Covid: Shed and garage offices pose insurance risk
08/04/2021 | news | business | 337
Plans to convert sheds, garages and extensions in order to work from home can leave some uninsured.
1
08/04/2021 09:01:05 47 5
bbc
A robber broke into my shed.... and left me a tenner....out of sympathy.
136
08/04/2021 12:08:46 20 4
bbc
You can afford a shed?!
193
08/04/2021 13:02:34 2 0
bbc
Who needs home insurance? I don't.
My contents are not worth much, no burglar would want them. The newest items ar now more than 25 years old...
Building insurance (covering fire, storms, earthquakes etc.) comes out of my service charges and is paid by the building management. The only insurance I pay is National Insurance (NI) contributions.
274
08/04/2021 16:32:50 4 0
bbc
You're lucky to have a shed. When I were a lad our shed were a hole in the road. When I say road, I mean a muddy track next to a manure factory. But it were a shed to us.
2
08/04/2021 09:04:08 126 12
bbc
While they're at it, can they also look into the deliveroo, just eat, hermes delivery drivers that are using their own vehicles for and work use which, if insured, are likley to only have social, domestic, pleasure and commuting to work insurance on them- thus making it null and void and uninsured.
Perhaps someone delivers pizzas socially.Meals on wheels sort of service.Feeding people not only literally but emotionally in such extreme circumstances by giving them some companionship.Often a "How are you? you look grand today" accompanied w/ a big smile even on the doorstep makes people's day and cheers them up.Everythin is subjective. Insurance providers are just cold heartless institutions
144
08/04/2021 12:17:06 2 10
bbc
any proof of this, or just a rant?
147
08/04/2021 12:19:32 8 0
bbc
That would be The Police's job to do that
173
08/04/2021 12:43:39 8 0
bbc
They do - there was a social media post by a Police force who impounded a vehicle being used for food delivery that had no business insurance.
203
08/04/2021 13:19:12 5 0
bbc
I had a 13 yer old boy get out of his mother's car and deliver a parcel on behalf of Herpes
244
08/04/2021 15:03:06 1 0
bbc
It happens all the time. Uber Eats shows the vehicle type and registration number that is supposidly being used - its amazing how many say 'bicycle' and then a car rolls up with your order.
249
08/04/2021 15:22:18 1 3
bbc
bicycles dont require 3rd party liability insurance. so cycle couriers and food deliveries are basically cost free.
261
08/04/2021 15:45:36 0 0
bbc
While I think it's very predatory practice it's true that there should be more focus on this. I was told by my insurer I'd need additional cover to drive 2 miles between two churches for volunteering at a mission for a week over the summer.

They can be extremely strict and they may not always investigate claims but anyone using a car in any way should make sure they're covered for that use.
266
08/04/2021 15:57:30 0 0
bbc
To be fair to the likes of Just Eat and Deliveroo - you cannot start working with them unless you provide proof of correct insurance.
It's not the companies that are the issue, it's the people. I don't think there's anything the companies can do to stop people cancelling insurance or using a different vehicle once they've started.
This is nothing new, happens with private hire taxis too.
323
09/04/2021 08:46:08 0 0
bbc
Indeed and I saw one report of someone prosecuted for the offence.....
3
08/04/2021 09:09:15 1 1
bbc
Around a 20% drop in daily commutes will do wonders for the traffic jams, not sure where the missing tax will come from in using less fuel, maybe from the fuel used to heat each home during the day, so much for carbon targets, as usual, good on one hand, bad on the other
4
08/04/2021 09:17:28 96 12
bbc
Insurance companies looking at how to cover there loss of turnover as businesses reduce the need for commercial premises.
A home occupied during the day is less likely to be burgled.
How about passing the relevant reductions on?
29
08/04/2021 09:53:09 14 4
bbc
It's absolutely negligible I'm afraid. Their loss of turnover (which is also negligible) is offset by reduced risk. That's the underwriting game. I hate to have to tell you but personal lines insurance is small-beer money swap for insurance companies.
107
08/04/2021 11:39:33 1 0
bbc
They should but they won't. They will think of some clever reason why not.
113
08/04/2021 11:44:52 0 0
bbc
Theft risks are negligible for most insurers. Increased strains on homes such as pipework, electrics etc. with escape of water claims are the most common/costly incidents, caused by freezing burst pipes, age, increased usage, to a leaking dishwasher or overflowing blocked toilet, water damage is one of the most common types of claim, with insurers paying out £1.8 million for it every day....
145
08/04/2021 12:18:14 5 1
bbc
And of course, a car parked up because it's not been driven to the office is a lower risk too. Funny how these savings don't seem to filter down to the consumer.
184
mc
08/04/2021 12:51:29 0 0
bbc
but more likely to cause damage and have disaters like electric fires etc
270
08/04/2021 16:11:52 0 0
bbc
What reduce the £300 premium when the pay out could be £500k plus if someone had their house lost to a fire not sure that insurers are racking it in on home insurance
5
08/04/2021 09:19:44 1 2
bbc
Surely people have been working in their sheds and garages forever. Building stuff, either practical or ornamental for their homes and gardens or for friends and family. What's the difference?
Or is a 'man in his shed' now an insurance liability that makes retirement pottering an expensive way to past the time?
15
08/04/2021 09:36:50 2 0
bbc
"Man in shed" probably not insured against personal injury, only against shed burning down. Former is much more likely than latter.
17
08/04/2021 09:38:17 2 0
bbc
The difference is, is the work for personal use and therefore no financial gain (tinkering for one's own pleasure) or for hire or reward ie being paid to do something, or receiving payment for good sold and items produced. This has always been the case
6
MVP
08/04/2021 09:20:32 3 5
bbc
Insurance companies need to make up for lost revenues somehow.
27
08/04/2021 09:48:59 2 0
bbc
The premium difference here is absolutely minimal and negligible to the insurance industry.
7
08/04/2021 09:22:12 13 4
bbc
In office, workplace assessments obligatory: desk height, lighting, seat adjustment etc. Are employers going to assess every homeworker? They aren't providing desks/chairs/lights! Aviva featured here - they are closing offices and two neighbours now work exclusively from home. Prediction: neck/back pain, eyestrain will result. What do HR have to say?
19
08/04/2021 09:40:49 17 1
bbc
It's not difficult to implement, a former employer of mine was doing DSE assessments using the company intranet nearly two decades ago. Just remind them the have a legal obligation to conduct them...

https://www.hse.gov.uk/msd/dse/
22
08/04/2021 09:44:08 1 1
bbc
Exactly right and why have the HSE/Government been so quiet on the risks posed by home working - employers have a duty of care, just wondering how many working from home audits have been carried out??
37
08/04/2021 10:13:14 5 1
bbc
I think the onus is on the homeowner.

You want to work from home; YOUR home. It is YOUR responsibility.

Can you imagine employees suing their company because they cut their hand on a chipped mug from their own home kitchen? Absurd!

You can't have it both ways.

