Peacocks stores back in business but only half will reopen
06/04/2021 | news | business | 346
Half the fashion chain's 400 stores will reopen, saving 2,000 jobs, but the rest are left behind.
1
06/04/2021 09:37:42 26 16
bbc
This is good news for employees.
2
06/04/2021 09:43:58 35 65
bbc
which will upset the usual anti-Working class / pseudo - socialist crowd here
1
06/04/2021 09:37:42 26 16
bbc
This is good news for employees.
2
06/04/2021 09:43:58 35 65
bbc
which will upset the usual anti-Working class / pseudo - socialist crowd here
27
06/04/2021 10:04:31 19 12
bbc
Right wing claptrap
113
06/04/2021 11:14:11 5 6
bbc
Nothing psuedo about it. Right back to Victorian times, very few avowed socialists have actually been part of the working class whose interests they manipulated and suborned. The actual working class are largely centrist - and too busy working.
161
06/04/2021 12:17:15 3 0
bbc
Yeah, why should the working classes have jobs with prospects and above minimum wage pay?
3
06/04/2021 09:45:56 51 16
bbc
Why bother, another average chain store selling tat made in Turkey. Although it's good for staff they will just go under again in another 6 months after even more assets are stripped from the business.
6
06/04/2021 09:54:59 26 19
bbc
Its a rinse repeat exercise

How many times have we borne witness to it
157
06/04/2021 12:14:56 1 0
bbc
The average uk population is poor. We couldn’t afford if made in uk.
4
06/04/2021 09:46:53 19 7
bbc
I only see this being a brief respite and some positive news for the employees at least.

Long term I see no value in the brand, so can only see it going the same way unless something wildly different is to happen with it.
7
06/04/2021 09:55:29 3 17
bbc
It could be the last one standing , though.
25
06/04/2021 10:17:22 1 1
bbc
Thanks for your specialist retail advice.
5
06/04/2021 09:52:58 279 24
bbc
The UK needs to move these lost retail jobs into quality manufacturing.

Importing cheap clothes and plastic is not sustainable.

Let's make the UK the world centre for technology and high value manufacturing.
8
06/04/2021 09:56:34 110 26
bbc
100 % the only viable option for our society to flourish.
14
Pip
06/04/2021 10:11:08 14 16
bbc
That the people who use Peacocks can't afford, mmmmm.........?
19
McQ
06/04/2021 10:15:18 37 2
bbc
So lets all do our bit then and not just buy the cheapest..... ask the question and be prepared to pay more for the same because its manufactured in the UK where costs are higher. IF we all support local manufacture then those costs can be driven down somewhat.....
22
06/04/2021 10:16:26 44 7
bbc
Capitalism demands the lowest cost producer, not some starry-eyed reimagining of our economy. People are in business to maximise their profit and will export manufacturing jobs instantly if they can make more doing so...ask James Dyson.
23
06/04/2021 10:16:26 23 20
bbc
Not without easy access to its biggest market it isn't.
32
06/04/2021 10:22:00 41 14
bbc
How about we start making rose tinted spectacles for fantasists..?
46
06/04/2021 10:29:47 25 12
bbc
Apart from all the materials will be shipped in from abroad and I bet you will struggle to find many people willing to work in manufacturing even if you paid a decent rate
55
06/04/2021 10:40:12 22 3
bbc
Great theory but who's going to buy this stuff? Low earners will still look for cheap imported tat because it's the best they can afford. It's a shame that everyone can't access quality goods but that's the way it is and even if many more could afford them they would still rather buy cheaper and spend the excess on something else. In our throwaway society it's quantity not quality that counts
58
06/04/2021 10:34:59 18 36
bbc
There are moves afoot for funding for various businesses. Things will change as we free ourselves from the shackles of the EU. Funding will be available to help UK businesses improve and expand.
66
06/04/2021 10:43:10 17 8
bbc
Because retail workers are skilled in high end manufacturing?
77
06/04/2021 10:51:23 29 9
bbc
Where you suggest the factories go? Would British people work in factories?

It's a pipedream. Get over it. Your dreams won't happen for real.
92
06/04/2021 10:56:17 10 6
bbc
Wishes and prayers to the sunny uplands unicorn.
116
06/04/2021 11:18:08 7 5
bbc
Yes, but added to that, wages need to be vastly improved. Sustainable production is more expensive and products are more expensive as a result. With wage value so depleted it's not economically viable, when you have major corporations able to keeps costs low, and wages low as a result. Wealth distribution needs correcting.
118
06/04/2021 11:18:42 1 1
bbc
If the price is right
130
06/04/2021 11:30:53 7 3
bbc
Good luck setting up your UK sweatshop to compete with cheaper imports.
132
06/04/2021 11:29:26 7 2
bbc
You're obviously NOT a businessman and have no idea how businesses and capitalism actually works, matey
133
06/04/2021 11:31:37 6 6
bbc
I completely agree. Our first priority should be self sustainability on food and goods. Back to the old days of Harold Wilson "I'm backing Britain". The EU is putting non tariff barriers and the French in particular being over meticulous in applying the rules. We have an open door that needs closing, eg horse meat in the burgers was not prevented. Brexit was never going to be that easy.
135
06/04/2021 11:40:54 10 4
bbc
Yes I agree. But. Where are our markets?
The obvious ones are now hidden behind our self inflicted tariffs.
Our potential rich EU customers can buy cheaper and quicker from other member states. And they will. To our detriment. To their convenience.
Whose idea was Brexit?
141
dan
06/04/2021 11:51:33 6 3
bbc
How do comments like these get upvotes. Idealistic but complete nonsense.

Do tell me how you plan to move the 16 year olds in part time retail jobs into high value manufacturing jobs.

Do tell me how Debra who's 55 and worked in a Sainsos for 30 year because she has no O'Levels is suddenly going to be able to have (or want) a job in "quality manufacturing"
146
06/04/2021 11:59:33 2 0
bbc
Skills required no longer here and people do not want to work in a factory setting because of poor wages and conditions. There was a time when this country produced good quality clothing aimed at the middle market. BBC highlighted the practice of one coat different prices by a company who have hoovered up many high street brands. Recognizing quality is a lost skill. Brand name means nothing.
148
06/04/2021 12:04:47 2 2
bbc
Absolutely, manufacturing creates wealth.
154
06/04/2021 12:13:14 5 1
bbc
You mean un do Thatchers legacy ?
163
06/04/2021 12:20:36 1 1
bbc
Great sentiments (though the two are not mutually exclusive). However too few people have the motivation (or ability?) to gain science qualifications and work in high tech. Manufacturing doesn't attract the young either: schools don't even turn out 'factory fodder' with good RRR skills in sufficient numbers now.
169
06/04/2021 12:30:07 1 0
bbc
Ridiculous house prices mean people can't afford much else. I just checked some prices from 1982. Average wage £8000 a year, Average House price £24177 (according to Nationwide). Pair of women's Jeans in the 1982 Kays catalogue £16.99 (£17.99 for size 20 and above !). So there has been about 0% inflation in clothing prices in the last 39 years and 955% inflation in house prices.
182
06/04/2021 12:39:34 0 0
bbc
Sounds a bit jackboot is that
193
06/04/2021 12:49:22 1 1
bbc
Naive sadly. People used to standing about doing nothing but talk will not want to get a real job making things. Even if they were available. Perhaps a machine minding job, pressing a button between chats about strictly come bake off island?

