Million students 'forgotten' in lack of uni return date
01/04/2021 | news | education | 642
Million students still waiting for a university return date, with calls for it to be April not May.
1
01/04/2021 12:26:53 30 20
bbc
Nobody cares. Education is not important. Schools are not important. The only thing that matters is COVID.
11
01/04/2021 12:42:00 19 5
bbc
Is exactly the kind of tripe the media have been telling us for the past year.
21
01/04/2021 12:46:24 1 9
bbc
I guess you never went to school then, judging by your uneducated posts.
30
01/04/2021 12:48:48 4 2
bbc
Too true unfortunately
305
01/04/2021 14:05:24 4 2
bbc
Yep. We could have a nuclear apocalypse tomorrow and nobody would care as long as it didn't increase the R value.
2
MVP
01/04/2021 12:30:37 70 10
bbc
Even if students return to campuses before 17 May it is likely that most of the lectures will still be on line. I feel for the current generation of students.
17
DrR
01/04/2021 12:44:23 41 6
bbc
You might as well study from home than going back to halls and risk getting locked in due to a Covid out-break.

We all remember the scenes from Manchester last November.
22
01/04/2021 12:46:28 13 2
bbc
They've been completely ripped off on all sorts of levels, as if they weren't being already. 5.6% interest is what the current gen pay in interest on their loans from the moment they start studying, absolutely outrageous. And before anyone says it, because of the interest, those doing the higher end degrees pay back about 10k more than they were loaned, essentially subsidising the disney degrees.
27
Dee
01/04/2021 12:48:11 12 4
bbc
I think many have returned to ours, just to have some quality of time with their friends. Don't blame them either, they've been asked to give up a year of life which should have been an amazing learning experience. Now all the vulnerable have been vaccinated they should be allowed back.
400
01/04/2021 14:38:33 3 2
bbc
I feel for (almost) everyone in society. The students are not special exemptions. If you're looking for something to blame it's the virus (and a government which failed to control it in time).
403
01/04/2021 14:39:26 3 6
bbc
I don’t, they need to get a grip and get on with it. They haven’t lost their house or job and can still go back to mummy/daddies house.
If you want an education bad enough you would work around it.
3
01/04/2021 12:20:15 37 31
bbc
Even with fees paid, a grant, and travel reimbursed, I would have been really gutted, and probably ended up on the psychiatrist's couch if my time at university had been buggered to hell like this.

Students have been sold down the river for a virus that's hardly any threat to them or their lecturers. What a shameful sacrifice of the young people who are our future.

Unis should never have shut!
4
01/04/2021 12:37:51 21 1
bbc
Scientists and academics insisted , so you can't have it both ways.
20
DrR
01/04/2021 12:45:53 4 1
bbc
Having a gap year would have been the sensible choice, everyone knew what it was going to be like.
31
01/04/2021 12:49:27 4 4
bbc
Unis seem to treat education as a necessary evil, anyone who has sat in classes full of Chinese who can't speak a word of English (but pay huge tuition fees as international students) knows that they exist primarily as money factories these days. They also offer plenty of good opportunities for academics to rinse the system with eyewatering salaries.
45
01/04/2021 12:56:04 3 0
bbc
You would have been really gutted, and probably ended up on the psychiatrist's couch? I guess my son and his university friends are made of sterner stuff.

Gutted about the fees for a year of online teaching, yes.
3
01/04/2021 12:20:15 37 31
bbc
Even with fees paid, a grant, and travel reimbursed, I would have been really gutted, and probably ended up on the psychiatrist's couch if my time at university had been buggered to hell like this.

Students have been sold down the river for a virus that's hardly any threat to them or their lecturers. What a shameful sacrifice of the young people who are our future.

Unis should never have shut!
4
01/04/2021 12:37:51 21 1
bbc
Scientists and academics insisted , so you can't have it both ways.
28
01/04/2021 12:48:33 1 1
bbc
True that you can't have it both ways (university is completely incompatible with distancing measures or reductions in gatherings).
It should have been acknowledged, even though the decision may well have been correct, that attempting to 'control' coronavirus would have more serious implications for sections of the population than an actual outbreak of coronavirus, at least for individuals
54
01/04/2021 12:45:41 2 2
bbc
If people hadn't been paid furlough and the like there would have been vastly fewer lockdown cheerleaders.