What if you work from a pop up coffee shop style office? Is your employer liable for their H&S as well?
214
08/04/2021 13:42:13 2 1
bbc
Have worked from home for over 17 years, fortunately as a freelance. That included a couple of years working from an armchair with laptop balanced on knees. No assessments not seat adjustment, current desk is repurposed kitchen table, No neck or back pain, no eye strain, and best of all no micromanagement by an HR idiot.
8
08/04/2021 09:28:25 1 4
bbc
Lol, just lol
9
ken
08/04/2021 09:30:54 6 3
bbc
Surely health and safety a big issue and the employer must be responsible for any additional insurance requirements for their staff to work from home
12
08/04/2021 09:34:57 4 0
bbc
Only if staff are given an option. Aviva staff now ONLY working from home have no choice, but probably have Aviva staff insurance policies, too. Self-employed using garage or shed are different case and probably uninsurable as well as unassessed for H&S.
39
08/04/2021 10:14:03 0 0
bbc
LoL. Keep dreaming.
10
08/04/2021 09:31:46 3 3
bbc
In office, using employer's internet. At home, work is impossible without internet. What happens when home internet goes down? Will IT Support be chasing Virgin/Sky/BT for home workers? Not all staff are IT experts and ISPs notorious for not answering phone and taking time to fix. Staff must tell home insurer they work from home - every year when switching insurers whose own staff work from home..
13
08/04/2021 09:35:12 3 4
bbc
A fair comment, the weak link in the chain and employers need to provide internet back up over mobile should the hardwire system fail.
16
08/04/2021 09:38:09 2 0
bbc
That has happened to me twice in the past year. The IT department won't help. What happens is I get a few hours off work until it comes back online.
49
08/04/2021 10:25:43 1 0
bbc
That's why you pay for a business internet connection for the better support if you are working from home. It's quite simple really and has been done for more than 20 years.
11
08/04/2021 09:26:11 6 7
bbc
A quick check over the insurance docs / call to your insurer is all that's needed.

Any premium increase would probably be nominal (assuming nothing 'risky' in the work being done).

So no need to make a fuss dear..................
42
sci
08/04/2021 10:19:21 2 0
bbc
Continuing on an existing home insurance policy by paying extra premium for home-working and/or home-office is NOT STRAIGHTFORWARD or IMPOSSIBLE. Many insurers simply don't cover home-working, have no alternative policies from standard home insurance. We discovered this when our broker switched us to a cheaper brand at renewal but the new insurer later cancelled upon finding hubby worked at home.
9
ken
08/04/2021 09:30:54 6 3
bbc
Surely health and safety a big issue and the employer must be responsible for any additional insurance requirements for their staff to work from home
12
08/04/2021 09:34:57 4 0
bbc
Only if staff are given an option. Aviva staff now ONLY working from home have no choice, but probably have Aviva staff insurance policies, too. Self-employed using garage or shed are different case and probably uninsurable as well as unassessed for H&S.
10
08/04/2021 09:31:46 3 3
bbc
In office, using employer's internet. At home, work is impossible without internet. What happens when home internet goes down? Will IT Support be chasing Virgin/Sky/BT for home workers? Not all staff are IT experts and ISPs notorious for not answering phone and taking time to fix. Staff must tell home insurer they work from home - every year when switching insurers whose own staff work from home..
13
08/04/2021 09:35:12 3 4
bbc
A fair comment, the weak link in the chain and employers need to provide internet back up over mobile should the hardwire system fail.
28
08/04/2021 09:50:58 1 0
bbc
I think you'll find that employers can't have back up plans for perhaps thousands of employees. They will accept that if there are individual outages then that employee will be less productive for a short time.
14
08/04/2021 09:36:15 4 1
bbc
I suppose the risk will be that sheds/garages will be the target for burglers as they hope to find computer equipment in there. However, that stuff usually belongs to the employer. So is it the employers responsibility to pay the insurance? Who supplies the alarm system etc.
41
08/04/2021 10:15:29 3 0
bbc
If you choose to work offsite I imagine the employee is responsible for any equipment they are the custodian of whilst off-site.
220
08/04/2021 13:56:32 0 0
bbc
I'd check with your employer if you've just started working from home. For example my employer, (large US multi-national) expect my contents insurance to apply, and I can claim for any increase in policy costs. Whether they would force that I don't know.....
306
08/04/2021 19:19:22 0 0
bbc
When we decamped to work from home last March an interesting issue arose. We were only allowed to take our laptops as all the other equipment was not insured out of the office. At this point we all refused. We all have multiple monitors and some have digitizer. Management very quickly realised the stupidity of their decision and let us take everything. They covered the insurance.
5
08/04/2021 09:19:44 1 2
bbc
Surely people have been working in their sheds and garages forever. Building stuff, either practical or ornamental for their homes and gardens or for friends and family. What's the difference?
Or is a 'man in his shed' now an insurance liability that makes retirement pottering an expensive way to past the time?
15
08/04/2021 09:36:50 2 0
bbc
"Man in shed" probably not insured against personal injury, only against shed burning down. Former is much more likely than latter.
10
08/04/2021 09:31:46 3 3
bbc
In office, using employer's internet. At home, work is impossible without internet. What happens when home internet goes down? Will IT Support be chasing Virgin/Sky/BT for home workers? Not all staff are IT experts and ISPs notorious for not answering phone and taking time to fix. Staff must tell home insurer they work from home - every year when switching insurers whose own staff work from home..
16
08/04/2021 09:38:09 2 0
bbc
That has happened to me twice in the past year. The IT department won't help. What happens is I get a few hours off work until it comes back online.
5
08/04/2021 09:19:44 1 2
bbc
Surely people have been working in their sheds and garages forever. Building stuff, either practical or ornamental for their homes and gardens or for friends and family. What's the difference?
Or is a 'man in his shed' now an insurance liability that makes retirement pottering an expensive way to past the time?
17
08/04/2021 09:38:17 2 0
bbc
The difference is, is the work for personal use and therefore no financial gain (tinkering for one's own pleasure) or for hire or reward ie being paid to do something, or receiving payment for good sold and items produced. This has always been the case
18
08/04/2021 09:39:32 189 16
bbc
Surely any increase risk due to home working would be offset by a household being less likely to be burgled or broken into as they’d be someone in most of the time . Insurance companies trying to find an issue that doesn’t really exist.
112
08/04/2021 11:43:58 57 4
bbc
That's a very good point.

Over the last year I've been working from home, and my son who is doing a post-grad degree has spent that time studying in his bedroom. As a result, our house is hardly ever empty. There's always someone there.

Pre-Covid, it was frequently empty during weekdays.
116
08/04/2021 11:46:49 7 1
bbc
Theft risks are negligible for most insurers. Increased strains on homes such as pipework, electrics etc. with escape of water claims are the most common/costly incidents, caused by freezing burst pipes, age, increased usage, to a leaking dishwasher or overflowing blocked toilet, water damage is one of the most common types of claim, with insurers paying out £1.8 million for it every day....
157
08/04/2021 12:30:58 3 1
bbc
They aren't looking for an issue, they are noting that people may not be covered sue to the T's & C's
182
08/04/2021 12:51:58 6 0
bbc
Sad times for burglars
239
Bob
08/04/2021 14:47:46 1 1
bbc
You're already asked when people are at home: day & night, day only, night only.

And per the article, the main concern here is about the type of work. I doubt it covers many, but per the example - work involving fire. That significantly increases the risk.

