Deliveroo shares rise on first full trading day as some riders go on strike
07/04/2021 | news | business | 474
Wednesday is the first day of trading for 70,000 retail investors, as 400 UK riders are expected to stage a strike.
1
07/04/2021 10:12:16 268 14
bbc
How can a bunch of bicycles and mopeds being driven by people below minimum wage be worth billions? The gig economy has us all racing to the bottom.
7
jon
07/04/2021 10:16:35 43 80
bbc
When furlough end in October and the redundancies kick in, there will be plenty of people looking for flexible jobs in the gig economy.
15
07/04/2021 10:19:43 8 1
bbc
Same argument for poundland, just a massive scale
63
07/04/2021 10:39:31 9 1
bbc
Their recognisable name and their online platform are their main assets. The latter can be copied pretty closely, so they don’t have much to go on. But then again Uber seem to have done quite well.
113
07/04/2021 11:03:53 6 0
bbc
Progress!

This is no different to people now spending thousands on a digital ownership of something that doesn't exist.

Some people clearly have more money than sense but see this as a way of investment to make money.
140
07/04/2021 11:16:42 4 9
bbc
Because its got contracts with a large number of organisations to provide a service, and a proven track record of generating a profit.

Of course this profit comes at the expense of some workers who probably value fair wages and benefits over "flexibility", but that's another story.
153
07/04/2021 11:21:57 10 2
bbc
It seems they are banking on the idea of "dark kitchens" i.e delivery only "restaurants". I was always told not to invest in things I don't understand - as I don't buy luke warm over priced mediocre food I'm out. I think though food boxes such as "mindful chef" may be a better bet for affluent people too dim or lazy to google recipies and go shopping.
162
07/04/2021 11:23:42 0 4
bbc
nope: people just need to work harder and be more inteligent.
165
07/04/2021 11:24:25 0 6
bbc
It makes money.
220
07/04/2021 11:42:49 2 0
bbc
There is an increasing disconnect (for many companies) between the inflated share value due to a scrabble to buy and make a quick buck and the real share value of the company. Deliveroo has so far only delivered losses so what is it really worth?
234
07/04/2021 11:47:11 0 0
bbc
Because analysts are made from a bunch of young MBAs and their greedy bosses like we have seen in Credit Suiss this weak....
266
07/04/2021 11:58:06 3 0
bbc
Welcome to the world of stock trading my friend. You've learnt your first lesson. Stock prices are not relevant to a companies profit/success. The stock markets are not relevant to the economy. Its a casino for rich folk.
416
07/04/2021 15:26:04 1 0
bbc
Not so much the gig economy as people demanding "cheap". As for the company, I just don't get it. It's a taxi for foods. That's it.
2
07/04/2021 10:12:58 182 10
bbc
People have basically been confined to the four walls of their homes for the last 12 months yet in this time this fast food home delivery company has made losses of £224m.

If you think is a sound long-term investment you've lost your mind.
4
07/04/2021 10:14:49 17 80
bbc
Ever heard of Amazon?
21
07/04/2021 10:23:11 16 6
bbc
Bit of a simplification. The gross profit for 2020 was £357.5m. They're only losing money because they're investing in expanding and the net loss was significantly down on the previous year with overall revenue significantly up and those figures would not include the current lockdown.
393
07/04/2021 13:36:49 1 0
bbc
Do you think all those that have had their weekly shop delivered for the first time during lockdown are now all going to get back in their cars and lose a morning of their weekend to walk around a crowded supermarket again? Some will; many won’t.

There are plenty of cash rich, time poor out there. And that’s before we include the lazy...??
3
07/04/2021 10:14:39 3 2
bbc
Crazy to jump on this bandwagon
2
07/04/2021 10:12:58 182 10
bbc
People have basically been confined to the four walls of their homes for the last 12 months yet in this time this fast food home delivery company has made losses of £224m.

If you think is a sound long-term investment you've lost your mind.
4
07/04/2021 10:14:49 17 80
bbc
Ever heard of Amazon?
11
07/04/2021 10:17:30 26 8
bbc
Most of Amazon profitability comes from Amazon Web Services, not the retail side......
16
07/04/2021 10:20:16 29 2
bbc
Deliveroo didn't generate 13.7 billion worth of revenue last time I checked... nor does it make a profit.

In fact it literally makes a loss on every delivery it, er, delivers.
72
07/04/2021 10:43:58 26 6
bbc
Of course I have heard of Amazon, the company that made no profit for many years but unlike Deliveroo has invested wisely in assets, has a world wide brand and vast array of products and services on offer. Only a fool would compare Deliveroo with Amazon.
219
07/04/2021 11:42:43 3 1
bbc
Yes and Deliveroo is nothing like that business model but has been around nearly as long and keeps losing money!..Not making 40bn in the first 3 months of lockdown!
274
07/04/2021 11:59:46 2 0
bbc
Amazon have half a billion invested in Deliveroo...
410
07/04/2021 14:37:14 2 0
bbc
"Ever heard of Amazon?"

Yes Amazon who during the same period reported turnover up 38% and profits up 84%, the point is that Deliveroo has had a fantastically positive environment for the last year (restaurants all closed for 6 of the last 12 months) and still made a loss.
455
LH
07/04/2021 21:10:17 0 0
bbc
Yep! It's a River in South America!!
Next!!!!!!
5
07/04/2021 10:15:57 66 6
bbc
April 2022. Deliverwho?
32
07/04/2021 10:29:04 12 5
bbc
That is *SO* funny!
6
07/04/2021 10:16:05 12 3
bbc
The only time I used deliveroo they tried to charge me more for delivery than the actual food, even though it was coming about from 1/2km away. I won't be using them again. This increase in takeaway consumption isn't a good thing, it's vastly unhealthy and all these cheap mopeds driving around can't be good for the environment.
18
07/04/2021 10:21:22 12 4
bbc
But you were happy to use them and only put off due to the delivery fee? ??
23
07/04/2021 10:23:44 12 1
bbc
from 500m away! get off your backside and walk!
1
07/04/2021 10:12:16 268 14
bbc
How can a bunch of bicycles and mopeds being driven by people below minimum wage be worth billions? The gig economy has us all racing to the bottom.
7
jon
07/04/2021 10:16:35 43 80
bbc
When furlough end in October and the redundancies kick in, there will be plenty of people looking for flexible jobs in the gig economy.
54
07/04/2021 10:22:54 5 0
bbc
But nobody sitting at home eating pizza.
128
07/04/2021 11:12:37 21 1
bbc
You mean there'll be lots of desperate people ripe for exploiting?