I've hardly been touched by lockdown, but many millions have been crucified by it. This is especially true for our young people. And I'm under no illusion that we will ALL eventually pay dearly for the government's profligacy.
5
01/04/2021 12:38:58 35 12
bbc
Who would be a student in all of this? It has been a very expensive wasted year for them.
36
01/04/2021 12:51:21 56 7
bbc
Not just the cost monetarily either, first year in particular is a huge life experience that they've lost forever. 'First World problem' perhaps, but still. I genuinely feel sorry for them.
222
01/04/2021 13:51:19 7 10
bbc
They'll still get a degree if they worked - so how is it wasted?
632
ww
02/04/2021 09:36:38 1 0
bbc
It's not wasted. They are still learning -or can be, if they try.
6
01/04/2021 12:39:11 68 28
bbc
Imagine paying £9k per year and getting absolutely nothing for it. Horrendous.
10
01/04/2021 12:41:48 84 22
bbc
Similar to my council tax!
38
01/04/2021 12:51:39 10 10
bbc
I wonder if the people who have been protected at such a high cost to students would feel that they should cover some of the financial cost (for example in taxes)?
My guess is that most wouldn't, which raises the question about which group is truly "selfish"
39
01/04/2021 12:51:58 15 7
bbc
All the while paying 5.6% interest on it too. Can't believe more has never been made of that element.
118
01/04/2021 13:14:36 10 4
bbc
Plenty of students do that anyway. Pick rubbish courses that don't lead to any jobs. Blair really pulled the wool over people's eyes!
319
01/04/2021 14:10:49 1 4
bbc
Imagine paying £16k and getting nothing for it, but that's ok because they're just foreign students. Meanwhile local students get all the attention.
351
01/04/2021 14:22:59 6 0
bbc
You forget all that hard work done by university staff to try and deliver courses in the face of the pandemic. Nothing for it? Have you not been paying attention?
379
01/04/2021 14:30:21 7 1
bbc
"Absolutely nothing for it"???

I know many uni students, and they're all getting a LOT - online lectures, zoom and email one-to-one/one-to-few tutorials. There's a lot of hard work gone in to this, and conscientious students have taken advantage and worked hard.

I wonder if those who are "getting nothing" are those that have gone to uni more for the social side rather then the education.
389
01/04/2021 14:33:25 5 0
bbc
Except a degree and the opportunity to get an interesting, higher paying job with promotion prospects that they might find more fulfilling than bricklaying or stacking shelves.
442
01/04/2021 14:54:21 3 0
bbc
But you don't pay anything the government does!
538
Gaz
01/04/2021 15:40:13 1 0
bbc
your comment is a lie. Students are getting massive support through virtual lectures, seminars, workshops, help in assessments, receiving assessment feedback as well as study support, support from the librarians etc. Get your facts straight before making inane comments please.
587
01/04/2021 16:19:11 1 0
bbc
Doubt that is a fair reflection or the little helpless kids would have moaned months ago and they didn't
639
02/04/2021 12:54:18 0 1
bbc
most of us have been doing this for years, it's called taxation!, get used to it.
7
01/04/2021 12:39:24 158 21
bbc
As a student, I can say 17 May is after my final exam and coursework submission date. There will literally be no point in returning for many students.

Which means the entire year has been online, devoid of any social life, sharing of ideas, etc. NOT what was signed up to for £9.5k per year.
24
DrR
01/04/2021 12:47:31 27 11
bbc
Probably not much point in you going back on April 12th either, unless you expect to cram 3 terms in to 3 or 4 weeks.
90
01/04/2021 13:13:03 21 7
bbc
If you are moaning about the 9.5k, blame the government for monetising what, in a civilised society, should be free to all who want to benefit from it - education.
197
01/04/2021 13:44:55 10 3
bbc
Prepares you for the world of work you are about to enter then does it not?
314
01/04/2021 14:09:49 4 4
bbc
£16,000 as a foreign student. Locals are subsidised by the foreigners.
346
01/04/2021 14:20:59 5 1
bbc
valuable lesson that it doesn't get any better from here. Welcome to adulthood, enjoy work ;-)
420
01/04/2021 14:45:12 6 3
bbc
Do you have a mobile telephone device? I see a few people using them these days. They can actually see who they are talking to. They're brilliant, apparently, for sharing ideas. Mine is an old persons one with a big dial, but I don't have many ideas left to share.
424
CR
01/04/2021 14:47:10 1 3
bbc
Blame the government for £9.5k not universities.
446
01/04/2021 14:57:04 2 4
bbc
As I fellow student I agree, the online lessons, unfortunately, have been lack lustre, the few times we were allowed in prior to Christmas were the reason many passed their exams for the first semester, this time round I think alot will fail their exams as no F2F learning
458
01/04/2021 15:02:05 4 3
bbc
Good!