As someone else said, theft is not a major issue, especially value wise, for insurers & mostly happens overnight anyway.
257
08/04/2021 15:38:58 1 0
bbc
Yes and selling you more insurance at a higher price!
271
08/04/2021 16:14:20 0 0
bbc
It’s true that the burglary risk reduces but risk on contents due to accidental damage is greater as you are in the property longer.
290
08/04/2021 18:24:11 0 0
bbc
I used that exact same argument with my insurance provider when I started working from home full time a few years back and they agreed. I don't store stock and only do office type work so there was no additional charges or conditions put on my policy.
310
08/04/2021 20:01:00 1 1
bbc
This is just part of a long series of 'get back to work plebs' stories that will be run over the coming weeks. Just ignore it. Most people and firms are happy with current arrangements so BS Boris and his cronies will have to do without the office rent and fuel duty, which is what this is really about.
7
08/04/2021 09:22:12 13 4
bbc
In office, workplace assessments obligatory: desk height, lighting, seat adjustment etc. Are employers going to assess every homeworker? They aren't providing desks/chairs/lights! Aviva featured here - they are closing offices and two neighbours now work exclusively from home. Prediction: neck/back pain, eyestrain will result. What do HR have to say?
19
08/04/2021 09:40:49 17 1
bbc
It's not difficult to implement, a former employer of mine was doing DSE assessments using the company intranet nearly two decades ago. Just remind them the have a legal obligation to conduct them...

https://www.hse.gov.uk/msd/dse/
20
08/04/2021 09:38:09 24 2
bbc
If people are at home working, surely the risk of crime is reduced. If you spot someone messing with your property you can then 'deal' with them in a suitable way.
24
08/04/2021 09:46:46 20 2
bbc
Call the police and be given a crime reference number?
25
08/04/2021 09:46:55 9 1
bbc
I think that the problem lies in the type of Insurance that you have. Most people have normal Home and Contents Insurance however, once you turn part of your home into an Office you actually need to let your Insurer know as you have changed the nature of your home. and if you don't tell them you may have invalidated your Insurance - similar to Social, Domestic, Business & pleasure for your car!
34
08/04/2021 10:07:07 5 1
bbc
The problem is that by not telling the insurance company about the new situation you invalidate all of your insurance cover not just the theft aspect. Working from home will increase the risk of accidental damage as you are there more often, extra computer gear and activity could lead to an increased fire risk, etc. All of which will not be covered if you haven't told your insurer about changes.
114
08/04/2021 11:45:05 3 0
bbc
Let the dogs out then hide the body!
Got it covered.
177
08/04/2021 12:47:31 0 0
bbc
Not if you're in the converted shed, garage or summerhouse...
186
mc
08/04/2021 12:52:49 0 1
bbc
no as you have more things to steal easy to burgle you at night as most are done then
21
08/04/2021 09:42:15 3 8
bbc
The British will always find a way to defraud the insurance man. It's the national sport.
23
08/04/2021 09:46:28 15 2
bbc
because its a way of getting back at a lousy industry which will find anyway of wriggling out of paying claims. Ts and Cs riddled with exclusions. Of all the industries, the Insurance Sector is the one that has been least helpful during Covid. You only have to look at the Class Action being taken against them to force them to pay out for Business Interruption
26
08/04/2021 09:46:57 7 1
bbc
More like the insurance industry ripping off the British public as a sport , happy to take payments each month with over inflation increases each year , less happy to pay out without each receipt in triplicate.
47
08/04/2021 10:23:10 2 3
bbc
Sounds like a few punters didn't get their carpets replaced, despite their best 'efforts'.
7
08/04/2021 09:22:12 13 4
bbc
In office, workplace assessments obligatory: desk height, lighting, seat adjustment etc. Are employers going to assess every homeworker? They aren't providing desks/chairs/lights! Aviva featured here - they are closing offices and two neighbours now work exclusively from home. Prediction: neck/back pain, eyestrain will result. What do HR have to say?
22
08/04/2021 09:44:08 1 1
bbc
Exactly right and why have the HSE/Government been so quiet on the risks posed by home working - employers have a duty of care, just wondering how many working from home audits have been carried out??
21
08/04/2021 09:42:15 3 8
bbc
The British will always find a way to defraud the insurance man. It's the national sport.
23
08/04/2021 09:46:28 15 2
bbc
because its a way of getting back at a lousy industry which will find anyway of wriggling out of paying claims. Ts and Cs riddled with exclusions. Of all the industries, the Insurance Sector is the one that has been least helpful during Covid. You only have to look at the Class Action being taken against them to force them to pay out for Business Interruption
53
08/04/2021 10:30:13 2 3
bbc
Wrong weatherlobe. The insurance industry has been cracking on throughout the pandemic, working continuously. Keeping full employment (no furlough), paying all that tax to support you no doubt. You cite the business interruption class action as if that is all of insurance! It accounts for about 0.00001% of insurance. Back to school.
62
08/04/2021 10:47:29 1 0
bbc
It wasn't a class action, only a few insurers were ruled against, the vast majority clearly didn't cover against the Covid19 novovirus. Their wording was not found to be open to legal interpretation. A few however were sloppy (mostly not ABI members) and were caught out, no sympathy there. One thing is for sure, all policies will now clearly exclude pandemics, they're an uninsurable risk.
20
08/04/2021 09:38:09 24 2
bbc
If people are at home working, surely the risk of crime is reduced. If you spot someone messing with your property you can then 'deal' with them in a suitable way.
24
08/04/2021 09:46:46 20 2
bbc
Call the police and be given a crime reference number?
40
08/04/2021 10:14:44 1 0
bbc
That's one option...
20
08/04/2021 09:38:09 24 2
bbc
If people are at home working, surely the risk of crime is reduced. If you spot someone messing with your property you can then 'deal' with them in a suitable way.
25
08/04/2021 09:46:55 9 1
bbc
I think that the problem lies in the type of Insurance that you have. Most people have normal Home and Contents Insurance however, once you turn part of your home into an Office you actually need to let your Insurer know as you have changed the nature of your home. and if you don't tell them you may have invalidated your Insurance - similar to Social, Domestic, Business & pleasure for your car!
21
08/04/2021 09:42:15 3 8
bbc
The British will always find a way to defraud the insurance man. It's the national sport.
26
08/04/2021 09:46:57 7 1
bbc
More like the insurance industry ripping off the British public as a sport , happy to take payments each month with over inflation increases each year , less happy to pay out without each receipt in triplicate.
6
MVP
08/04/2021 09:20:32 3 5
bbc
Insurance companies need to make up for lost revenues somehow.
27
08/04/2021 09:48:59 2 0
bbc
The premium difference here is absolutely minimal and negligible to the insurance industry.
13
08/04/2021 09:35:12 3 4
bbc
A fair comment, the weak link in the chain and employers need to provide internet back up over mobile should the hardwire system fail.
28
08/04/2021 09:50:58 1 0
bbc
I think you'll find that employers can't have back up plans for perhaps thousands of employees. They will accept that if there are individual outages then that employee will be less productive for a short time.
104
08/04/2021 11:38:32 1 0
bbc
If one employee has a problem with home internet, the employer might lose a few hours work time. If the office internet goes down, they lose hundreds or even thousands of hours. Although that's less likely to happen, the employer's risk is lower when workers are dispersed - assuming they can work in the cloud, and are not reliant on office-based servers.
155
08/04/2021 12:29:30 1 0
bbc
They most certainly will and do for business critical employees by either provision of a mobile for tethering, a router with a SIM back up facility or a SIM dongle.
4
08/04/2021 09:17:28 96 12
bbc
Insurance companies looking at how to cover there loss of turnover as businesses reduce the need for commercial premises.
A home occupied during the day is less likely to be burgled.
How about passing the relevant reductions on?
29
08/04/2021 09:53:09 14 4
bbc
It's absolutely negligible I'm afraid. Their loss of turnover (which is also negligible) is offset by reduced risk. That's the underwriting game. I hate to have to tell you but personal lines insurance is small-beer money swap for insurance companies.
30
08/04/2021 09:56:53 16 7
bbc
No surprise really, Insurers will always find a way to squeeze you for more dosh.
33
08/04/2021 10:04:20 14 8
bbc
And in your business you've never put up prices?
31
sci
08/04/2021 10:00:33 2 1
bbc
Continuing on an existing home insurance policy by paying extra premium for home-working and/or home-office is NOT STRAIGHTFORWARD. Many insurers simply don't cover home-working, don't have any alternative policies from standard home insurance; we discovered this when our broker switched us to a cheaper brand at renewal but the new insurer later cancelled upon finding hubby worked at home. Beware.
32
08/04/2021 10:00:45 77 6
bbc
There is a much bigger risk when working in the garden shed: SPIDERS!
52
sw
08/04/2021 10:27:20 28 14
bbc
Spiders are not a risk. You are more of a risk to them.
54
08/04/2021 10:27:49 6 1
bbc
Nothing wrong with spiders. They are just doing their thing, and mean us no harm. And it is bad luck to harm them!
63
08/04/2021 10:47:37 10 0
bbc
An even bigger risk is dozing off as the shed warms up in the sunshine. Might be just me! :-D
162
08/04/2021 12:33:45 4 0
bbc
Only if you jump out of your skin on seeing one, hit your head on the ceiling, fall back down unconscious and knock over your heater, causing a fire...
185
08/04/2021 12:53:23 0 0
bbc
In Australia maybe, but the average UK garden spider is not going to cause many issues.
190
08/04/2021 12:57:20 2 0
bbc
Never kill spiders ... they eat all sort of other unpleasant bugs that invade your house.
265
08/04/2021 15:57:00 6 0
bbc
The spider in my shed is not a problem. He spends most of his time looking at flies on the web.
30
08/04/2021 09:56:53 16 7
bbc
No surprise really, Insurers will always find a way to squeeze you for more dosh.
33
08/04/2021 10:04:20 14 8
bbc
And in your business you've never put up prices?
122
08/04/2021 11:54:22 5 0
bbc
No, my company has not put up prices since 2017.
We have not had a pay rise either.
The leeches however carry on sucking the blood from their victims.....
20
08/04/2021 09:38:09 24 2
bbc
If people are at home working, surely the risk of crime is reduced. If you spot someone messing with your property you can then 'deal' with them in a suitable way.
34
08/04/2021 10:07:07 5 1
bbc
The problem is that by not telling the insurance company about the new situation you invalidate all of your insurance cover not just the theft aspect. Working from home will increase the risk of accidental damage as you are there more often, extra computer gear and activity could lead to an increased fire risk, etc. All of which will not be covered if you haven't told your insurer about changes.
35
08/04/2021 10:07:39 52 16
bbc
If you are morally and ethically bereft then Insurance is surely a great industry in which to operate. Every pay out means higher premiums for customers. Its an industry cartel driven by small print exclusion zones praying on the uninitiated's' lack of attention to detail. I don't recall hearing of many insurance companies going bust.
43
08/04/2021 10:20:30 21 2
bbc
There have been many over the years especially before tighter regulation was brought in. Fire Auto and Marine went bust owing tens of millions and who paid the outstanding claims - the Motor Insurers Bureau. And who funds them - Motor Insurers.
46
08/04/2021 10:22:53 1 0
bbc
There are plenty of syndicates who make massive losses each year though
48
08/04/2021 10:25:14 8 3
bbc
Thank you for saying I am morally and ethically bereft then. You've just shown how you know absolutely nothing about an very important industry that has for centuries allowed businesses to create opportunities for numpties like you to have a job because they are able to transfer their risks away for an annual premium. And personal lines insurance is a drop in the ocean compared to commercial.
50
08/04/2021 10:26:18 8 2
bbc
And if you want to do a bit of research, multiple insurance companies have gone bust, or incur huge losses requiring capital injection. You seem to know the square root of zero. Go back to frying chicken.
55
08/04/2021 10:36:41 7 3
bbc
Here's a list for you of the insurers who HAVE gone insolvent:
https://www.fscs.org.uk/what-we-cover/insurance/insurance-insolvencies/