Besides the huge pay taken in the UK just won’t compete with the working culture and lower pay elsewhere unless it is a totally automated process.
223
06/04/2021 13:05:48 0 0
bbc
Tell that to these 'save the planet' kids who keep buying this trash
233
xlr
06/04/2021 13:22:06 1 0
bbc
Employees with customer-focused skills but no technical skills reassigned to technical jobs that require no customer-focused skills? Not going to happen.
236
06/04/2021 13:28:09 0 1
bbc
Agree totally. Sadly though here in the UK we have a culture where the "influencers" have zero interest or understanding of technology and manufacturing. It has been like that for decades, and changing that culture is a huge task. It runs through government, the finance sector, media and of course education. A few visits to schools and listening to career advisers soon makes that clear.
241
06/04/2021 13:35:21 0 0
bbc
The original post is looking ahead to where we will be - the commenters are the ones living in the past. Within 5-10 years most of these low paid manufacturing jobs will be no paid manufacturing jobs done by machines. absolutely makes economic sense.
243
06/04/2021 13:37:12 1 0
bbc
I agree more goods should be made in Great Britain. However this can be expensive. Example just purchased a pair of sheepskin slippers from Celtic and Co, cost £76. Many cannot afford this amount. My purchase for my daughter's kindly neighbour who has done her washing during pandemic. My daughter is a key worker who was exhausted at end of her work days. Neighbour lost job but stepped up to help.
250
NP
06/04/2021 13:48:50 1 0
bbc
Good vision, but still the same problem, high value manufacturing does requires high skilled jobs, and they are more computerised operations and precision engineering than any thing else. They roll high volume in financial terms but human terms they are limited and can not provide mass employment. Making cloths for £12/hour is not high value manufacturing.
257
06/04/2021 14:05:35 1 0
bbc
Absolutely correct, time to correct the Maggie led follies of being a service economy. And to all the detractors on here saying where is the workforce, etc, get out from behind your keyboard, learn yourself a trade, and be of use to society.
3
06/04/2021 09:45:56 51 16
bbc
Why bother, another average chain store selling tat made in Turkey. Although it's good for staff they will just go under again in another 6 months after even more assets are stripped from the business.
6
06/04/2021 09:54:59 26 19
bbc
Its a rinse repeat exercise

How many times have we borne witness to it
15
06/04/2021 10:13:08 6 3
bbc
Pretty much just an easy way to get hold of hundreds of leases in good locations, a large staff and a large list of suppliers. The brand itself is hardly worth anything, I sea Peacock's and to me it just looks like an oversized charity shop.

To rescue that name is going to be a lot of work, I'd put my money on one of the online retailers using it to bring their brand to the high street.
4
06/04/2021 09:46:53 19 7
bbc
I only see this being a brief respite and some positive news for the employees at least.

Long term I see no value in the brand, so can only see it going the same way unless something wildly different is to happen with it.
7
06/04/2021 09:55:29 3 17
bbc
It could be the last one standing , though.
5
06/04/2021 09:52:58 279 24
bbc
The UK needs to move these lost retail jobs into quality manufacturing.

Importing cheap clothes and plastic is not sustainable.

Let's make the UK the world centre for technology and high value manufacturing.
8
06/04/2021 09:56:34 110 26
bbc
100 % the only viable option for our society to flourish.
164
06/04/2021 12:20:52 2 1
bbc
But is it viable?
9
06/04/2021 10:01:07 100 3
bbc
Owners need to reinvest profits not borrow money and pay profits out in dividends, it would seem all these businesses are run on a shoe string. You can't keep borrowing money, it's just digging a hole and that hole just get's bigger
17
06/04/2021 10:14:43 58 3
bbc
Well yes, you can keep borrowing money! Look at any published accounts of any company and you will see "interest on loans" in the profit and loss and, usually, a huge number on the deficit column of assets. That is the capitalist western way of doing business. Which is why western countries are in trillions of debt. I'm not saying right or wrong, just the way it is.
94
06/04/2021 10:57:32 7 0
bbc
Sadly borrowing money has never been cheaper which dictates business borrowing as it enables investment or acquisitions. just look at the ASDA purchase. Debt financed from cheap borrowing.
155
06/04/2021 12:13:48 1 3
bbc
You’ve described capitalism
204
06/04/2021 12:56:26 2 0
bbc
No it just needs tougher regulations preventing the taking on of debt without realisable physical assets to cover them. Debt these days is just seen as a safe way to rob a bank. By public and companies. Stealing from the decent honest with savings effectively. Like shoplifting adds to the price of honest people’s purchases. Anyone 'let off' debt is a thief.
10
pTc
06/04/2021 10:03:59 12 13
bbc
Peacocks is just full of generic crap imported from the sweatshops of India and Bangladesh. It will still go under, just prolonging the inevitable.
56
06/04/2021 10:41:33 1 2
bbc
Nice to see someone as misanthropic as myself. Sod the British workers, sod the UK landlords, sod HMG as they won't get any tax but let's not forget to sod the Indian & Bangladeshi workers as well. Well rounded comment, Sir (I presume Sir though that may be misogynistic)
11
06/04/2021 10:04:33 95 3
bbc
I hope they suevive and wish them a successful future
187
06/04/2021 12:44:18 20 6
bbc
Can't believe someone downvoted that!?
324
07/04/2021 15:47:23 0 0
bbc
AND SUEVIVE THEY WILL, for about another 5 years , by then it will be less than a 100 shops
12
06/04/2021 10:07:19 11 20
bbc
Peacocks is just one of those places you never really set foot in, maybe somewhere your nan would go but it's never attracted me or anyone I know under 40.

What we need right now is to stop propping up prehistoric giants and work hard on creating the right set of circumstances for new businesses to start up and existing small businesses to grow into the larger newly-available spaces. Sthng Fresh!
18
06/04/2021 10:15:09 23 1
bbc
So, only people under 40 are able to have to shops to go to?
30
06/04/2021 10:21:21 12 1
bbc
I was under 40 once and now I am not. I suspect that the same may happen to you.
38
06/04/2021 10:14:22 1 3
bbc
Yeah, definitely don't need to cater to the over 40's.
47
DWM
06/04/2021 10:31:23 8 0
bbc
You will be 40 before you know it, let’s hope you’re not as unfashionable, old and ready to give up as you seem to thing the 40 plus are.
13
06/04/2021 10:10:21 1 15
bbc
either Peacocks or Hancock that turns out to be such a mess
26
06/04/2021 10:18:14 15 1
bbc
Stupid comment
5
06/04/2021 09:52:58 279 24
bbc
The UK needs to move these lost retail jobs into quality manufacturing.

Importing cheap clothes and plastic is not sustainable.

Let's make the UK the world centre for technology and high value manufacturing.
14
Pip
06/04/2021 10:11:08 14 16
bbc
That the people who use Peacocks can't afford, mmmmm.........?
6
06/04/2021 09:54:59 26 19
bbc
Its a rinse repeat exercise

How many times have we borne witness to it
15
06/04/2021 10:13:08 6 3
bbc
Pretty much just an easy way to get hold of hundreds of leases in good locations, a large staff and a large list of suppliers. The brand itself is hardly worth anything, I sea Peacock's and to me it just looks like an oversized charity shop.