Yeah, brilliant.
129
07/04/2021 11:13:42 8 0
bbc
Nope, because they'll be no money to buy crap food delivered to your door
167
07/04/2021 11:25:19 2 5
bbc
I don't believe that many people are still on furlough. I can't see what companies or industries would have made it this far without going under. Most of us were made redundant last Sept/Oct. Anyone still trapped on furlough would be better off walking away now and getting a new job, take your power back like I did.
230
07/04/2021 11:45:56 0 0
bbc
They will not be looking for jobs in the euphemistically named gig economy, it is what will be available.
285
xlr
07/04/2021 12:05:10 0 0
bbc
Yes, but mostly employers.
435
07/04/2021 16:17:45 0 0
bbc
too bad for anybody looking for a gig job now the tories have opened the floodgates from india now so now you are competing against people who will work for 50p an hour. but like boris says greed and capitalism are good.
8
07/04/2021 10:16:56 8 1
bbc
I mean almost a quarter of their shares have been sucked up by underwriters. I suppose it's nice for them that someone out there actually agreed to underwrite any unforseen loss in expected share price, but it's hardly encouraging.

On the flip side most retail investors are certified lunatics, so they'll probably raise the share price through the roof.
28
07/04/2021 10:27:53 5 0
bbc
"most retail investors are certified lunatics"
At least they're human beings. Most corporate investment is done by algorithm, while the shysters pick up humungous bonuses for gambling.
Yes, I'm generalising. But so were you.
9
07/04/2021 10:17:00 189 4
bbc
If you don't like the company, don't use it. Most takeaways have lower prices if you call direct or get off your ample bottom and go and pick it up...
131
07/04/2021 11:14:23 10 87
bbc
Tech company are struggling in brexit britain.
134
07/04/2021 11:15:32 14 6
bbc
You'd say the same thing to Amazon workers, Uber drivers, warehouse workers, parcel delivery drivers, and where do you want them to work?
They've the right to protest and make changes so other people will benefit in the future!
172
07/04/2021 11:27:51 6 0
bbc
And they don't have to give Deliveroo etc. an obscene % of the sale.
173
DrR
07/04/2021 11:28:15 18 1
bbc
Exactly, it's a question of choice.

It has all gone very wrong for Deliveroo, if they can't make a profit in lockdown and paying peanuts to workers then their future is not very good.
454
LH
07/04/2021 21:09:17 0 0
bbc
... or do your OWN cooking!!!
10
Ads
07/04/2021 10:17:03 25 3
bbc
Shares will crash in a couple of months when everyone can get out
432
jay
07/04/2021 15:59:36 3 3
bbc
People can get out today, share price went up. Lucky you dont invest for a living.
4
07/04/2021 10:14:49 17 80
bbc
Ever heard of Amazon?
11
07/04/2021 10:17:30 26 8
bbc
Most of Amazon profitability comes from Amazon Web Services, not the retail side......
12
07/04/2021 10:17:30 17 0
bbc
I wonder how many have shorted Deliveroo?
17
07/04/2021 10:21:18 11 8
bbc
Dangerous game; shorting still assumes that the business won't go completely bust! ??
13
07/04/2021 10:17:52 11 5
bbc
Solidarity with the riders.
14
07/04/2021 10:19:26 105 5
bbc
'Investment bank Goldman Sachs, which was an adviser to Deliveroo and was responsible for stabilising the share price, had to buy about £75m worth of Deliveroo shares to support the share price in the first few days'

Yet those responsible for will STILL qualify for gigantic life changing bonuses.

A fool and his money etc.
30
07/04/2021 10:28:06 30 7
bbc
This is a short selling kick back for both Goldman and Deliveroo who will split the money made through this "insurance policy"
40
07/04/2021 10:32:06 5 5
bbc
The problem is that these multi million pound bonuses are not life changing for the bankers involved. Their 'coining it in' is endemic (and encouraged by the Tories) and has caused many companies to be privatised with massive losses to the public - whether from lack of future profit or lack of future services.
1
07/04/2021 10:12:16 268 14
bbc
How can a bunch of bicycles and mopeds being driven by people below minimum wage be worth billions? The gig economy has us all racing to the bottom.
15
07/04/2021 10:19:43 8 1
bbc
Same argument for poundland, just a massive scale
34
07/04/2021 10:30:48 20 0
bbc
At least poundland has some assets: Deliveroo just has a few insulated plastic bags.
4
07/04/2021 10:14:49 17 80
bbc
Ever heard of Amazon?
16
07/04/2021 10:20:16 29 2
bbc
Deliveroo didn't generate 13.7 billion worth of revenue last time I checked... nor does it make a profit.