Many more have been taken over when they run into problems and ultra-tight regulation, the strictest in the world, prevents many many more.

So we've shown you know absolutely nothing haven't we.

Time to apologise for calling insurance "morally bereft".
217
08/04/2021 13:51:38 1 0
bbc
Don't want to be all "grown-up" here, but I think they offer a genuine service, giving people peace of mind and the ability to plan. So long as they are honest and both sides know what they're getting, but that could be said of most industries ....
256
08/04/2021 15:36:55 1 0
bbc
Insurance is socialism- the risk is shared by all who agree to be part of it. Some get back more, some less. It's like the NHS for property.
262
08/04/2021 15:46:54 0 0
bbc
Many insurers have gone bust -Equitable Life, Fire Auto and Marine Insurance to name just two.
292
08/04/2021 18:31:07 0 0
bbc
I've heard of too many examples where they've happily taken policy payments and then only on a claim have they gone out of their way to invalidate it as it's cheaper to refund the premiums than to pay the claim.

Also my father-in-law recently had to make a relatively small claim for a car accident. Come renewal he has protected no claims so they just jacked up his premium instead. Cretins.
36
08/04/2021 10:09:26 23 4
bbc
sadly its all about money. insurances are a mindfield and you need to shop around. when you her the classic your premium is going up dont believe a word of it. always get two or three quotes. when you tell you insurance company about any change they always use this to their advantage. when you say uyou will get another quote your company will straigh away drop the price. dont fall for the flannel.
134
08/04/2021 12:05:50 31 3
bbc
Try and make a claim. Made my first claim last year after 30 years with the same company. They did everything they could not to pay our. Eventually they did however we had to use a solicitor before they begrudgingly coughed up. Bandits the lot of them.
7
08/04/2021 09:22:12 13 4
bbc
In office, workplace assessments obligatory: desk height, lighting, seat adjustment etc. Are employers going to assess every homeworker? They aren't providing desks/chairs/lights! Aviva featured here - they are closing offices and two neighbours now work exclusively from home. Prediction: neck/back pain, eyestrain will result. What do HR have to say?
37
08/04/2021 10:13:14 5 1
bbc
I think the onus is on the homeowner.

You want to work from home; YOUR home. It is YOUR responsibility.

Can you imagine employees suing their company because they cut their hand on a chipped mug from their own home kitchen? Absurd!

You can't have it both ways.