To rescue that name is going to be a lot of work, I'd put my money on one of the online retailers using it to bring their brand to the high street.
121
06/04/2021 11:22:15 1 0
bbc
Oh, right. So someone can snap up their prime leasehold properties, large staff and suppliers? So why on earth did they go bust?
Reality - poor locations, excessive rent and wage bill and suppliers with the wrong products.
16
06/04/2021 10:14:17 11 1
bbc
That's good news. I wonder which ones will reopen.
9
06/04/2021 10:01:07 100 3
bbc
Owners need to reinvest profits not borrow money and pay profits out in dividends, it would seem all these businesses are run on a shoe string. You can't keep borrowing money, it's just digging a hole and that hole just get's bigger
17
06/04/2021 10:14:43 58 3
bbc
Well yes, you can keep borrowing money! Look at any published accounts of any company and you will see "interest on loans" in the profit and loss and, usually, a huge number on the deficit column of assets. That is the capitalist western way of doing business. Which is why western countries are in trillions of debt. I'm not saying right or wrong, just the way it is.
80
06/04/2021 10:50:18 1 5
bbc
If you want to hold stocks to supply your customers, you have to finance their purchase. The alternative is that all businesses are owned by rich aristocrats and supplies are scarce.
192
06/04/2021 12:49:00 4 0
bbc
If a business is not fundamentally making money it js just a pyramid scheme waiting to burst
12
06/04/2021 10:07:19 11 20
bbc
Peacocks is just one of those places you never really set foot in, maybe somewhere your nan would go but it's never attracted me or anyone I know under 40.

What we need right now is to stop propping up prehistoric giants and work hard on creating the right set of circumstances for new businesses to start up and existing small businesses to grow into the larger newly-available spaces. Sthng Fresh!
18
06/04/2021 10:15:09 23 1
bbc
So, only people under 40 are able to have to shops to go to?
35
06/04/2021 10:22:43 5 2
bbc
Or how about shops that cater to the whole range of ages? Like M&S do, and do very well as a matter of fact.

The point is the place has an image problem, it looks like an oversized charity shop, not somewhere attractive to go.
5
06/04/2021 09:52:58 279 24
bbc
The UK needs to move these lost retail jobs into quality manufacturing.

Importing cheap clothes and plastic is not sustainable.

Let's make the UK the world centre for technology and high value manufacturing.
19
McQ
06/04/2021 10:15:18 37 2
bbc
So lets all do our bit then and not just buy the cheapest..... ask the question and be prepared to pay more for the same because its manufactured in the UK where costs are higher. IF we all support local manufacture then those costs can be driven down somewhat.....
125
06/04/2021 11:22:26 1 1
bbc
Good idea but this will need a degree of protectionism over to you HMG the poor will keep getting poorer otherwise
226
06/04/2021 13:10:23 2 0
bbc
I hate to break it to you, but those UK-manufactured rose-tinted specs you're wearing don't actually show you real life!
20
06/04/2021 09:59:46 8 2
bbc
Excellent news!!
21
06/04/2021 10:15:31 8 6
bbc
Sorry new owners but you're flogging a dead horse. You can't expect to sell Primark quality at Waitrose prices!
42
06/04/2021 10:18:34 12 0
bbc
Yes but unlike Primark Peacocks catered for the more mature male figure.
5
06/04/2021 09:52:58 279 24
bbc
The UK needs to move these lost retail jobs into quality manufacturing.

Importing cheap clothes and plastic is not sustainable.

Let's make the UK the world centre for technology and high value manufacturing.
22
06/04/2021 10:16:26 44 7
bbc
Capitalism demands the lowest cost producer, not some starry-eyed reimagining of our economy. People are in business to maximise their profit and will export manufacturing jobs instantly if they can make more doing so...ask James Dyson.
140
06/04/2021 11:51:23 6 2
bbc
You say "Capitalism demands the lowest cost producer" so you just keep feeding the Chinese then. The reeducation center awaits you and yours.
5
06/04/2021 09:52:58 279 24
bbc
The UK needs to move these lost retail jobs into quality manufacturing.

Importing cheap clothes and plastic is not sustainable.

Let's make the UK the world centre for technology and high value manufacturing.
23
06/04/2021 10:16:26 23 20
bbc
Not without easy access to its biggest market it isn't.
175
06/04/2021 12:33:53 1 1
bbc
Yes indeed correct with the whole world being our biggest market not just one protectionist bloc. Diversification is the name of the game when investing money shrewdly and the same applies to when trading. However, unless you and many others like you move forward you will just stagnate, a bit like the EU, which is currently paralysed and sadly moribund.
24
06/04/2021 10:16:40 7 5
bbc
At least one retailer will realise that shops will be to try on and measure and that clothes will be made on demand through technology and delivered the next day. No excess or unsold stock, no transportation and environmental costs from Asia.
33
06/04/2021 10:22:25 4 1
bbc
No they won't certainly not in the next 10 years one day certainly but we don't have to technology to make cloths of demand like you suggest
4
06/04/2021 09:46:53 19 7
bbc
I only see this being a brief respite and some positive news for the employees at least.

Long term I see no value in the brand, so can only see it going the same way unless something wildly different is to happen with it.
25
06/04/2021 10:17:22 1 1
bbc
Thanks for your specialist retail advice.
13
06/04/2021 10:10:21 1 15
bbc
either Peacocks or Hancock that turns out to be such a mess
26
06/04/2021 10:18:14 15 1
bbc
Stupid comment
2
06/04/2021 09:43:58 35 65
bbc
which will upset the usual anti-Working class / pseudo - socialist crowd here
27
06/04/2021 10:04:31 19 12
bbc
Right wing claptrap
28
RRP
06/04/2021 10:18:47 19 3
bbc
Seems dodgy to me.
Time will tell, if it provides long term job security for the staff. I have my doubts.
211
06/04/2021 13:00:01 0 1
bbc
No such thing in any retail job unfortunately.
29
06/04/2021 10:21:03 29 4
bbc
Good deal.Although again in the report the BBC is slightly biased about to the trend for online.The returns especially from online are very high and costly.The recent purchases of brands will not be good as one can see from this weeks news about how the same clothes being sold under different brand names.
159
06/04/2021 12:15:45 6 2
bbc
Biased how ?

Online shopping is only getting bigger. It’s a definite trend
12
06/04/2021 10:07:19 11 20
bbc
Peacocks is just one of those places you never really set foot in, maybe somewhere your nan would go but it's never attracted me or anyone I know under 40.

What we need right now is to stop propping up prehistoric giants and work hard on creating the right set of circumstances for new businesses to start up and existing small businesses to grow into the larger newly-available spaces. Sthng Fresh!
30
06/04/2021 10:21:21 12 1
bbc
I was under 40 once and now I am not. I suspect that the same may happen to you.
31
06/04/2021 10:21:53 15 3
bbc
You would not say a boohoo to a peacock.
5
06/04/2021 09:52:58 279 24
bbc
The UK needs to move these lost retail jobs into quality manufacturing.