In fact it literally makes a loss on every delivery it, er, delivers.
12
07/04/2021 10:17:30 17 0
bbc
I wonder how many have shorted Deliveroo?
17
07/04/2021 10:21:18 11 8
bbc
Dangerous game; shorting still assumes that the business won't go completely bust! ??
212
07/04/2021 11:35:42 4 0
bbc
Shorting a company that goes bankrupt means that you'll never have to buy back the shares that you've borrowed. Basically it's like winning the lottery for the short seller.
244
07/04/2021 11:37:15 0 0
bbc
j
6
07/04/2021 10:16:05 12 3
bbc
The only time I used deliveroo they tried to charge me more for delivery than the actual food, even though it was coming about from 1/2km away. I won't be using them again. This increase in takeaway consumption isn't a good thing, it's vastly unhealthy and all these cheap mopeds driving around can't be good for the environment.
18
07/04/2021 10:21:22 12 4
bbc
But you were happy to use them and only put off due to the delivery fee? ??
41
07/04/2021 10:32:10 5 0
bbc
I had no choice. I was in a hotel during lock down
19
07/04/2021 10:21:58 163 10
bbc
What is going on where the nation has turned into a bunch of idle fat slobs who have to be fed garbage by someone on a pushbike? Give me strength..
73
07/04/2021 10:44:50 77 3
bbc
So often do we follow American trends, this is just another example of such.
85
07/04/2021 10:51:19 14 9
bbc
Hi Scooter. There was this thing called a coronavirus pandemic or something like that. Kept people housebound for months. It's been quite bad really. I think that's what's been going on so that takeaway sales have increased.
86
07/04/2021 10:52:27 19 1
bbc
Deliveroo don't just deliver takeaways, but groceries as well from local stores such as One-Stop, Co-Op, etc. At a time when I had to stay at home, supermarket delivery slots were like gold dust, and required a minimum spend of £40, this option for buying basic groceries like bread, milk, eggs, etc was a valuable lifeline. Not everyone who uses Deliveroo is an "idle fat slob"!
320
07/04/2021 12:18:00 4 1
bbc
I think the real problem is that the nation has too many opinionated and ill informed curmudgeons. Everyone who orders from Deliveroo is a fat idea slob? Everything from Deliveroo is garbage? "Pushbike" !? What decade is it where you are? This weekend I ordered 2 takeaways. I also cycled 50 miles, played tennis and swam 3km. I also cooked for friends. What did you do fatso?
321
07/04/2021 12:19:22 1 1
bbc
And, of course they do provide a useful service...

They give smug bleeps like you another reason to look down on people who make different choices to them.

At least, I expect -you- think that is useful!
464
08/04/2021 06:36:50 0 0
bbc
Never had a takeaway then chap?
20
07/04/2021 10:22:01 19 8
bbc
Good to hear the employees sticking up for themselves. Hopefully equally abhorrent slave labour style businesses like Amazon, who treat people like disposable waste, will be next in line. Be good to see their workforce unionised & be able to negotiate themselves the most of basic of employment rights they are currently denied.
88
07/04/2021 10:54:12 13 1
bbc
Amazon are great employers. I've seen their expensive propaganda, sorry, public information films, sorry, adverts.
2
07/04/2021 10:12:58 182 10
bbc
People have basically been confined to the four walls of their homes for the last 12 months yet in this time this fast food home delivery company has made losses of £224m.

If you think is a sound long-term investment you've lost your mind.
21
07/04/2021 10:23:11 16 6
bbc
Bit of a simplification. The gross profit for 2020 was £357.5m. They're only losing money because they're investing in expanding and the net loss was significantly down on the previous year with overall revenue significantly up and those figures would not include the current lockdown.
179
DrR
07/04/2021 11:30:27 10 2
bbc
Expanding in what? The drivers aren't members of staff, the probably don't own the bikes, a website and some insulated bags, that is about it.
22
Leo
07/04/2021 10:23:11 5 6
bbc
I avoid these food delivery services. Why? With just an O Level in Human and Social Biology it would seem clear to myself that there must be real health issues in cooked food being delivered in this way. That's before we even get to issues around possible Covid transmission.

But if you work for them accept their terms or work elsewhere. Surely that's the view we all take with our job.
6
07/04/2021 10:16:05 12 3
bbc
The only time I used deliveroo they tried to charge me more for delivery than the actual food, even though it was coming about from 1/2km away. I won't be using them again. This increase in takeaway consumption isn't a good thing, it's vastly unhealthy and all these cheap mopeds driving around can't be good for the environment.
23
07/04/2021 10:23:44 12 1
bbc
from 500m away! get off your backside and walk!
45
07/04/2021 10:32:47 4 0
bbc
I had just come out of hospital
24
07/04/2021 10:23:53 5 10
bbc
Are these self-employed riders striking against themselves?
25
rob
07/04/2021 10:25:07 35 4
bbc
Muppets, shares in a company that hasn't and won't make profit, in an over crowded market with more joining. No USP.. Worthless business model... Restaurants open again will mean demand will fall rather than climb.
60
07/04/2021 10:27:53 7 3
bbc
Ocado made no money for donkeys years
137
07/04/2021 11:16:30 2 3
bbc
People that use Deliveroo aren't doing so because restaurants are shut, it's because they want it brought to them without leaving the house, that's not suddenly going to change with the opening up.
26
07/04/2021 10:27:12 59 4
bbc
How can a food delivery company that manages to loose money even though it uses gig workers, during lockdown conditions have any value at all? Imagine what will happen if things go back to normal, pandemic wise, and they are forced to pay benefits.
430
jay
07/04/2021 15:57:55 4 4
bbc
Your knowledge of the stock market is appalling its all about future profits.
How about ITM power worth £2.5 Billion makes a loss however it makes hydrogen electrolyzers. Profits are what happens in the future just like Facebook all those that said it would never make money have been proven wrong. Educate yourself a little on business before you post about it.
27
07/04/2021 10:27:40 5 1
bbc
‘The firm employs 50,000 riders’.

is what the strike is about. not being employed, only hired on the cheap.
144
07/04/2021 11:19:14 4 0
bbc
If they don't like the self employed status and the income they make I'm surprised they don't decide to work somewhere else.
8
07/04/2021 10:16:56 8 1
bbc
I mean almost a quarter of their shares have been sucked up by underwriters. I suppose it's nice for them that someone out there actually agreed to underwrite any unforseen loss in expected share price, but it's hardly encouraging.