What if you work from a pop up coffee shop style office? Is your employer liable for their H&S as well?
38
sci
08/04/2021 10:13:44 7 3
bbc
We live near the Wash low-lying Fens not many feet above mean sea level and classed by many insurers as flood risk area despite comprehensive fens drainage installed from 1700s onwards. Our insurance broker UNABLE TO GET ANY COVER FOR US WHATSOEVER for home-working in a deemed flood-risk area, apart from very expensive Ageas nearly £2k pa, though we ditched broker, went direct to NFU slightly less
57
08/04/2021 10:41:53 8 1
bbc
There is a scheme for those in flood areas to get cover, Flood Re, if your broker is doing their job properly they should be able to source cover for you. It may not be any cheaper than Ageas but if your home floods it is worth every penny.
9
ken
08/04/2021 09:30:54 6 3
bbc
Surely health and safety a big issue and the employer must be responsible for any additional insurance requirements for their staff to work from home
39
08/04/2021 10:14:03 0 0
bbc
LoL. Keep dreaming.
24
08/04/2021 09:46:46 20 2
bbc
Call the police and be given a crime reference number?
40
08/04/2021 10:14:44 1 0
bbc
That's one option...
14
08/04/2021 09:36:15 4 1
bbc
I suppose the risk will be that sheds/garages will be the target for burglers as they hope to find computer equipment in there. However, that stuff usually belongs to the employer. So is it the employers responsibility to pay the insurance? Who supplies the alarm system etc.
41
08/04/2021 10:15:29 3 0
bbc
If you choose to work offsite I imagine the employee is responsible for any equipment they are the custodian of whilst off-site.
61
08/04/2021 10:46:33 4 1
bbc
Unlikely. You don't "own" the company laptop and so if it were to be damaged in a fire or stolen I'd expect it to be insured (if at all) by the employer.
192
08/04/2021 12:59:31 1 0
bbc
portable equipment is usually insured and maintained by the owner, which is why Data Security and IT Support don't like you playing software on it which they didn't supply.
11
08/04/2021 09:26:11 6 7
bbc
A quick check over the insurance docs / call to your insurer is all that's needed.

Any premium increase would probably be nominal (assuming nothing 'risky' in the work being done).

So no need to make a fuss dear..................
42
sci
08/04/2021 10:19:21 2 0
bbc
Continuing on an existing home insurance policy by paying extra premium for home-working and/or home-office is NOT STRAIGHTFORWARD or IMPOSSIBLE. Many insurers simply don't cover home-working, have no alternative policies from standard home insurance. We discovered this when our broker switched us to a cheaper brand at renewal but the new insurer later cancelled upon finding hubby worked at home.
35
08/04/2021 10:07:39 52 16
bbc
If you are morally and ethically bereft then Insurance is surely a great industry in which to operate. Every pay out means higher premiums for customers. Its an industry cartel driven by small print exclusion zones praying on the uninitiated's' lack of attention to detail. I don't recall hearing of many insurance companies going bust.
43
08/04/2021 10:20:30 21 2
bbc
There have been many over the years especially before tighter regulation was brought in. Fire Auto and Marine went bust owing tens of millions and who paid the outstanding claims - the Motor Insurers Bureau. And who funds them - Motor Insurers.
183
08/04/2021 12:52:02 0 3
bbc
Name them, I can't think of any.
44
08/04/2021 10:21:48 38 13
bbc
This translates to insurance companies seeking to make some more money!
56
08/04/2021 10:39:07 36 8
bbc
Or put another way, making sure that you pay the right price for the risk you represent. Better that than having your claim declined for not telling them.
102
08/04/2021 11:37:45 4 0
bbc
No, it's always been the case you need to let your insured know if you carry out a business from home, it's not called home insurance for nothing!
45
08/04/2021 10:22:45 7 17
bbc
Ooh look. More anti-WFH propaganda from the British Broadcasting Conservatives.
67
08/04/2021 10:52:36 5 4
bbc
No, they are reporting the facts. What is it that you don't like about the truth? Could it be that you are a Brexit Supporter and as there hasn't been any good news you take every opportunity to have a pop at the BBC? If you don't like the content then go to Telegraph or other right wing site to get the news that you want to read.
70
08/04/2021 10:57:27 0 2
bbc
I've been working from home for over a year now and I've hated the last 11 months. I miss being in an office surrounded by my team mates. Work is much more productive in person and I've managed to achieve much less whilst working remotely. I can't wait to be able to properly separate work from home in the future.
35
08/04/2021 10:07:39 52 16
bbc
If you are morally and ethically bereft then Insurance is surely a great industry in which to operate. Every pay out means higher premiums for customers. Its an industry cartel driven by small print exclusion zones praying on the uninitiated's' lack of attention to detail. I don't recall hearing of many insurance companies going bust.
46
08/04/2021 10:22:53 1 0
bbc
There are plenty of syndicates who make massive losses each year though
21
08/04/2021 09:42:15 3 8
bbc
The British will always find a way to defraud the insurance man. It's the national sport.
47
08/04/2021 10:23:10 2 3
bbc
Sounds like a few punters didn't get their carpets replaced, despite their best 'efforts'.
35
08/04/2021 10:07:39 52 16
bbc
If you are morally and ethically bereft then Insurance is surely a great industry in which to operate. Every pay out means higher premiums for customers. Its an industry cartel driven by small print exclusion zones praying on the uninitiated's' lack of attention to detail. I don't recall hearing of many insurance companies going bust.
48
08/04/2021 10:25:14 8 3
bbc
Thank you for saying I am morally and ethically bereft then. You've just shown how you know absolutely nothing about an very important industry that has for centuries allowed businesses to create opportunities for numpties like you to have a job because they are able to transfer their risks away for an annual premium. And personal lines insurance is a drop in the ocean compared to commercial.
10
08/04/2021 09:31:46 3 3
bbc
In office, using employer's internet. At home, work is impossible without internet. What happens when home internet goes down? Will IT Support be chasing Virgin/Sky/BT for home workers? Not all staff are IT experts and ISPs notorious for not answering phone and taking time to fix. Staff must tell home insurer they work from home - every year when switching insurers whose own staff work from home..
49
08/04/2021 10:25:43 1 0
bbc
That's why you pay for a business internet connection for the better support if you are working from home. It's quite simple really and has been done for more than 20 years.
35
08/04/2021 10:07:39 52 16
bbc
If you are morally and ethically bereft then Insurance is surely a great industry in which to operate. Every pay out means higher premiums for customers. Its an industry cartel driven by small print exclusion zones praying on the uninitiated's' lack of attention to detail. I don't recall hearing of many insurance companies going bust.
50
08/04/2021 10:26:18 8 2
bbc
And if you want to do a bit of research, multiple insurance companies have gone bust, or incur huge losses requiring capital injection. You seem to know the square root of zero. Go back to frying chicken.
51
08/04/2021 10:27:03 21 4
bbc
Nobody forces you to take out Insurance on your house contents nor on your buildings if you don't have a mortgage. Save yourselves from the evils of those wicked Insurers by putting away the money you save in premiums to deal with the claims yourself. After 10 years you might have £2500 - see how far that goes if your house burns down!!
60
08/04/2021 10:46:19 11 0
bbc
A house fire could cost you hundreds of thousands in building and contents.
32
08/04/2021 10:00:45 77 6
bbc
There is a much bigger risk when working in the garden shed: SPIDERS!
52
sw
08/04/2021 10:27:20 28 14
bbc
Spiders are not a risk. You are more of a risk to them.
228
08/04/2021 14:23:40 15 1
bbc
Sense of humour failure alert!
248
08/04/2021 15:21:08 2 0
bbc
Have you never watched Harry Potter?
272
08/04/2021 16:15:15 1 0
bbc
Tell my wife that ?? !
23
08/04/2021 09:46:28 15 2
bbc
because its a way of getting back at a lousy industry which will find anyway of wriggling out of paying claims. Ts and Cs riddled with exclusions. Of all the industries, the Insurance Sector is the one that has been least helpful during Covid. You only have to look at the Class Action being taken against them to force them to pay out for Business Interruption
53
08/04/2021 10:30:13 2 3
bbc
Wrong weatherlobe. The insurance industry has been cracking on throughout the pandemic, working continuously. Keeping full employment (no furlough), paying all that tax to support you no doubt. You cite the business interruption class action as if that is all of insurance! It accounts for about 0.00001% of insurance. Back to school.
32
08/04/2021 10:00:45 77 6
bbc
There is a much bigger risk when working in the garden shed: SPIDERS!
54
08/04/2021 10:27:49 6 1
bbc
Nothing wrong with spiders. They are just doing their thing, and mean us no harm. And it is bad luck to harm them!
35
08/04/2021 10:07:39 52 16
bbc
If you are morally and ethically bereft then Insurance is surely a great industry in which to operate. Every pay out means higher premiums for customers. Its an industry cartel driven by small print exclusion zones praying on the uninitiated's' lack of attention to detail. I don't recall hearing of many insurance companies going bust.
55
08/04/2021 10:36:41 7 3
bbc
Here's a list for you of the insurers who HAVE gone insolvent:
https://www.fscs.org.uk/what-we-cover/insurance/insurance-insolvencies/

Many more have been taken over when they run into problems and ultra-tight regulation, the strictest in the world, prevents many many more.