Importing cheap clothes and plastic is not sustainable.

Let's make the UK the world centre for technology and high value manufacturing.
32
06/04/2021 10:22:00 41 14
bbc
How about we start making rose tinted spectacles for fantasists..?
24
06/04/2021 10:16:40 7 5
bbc
At least one retailer will realise that shops will be to try on and measure and that clothes will be made on demand through technology and delivered the next day. No excess or unsold stock, no transportation and environmental costs from Asia.
33
06/04/2021 10:22:25 4 1
bbc
No they won't certainly not in the next 10 years one day certainly but we don't have to technology to make cloths of demand like you suggest
120
06/04/2021 11:22:02 0 0
bbc
You are wrong. Covid in particular may be the last straw for long supply lines. Prior to Covid some UK retailers caught a cold because of a fashion change that was caused by our famous weather. The retailer had the wrong stock to sell. Could not get resupplied quickly or sell what they had.
China etc cheap labour has got more expensive, UK less so, so the differential has shrunk. Derisking?
34
bbc
Removed
18
06/04/2021 10:15:09 23 1
bbc
So, only people under 40 are able to have to shops to go to?
35
06/04/2021 10:22:43 5 2
bbc
Or how about shops that cater to the whole range of ages? Like M&S do, and do very well as a matter of fact.

The point is the place has an image problem, it looks like an oversized charity shop, not somewhere attractive to go.
36
06/04/2021 10:22:48 70 13
bbc
I presume the folks complaining about the generic tat are not, and have never been, in the financial position where every penny really does count?
39
06/04/2021 10:26:01 15 63
bbc
Even then you'd catch me in Asda or Primark before Peacock's. The branding just shouts "60+ only" at you.
196
06/04/2021 12:51:08 1 1
bbc
The solution to that is to go to Primark. Better clothes at a cheaper price. Same at Asda, or even Sainsbury's. Peacocks have been using super cheap fabric that is poorly cut for a decade or more. Every time I go in I'm just disappointed. They were great around 2005-2008 (when I was in my 20s). I haven't bought anything from them since then. Nasty fabric, nasty cuts, poor shopping environments.
307
06/04/2021 21:27:45 0 0
bbc
There should be a place for cheap shops, mid range shops & exclusive shops both in high streets & online, but the surge in cheap shops has driven cheap-mid range stores out of business, supermarkets & primark are too popular & sink other similar priced stores.
37
06/04/2021 10:23:58 9 6
bbc
Even Mrs Slocombe couldnt turn (Captain) Peacocks around. Retailers like this are finished the world has moved on they haven't.
302
06/04/2021 18:15:23 0 0
bbc
Mrs Slocombe was a top Bra Fitter, the Internet cant take that over.
12
06/04/2021 10:07:19 11 20
bbc
Peacocks is just one of those places you never really set foot in, maybe somewhere your nan would go but it's never attracted me or anyone I know under 40.

What we need right now is to stop propping up prehistoric giants and work hard on creating the right set of circumstances for new businesses to start up and existing small businesses to grow into the larger newly-available spaces. Sthng Fresh!
38
06/04/2021 10:14:22 1 3
bbc
Yeah, definitely don't need to cater to the over 40's.
36
06/04/2021 10:22:48 70 13
bbc
I presume the folks complaining about the generic tat are not, and have never been, in the financial position where every penny really does count?
39
06/04/2021 10:26:01 15 63
bbc
Even then you'd catch me in Asda or Primark before Peacock's. The branding just shouts "60+ only" at you.
54
06/04/2021 10:39:57 5 2
bbc
I see lots of customers under 60 who don't like being told their fashion sense is out of date :')

I wear generic stuff only myself! I just don't get it from a place that hasn't had a brand meeting since 1980.
108
06/04/2021 11:10:07 7 1
bbc
And what about those of us in small country town who may not have such an abundance of choice? Everyone's circumstances are different so don't judge everyone by your own experience. I buy socks in Peacocks & I've got towels from there that are still good after at least 15 years. Even "cheap tat" lasts well if you wear & wash it gently.
156
06/04/2021 12:14:27 1 4
bbc
Primark and Asda are down market “ITV” shops
186
06/04/2021 12:43:47 4 2
bbc
I realize this is going to be hard for you to grasp but not everyone who buys clothes is one of the bright young things like you. People over 60 actually buy clothes. Yes, I know - hard to believe isn't it - but I'm reliably informed that it's true.
207
06/04/2021 12:58:07 1 2
bbc
I had never heard of them. Do people of that age still go out to high streets? That era is over.
225
06/04/2021 13:08:11 0 0
bbc
I’ve been buying from Peacocks as have my children over the last 40 years. Unfortunately Primark, good as it is, does not cater if you’re a plus size person whereas Peacocks does. My local one even had quite a decent decent Men’s range and there were still some reasonably fashionable clothes for my children who range from 20 to 33.
251
06/04/2021 13:49:33 0 0
bbc
To me it is aimed at the teenager and 30 year olds.
Have they taken the pea or saved the cock? Removed
41
06/04/2021 10:27:41 141 2
bbc
Peacocks needs to find its own personality and niche if it wants to succeed on the High Street. Looking at our local store teenagers didn't like it, but young mums did when shopping for children's clothes, so it could make a name for itself there.
BHS (British HOME stores) used to be THE place for lighting until Philip Green decided it should be all clothes and no homewares. There's a lesson there
103
06/04/2021 11:05:19 35 9
bbc
This is a disaster being kicked down the road. Just like EWM'S own Edinburgh Woollen Mills stores which were aimed at the 60+ consumer. Peacocks is possibly 50+ and both are aimed at a generation who just dont buy online now in any significant volumes. Peacocks needs a complete makeover. It needs to understand its position in the marketplace and online. It shouldnt try to compete with Primark etc.
201
06/04/2021 12:55:35 0 0
bbc
They need to make/supply their own quality clothes. If they just import cheap tat from China it wil lfail as I can do that myself on ebay for less.
People will pay for quality or a USP they can't find elsewhere.
21
06/04/2021 10:15:31 8 6
bbc
Sorry new owners but you're flogging a dead horse. You can't expect to sell Primark quality at Waitrose prices!
42
06/04/2021 10:18:34 12 0
bbc
Yes but unlike Primark Peacocks catered for the more mature male figure.
43
06/04/2021 10:29:29 27 13
bbc
Too many stores like this, selling mass produced and unethical clothing, made in sweatshops abroad. Hopefully people will start thinking about where the clothes come from, how they are made and how many will just end up on landfill.
50
06/04/2021 10:32:55 26 10
bbc
Need alternatives - sweatshops in the UK are becoming more popular, I've heard - and equally good quality for your landfill.
Mate, most of the morons who shop in these places, it's just depressing to observe these creatures moping around in stores, consuming, usually leaning on their shopping trolly like it's a damn zimmer frame Removed
44
06/04/2021 10:29:39 25 12
bbc
Sorry, but if you've ever been in one of these awful stores it's no surprise they collapsed. I feel sorry for the staff, but not the owners. Not sure the saved stores will last that long if they don't change the offering.
49
06/04/2021 10:31:47 15 10
bbc
Apparently it's ageist to suggest this, as I've discovered from an earlier comment :')

The place still looks like it was due for modernisation in 1995!
104
06/04/2021 11:06:32 1 3
bbc
They are ok for cheap tee shirts which you take on holiday and don't bother to bring home
293
06/04/2021 17:13:18 0 1
bbc
Peacocks is another TK Max
Expensive tat
Considering they’re clothes are probably made in the same places as Primark
Pea, cock and gammon is a traditional British dish. I'm surprised it hasn't been bought out by a notorious high street pub chain.. Removed
5
06/04/2021 09:52:58 279 24
bbc
The UK needs to move these lost retail jobs into quality manufacturing.