On the flip side most retail investors are certified lunatics, so they'll probably raise the share price through the roof.
28
07/04/2021 10:27:53 5 0
bbc
"most retail investors are certified lunatics"
At least they're human beings. Most corporate investment is done by algorithm, while the shysters pick up humungous bonuses for gambling.
Yes, I'm generalising. But so were you.
29
07/04/2021 10:28:00 6 12
bbc
Just under 6 million people have suffered from food insecurity already this year and we now have more food banks than McDonalds. This is driven by zero hours contracts in the ‘gig’ economy. This government’s ‘greed is good’ mantra benefits the few and means children go to bed hungry. The very existence of sharks like this company is a national disgrace
69
07/04/2021 10:41:38 2 0
bbc
You reduce food insecurity by cooking your own food not by paying a premium to have expensive food delivered
14
07/04/2021 10:19:26 105 5
bbc
'Investment bank Goldman Sachs, which was an adviser to Deliveroo and was responsible for stabilising the share price, had to buy about £75m worth of Deliveroo shares to support the share price in the first few days'

Yet those responsible for will STILL qualify for gigantic life changing bonuses.

A fool and his money etc.
30
07/04/2021 10:28:06 30 7
bbc
This is a short selling kick back for both Goldman and Deliveroo who will split the money made through this "insurance policy"
115
07/04/2021 11:04:32 6 1
bbc
Do you even know what short selling is.
279
PH2
07/04/2021 12:02:05 4 0
bbc
Goldman aren't shorting it, they are the advisor in the IPO.

Do you even know what shorting is?

Hint, it's not buying up lots of stock to stabilise the price.
31
07/04/2021 10:28:32 17 1
bbc
I have issues with this company and their drivers who flout the highway code, park illegally and then the company charge a premium to deliver cold junk food. And on top of that you pay a premium for the service. I dont use it and never will hope goes dpwn the pan
37
07/04/2021 10:31:42 11 3
bbc
Yeah their drivers don't understand the idea of a road and how to use it, they seem to assume its a flat desert plain with no rules or road markings.
5
07/04/2021 10:15:57 66 6
bbc
April 2022. Deliverwho?
32
07/04/2021 10:29:04 12 5
bbc
That is *SO* funny!
292
07/04/2021 12:00:59 0 1
bbc
Your reply is *SO* witty!
33
07/04/2021 10:29:45 9 2
bbc
There are too many obese people in this country. Giving them the ability to speed dial fast food from their couch is such a stupid idea.
15
07/04/2021 10:19:43 8 1
bbc
Same argument for poundland, just a massive scale
34
07/04/2021 10:30:48 20 0
bbc
At least poundland has some assets: Deliveroo just has a few insulated plastic bags.
35
07/04/2021 10:31:28 139 4
bbc
Odd that some people are banging on about blood clots, but are prepared to eat a triple cheese burger...
287
07/04/2021 11:59:34 18 1
bbc
I had my jab at a health centre that was located next to a fast food place, which had a queue of cars collecting orders, I opted to sit outside instead of inside for 15 minutes after the jab, I wish I hadn't, the stench from that fast food place was terrible.
305
xlr
07/04/2021 12:10:33 11 0
bbc
And 33 people a month in the UK choke to death on food, statistically speaking, making eating a much riskier activity than being vaccinated.
36
rob
07/04/2021 10:31:29 1 2
bbc
Crypto is where the money is going, not on these daft business models. 12 years and no profit, based on people just getting Fat isn't where people should invest.

The Top 50 Crypto coins have all done 300% in the last year...some even more when the likes of Mr Musk drops a tweet.
31
07/04/2021 10:28:32 17 1
bbc
I have issues with this company and their drivers who flout the highway code, park illegally and then the company charge a premium to deliver cold junk food. And on top of that you pay a premium for the service. I dont use it and never will hope goes dpwn the pan
37
07/04/2021 10:31:42 11 3
bbc
Yeah their drivers don't understand the idea of a road and how to use it, they seem to assume its a flat desert plain with no rules or road markings.
66
07/04/2021 10:35:38 5 1
bbc
Bit like cyclists then eh...
38
07/04/2021 10:31:45 1 2
bbc
A lot of people can be guilty of comfort eating but covid and fast food delivery has taken it to another level in the last 12 months.
Time to start finding real jobs for these delivery people.
39
07/04/2021 10:31:59 1 1
bbc
I wouldn't invest in a company with such low profit margins. If Deliveroo had floated at the start of the pandemic, it would've been worth it for the capital gain. Not a good investment for me. If someone wants to board the hype train, then fair enough.
47
07/04/2021 10:34:24 0 0
bbc
And how does a firm achieve greater profit margins?
127
07/04/2021 11:12:20 0 0
bbc
I bet you never invested in the likes of Amazon and have therefore missed out on massive gains
14
07/04/2021 10:19:26 105 5
bbc
'Investment bank Goldman Sachs, which was an adviser to Deliveroo and was responsible for stabilising the share price, had to buy about £75m worth of Deliveroo shares to support the share price in the first few days'

Yet those responsible for will STILL qualify for gigantic life changing bonuses.

A fool and his money etc.
40
07/04/2021 10:32:06 5 5
bbc
The problem is that these multi million pound bonuses are not life changing for the bankers involved. Their 'coining it in' is endemic (and encouraged by the Tories) and has caused many companies to be privatised with massive losses to the public - whether from lack of future profit or lack of future services.
228
07/04/2021 11:45:33 3 1
bbc
My company went private giving me 500 shares valued at about £2,000.
Unlike a lot of BT and British Gas privatization share holders, I kept mine getting dividends and growth to £38 per share.

