing with it, just highlighting how pointless and obvious. it is. Chill out.
80
07/04/2021 16:26:33 3 0
bbc
It's a paradox with some people.

If a study proves what someone already thinks is true, then it was a waste of time and they should have just used common sense.

And if a story disproves what someone already thinks is true, then it's politically motivated or badly researched and should be ignored!
1
07/04/2021 14:02:51 70 5
bbc
I'm so glad the ONS have commissioned this work to highlight such a large number of people who feel this way, and not just one single demographic is prevalent. Hopefully this will start to knock down some perceptions of this scourge.
67
07/04/2021 16:14:22 11 4
bbc
What are you doing? You've come here, pointing out sensible things, making valid points. You even ended on a positive!
458
08/04/2021 00:07:34 0 0
bbc
Calm down Paul. Next thing, you'll be berating someone for being logical. That would never do!
51
07/04/2021 15:31:59 8 4
bbc
What a pointless research exercise !
68
07/04/2021 16:20:05 1 1
bbc
Busy work.
7
07/04/2021 14:07:42 236 11
bbc
You can feel lonely around a hundred people and yet perfectly happy alone. Loneliness has nothing to do with number of people physically around you, it's about deep connections.
69
07/04/2021 16:21:11 89 279
bbc
This has all been caused by the government's monumental overreaction to coronavirus and these ridiculous and unnecessary lockdowns.

We'll be paying for this for decades. Shame on this government.
98
07/04/2021 16:34:07 78 24
bbc
What complete and utter rubbish. If anything, they underreacted at the beginning which only made the situation much worse than it needed to be. If we'd locked down harder and longer instead of listening to idiots whinging about lockdown, things would have been much easier. Sit down.
Getcher, your one braincell must be really lonely Removed
@Getcher --> kindly take your pathetic and dangerous conspiracy theories and leave! Removed
208
07/04/2021 17:43:39 9 18
bbc
It’s actually caused by the governments ridiculous obsession with stopping people from dying. A fate waiting for all of us
247
07/04/2021 18:05:50 18 8
bbc
It's people like you that caused the 2nd and 3rd lockdown. "Oh but my rights".

3 months, hard lockdown, close the borders to stop all holiday makers - import/exports to be maintained safely. Job done ie like Taiwan and NZ - they closed their borders to tourism not food.

What we've paid out and all the deaths because of the whiney anti-vax, covid-denying, anti-lockdown. Thanks for nothing.
288
07/04/2021 18:30:57 4 3
bbc
You think lockdowns are not needed and its all the governments fault.

Why on earth didn't you say that a thousand times over the last year?
296
07/04/2021 18:34:27 9 1
bbc
If you believe the Government has overreacted you either know nobody who has had the virus or anybody who works as a doctor or nurse.Also why have many other countries taken similar measures?
325
07/04/2021 18:46:46 8 1
bbc
No shame on you for being a fool... Thousands have died, and without lockdowns that figure could well be in the millions, just look at Brazil.
Bullshit Removed
472
08/04/2021 07:34:46 0 0
bbc
Really
476
08/04/2021 08:16:12 0 0
bbc
Would you suggest Brazil with it's lower restrictions and lockdowns is coming through the pandemic better than the UK then?
496
08/04/2021 13:29:21 0 0
bbc
Oh dear- it's been a global pandemic and lock downs have been a feature of many governments reaction - following WHO advice- but sure go ahead and blame the incumbent government here- get it off yer chest ;)
70
07/04/2021 16:21:49 9 8
bbc
London must be very lonely.

I’m glad I live in the north where we know our neighbours and speak to strangers.
78
07/04/2021 16:25:32 8 2
bbc
I live South of London and also know my neighbours and speak to strangers. Mind you I am from the North!
84
07/04/2021 16:28:00 4 1
bbc
London isn’t like that really, I know my neighbours and speak to strangers all the time - more so than when I lived in rural Oxfordshire
86
07/04/2021 16:26:17 2 1
bbc
My mate in the north keeps getting burgled but they don't stop to chat....
90
07/04/2021 16:31:38 3 0
bbc
You can speak to strangers in London too, nothing stopping you...