Importing cheap clothes and plastic is not sustainable.

Let's make the UK the world centre for technology and high value manufacturing.
46
06/04/2021 10:29:47 25 12
bbc
Apart from all the materials will be shipped in from abroad and I bet you will struggle to find many people willing to work in manufacturing even if you paid a decent rate
142
06/04/2021 11:51:53 1 1
bbc
Our equipment is made bespoke, in house, selling all over the world at £100k plus a unit (some at £500k). It's a patent locked down product, we have customers everywhere and are not dependent on EU business. We get three bonuses a year (yes including last year, because we didn't have a single furlough or "WFH" day). British built, unique, and we pay very well. Our job notices last less than a day.
272
06/04/2021 14:59:00 0 0
bbc
Some materials will be brought in from abroad name a country that doesn't do this?
Japan is a country of few if any natural resources yet they found a way to overcome this disadvantage. And they still have high paid manufacturing jobs
12
06/04/2021 10:07:19 11 20
bbc
Peacocks is just one of those places you never really set foot in, maybe somewhere your nan would go but it's never attracted me or anyone I know under 40.

What we need right now is to stop propping up prehistoric giants and work hard on creating the right set of circumstances for new businesses to start up and existing small businesses to grow into the larger newly-available spaces. Sthng Fresh!
47
DWM
06/04/2021 10:31:23 8 0
bbc
You will be 40 before you know it, let’s hope you’re not as unfashionable, old and ready to give up as you seem to thing the 40 plus are.
51
06/04/2021 10:35:02 1 2
bbc
Maybe I should have said 60+, but you get my drift.

The place looks like it was still riding on the same set of customers it once attracted in the 80s and 90s, when its current branding was more fresh. That is the point I'm making.

It's not even targeting over 40s, it's just not targeting anyone except repeat (old) customers.
48
06/04/2021 10:31:39 8 12
bbc
The world has changed. Retail is moving on-line. We need less consumption (retail) and more production in this country. The high street and retail parks are going to struggle in the new normal unless they adapt. Many shops and offices will become apartment buildings, restaurants and coffee shops. Many retail parks will become industrial units. The government should enable and encourage this trend.
52
06/04/2021 10:37:09 11 4
bbc
Don't agree. People are totally gutsed-up with sitting at home and would love the opportunity to go shopping again. And to get high streets back up and running again local authorities should be reducing rates on retail premises for the next 48 months.
Stay at home and only shop online = mental health ticking timebomb for us all.
53
06/04/2021 10:39:33 2 0
bbc
Ah, you mean urban planning and clear leadership? I totally agree with your point, but very optimistic.
57
06/04/2021 10:41:34 1 0
bbc
Producing what and who we going to sell to
44
06/04/2021 10:29:39 25 12
bbc
Sorry, but if you've ever been in one of these awful stores it's no surprise they collapsed. I feel sorry for the staff, but not the owners. Not sure the saved stores will last that long if they don't change the offering.
49
06/04/2021 10:31:47 15 10
bbc
Apparently it's ageist to suggest this, as I've discovered from an earlier comment :')

The place still looks like it was due for modernisation in 1995!
68
06/04/2021 10:48:21 3 4
bbc
Just ignore the Boomers, they've had their moment
210
06/04/2021 12:59:46 2 0
bbc
It wasn't modernised in 1905
43
06/04/2021 10:29:29 27 13
bbc
Too many stores like this, selling mass produced and unethical clothing, made in sweatshops abroad. Hopefully people will start thinking about where the clothes come from, how they are made and how many will just end up on landfill.
50
06/04/2021 10:32:55 26 10
bbc
Need alternatives - sweatshops in the UK are becoming more popular, I've heard - and equally good quality for your landfill.
208
06/04/2021 12:58:49 1 0
bbc
But then people will moan about the increased prices from those sweatshops ;)
47
DWM
06/04/2021 10:31:23 8 0
bbc
You will be 40 before you know it, let’s hope you’re not as unfashionable, old and ready to give up as you seem to thing the 40 plus are.
51
06/04/2021 10:35:02 1 2
bbc
Maybe I should have said 60+, but you get my drift.

The place looks like it was still riding on the same set of customers it once attracted in the 80s and 90s, when its current branding was more fresh. That is the point I'm making.

It's not even targeting over 40s, it's just not targeting anyone except repeat (old) customers.
61
06/04/2021 10:44:25 3 0
bbc
It didn't hit most high streets until the 2000's. Mainly South Wales and Southern England before then. Its demise started in 2005 when hedge funds got involved. An all too familiar story of decline.
76
06/04/2021 10:51:09 2 0
bbc
Whilst I agree that Peacocks needs rebranding I take issue with your last sentence.

Do you really think, especially with longer lifespans and an ageing population, that there is not, nor will be, any demand for clothes for the older generation?

What will you wear when and if you get to that age? Where will you shop?

I am sure that the new owners will review all aspects. I wish them well.
48
06/04/2021 10:31:39 8 12
bbc
The world has changed. Retail is moving on-line. We need less consumption (retail) and more production in this country. The high street and retail parks are going to struggle in the new normal unless they adapt. Many shops and offices will become apartment buildings, restaurants and coffee shops. Many retail parks will become industrial units. The government should enable and encourage this trend.
52
06/04/2021 10:37:09 11 4
bbc
Don't agree. People are totally gutsed-up with sitting at home and would love the opportunity to go shopping again. And to get high streets back up and running again local authorities should be reducing rates on retail premises for the next 48 months.
Stay at home and only shop online = mental health ticking timebomb for us all.
60
06/04/2021 10:43:39 1 1
bbc
Agree with Tim
Getting out does NOT mean shopping, which is not a solution to mental health issues. Getting out means perhaps eating out, meeting friends over coffee, watching a film. Lots of shopping will be online forever now
96
06/04/2021 11:00:10 4 0
bbc
" local authorities should be reducing rates on retail premises"

Local authorities provide local services (which needs to be paid for). IMO, it's landlords that need to start getting real about how much they're charging in rent. They seem to think some magic opportunity will come their way, even while many properties on local high streets are boarded up.
48
06/04/2021 10:31:39 8 12
bbc
The world has changed. Retail is moving on-line. We need less consumption (retail) and more production in this country. The high street and retail parks are going to struggle in the new normal unless they adapt. Many shops and offices will become apartment buildings, restaurants and coffee shops. Many retail parks will become industrial units. The government should enable and encourage this trend.
53
06/04/2021 10:39:33 2 0
bbc
Ah, you mean urban planning and clear leadership? I totally agree with your point, but very optimistic.
39
06/04/2021 10:26:01 15 63
bbc
Even then you'd catch me in Asda or Primark before Peacock's. The branding just shouts "60+ only" at you.
54
06/04/2021 10:39:57 5 2
bbc
I see lots of customers under 60 who don't like being told their fashion sense is out of date :')

I wear generic stuff only myself! I just don't get it from a place that hasn't had a brand meeting since 1980.
5
06/04/2021 09:52:58 279 24
bbc
The UK needs to move these lost retail jobs into quality manufacturing.