That's £19,000 plus £600 a year in dividends.......... luvly jubbly!
424
07/04/2021 15:36:17 0 0
bbc
So they acted all responsibly during the Labour years?
18
07/04/2021 10:21:22 12 4
bbc
But you were happy to use them and only put off due to the delivery fee? ??
41
07/04/2021 10:32:10 5 0
bbc
I had no choice. I was in a hotel during lock down
42
07/04/2021 10:32:21 2 1
bbc
Good news for the nation's ailing health anyway.
43
07/04/2021 10:19:27 1 0
bbc
More financial 'expertise' to follow................................!!!

Shares rise and fall : they'll find their level in due course.
44
07/04/2021 10:20:45 1 0
bbc
Their shares were very low when first offered so 2% is negligible. I resisted the use of any of these food delivery services even before covidarona because of the poor terms & conditions.
23
07/04/2021 10:23:44 12 1
bbc
from 500m away! get off your backside and walk!
45
07/04/2021 10:32:47 4 0
bbc
I had just come out of hospital
46
07/04/2021 10:32:49 2 1
bbc
Want some useful advice?

If you know the takeaway you want to use, also offers deliveroo etc. Ring them direct and suggest if you don't use Deliveroo to order what you want, but have it delivered directly from the takeaway can they offer an incentive? Normally they will throw in a free side as its more profitable for them to do that, then loose 30% via Deliveroo
39
07/04/2021 10:31:59 1 1
bbc
I wouldn't invest in a company with such low profit margins. If Deliveroo had floated at the start of the pandemic, it would've been worth it for the capital gain. Not a good investment for me. If someone wants to board the hype train, then fair enough.
47
07/04/2021 10:34:24 0 0
bbc
And how does a firm achieve greater profit margins?
Laziness of people. Should be getting their takeaway from their local supplier by calling them directly or perhaps ....cooking from scratch. Eliminate the middleman. Why am I even writing this. I should be visiting you all telling you all this in person rather than using the middleman platform of BBC.
49
07/04/2021 10:36:19 66 3
bbc
If someone could tell me how a company with virtually no assets and doesn't make any profit can be worth (market capitalisation) about 50% of that of Tesco which made more than a billion pounds last year in profits, has huge assets and pays a good dividend to investors, then I will buy some shares in it.
139
07/04/2021 11:16:40 12 14
bbc
Expectation of future profits through brand management and market share.
150
07/04/2021 11:20:44 3 0
bbc
I think it took 10 years for Amazon to make its first profits. Eliminate the competition and get consumers to rely on them. Once you've got that just sit back and watch the cash tumble in. All with the assistance of minimum wage employees with little legal results.
202
07/04/2021 11:38:43 7 1
bbc
Down to good old Goldman Sachs over inflating it and touting it on the stockmarket for silly £
214
07/04/2021 11:41:44 3 1
bbc
I heard there's this company called WhatsApp with virtually no assets, doesn't make any profit and is worth billions. We live in a post-bricks-and-mortar world.
473
08/04/2021 17:43:38 0 0
bbc
Tesco’s market capitalisation is over £20 billion, Deliveroo is not currently worth anywhere near 50% of that.
50
07/04/2021 10:36:26 1 1
bbc
I used to find that McD's food was cold by the time it got to the drive through window. Would be completely inedible by the time it's spent 15 mins in a backpack on a bicycle!
51
07/04/2021 10:21:28 2 1
bbc
I blame the people who use them lazy people cook at home
52
07/04/2021 10:21:55 8 2
bbc
A company built on the idleness of fat pizza addicts.
53
07/04/2021 10:22:06 8 1
bbc
This country is full off lazy couch potatoes
7
jon
07/04/2021 10:16:35 43 80
bbc
When furlough end in October and the redundancies kick in, there will be plenty of people looking for flexible jobs in the gig economy.
54
07/04/2021 10:22:54 5 0
bbc
But nobody sitting at home eating pizza.
55
07/04/2021 10:24:20 0 3
bbc
Well, that's Deliveroo told then. All the boomers on here with their vast investment acumen couldn't possibly be wrong.