So we've shown you know absolutely nothing haven't we.

Time to apologise for calling insurance "morally bereft".
69
08/04/2021 10:56:06 6 0
bbc
Please accept my apology.
44
08/04/2021 10:21:48 38 13
bbc
This translates to insurance companies seeking to make some more money!
56
08/04/2021 10:39:07 36 8
bbc
Or put another way, making sure that you pay the right price for the risk you represent. Better that than having your claim declined for not telling them.
38
sci
08/04/2021 10:13:44 7 3
bbc
We live near the Wash low-lying Fens not many feet above mean sea level and classed by many insurers as flood risk area despite comprehensive fens drainage installed from 1700s onwards. Our insurance broker UNABLE TO GET ANY COVER FOR US WHATSOEVER for home-working in a deemed flood-risk area, apart from very expensive Ageas nearly £2k pa, though we ditched broker, went direct to NFU slightly less
57
08/04/2021 10:41:53 8 1
bbc
There is a scheme for those in flood areas to get cover, Flood Re, if your broker is doing their job properly they should be able to source cover for you. It may not be any cheaper than Ageas but if your home floods it is worth every penny.
58
08/04/2021 10:42:58 3 1
bbc
They'll be lots of tricks like this that Gov, insurers, et al will try to pull. I'm waiting for the first Gov to try and put Capital Gains Tax or some such other tax on the portion of the sale of your house that you advertise as or call the office.
78
08/04/2021 11:10:04 7 0
bbc
Capital Gains Tax is already payable on the portion of your home you use for business when the house is sold. Has been for years
91
08/04/2021 11:23:16 1 0
bbc
Stop giving them daft ideas!
59
08/04/2021 10:43:37 36 3
bbc
If your company allows or asked you to work from home then ask them if they are going to cover any liabilities you may incur. Also the company are still liable for any injury to you under H&S even if you do work from home. They have to provide proper working conditions and working from your bed is not. If they want you to work from home insist on a proper desk, chair, screens, keyboard.
66
08/04/2021 10:51:28 18 0
bbc
Spot on.
194
08/04/2021 13:02:58 2 0
bbc
Funny you should mention this. One of our colleagues company laptop was stolen. The employer said no problem but the company insurer said no - it was the responsibility of the employee's household insurance provider to pay for a new one. At the moment, our legal team are putting together a policy which should clear up responsibilities for thefts and accidents as a result of working from home.
326
09/04/2021 10:26:28 0 0
bbc
An be told
"Forget it. Come to the office everyday"
51
08/04/2021 10:27:03 21 4
bbc
Nobody forces you to take out Insurance on your house contents nor on your buildings if you don't have a mortgage. Save yourselves from the evils of those wicked Insurers by putting away the money you save in premiums to deal with the claims yourself. After 10 years you might have £2500 - see how far that goes if your house burns down!!
60
08/04/2021 10:46:19 11 0
bbc
A house fire could cost you hundreds of thousands in building and contents.
92
08/04/2021 11:24:32 4 0
bbc
My insurer insists I have insurance - yours will to. Be careful when you ask them for confirmation though as they could be annoyed when you say "I've got a mortgage with you but my house is not insured, are you ok with that?" Don't forget - your house is actually their house whilst you're paying off a mortgage. If it burns down due to your dodgey wfh printer - they'll want their money back.
41
08/04/2021 10:15:29 3 0
bbc
If you choose to work offsite I imagine the employee is responsible for any equipment they are the custodian of whilst off-site.
61
08/04/2021 10:46:33 4 1
bbc
Unlikely. You don't "own" the company laptop and so if it were to be damaged in a fire or stolen I'd expect it to be insured (if at all) by the employer.
141
08/04/2021 12:15:12 2 0
bbc
I imagine if lots of laptops sudden start getting 'stolen' then the employer might think their equipment is safer kept at the work premises with proper security measures.

The ball is in our court; if WFH is the boon that so many claim it is, then perhaps it is worth employees making it as easy, productive & hassle-free as possible to show employers it is the way forward. Lest you get recalled.
23
08/04/2021 09:46:28 15 2
bbc
because its a way of getting back at a lousy industry which will find anyway of wriggling out of paying claims. Ts and Cs riddled with exclusions. Of all the industries, the Insurance Sector is the one that has been least helpful during Covid. You only have to look at the Class Action being taken against them to force them to pay out for Business Interruption
62
08/04/2021 10:47:29 1 0
bbc
It wasn't a class action, only a few insurers were ruled against, the vast majority clearly didn't cover against the Covid19 novovirus. Their wording was not found to be open to legal interpretation. A few however were sloppy (mostly not ABI members) and were caught out, no sympathy there. One thing is for sure, all policies will now clearly exclude pandemics, they're an uninsurable risk.
32
08/04/2021 10:00:45 77 6
bbc
There is a much bigger risk when working in the garden shed: SPIDERS!
63
08/04/2021 10:47:37 10 0
bbc
An even bigger risk is dozing off as the shed warms up in the sunshine. Might be just me! :-D
64
08/04/2021 10:48:19 9 2
bbc
Like this is new, how long have sales reps worked from home servicing engineers etc. Infact quite a few self employed work fro their vans
133
08/04/2021 12:05:20 4 1
bbc
Fro their van bro.
65
08/04/2021 10:48:46 4 1
bbc
Well you would have an office like that in a 7.2 Million London Gaff...

Bet my Council Tax in North Manchester is almost double the London Gaffs....

* Do make sure your covered by your insurance, leave no wiggle room for them?
59
08/04/2021 10:43:37 36 3
bbc
If your company allows or asked you to work from home then ask them if they are going to cover any liabilities you may incur. Also the company are still liable for any injury to you under H&S even if you do work from home. They have to provide proper working conditions and working from your bed is not. If they want you to work from home insist on a proper desk, chair, screens, keyboard.
66
08/04/2021 10:51:28 18 0
bbc
Spot on.
89
08/04/2021 11:21:32 3 1
bbc
Exactly - also the increased costs that you will incur, lighting, heating, paper, printer consumables, paper, wifi, internet, etc etc. Will your employer provide them? (as well as those they're already providing in their offices for employees that don't/cant wfh?
45
08/04/2021 10:22:45 7 17
bbc
Ooh look. More anti-WFH propaganda from the British Broadcasting Conservatives.
67
08/04/2021 10:52:36 5 4
bbc
No, they are reporting the facts. What is it that you don't like about the truth? Could it be that you are a Brexit Supporter and as there hasn't been any good news you take every opportunity to have a pop at the BBC? If you don't like the content then go to Telegraph or other right wing site to get the news that you want to read.
95
08/04/2021 11:26:41 1 0
bbc
Nope. I proudly voted Remain.