Importing cheap clothes and plastic is not sustainable.

Let's make the UK the world centre for technology and high value manufacturing.
55
06/04/2021 10:40:12 22 3
bbc
Great theory but who's going to buy this stuff? Low earners will still look for cheap imported tat because it's the best they can afford. It's a shame that everyone can't access quality goods but that's the way it is and even if many more could afford them they would still rather buy cheaper and spend the excess on something else. In our throwaway society it's quantity not quality that counts
10
pTc
06/04/2021 10:03:59 12 13
bbc
Peacocks is just full of generic crap imported from the sweatshops of India and Bangladesh. It will still go under, just prolonging the inevitable.
56
06/04/2021 10:41:33 1 2
bbc
Nice to see someone as misanthropic as myself. Sod the British workers, sod the UK landlords, sod HMG as they won't get any tax but let's not forget to sod the Indian & Bangladeshi workers as well. Well rounded comment, Sir (I presume Sir though that may be misogynistic)
48
06/04/2021 10:31:39 8 12
bbc
The world has changed. Retail is moving on-line. We need less consumption (retail) and more production in this country. The high street and retail parks are going to struggle in the new normal unless they adapt. Many shops and offices will become apartment buildings, restaurants and coffee shops. Many retail parks will become industrial units. The government should enable and encourage this trend.
57
06/04/2021 10:41:34 1 0
bbc
Producing what and who we going to sell to
5
06/04/2021 09:52:58 279 24
bbc
The UK needs to move these lost retail jobs into quality manufacturing.

Importing cheap clothes and plastic is not sustainable.

Let's make the UK the world centre for technology and high value manufacturing.
58
06/04/2021 10:34:59 18 36
bbc
There are moves afoot for funding for various businesses. Things will change as we free ourselves from the shackles of the EU. Funding will be available to help UK businesses improve and expand.
95
06/04/2021 10:58:34 8 5
bbc
Free yourself from the shackles of delusional fantasies.
59
06/04/2021 10:43:33 2 2
bbc
Give it two years and they'll be in administration again.

To save the business they need to build an online presence and get their stores in the right location's for their target market. The latter being woeful in my local area - where they closed the city centre store and moved to an area that's very middle class and has nothing else that would attract Peacocks target customers.
52
06/04/2021 10:37:09 11 4
bbc
Don't agree. People are totally gutsed-up with sitting at home and would love the opportunity to go shopping again. And to get high streets back up and running again local authorities should be reducing rates on retail premises for the next 48 months.
Stay at home and only shop online = mental health ticking timebomb for us all.
60
06/04/2021 10:43:39 1 1
bbc
Agree with Tim
Getting out does NOT mean shopping, which is not a solution to mental health issues. Getting out means perhaps eating out, meeting friends over coffee, watching a film. Lots of shopping will be online forever now
51
06/04/2021 10:35:02 1 2
bbc
Maybe I should have said 60+, but you get my drift.

The place looks like it was still riding on the same set of customers it once attracted in the 80s and 90s, when its current branding was more fresh. That is the point I'm making.

It's not even targeting over 40s, it's just not targeting anyone except repeat (old) customers.
61
06/04/2021 10:44:25 3 0
bbc
It didn't hit most high streets until the 2000's. Mainly South Wales and Southern England before then. Its demise started in 2005 when hedge funds got involved. An all too familiar story of decline.
79
06/04/2021 10:52:02 1 0
bbc
Apparently the current logo was introduced in 2006. Looks like it was made by an intern using a free logo maker, shockingly out of date even for 2006!
62
06/04/2021 10:36:58 0 2
bbc
shops that sell tat dont last -there are some dodgy goings on at the moment -a pack of retailers taking advantage of acquisition opportunities -the only company that come out of the scrap for "names" with any credit seems to be Next
63
06/04/2021 10:45:36 3 4
bbc
mens shorts for attention seeking vain men are a best seller along with leggings with a tea stain on them
64
06/04/2021 10:45:51 2 5
bbc
I think I went there once with my Nan
I've no idea what it is they sell, but I imaginie like most British highstreet shops, overpriced tat and is full of consumers, not shoppers
65
06/04/2021 10:46:07 7 4
bbc
They won’t survive unless they stop selling cheap clothes it’s saying a lot about this country now
87
06/04/2021 10:55:04 13 1
bbc
Some people can only afford cheap clothes
5
06/04/2021 09:52:58 279 24
bbc
The UK needs to move these lost retail jobs into quality manufacturing.

Importing cheap clothes and plastic is not sustainable.

Let's make the UK the world centre for technology and high value manufacturing.
66
06/04/2021 10:43:10 17 8
bbc
Because retail workers are skilled in high end manufacturing?
67
06/04/2021 10:47:09 0 7
bbc
Highstreet shops, for those people who have no idea what it is what they want or need so will instead just pick up any old crap.

#windowshopping
91
06/04/2021 10:55:20 0 0
bbc
So I can't pass on my stuff to you then ?
49
06/04/2021 10:31:47 15 10
bbc
Apparently it's ageist to suggest this, as I've discovered from an earlier comment :')

The place still looks like it was due for modernisation in 1995!
68
06/04/2021 10:48:21 3 4
bbc
Just ignore the Boomers, they've had their moment
69
06/04/2021 10:48:32 2 0
bbc
You can have as many shops opening up as you want but if at the end of the day people don't walk out the doors of them with something they bought then they are wasting their time.... Footfall means nothing if they don't buy something.
70
06/04/2021 10:48:36 9 12
bbc
As far as im concerned you deserve everything thats coming to you. Mass unemployment, forced cheap slave labour and no workers rights. The Tories are always talking about returning to Victorian values. Want to know what that is, think Oliver Twists. But still at least you won't have to worry about the commie marxist corbyn that wanted to make sure you had sick pay, holiday pay, work contracts etc.
86
06/04/2021 10:54:48 8 5
bbc
You mean the Corbyn that wants to lead his Army of Protesters down the High Streets scaring the customers away making sure your Businesses don't exist ?
88
06/04/2021 10:55:16 5 2
bbc
The majority do have sick pay, holiday pay and a contract. Not sure which country you are on about. We also have a minimum wage, first class health care, extended paternity and maternity leave and family credit, much better than most countries.
71
06/04/2021 10:48:42 0 1
bbc
you wont beat primark as they are owned by associated British bakeries so well funded, they started in llanelly wales years ago and should have gone under in the 1970s
84
06/04/2021 10:54:25 1 0
bbc
Why?
72
06/04/2021 10:49:54 0 1
bbc
Do we know which ones have been saved? Hopefully they have saved Peacocks in Wigston, Leicestershire as it contains the Post Office. It has been closed when non essential retail had to close.