For all the couch investors here, there are tons of companies out there worth billions who have never made any profit.
56
07/04/2021 10:37:40 39 4
bbc
Those worried about conspiracies should take note of the exponential rise of the delivery rider/driver and their impact on society. Zero hours contracts, low pay, poor health and safety, untrained workforce and so on. This is the well off, exploiting the masses, big time. Meanwhile Royal Mail struggle to compete even though employees T&Cs are more appropriate to a civilised society.
70
07/04/2021 10:41:39 25 6
bbc
Really - Deliveroo are only serving millionaires who exploit the miserable masses on zero hours contracts? People have a choice - you don't have to pay Deliveroo. You could always cook yourself
82
07/04/2021 10:48:04 3 5
bbc
What a load of nonsense. Deliveroo took off because there is a rise in demand; Royal Mail is struggling because, you guess it, there is drop in demand. It's called basic economic principle.
57
07/04/2021 10:38:23 75 2
bbc
Food delivery pop ups have zero concern for their riders or customers. The riders will often work multiple companies making multiple pick-ups and drops, messing about restaurants by lying about arrival times so as not to appear late, carrying food for long times to delivery etc. Companies just want their cut and no responsibility. Stop using them - use local independents who deliver their own!
133
07/04/2021 11:14:53 6 9
bbc
When I contact my local curry house they seem surprised that anyone is contacting them direct and not really ready/prepared for it. The Middle Eastern restaurant told me they had no delivery staff and to use Justeat.
193
07/04/2021 11:36:02 4 0
bbc
"The riders will often work multiple companies making multiple pick-ups and drops" -- you mean almost like they're self-employed offering a delivery service?
400
07/04/2021 13:49:52 4 0
bbc
Or walk or drive there and pick it up yourself.
58
07/04/2021 10:38:33 5 0
bbc
Think I will invent an 'app' in the next few years that will allow hungry people to contact takeaways directly. It might just catch on.
90
07/04/2021 10:55:03 0 0
bbc
Either that or bring back the " Yellow Pages"
59
07/04/2021 10:38:34 28 1
bbc
The company I used to work for also has satisfaction surveys. I always lied and said how wonderful the company was until the last one when I told the truth
175
07/04/2021 11:28:57 12 0
bbc
similar - except I told the truth first time of asking - and was out the door the following week -
25
rob
07/04/2021 10:25:07 35 4
bbc
Muppets, shares in a company that hasn't and won't make profit, in an over crowded market with more joining. No USP.. Worthless business model... Restaurants open again will mean demand will fall rather than climb.
60
07/04/2021 10:27:53 7 3
bbc
Ocado made no money for donkeys years
61
07/04/2021 10:31:56 55 8
bbc
More free advertising for this company - every week there is a headline story about them, enough is enough BBC
251
07/04/2021 11:52:18 12 0
bbc
And Tesco, and Greggs, and Apple, and CyberPunk.
322
07/04/2021 12:19:39 2 0
bbc
That's right, BBC. Stop reporting news. Enough is enough.
409
07/04/2021 14:34:14 2 0
bbc
I agree. The BBC's headline is misleading by talking about the share price and the proposed strike in the same sentence, suggesting that the share price-hike is linked to the strike. They are entirely separate issues.
A bunch of easily replaceable riders who could barely speak any English going on strike...gosh they learn well from their British peers. Removed
1
07/04/2021 10:12:16 268 14
bbc
How can a bunch of bicycles and mopeds being driven by people below minimum wage be worth billions? The gig economy has us all racing to the bottom.
63
07/04/2021 10:39:31 9 1
bbc
Their recognisable name and their online platform are their main assets. The latter can be copied pretty closely, so they don’t have much to go on. But then again Uber seem to have done quite well.
100
07/04/2021 10:57:14 12 3
bbc
Uber at least offer a more competitive and responsive service vs traditional mini cab / back cab, hence why they have succeeded. In the case of these middle agents they do win on convenience, but charge a premium for a non premium service (late/cold food etc), and gorge the seller in the same breath...be surprised if most do not fold in 2 years
64
07/04/2021 10:39:46 13 3
bbc
In fairness to the riders. in order to make a wage, they seem to take their life in their hands on the roads, jumping red lights, going the wrong way up one way streets. riding at night without lights on their bikes. Or maybe they are just idiots with no regard for the rules of the roads. I will let you decide which it is. I have my own opinions
74
07/04/2021 10:45:00 8 0
bbc
......and driving their mopeds on the pavements putting others at risk too.
65
07/04/2021 10:39:49 7 6
bbc
This must go down as one of the most meaningless and in effectual "strikes" of all time .

Its basically means if you want some food from a take away you will have to get it yourself

My my what a terrible hardship that will be.
89
07/04/2021 10:55:00 0 0
bbc
Or the Take-Away will orchestrate their own delivery - as many do already.

Union "leader" berks shooting their members (and all the innocent non-members) in the foot - yet again.
37
07/04/2021 10:31:42 11 3
bbc
Yeah their drivers don't understand the idea of a road and how to use it, they seem to assume its a flat desert plain with no rules or road markings.
66
07/04/2021 10:35:38 5 1
bbc
Bit like cyclists then eh...
67
07/04/2021 10:40:39 29 1
bbc
Striking within days of becoming employees! Haha.
77
07/04/2021 10:46:05 6 3
bbc
The Delivery Drivers union will be being set up in days!
68
07/04/2021 10:40:57 13 1
bbc
Power to the people ?
29
07/04/2021 10:28:00 6 12
bbc
Just under 6 million people have suffered from food insecurity already this year and we now have more food banks than McDonalds. This is driven by zero hours contracts in the ‘gig’ economy. This government’s ‘greed is good’ mantra benefits the few and means children go to bed hungry. The very existence of sharks like this company is a national disgrace
69
07/04/2021 10:41:38 2 0
bbc
You reduce food insecurity by cooking your own food not by paying a premium to have expensive food delivered
56
07/04/2021 10:37:40 39 4
bbc
Those worried about conspiracies should take note of the exponential rise of the delivery rider/driver and their impact on society. Zero hours contracts, low pay, poor health and safety, untrained workforce and so on. This is the well off, exploiting the masses, big time. Meanwhile Royal Mail struggle to compete even though employees T&Cs are more appropriate to a civilised society.
70
07/04/2021 10:41:39 25 6
bbc
Really - Deliveroo are only serving millionaires who exploit the miserable masses on zero hours contracts? People have a choice - you don't have to pay Deliveroo. You could always cook yourself
105
07/04/2021 10:59:10 6 3
bbc
"Deliveroo are only serving millionaires"

Funny, I thought these "millionaires" are the least likely to buy from KFC, MacDs and other junk food.

In contrast, its not much of a business case by excluding the vast majority of the public who want a take-away - especially in light of recent events.