And I vote Labour.

So why are you attacking me ?

Why are you getting personal ?

Why are you so angry ?
68
08/04/2021 10:47:10 9 7
bbc
Insurance companies trying to wriggle out of their responsibilities. No great surprise.
55
08/04/2021 10:36:41 7 3
bbc
Here's a list for you of the insurers who HAVE gone insolvent:
https://www.fscs.org.uk/what-we-cover/insurance/insurance-insolvencies/

Many more have been taken over when they run into problems and ultra-tight regulation, the strictest in the world, prevents many many more.

So we've shown you know absolutely nothing haven't we.

Time to apologise for calling insurance "morally bereft".
69
08/04/2021 10:56:06 6 0
bbc
Please accept my apology.
45
08/04/2021 10:22:45 7 17
bbc
Ooh look. More anti-WFH propaganda from the British Broadcasting Conservatives.
70
08/04/2021 10:57:27 0 2
bbc
I've been working from home for over a year now and I've hated the last 11 months. I miss being in an office surrounded by my team mates. Work is much more productive in person and I've managed to achieve much less whilst working remotely. I can't wait to be able to properly separate work from home in the future.
71
08/04/2021 11:02:22 1 1
bbc
Self insure, get a few 1,000 small businesses to set up a fund for the lowly home worker. the Big companies never the small ones.
72
Ian
08/04/2021 11:04:10 3 0
bbc
The health and safety 'at work' legislation requires the employer to risk assess workplaces and ensure that employees are able to work in a safe environment with the correct (electrically PAT tested) equipment. How many 'wfh'ers have had their employer round to inspect their workplaces or even had to complete a risk assessment? Working on the kitchen table using a laptop is probably not allowed!
Removed
87
08/04/2021 11:19:13 3 0
bbc
When you claim for your back injury because you've been working at the kitchen table for 6 months & eyesight worsens from looking at a tiny screen for 6 months - then see when your insurer steps up & pays. They have to asses your work environment to see if it's safe - as your employer is liable for the consequences. It's the next claim for lawyers to will jump on now PPI insurance is behind us.
90
08/04/2021 11:22:38 3 0
bbc
It's also possible for employers to provide staff with the means to risk assess their own workplaces. Honestly home visits really aren't necessary.
73
08/04/2021 11:04:36 1 5
bbc
Sorry what's the point of insurance?....very few have paid out under the virus showing their true colours of the industry
75
08/04/2021 11:06:49 7 0
bbc
Absolute nonsense. What's that based on? Just the BI class action.....that's one drop in the ocean of insurance.
79
08/04/2021 11:10:25 5 0
bbc
You'll find out quick enough if your house burns down and you don't have any.
84
08/04/2021 11:15:12 1 0
bbc
So don't buy insurance then. Only a couple of types are compulsory. Just take the risk yourself.....but don't go moaning if you lose everything and don't have any insurance to help.
People don't realise but insurance allows people and business to go about their daily lives/work without the risk of losing everything. Everyone's lives would be very different (and worse) without insurance.
74
08/04/2021 11:05:08 24 7
bbc
With the roads empty and driving few mile will my car insurance go down!
Don't think so
76
08/04/2021 11:07:13 24 2
bbc
Mine did.
80
08/04/2021 11:10:34 5 0
bbc
I got a rebate from Admiral (my insurers for 4 of my cars), but 5th was with a different insurer who didn't. But sums were £50 per car which was significant.
97
08/04/2021 11:30:08 4 0
bbc
Yes. Change insurer if it doesn't.
100
08/04/2021 11:34:00 1 0
bbc
mine went down, had to ask them though!
123
08/04/2021 11:57:45 3 0
bbc
No, but your battery will.
227
08/04/2021 14:23:31 1 0
bbc
I re-insured my car recently. I was going to reduce the miles to 1000/yr to bring the cost down, knowing it would be more than enough. However stating 2000/year brought the cost DOWN. It turned out that one underwriter didn't have a policy that would do 1000/yr and so thier system chose another that did 2000/yr and it was cheaper. So on next renewal try 1000/2000/3000 miles and see what happens
73
08/04/2021 11:04:36 1 5
bbc
Sorry what's the point of insurance?....very few have paid out under the virus showing their true colours of the industry
75
08/04/2021 11:06:49 7 0
bbc
Absolute nonsense. What's that based on? Just the BI class action.....that's one drop in the ocean of insurance.
74
08/04/2021 11:05:08 24 7
bbc
With the roads empty and driving few mile will my car insurance go down!
Don't think so
76
08/04/2021 11:07:13 24 2
bbc
Mine did.
86
08/04/2021 11:17:25 4 0
bbc
Mine did also when I sacked my current provider..
207
08/04/2021 13:27:07 0 0
bbc
Mine went up.
77
08/04/2021 11:09:23 10 5
bbc
Interesting picture of rich persons office. Note hardly anything on the table as the richer you are the more work you delegate to someone else. I wonder if its my boss.
My table is covered in books, screens, logbooks, phones and loads of piles of paper documents in various states of disorder.
85
08/04/2021 11:12:13 3 2
bbc
Vulture Caps, don't actually work, get with the program.
148
08/04/2021 12:21:38 2 0
bbc
I bet you could get rid of 90% of them with more efficient working practices.
58
08/04/2021 10:42:58 3 1
bbc
They'll be lots of tricks like this that Gov, insurers, et al will try to pull. I'm waiting for the first Gov to try and put Capital Gains Tax or some such other tax on the portion of the sale of your house that you advertise as or call the office.
78
08/04/2021 11:10:04 7 0
bbc
Capital Gains Tax is already payable on the portion of your home you use for business when the house is sold. Has been for years
307
08/04/2021 19:33:07 0 0
bbc
You're right if you own a business and run it from your home. I'm talking about those who don't own a business but become homeworkers or advertise their house as having an office.