There are smaller POs about but can't cater a medium sized town.
43
06/04/2021 10:29:29 27 13
bbc
Too many stores like this, selling mass produced and unethical clothing, made in sweatshops abroad. Hopefully people will start thinking about where the clothes come from, how they are made and how many will just end up on landfill.
Mate, most of the morons who shop in these places, it's just depressing to observe these creatures moping around in stores, consuming, usually leaning on their shopping trolly like it's a damn zimmer frame Removed
74
06/04/2021 10:50:13 16 2
bbc
Hmm, this just feels like re-arranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. If they still owe money to EWM, plus they still need support from all their partners, as well as a serious re-imaging of their drab-looking branding, then they are probably going to further need fresh capital very quickly.
209
06/04/2021 12:59:30 0 0
bbc
External international investors are taking over, some might have big pockets.
75
06/04/2021 10:50:25 2 2
bbc
Any jobs that are saved are a bonus competition online has made it a struggle for shops on the high street to survive it might not be everyones taste but our high streets used to thrive on being able to sort a variety of clientele sometimes people need a item there and then and cant afford to wait for a package to arrive on the doorstep while many supermarkets sell clothes some carry limited stock
83
06/04/2021 10:53:44 5 1
bbc
Punctuation please!
51
06/04/2021 10:35:02 1 2
bbc
Maybe I should have said 60+, but you get my drift.

The place looks like it was still riding on the same set of customers it once attracted in the 80s and 90s, when its current branding was more fresh. That is the point I'm making.

It's not even targeting over 40s, it's just not targeting anyone except repeat (old) customers.
76
06/04/2021 10:51:09 2 0
bbc
Whilst I agree that Peacocks needs rebranding I take issue with your last sentence.

Do you really think, especially with longer lifespans and an ageing population, that there is not, nor will be, any demand for clothes for the older generation?

What will you wear when and if you get to that age? Where will you shop?

I am sure that the new owners will review all aspects. I wish them well.
93
06/04/2021 10:56:48 1 1
bbc
I'll shop at literally all the other places available, H&M, Primark, George, M&S, all do clothes aimed at all age groups.
5
06/04/2021 09:52:58 279 24
bbc
The UK needs to move these lost retail jobs into quality manufacturing.

Importing cheap clothes and plastic is not sustainable.

Let's make the UK the world centre for technology and high value manufacturing.
77
06/04/2021 10:51:23 29 9
bbc
Where you suggest the factories go? Would British people work in factories?

It's a pipedream. Get over it. Your dreams won't happen for real.
203
06/04/2021 12:56:16 0 2
bbc
Of course British people would work in factories. How insulting.
274
06/04/2021 15:01:45 0 0
bbc
How old are you Helen? Because there was a time when there was factories all over this land including London and the South East. And some of these jobs are well paid
78
06/04/2021 10:51:30 1 2
bbc
Is Britain a nation of shopkeepers or a nation of shoppers

I'm confused
97
06/04/2021 11:00:23 5 0
bbc
A nation of permanently aggrieved victims apparently.
61
06/04/2021 10:44:25 3 0
bbc
It didn't hit most high streets until the 2000's. Mainly South Wales and Southern England before then. Its demise started in 2005 when hedge funds got involved. An all too familiar story of decline.
79
06/04/2021 10:52:02 1 0
bbc
Apparently the current logo was introduced in 2006. Looks like it was made by an intern using a free logo maker, shockingly out of date even for 2006!
17
06/04/2021 10:14:43 58 3
bbc
Well yes, you can keep borrowing money! Look at any published accounts of any company and you will see "interest on loans" in the profit and loss and, usually, a huge number on the deficit column of assets. That is the capitalist western way of doing business. Which is why western countries are in trillions of debt. I'm not saying right or wrong, just the way it is.
80
06/04/2021 10:50:18 1 5
bbc
If you want to hold stocks to supply your customers, you have to finance their purchase. The alternative is that all businesses are owned by rich aristocrats and supplies are scarce.
81
06/04/2021 10:50:42 1 4
bbc
I stopped visiting my local Peacocks when they closed their cafe in the mid-90's. It was the only decent thing they had....
82
06/04/2021 10:52:58 38 5
bbc
The only problem with the sweat shop, and cheap clothes argument is what happens to those workers if we suddenly stop buying.Do not agree with sweat shops, but if your dirt poor some money is better than none. Saving the planet is great when you live in a rich country, but if your dirt poor not so great.
It’s appears often being ethical about the planet is at the expense of the poor,.
160
06/04/2021 12:16:36 4 3
bbc
Those in dirt poor countries eg Bangladesh will will underwater because of claim the change. They are a population larger than the UK, they will all need somewhere to live.
165
06/04/2021 12:24:51 4 2
bbc
Well, at least your illiteracy is consistent!
75
06/04/2021 10:50:25 2 2
bbc
Any jobs that are saved are a bonus competition online has made it a struggle for shops on the high street to survive it might not be everyones taste but our high streets used to thrive on being able to sort a variety of clientele sometimes people need a item there and then and cant afford to wait for a package to arrive on the doorstep while many supermarkets sell clothes some carry limited stock
83
06/04/2021 10:53:44 5 1
bbc
Punctuation please!
98
06/04/2021 11:01:50 0 3
bbc
No actual comment to make, then, just a Grammar Police raid?