Oh - sorry, I see, you were just having a pointless and clearly deluded "anti-capitalist" rant.
71
07/04/2021 10:41:49 109 9
bbc
Never used them and hopefully never will; wonder why there are so many fat people in the Uk - they need to get in their kitchen and cook a meal.
79
07/04/2021 10:46:57 42 3
bbc
Spot on jonbj ?
103
07/04/2021 10:46:47 6 1
bbc
Delivery vans of full of utter crap congregate, not at tea-time but just in time for utter crap soaps on TV. ---------Connection?
160
07/04/2021 11:23:13 9 8
bbc
Blaming Deliveroo for obesity??? Guess you've never seen fat people in a supermarket buying food or out for meal in a restaurant then?
Deliveroo account for <10% of take away food deliveries in the UK, but don't let the facts spoil your rant.
426
07/04/2021 15:37:47 0 1
bbc
I'm guessing the down votes had people to press the keyboard for them?
436
07/04/2021 16:22:48 2 0
bbc
Deliveroo don't make people fat, eating too much does that.
4
07/04/2021 10:14:49 17 80
bbc
Ever heard of Amazon?
72
07/04/2021 10:43:58 26 6
bbc
Of course I have heard of Amazon, the company that made no profit for many years but unlike Deliveroo has invested wisely in assets, has a world wide brand and vast array of products and services on offer. Only a fool would compare Deliveroo with Amazon.
83
07/04/2021 10:49:26 24 9
bbc
You literally just compared Amazon with Deliveroo.
122
07/04/2021 11:08:51 2 8
bbc
Assets aren't just rented warehouses and leased vans - "goodwill" and brand is a huge asset, as is the website and it's SEO.
19
07/04/2021 10:21:58 163 10
bbc
What is going on where the nation has turned into a bunch of idle fat slobs who have to be fed garbage by someone on a pushbike? Give me strength..
73
07/04/2021 10:44:50 77 3
bbc
So often do we follow American trends, this is just another example of such.
124
07/04/2021 11:09:36 5 0
bbc
Americans mostly don't deliver by bike - they drive.
275
07/04/2021 11:59:57 1 0
bbc
Very very true unfortunately
344
07/04/2021 12:28:30 1 0
bbc
I live in North America and until the last 5 years most takeaways employed their own delivery service, very few, if any, restaurant's did delivery. I never came across the concept until I came over to the UK that I started to notice al of the bikes and scooters bombing around the streets of Newcastle. There was nothing like that in North America, in this case we have copied of Europe and the UK
64
07/04/2021 10:39:46 13 3
bbc
In fairness to the riders. in order to make a wage, they seem to take their life in their hands on the roads, jumping red lights, going the wrong way up one way streets. riding at night without lights on their bikes. Or maybe they are just idiots with no regard for the rules of the roads. I will let you decide which it is. I have my own opinions
74
07/04/2021 10:45:00 8 0
bbc
......and driving their mopeds on the pavements putting others at risk too.
75
07/04/2021 10:45:34 10 0
bbc
Going on strike from a job offering a service that was a service already offered by 90% of the takeaway businesses and will continue to do so- strike or not- will help Deliveroo realise what a futile offering it is.
76
07/04/2021 10:45:51 5 0
bbc
I have seen deliveroo 'riders' in our town. Most are in cars! Its very hillly! A joke of a job so not surprised the value is dodgy which enriches a couple of people.
108
07/04/2021 11:01:42 6 0
bbc
At least they are in cars which presumably they have a licence to drive. Most in our area use mopeds on L plates. They would never be able to pass a test with the way they ride. I think nobody on these types of jobs should be delivering on a provisional licence.
67
07/04/2021 10:40:39 29 1
bbc
Striking within days of becoming employees! Haha.
77
07/04/2021 10:46:05 6 3
bbc
The Delivery Drivers union will be being set up in days!
78
PJT
07/04/2021 10:46:33 2 2
bbc
Many of the younger riders are not aware of the realities of the gig economy. The fact that riders for Deliveroo, like Uber are likely to be classes as employees is irrelevant. Teaching in schools, colleges and University tend to side against Unions despite being crucial in a fair employment system and how eroded their rights are especially, Holiday, Pension etc...
71
07/04/2021 10:41:49 109 9
bbc
Never used them and hopefully never will; wonder why there are so many fat people in the Uk - they need to get in their kitchen and cook a meal.
79
07/04/2021 10:46:57 42 3
bbc
Spot on jonbj ?
80
07/04/2021 10:47:11 0 3
bbc
its called HELLO FRESH a weeks food stuffed in a box will fridays realy be fresh YES
97
07/04/2021 10:56:50 1 0
bbc
What?
81
07/04/2021 10:47:32 5 4
bbc
Deliveroo are the epitome of how modern and lazy capitalism operates, with no morals and as little responsibility as possible, whilst having an absurd value for some.

Shareholder prerogative has killed employee and customer satisfaction.
56
07/04/2021 10:37:40 39 4
bbc
Those worried about conspiracies should take note of the exponential rise of the delivery rider/driver and their impact on society. Zero hours contracts, low pay, poor health and safety, untrained workforce and so on. This is the well off, exploiting the masses, big time. Meanwhile Royal Mail struggle to compete even though employees T&Cs are more appropriate to a civilised society.
82
07/04/2021 10:48:04 3 5
bbc
What a load of nonsense. Deliveroo took off because there is a rise in demand; Royal Mail is struggling because, you guess it, there is drop in demand. It's called basic economic principle.
107
07/04/2021 11:01:17 2 1
bbc
A short-term (temporary) rise in Demand because of Covid for expensive Deliveroo and a long-term rise in Royal Mail because of a change in shopping patterns and increased online ordering - which would you back, its basic economics...
72
07/04/2021 10:43:58 26 6
bbc
Of course I have heard of Amazon, the company that made no profit for many years but unlike Deliveroo has invested wisely in assets, has a world wide brand and vast array of products and services on offer. Only a fool would compare Deliveroo with Amazon.
83
07/04/2021 10:49:26 24 9
bbc
You literally just compared Amazon with Deliveroo.
84
07/04/2021 10:49:36 4 1
bbc
Nice to know all is well in the Deliveroo community.

The fact that this business was touted as an internet company when it is but an app with a menu just indicates the degree by which it was puffed up by some merchant bankers.