...but they may just collapse in fear of conversation, or call the police instead.
93
07/04/2021 16:32:38 2 3
bbc
Smelly too I'm told.
71
07/04/2021 16:22:01 3 15
bbc
Long term damage of lockdown will be worse than the virus

Mental health issues, poverty, economic damage, housing issues, crime, increased taxes, less public services etc etc
83
07/04/2021 16:25:31 8 4
bbc
Pointless comparison as without lockdown and effects hundreds of thousands would have died.
101
07/04/2021 16:35:33 3 3
bbc
For decades now I have listened to and read, people moaning about the same issues you seem to think are the result of lockdown. Surely you don't think that all the problems you mention have suddenly appeared in 2020/2021 as a result of Covid and lockdown.
72
07/04/2021 16:23:11 2 7
bbc
"People who are living alone are more likely to be lonely"

Yep, can't disagree with that.
73
07/04/2021 16:23:27 114 3
bbc
Having moved to a fairly rural village a couple of years ago, but one that isn't truly "middle of nowhere" remote, people are far friendlier than living in a city. People say hello to one another passing in the street here, even if they don't know one another - it makes the whole place feel peaceful, relaxed, and less lonely even in times like these.
181
07/04/2021 17:25:49 46 2
bbc
You're right, in our small rural town you can always tell a townie by the way they look gone out when someone says hello to them.
470
08/04/2021 07:27:19 1 0
bbc
I live in the leafy suburbs around Manchester. It is perfectly normal for most people here to say hello when passing, to chat with the neighbours and to help each other out.
74
07/04/2021 16:20:02 94 3
bbc
Loneliness and being alone aren’t the same thing
92
07/04/2021 16:32:19 32 2
bbc
Agreed I have worked from home for over 10 years (no I'm not unemployed )the last year my whole family have worked from home and I so cannot wait for them to go back to office work.
114
07/04/2021 16:43:38 6 0
bbc
Yes, you can be living with people/ see people every day and still feel lonely. I wonder what questions ONS asked.
450
ner
07/04/2021 22:36:05 1 0
bbc
Coronavirus has made no difference to my life. I have no friends, no family and spent 90% of my time alone. Rarely does it bother me. Occasionally i think it would be nice to have someone around to talk to u have my cat so that is fine.
Removed
64
js
07/04/2021 16:05:34 51 7
bbc
I feel more alone in a crowd than I do alone in my home
We feel lonely, but the idle chit-chat that comes with everyday life at work, school, and out and about, can make you feel more isolated than just sitting in your room. There are people all around you; but they’re just exchanging pleasantries because polite society dictates this. Why go out in the world and be reminded of how alone you are?
76
07/04/2021 16:25:13 3 0
bbc
Summed up perfectly!
77
07/04/2021 16:25:26 4 5
bbc
Normal sensible People on HYS are the loneliest people
70
07/04/2021 16:21:49 9 8
bbc
London must be very lonely.

I’m glad I live in the north where we know our neighbours and speak to strangers.
78
07/04/2021 16:25:32 8 2
bbc
I live South of London and also know my neighbours and speak to strangers. Mind you I am from the North!
79
07/04/2021 16:25:36 3 6
bbc
Strange reading about urban centres. I live in London and have never felt closer to the people around me and live near me.
66
07/04/2021 16:12:54 4 2
bbc
It would be plagiarism. The above article says it all. I'm not disagreeing with it, just highlighting how pointless and obvious. it is. Chill out.
80
07/04/2021 16:26:33 3 0
bbc
It's a paradox with some people.

If a study proves what someone already thinks is true, then it was a waste of time and they should have just used common sense.

And if a story disproves what someone already thinks is true, then it's politically motivated or badly researched and should be ignored!
45
07/04/2021 14:42:09 3 15
bbc
Whilst the epidemiologists get all the plaudits (& funding) these behavioural scientists need something to do so they write up this rubbish. The conclusion that people living alone are lonely, well no excrement Mr Holmes! I'd rather pay more for test & trace than pay for this kind of rubbish & pointless research. Get over it & get on with life if you can get out of beds you lazy so & so's
81
07/04/2021 16:26:59 2 0
bbc
Did you know more soldiers died from suicide than they did in combat in Afghanistan?

All of Andy McNabs SAS troop killed themselves - all of them

Fancy calling them “lazy so and so’s”
82
07/04/2021 16:25:01 6 13
bbc
What is happening to young people is scandalous. If the vaccine is effective then they are at no risk to elders or themselves from covid.
What evidence is their for under 30's that any new or alternative vaccines will not have side affects?
Leave the youth alone.
87
07/04/2021 16:30:09 6 13
bbc
Agreed.

The young have been by far the worst affected by this crisis yet the old continue to play the victim and pedal their divisive rhetoric that the young are to blame.
113
07/04/2021 16:41:18 1 0
bbc
According to JCVI vaccine prevents transmission between 30-50%. That's not very high, the majority of the population needs to be vaccinated to protect the vulnerable.
71
07/04/2021 16:22:01 3 15
bbc
Long term damage of lockdown will be worse than the virus

Mental health issues, poverty, economic damage, housing issues, crime, increased taxes, less public services etc etc
83
07/04/2021 16:25:31 8 4
bbc
Pointless comparison as without lockdown and effects hundreds of thousands would have died.
167
07/04/2021 17:20:45 2 0
bbc
Lots of 85 year olds yes, but we wouldn’t have had the same level of issues mentioned

We have only measured covid deaths - nothing else
70
07/04/2021 16:21:49 9 8
bbc
London must be very lonely.