What I'm alluding to is that though in these new circumstances homeowners are not yet liable for CGT, if they're employed. However it won't be long before some Gov look to these arrangements and decide to tax them.
73
08/04/2021 11:04:36 1 5
bbc
Sorry what's the point of insurance?....very few have paid out under the virus showing their true colours of the industry
79
08/04/2021 11:10:25 5 0
bbc
You'll find out quick enough if your house burns down and you don't have any.
74
08/04/2021 11:05:08 24 7
bbc
With the roads empty and driving few mile will my car insurance go down!
Don't think so
80
08/04/2021 11:10:34 5 0
bbc
I got a rebate from Admiral (my insurers for 4 of my cars), but 5th was with a different insurer who didn't. But sums were £50 per car which was significant.
81
jas
08/04/2021 11:12:29 2 2
bbc
I wish I could afford an office like that, trust the good ole BBC to show how the rich survive...when will they think of the rest of us...oops they won't bit like the government
Removed
72
Ian
08/04/2021 11:04:10 3 0
bbc
The health and safety 'at work' legislation requires the employer to risk assess workplaces and ensure that employees are able to work in a safe environment with the correct (electrically PAT tested) equipment. How many 'wfh'ers have had their employer round to inspect their workplaces or even had to complete a risk assessment? Working on the kitchen table using a laptop is probably not allowed!
Removed
73
08/04/2021 11:04:36 1 5
bbc
Sorry what's the point of insurance?....very few have paid out under the virus showing their true colours of the industry
84
08/04/2021 11:15:12 1 0
bbc
So don't buy insurance then. Only a couple of types are compulsory. Just take the risk yourself.....but don't go moaning if you lose everything and don't have any insurance to help.
People don't realise but insurance allows people and business to go about their daily lives/work without the risk of losing everything. Everyone's lives would be very different (and worse) without insurance.
126
08/04/2021 11:59:14 1 0
bbc
Totally agree, although i do feel for those poor individuals that got flooded in Bath and Shrewsbury just to name a few places - however, some had payouts from the government subsidised by guess who.... the taxpayer AND insurance companies.. I buy it so that I don't take the risk... if you don't buy it and have an issue, blame yourself not the system or the insurers !!
77
08/04/2021 11:09:23 10 5
bbc
Interesting picture of rich persons office. Note hardly anything on the table as the richer you are the more work you delegate to someone else. I wonder if its my boss.
My table is covered in books, screens, logbooks, phones and loads of piles of paper documents in various states of disorder.
85
08/04/2021 11:12:13 3 2
bbc
Vulture Caps, don't actually work, get with the program.
76
08/04/2021 11:07:13 24 2
bbc
Mine did.
86
08/04/2021 11:17:25 4 0
bbc
Mine did also when I sacked my current provider..
72
Ian
08/04/2021 11:04:10 3 0
bbc
The health and safety 'at work' legislation requires the employer to risk assess workplaces and ensure that employees are able to work in a safe environment with the correct (electrically PAT tested) equipment. How many 'wfh'ers have had their employer round to inspect their workplaces or even had to complete a risk assessment? Working on the kitchen table using a laptop is probably not allowed!
87
08/04/2021 11:19:13 3 0
bbc
When you claim for your back injury because you've been working at the kitchen table for 6 months & eyesight worsens from looking at a tiny screen for 6 months - then see when your insurer steps up & pays. They have to asses your work environment to see if it's safe - as your employer is liable for the consequences. It's the next claim for lawyers to will jump on now PPI insurance is behind us.
88
08/04/2021 11:20:51 14 2
bbc
Nasty trip wire in that picture, and even more if you use the power sockets half way up the wall to a desk in the middle of the room.
93
AJ
08/04/2021 11:26:14 10 2
bbc
Also, he might find he's more productive if he upgrades that book to a laptop, or something...
66
08/04/2021 10:51:28 18 0
bbc
Spot on.
89
08/04/2021 11:21:32 3 1
bbc
Exactly - also the increased costs that you will incur, lighting, heating, paper, printer consumables, paper, wifi, internet, etc etc. Will your employer provide them? (as well as those they're already providing in their offices for employees that don't/cant wfh?
179
08/04/2021 12:48:31 4 1
bbc
Possibly offset by the money you're saving by not having to commute?
72
Ian
08/04/2021 11:04:10 3 0
bbc
The health and safety 'at work' legislation requires the employer to risk assess workplaces and ensure that employees are able to work in a safe environment with the correct (electrically PAT tested) equipment. How many 'wfh'ers have had their employer round to inspect their workplaces or even had to complete a risk assessment? Working on the kitchen table using a laptop is probably not allowed!
90
08/04/2021 11:22:38 3 0
bbc
It's also possible for employers to provide staff with the means to risk assess their own workplaces. Honestly home visits really aren't necessary.
212
08/04/2021 13:36:06 2 0
bbc
Can of worms. You use an extension lead to power your laptop on dining table. Trip Hazard! Young children around, downright dangerous. Neither would be allowed in an office, even if your dog were sometimes allowed at your desk. And don't start me on data security risks while flatmate reads screen over your shoulder.
58
08/04/2021 10:42:58 3 1
bbc
They'll be lots of tricks like this that Gov, insurers, et al will try to pull. I'm waiting for the first Gov to try and put Capital Gains Tax or some such other tax on the portion of the sale of your house that you advertise as or call the office.
91
08/04/2021 11:23:16 1 0
bbc
Stop giving them daft ideas!
60
08/04/2021 10:46:19 11 0
bbc
A house fire could cost you hundreds of thousands in building and contents.
92
08/04/2021 11:24:32 4 0
bbc
My insurer insists I have insurance - yours will to. Be careful when you ask them for confirmation though as they could be annoyed when you say "I've got a mortgage with you but my house is not insured, are you ok with that?" Don't forget - your house is actually their house whilst you're paying off a mortgage. If it burns down due to your dodgey wfh printer - they'll want their money back.
263
08/04/2021 15:54:40 2 0
bbc
It’s not the lenders house if they have a mortgage (charge) on it. The house belongs to you if you are a freeholder. They have a charge on it to protect the money they have lent you, but you are “the proprietor” according to the Land Registry not the building society.
88
08/04/2021 11:20:51 14 2
bbc
Nasty trip wire in that picture, and even more if you use the power sockets half way up the wall to a desk in the middle of the room.
93
AJ
08/04/2021 11:26:14 10 2
bbc
Also, he might find he's more productive if he upgrades that book to a laptop, or something...
94
08/04/2021 11:26:37 4 7
bbc
A nice BBC article trying to scare people not to work from home. The Cat is out of the Bag now.
98
08/04/2021 11:32:00 8 3
bbc
Hardly ... if you fail to inform your home insurance provider you may find your home insurance invalidated.

I started working from home over 6 years ago and found my original home insurance didn't cover home working. I had to shop around to find a suitable policy.

This is an informative article not a scare story to help people avoid invalidating their current insurance.
67
08/04/2021 10:52:36 5 4
bbc
No, they are reporting the facts. What is it that you don't like about the truth? Could it be that you are a Brexit Supporter and as there hasn't been any good news you take every opportunity to have a pop at the BBC? If you don't like the content then go to Telegraph or other right wing site to get the news that you want to read.
95
08/04/2021 11:26:41 1 0
bbc
Nope. I proudly voted Remain.

And I vote Labour.

So why are you attacking me ?

Why are you getting personal ?

Why are you so angry ?
197
08/04/2021 13:08:08 1 0
bbc
* tumbleweed *
Sorry but I suggest you are being minimal in the correct information field. Removed
96
Ben
08/04/2021 11:30:00 1 1
bbc
Given more and more people live in flats anyway, I don't see this being that big of a problem.
74
08/04/2021 11:05:08 24 7
bbc
With the roads empty and driving few mile will my car insurance go down!
Don't think so
97
08/04/2021 11:30:08 4 0
bbc
Yes. Change insurer if it doesn't.
94
08/04/2021 11:26:37 4 7
bbc
A nice BBC article trying to scare people not to work from home. The Cat is out of the Bag now.
98
08/04/2021 11:32:00 8 3
bbc
Hardly ... if you fail to inform your home insurance provider you may find your home insurance invalidated.

I started working from home over 6 years ago and found my original home insurance didn't cover home working. I had to shop around to find a suitable policy.

This is an informative article not a scare story to help people avoid invalidating their current insurance.
99
08/04/2021 11:32:59 0 4
bbc
I would love that posh home office / shed ... a real mans cave
74
08/04/2021 11:05:08 24 7
bbc
With the roads empty and driving few mile will my car insurance go down!
Don't think so
100
08/04/2021 11:34:00 1 0
bbc
mine went down, had to ask them though!