You'd almost think we were back at school!
71
06/04/2021 10:48:42 0 1
bbc
you wont beat primark as they are owned by associated British bakeries so well funded, they started in llanelly wales years ago and should have gone under in the 1970s
84
06/04/2021 10:54:25 1 0
bbc
Why?
85
06/04/2021 10:54:40 0 4
bbc
Geoff Brown, alias, 'The Local Bore, You Can't Ignore, writes: Will the Day family and cohorts bleed them dry before again forcing their staff onto 'the scrapheap?'
70
06/04/2021 10:48:36 9 12
bbc
As far as im concerned you deserve everything thats coming to you. Mass unemployment, forced cheap slave labour and no workers rights. The Tories are always talking about returning to Victorian values. Want to know what that is, think Oliver Twists. But still at least you won't have to worry about the commie marxist corbyn that wanted to make sure you had sick pay, holiday pay, work contracts etc.
86
06/04/2021 10:54:48 8 5
bbc
You mean the Corbyn that wants to lead his Army of Protesters down the High Streets scaring the customers away making sure your Businesses don't exist ?
65
06/04/2021 10:46:07 7 4
bbc
They won’t survive unless they stop selling cheap clothes it’s saying a lot about this country now
87
06/04/2021 10:55:04 13 1
bbc
Some people can only afford cheap clothes
99
06/04/2021 11:03:21 3 0
bbc
No shortage of places to shop for cheap clothes though are there...
215
06/04/2021 13:01:40 0 0
bbc
That's what Primark's for.
70
06/04/2021 10:48:36 9 12
bbc
As far as im concerned you deserve everything thats coming to you. Mass unemployment, forced cheap slave labour and no workers rights. The Tories are always talking about returning to Victorian values. Want to know what that is, think Oliver Twists. But still at least you won't have to worry about the commie marxist corbyn that wanted to make sure you had sick pay, holiday pay, work contracts etc.
88
06/04/2021 10:55:16 5 2
bbc
The majority do have sick pay, holiday pay and a contract. Not sure which country you are on about. We also have a minimum wage, first class health care, extended paternity and maternity leave and family credit, much better than most countries.
112
06/04/2021 11:13:46 1 0
bbc
you need to pay closer attention to whats happening before your eyes. British gas recently sacked all their employees and retained them on lesser contracts. Thats not an anomaly thats the new norm and its coming your way. Unemployment hasn't started its meteoric rise yet, it will later in the year, thats when employment rights and wages will nose dive. You'll be working longer, harder for less.
119
06/04/2021 11:20:01 2 0
bbc
Yes, your are right, lower sick and holiday pay, lower minium wage, lower family credit and underfunded health care and poorer parental leave compared with most 'civilised' countries. But that's something to shout about isn't it...
89
06/04/2021 10:55:17 9 1
bbc
we remember the time when GRATAN,LITTLEWOODSand the like were our way of getting things to our door so with AMAZON it has just gone full circle so wait another 50 years although i wont be here.
150
06/04/2021 12:05:17 3 0
bbc
Great comment. Gratan and Littlewoods also offered buy now pay latter services, so Klarna and PayPal Credit are likewise simply taking the wheel full circle. They just don't need an army of agents to knock on doors selling/collecting payments another example of low paid but flexible working jobs lost to internet .
90
06/04/2021 10:55:17 62 1
bbc
I think there is a massive element of suck it and see in all this. I believe that shoppers, particularly in the rag trade like to go to a shop and feel the cloth and try it on. On Line has it uses but not thinks you need to send back because it's not what you wanted.
The lockdown left shoppers with no choice but to buy online, it was not a willing choice. Better for some but certainly not all.
100
06/04/2021 11:03:43 51 0
bbc
Totally agree. I want to feel fabrics and assess quality before buying. Can't do this with online stuff - it works sometimes- but too often disappoints
107
06/04/2021 11:07:31 7 0
bbc
Exactly. Which is why online sales of clothing have a high returns rate. Unless all postage costs are passed on to the customer, it must be hitting the bottom line.
171
RR
06/04/2021 12:30:33 4 1
bbc
I'll certainly go back to high street shopping when the lockdown is over. When it's clothing I'm looking for I prefer to check the feel and quality before buying, try stuff on, and come home with something suitable. No faff with returning deliveries. Or the cost if delivery charges absorbing all the online savings.
219
06/04/2021 13:03:29 1 1
bbc
It is weird, even a decade or so ago when I last was in any high street I can not recall ever trying on any clothes. Nor was there ever much choice. One shade of a colour or tough.

Never returned a single item bought on line. It is clearly a bad behaviour scam ordering five things and only keeping one. Returns must be banned.
244
06/04/2021 13:39:02 2 1
bbc
I would never buy jeans/trousers online. It is absolutely essential to try them on as all makes vary so much.
325
07/04/2021 15:49:29 0 0
bbc
cant feel fabric ,cant try on . So april onwards back to the shops
326
07/04/2021 15:59:07 0 0
bbc
normal leather shoes or boots along with hats and sunglasses is the items that i cant beleive peeps buy on line, unless they tried their mates or a one of the family with same size feet or head and they fitted fine, I can understand a soft trainer bought online if you already wear that brand. The other one that slightly baffles me is risking buying mattresses and sofas online
67
06/04/2021 10:47:09 0 7
bbc
Highstreet shops, for those people who have no idea what it is what they want or need so will instead just pick up any old crap.

#windowshopping
91
06/04/2021 10:55:20 0 0
bbc
So I can't pass on my stuff to you then ?
5
06/04/2021 09:52:58 279 24
bbc
The UK needs to move these lost retail jobs into quality manufacturing.

Importing cheap clothes and plastic is not sustainable.

Let's make the UK the world centre for technology and high value manufacturing.
92
06/04/2021 10:56:17 10 6
bbc
Wishes and prayers to the sunny uplands unicorn.
76
06/04/2021 10:51:09 2 0
bbc
Whilst I agree that Peacocks needs rebranding I take issue with your last sentence.

Do you really think, especially with longer lifespans and an ageing population, that there is not, nor will be, any demand for clothes for the older generation?

What will you wear when and if you get to that age? Where will you shop?

I am sure that the new owners will review all aspects. I wish them well.
93
06/04/2021 10:56:48 1 1
bbc
I'll shop at literally all the other places available, H&M, Primark, George, M&S, all do clothes aimed at all age groups.
9
06/04/2021 10:01:07 100 3
bbc
Owners need to reinvest profits not borrow money and pay profits out in dividends, it would seem all these businesses are run on a shoe string. You can't keep borrowing money, it's just digging a hole and that hole just get's bigger
94
06/04/2021 10:57:32 7 0
bbc
Sadly borrowing money has never been cheaper which dictates business borrowing as it enables investment or acquisitions. just look at the ASDA purchase. Debt financed from cheap borrowing.
58
06/04/2021 10:34:59 18 36
bbc
There are moves afoot for funding for various businesses. Things will change as we free ourselves from the shackles of the EU. Funding will be available to help UK businesses improve and expand.
95
06/04/2021 10:58:34 8 5
bbc
Free yourself from the shackles of delusional fantasies.
217
06/04/2021 13:02:35 0 0
bbc
Exactly!
52
06/04/2021 10:37:09 11 4
bbc
Don't agree. People are totally gutsed-up with sitting at home and would love the opportunity to go shopping again. And to get high streets back up and running again local authorities should be reducing rates on retail premises for the next 48 months.
Stay at home and only shop online = mental health ticking timebomb for us all.
96
06/04/2021 11:00:10 4 0
bbc
" local authorities should be reducing rates on retail premises"

Local authorities provide local services (which needs to be paid for). IMO, it's landlords that need to start getting real about how much they're charging in rent. They seem to think some magic opportunity will come their way, even while many properties on local high streets are boarded up.
78
06/04/2021 10:51:30 1 2
bbc
Is Britain a nation of shopkeepers or a nation of shoppers

I'm confused
97
06/04/2021 11:00:23 5 0
bbc
A nation of permanently aggrieved victims apparently.
83
06/04/2021 10:53:44 5 1
bbc
Punctuation please!
98
06/04/2021 11:01:50 0 3
bbc
No actual comment to make, then, just a Grammar Police raid?

You'd almost think we were back at school!
170
06/04/2021 12:30:32 1 0
bbc
Punctuation, grammar and spelling make a massive difference to something being readable and intelligible.

So, if you want to get a point across, these things are very important.
87
06/04/2021 10:55:04 13 1
bbc
Some people can only afford cheap clothes
99
06/04/2021 11:03:21 3 0
bbc
No shortage of places to shop for cheap clothes though are there...
90
06/04/2021 10:55:17 62 1
bbc
I think there is a massive element of suck it and see in all this. I believe that shoppers, particularly in the rag trade like to go to a shop and feel the cloth and try it on. On Line has it uses but not thinks you need to send back because it's not what you wanted.
The lockdown left shoppers with no choice but to buy online, it was not a willing choice. Better for some but certainly not all.
100
06/04/2021 11:03:43 51 0
bbc
Totally agree. I want to feel fabrics and assess quality before buying. Can't do this with online stuff - it works sometimes- but too often disappoints
300
06/04/2021 17:55:18 0 0
bbc
Doll's clothing, anyone?