I’m glad I live in the north where we know our neighbours and speak to strangers.
84
07/04/2021 16:28:00 4 1
bbc
London isn’t like that really, I know my neighbours and speak to strangers all the time - more so than when I lived in rural Oxfordshire
51
07/04/2021 15:31:59 8 4
bbc
What a pointless research exercise !
85
07/04/2021 16:28:17 0 0
bbc
Why? Because the evidence happens, on this occasion, to point towards whatever you already believed was true?

Or because you generally think that tracking the impact of the pandemic on the nation's mental health is a waste of time?
70
07/04/2021 16:21:49 9 8
bbc
London must be very lonely.

I’m glad I live in the north where we know our neighbours and speak to strangers.
86
07/04/2021 16:26:17 2 1
bbc
My mate in the north keeps getting burgled but they don't stop to chat....
82
07/04/2021 16:25:01 6 13
bbc
What is happening to young people is scandalous. If the vaccine is effective then they are at no risk to elders or themselves from covid.
What evidence is their for under 30's that any new or alternative vaccines will not have side affects?
Leave the youth alone.
87
07/04/2021 16:30:09 6 13
bbc
Agreed.

The young have been by far the worst affected by this crisis yet the old continue to play the victim and pedal their divisive rhetoric that the young are to blame.
165
07/04/2021 17:20:13 1 2
bbc
well it wasn’t rampaging OAPs laying waste to that park in Nottingham. the spikes after unis went back etc. it’s not wrong to point out that some younger people do seem to have caused more problems by their actions. equally I saw a 70s guy today with mask on under his nose and you think to yourself ‘it’s over a year now and 9 months with masks surely by now you bloody well know to put it on’
It is a virus for humans and a major killer as it affects its entire existence and takes away the purpose of life as we are mammals , living in flock creatures who crave for another being. Loneliness is especially prevalent in the Western World where we deal with that sort of attitude " I am alright Jack so you should be too" esp. now. If you like loneliness you are either a god or need a therapy
115
07/04/2021 16:43:47 1 0
bbc
"If you like loneliness you are either a god ..."

Thank you for recognising my divinity!
47
07/04/2021 14:52:39 9 10
bbc
7% of the population feeling lonely seems quite a small percentage given the dire warnings of a tsunami of mental health problems we hear so regularly. I realise it's a lot of individuals, but still a small percentage. I also wonder how many of the young people actually know the difference between being lonely & being bored. Keeping yourself occupied shouldn't rely on other people.
89
07/04/2021 16:30:22 1 0
bbc
How patronising, and how uncomprehending, to ask whether young people know the difference between loneliness and boredom. As if coping with the upheavals caused by the pandemic was like coping with a wet Sunday afternoon in normal times. Evidently age does not always bring insight.
70
07/04/2021 16:21:49 9 8
bbc
London must be very lonely.

I’m glad I live in the north where we know our neighbours and speak to strangers.
90
07/04/2021 16:31:38 3 0
bbc
You can speak to strangers in London too, nothing stopping you...

...but they may just collapse in fear of conversation, or call the police instead.
91
07/04/2021 16:32:09 5 1
bbc
The lockdowns have not helped, even a visit to a shop or bank does help and gives you contact with other peoples but as we know the migration to do everything on line has added to the problem. As for younger people it works both ways older like to see and chat toyoungsters and visa versa.
74
07/04/2021 16:20:02 94 3
bbc
Loneliness and being alone aren’t the same thing
92
07/04/2021 16:32:19 32 2
bbc
Agreed I have worked from home for over 10 years (no I'm not unemployed )the last year my whole family have worked from home and I so cannot wait for them to go back to office work.
488
08/04/2021 08:51:55 0 0
bbc
So you are happy working from home but want to deny the rest of your family the opportunity you have? Hm. That sounds a mite selfish.
70
07/04/2021 16:21:49 9 8
bbc
London must be very lonely.