Lots of business have apps these days. It is no big deal.
19
07/04/2021 10:21:58 163 10
bbc
What is going on where the nation has turned into a bunch of idle fat slobs who have to be fed garbage by someone on a pushbike? Give me strength..
85
07/04/2021 10:51:19 14 9
bbc
Hi Scooter. There was this thing called a coronavirus pandemic or something like that. Kept people housebound for months. It's been quite bad really. I think that's what's been going on so that takeaway sales have increased.
166
djf
07/04/2021 11:24:57 20 3
bbc
And at no point in the last year has it crossed my mind to get food(loose description), delivered by taxi or moped.
Feeding my family has been no more difficult than any previous time. Dont use Covid restrictions as an excuse for sloth.
386
Dee
07/04/2021 13:13:18 0 0
bbc
However, people can order food shopping online or go to the supermarkets & cook from scratch. They don’t have to order takeaways.
460
08/04/2021 01:55:35 0 1
bbc
hahahaha a great example of sarcasm being the lowest form of wit. Food shops have all remained open so your point is moot. Scooter is right, people are idle and fat. Nearly 60% of the adult population is overweight.
19
07/04/2021 10:21:58 163 10
bbc
What is going on where the nation has turned into a bunch of idle fat slobs who have to be fed garbage by someone on a pushbike? Give me strength..
86
07/04/2021 10:52:27 19 1
bbc
Deliveroo don't just deliver takeaways, but groceries as well from local stores such as One-Stop, Co-Op, etc. At a time when I had to stay at home, supermarket delivery slots were like gold dust, and required a minimum spend of £40, this option for buying basic groceries like bread, milk, eggs, etc was a valuable lifeline. Not everyone who uses Deliveroo is an "idle fat slob"!
271
07/04/2021 11:58:51 1 0
bbc
Amazon do Morrison's, Ocado deliver then too. Both of those are currently running at profit.
87
07/04/2021 10:53:17 5 1
bbc
As usual, exploiting your employees leads to massive profits.

It will continue until employees and consumers wise up... which they are conditioned by government and media not to do.
95
07/04/2021 10:56:17 3 0
bbc
Except it’s not made a profit. Just means big payouts for initial investors and the CEO.
20
07/04/2021 10:22:01 19 8
bbc
Good to hear the employees sticking up for themselves. Hopefully equally abhorrent slave labour style businesses like Amazon, who treat people like disposable waste, will be next in line. Be good to see their workforce unionised & be able to negotiate themselves the most of basic of employment rights they are currently denied.
88
07/04/2021 10:54:12 13 1
bbc
Amazon are great employers. I've seen their expensive propaganda, sorry, public information films, sorry, adverts.
65
07/04/2021 10:39:49 7 6
bbc
This must go down as one of the most meaningless and in effectual "strikes" of all time .

Its basically means if you want some food from a take away you will have to get it yourself

My my what a terrible hardship that will be.
89
07/04/2021 10:55:00 0 0
bbc
Or the Take-Away will orchestrate their own delivery - as many do already.

Union "leader" berks shooting their members (and all the innocent non-members) in the foot - yet again.
58
07/04/2021 10:38:33 5 0
bbc
Think I will invent an 'app' in the next few years that will allow hungry people to contact takeaways directly. It might just catch on.
90
07/04/2021 10:55:03 0 0
bbc
Either that or bring back the " Yellow Pages"
91
07/04/2021 10:55:09 1 1
bbc
What ever the merits or demerits, it employs thousands of young drivers who will not be able to find jobs. also no one goes to restaurants so it is good business for them a well,
92
07/04/2021 10:55:11 2 0
bbc
What a non-story BBC. Deliveroo share price bombs and barely recovers any ground. Why guve this abominable company free advertising!
116
07/04/2021 11:04:41 0 0
bbc
It only free advertising if you ascribe to the idea any publicity is good publicity.
93
07/04/2021 10:55:21 21 3
bbc
The gig economy is only ever going to benefit a handful of people and Deliveroo (like others) is akin to the plantation owners of yesteryear. One person at the top, raking it in, everybody else living like slaves.
142
07/04/2021 11:17:13 7 4
bbc
Yet more and more choose to be slaves?
209
07/04/2021 11:40:41 1 0
bbc
I saw a white delivery rider yesterday though
226
Soo
07/04/2021 11:44:31 2 0
bbc
Slavery was abolished a while back. And rightfully so, it turns out. Imagine, having to house and feed all of them slaves...
94
07/04/2021 10:55:24 5 0
bbc
The only people who did well out of this IPO were early days investors and the CEO, who has maintained hugely beneficial voting rights and secured a large payout.

There’s too much market competition, they’ll never get a better year to sell takeaway and yet it still made no money. Combine all this with the critical eye now on the gig economy and it’s not going to look pretty.
87
07/04/2021 10:53:17 5 1
bbc
As usual, exploiting your employees leads to massive profits.

It will continue until employees and consumers wise up... which they are conditioned by government and media not to do.
95
07/04/2021 10:56:17 3 0
bbc
Except it’s not made a profit. Just means big payouts for initial investors and the CEO.
96
07/04/2021 10:56:36 5 0
bbc
Maybe most but not all of these delivery guys could have a hyjean test whilst on strike...plus their delivery bags a clean out...yuk.
80
07/04/2021 10:47:11 0 3
bbc
its called HELLO FRESH a weeks food stuffed in a box will fridays realy be fresh YES
97
07/04/2021 10:56:50 1 0
bbc
What?
98
07/04/2021 10:50:29 6 0
bbc
We must not allow these type of companies to abuse employees.
99
07/04/2021 10:51:35 0 0
bbc
Surely this is another WeWork in the making
63
07/04/2021 10:39:31 9 1
bbc
Their recognisable name and their online platform are their main assets. The latter can be copied pretty closely, so they don’t have much to go on. But then again Uber seem to have done quite well.
100
07/04/2021 10:57:14 12 3
bbc
Uber at least offer a more competitive and responsive service vs traditional mini cab / back cab, hence why they have succeeded. In the case of these middle agents they do win on convenience, but charge a premium for a non premium service (late/cold food etc), and gorge the seller in the same breath...be surprised if most do not fold in 2 years