I’m glad I live in the north where we know our neighbours and speak to strangers.
93
07/04/2021 16:32:38 2 3
bbc
Smelly too I'm told.
53
07/04/2021 15:38:09 48 4
bbc
"People who are living alone are more likely to be lonely, particularly those who are widowed or separated "

Another research gem.
94
07/04/2021 16:32:57 8 1
bbc
To determine cause you must take all factors into account.
Let's say the results show high loneliness in cities and also high loneliness among single people. Do both cause it? Or do single people live more in cities? If so, which cause is it - being single or being in a city?
You have to study each factor, and analyse the data even if you think the answer is obvious, to have a scientific approach.
328
07/04/2021 18:48:06 2 0
bbc
Agreed but the news shouldn't include these things in a 'news' article. This is not news to roughly 100% of people.
95
07/04/2021 16:30:21 3 9
bbc
Lockdown is the real killer.
103
07/04/2021 16:36:03 7 3
bbc
These problems were there long before covid and lockdowns.
96
07/04/2021 16:33:52 6 5
bbc
Sadly these will be in people’s minds.
The nastiness people have to face, HYS included, as well as Covid put pressure on people. Be open and honest seems to be a stigma, mental issues are not talked about, very much like cancer.
People’s minds need exercise like the rest of the body but like so many subjects they are taboo.
It’s time to talk and be open.
59
07/04/2021 15:53:51 325 3
bbc
If I see my 85 year old neighbour who lives alone outside I always make a point of having a chat asking if he needs anything doing - he may then talk the hind legs off a donkey but I may be the only person he talks to all day and having a friendly chat costs nothing
97
07/04/2021 16:33:55 161 5
bbc
Good on you. 5 minutes of your time cost you very little but means a lot to him.
69
07/04/2021 16:21:11 89 279
bbc
This has all been caused by the government's monumental overreaction to coronavirus and these ridiculous and unnecessary lockdowns.

We'll be paying for this for decades. Shame on this government.
98
07/04/2021 16:34:07 78 24
bbc
What complete and utter rubbish. If anything, they underreacted at the beginning which only made the situation much worse than it needed to be. If we'd locked down harder and longer instead of listening to idiots whinging about lockdown, things would have been much easier. Sit down.
Sweaty Yeti - are you ok under that tin-foil hat? Removed
Locked down harder!? You utter moron... you'll be telling us next it'll all be back to normal as soon as we've had the jab that neither prevents us getting the wu flu or passing it on. Open your mince pies and see what lockdowns/dnr's/masks/isolation/ babies unable to register a facial expression.
People like you would have others wearing the yellow star for not muzzling up or taking the poison
Removed
156
07/04/2021 17:10:34 11 29
bbc
Of course you have evidence to support your assertion that the lockdown experiment works do you?

No? Thought not.
157
07/04/2021 17:11:08 23 53
bbc
Underreacted!? The cure has been vastly worse than the disease. Locking up healthy people to give a few more months to the very old and very vulnerable.
305
07/04/2021 18:37:41 2 7
bbc
the "idiots" seem to care about people's mental health. There "covid only" lockdowners need to stop thinking that covid only matters and relise that people are dying from other non covid things
326
07/04/2021 18:47:13 2 12
bbc
Absolute tosh, my friend, lockdowns do not work and there has been a huge overreaction to the virus.
99
07/04/2021 16:34:58 14 1
bbc
As with deprivation, the UK is riddled with loneliness. There are many reasons for this. As for resilience in older people, I thinks it's more to do with having to accept loneliness and mental health issues (which isn't right). This situation will get worse as local authorities are cutting their budgets.
222
07/04/2021 17:49:17 9 0
bbc
I believe people of my age (69) are resilient simply because of the circumstances at the time we were born and grew up in. Yes we played together as kids and then went on to make our own lives but in simpler times. Life was less immediate and we weren't subject to social media pressure or living our lives through technology. As an independent adult I was 24 before I lived in a flatshare with a tv!
335
07/04/2021 18:51:30 2 0
bbc
You don't need local authorities' money to cut loneliness. You need community, solidarity, contact. Not everything can be bought and nor should it.
8
07/04/2021 14:08:12 72 10
bbc
Interesting. As a "standoffish" southerner I am often told how much more friendly and inclusive people are "up north" yet the ONS top 3 for loneliness are all in the NE or NW. Seems like as with most things friendliness and inclusiveness are all about individuals rather than areas.
100
07/04/2021 16:35:00 10 6
bbc
In fairness this pandemic has restricted contact to phone and computer screens, which is the southerner's favourite and often only means of contact. It is unlikely that anyone in, say, London is going to be adversely affected by this shift.

It's a bit more face-to-face up north; not being able to actually see or socialise in a normal environment is likely to trigger some loneliness.
448
07/04/2021 22:28:23 2 0
bbc
What a load of old cobblers. I live in the south west and people are very friendly here. There is more to the south than just London/South East!
483
08/04/2021 08:34:32 0 0
bbc
I'm not a fan of London, but you have made some real sweeping statements there.