No social life is any reason or excuse to be at a university. It is not supposed to be a holiday. This bad attitude by a portion, a very vocal and not necessarily majority way of behaviour.
541
01/04/2021 15:40:32 1 3
bbc
Poor dear

missed out on going to the Student Union bar for cheap booze

Are the bars still called the Nelson Mandela or Steve Beko bars

Or it that too 80s in Union agenda for brainwashing the freshers

Get em while they're young was the motto
8
01/04/2021 12:40:11 13 19
bbc
Hardly surprising is it?

Last September's increase of Covid was almost certainly down to hundreds of thousands of students returning to uni at same time. Add to that, freshers week parties and general socialising.

Government know this but have kept it quiet because of the very obvious mistake they made in letting it happen.
18
01/04/2021 12:45:10 7 8
bbc
More thumbs down suggest that you have hit the nail on the head. Guilty consciences plus so many people do not like the governments mistakes being pointed out.
9
01/04/2021 12:41:17 21 10
bbc
Not great to be a student at the moment.

No real guarantee of having a meaningful degree by the end of your course, and being, in theory, stuck indoors all day without outside contact with your friends must be demotivating.
6
01/04/2021 12:39:11 68 28
bbc
Imagine paying £9k per year and getting absolutely nothing for it. Horrendous.
10
01/04/2021 12:41:48 84 22
bbc
Similar to my council tax!
78
01/04/2021 13:08:07 2 2
bbc
Would be funny if it wasn't true!
139
01/04/2021 13:25:27 12 1
bbc
9K council tax - big house then?
408
01/04/2021 14:40:49 3 0
bbc
No bin collection, police, parks or libraries down your way then.
429
01/04/2021 14:49:12 0 1
bbc
Tory cuts for you
1
01/04/2021 12:26:53 30 20
bbc
Nobody cares. Education is not important. Schools are not important. The only thing that matters is COVID.
11
01/04/2021 12:42:00 19 5
bbc
Is exactly the kind of tripe the media have been telling us for the past year.
12
01/04/2021 12:42:26 34 15
bbc
This has been a complete nightmare for students.
37
01/04/2021 12:51:38 37 28
bbc
And what about the nightmare it has been for University lecturing staff, or have you forgot about them?
602
01/04/2021 16:40:52 3 0
bbc
Think of it as a character building experience. The rest of your life might be a complete nightmare, so it will be good preparation.
13
01/04/2021 12:22:26 2 8
bbc
Thanks to the BBC for bringing this important matter to light. Most students aren't expecting a return to in-person teaching, but returning to campus means so much more than that, including recreational sport and outdoor socialising, as well as access to quiet study and examination spaces. Combined with strong testing programs, this must be safer than some of the other planned reopenings on 12/04.
14
01/04/2021 12:25:29 14 11
bbc
Thank you to the BBC for bringing this important matter to light. Most students aren't expecting in-person teaching, but returning to campus means so much more than that, including recreational sport and outdoor socialising, along with access to quiet study and examination spaces. Combined with strong testing programs, this must be safer than some of the other planned reopenings for 12th April.
15
01/04/2021 12:43:00 224 32
bbc
£9500 for a few online lessons a week. These students should get either an extra year free or some sort of refund.... My daughter's final year course ends in may and since last october she has spent 6 days in uni and a few half days a week online.. this not a fair way to treat the kids.
41
01/04/2021 12:52:20 134 63
bbc
There seems to be no acceptance that the young, students and school children in particular, have been by far the worst affected by this last year with their future's jeperdised and their lives put on hold without a word of thanks from the older generations.
107
01/04/2021 13:18:22 22 30
bbc
Corrections: £9250, not £9.500 - paid through a loan scheme paid when earn enough. Fees have been fixed for a ages, costs have risen exponentially. The fees don't just cover 'lessons' - a huge range of services available to students, being delivered during lockdown. All up for students getting refunds - but you need to lobby the government for that, unless you don't want universities to survive.
130
01/04/2021 13:23:47 4 3
bbc
Most students don't get anything in Term 3
134
01/04/2021 13:24:13 23 0
bbc
Trust me - they don't want an extra year.

University isn't about being a long as possible, it' about the piece of paper at the end.

I did 4 years for my masters, and towards the end you are ready to leave. Only so many nights out before you are 4 years older than everyone in the club and have done it all before.
147
01/04/2021 13:28:27 15 3
bbc
If universities are forced to refund fees for students they WILL have to reduce the facilities available to future students. They still need their staff and buildings. So, their costs have been at least the same delivering teaching online, and in many cases it has increased. Some universities were teetering on the edge before the pandemic - they will be forced to close or be bailed out.
265
01/04/2021 13:54:49 11 6
bbc
my son is in final year of business and finance degree and has had NO face to face teaching at all. £9,500 fees and one year accommodation for on line learning.
SHAME on Bournemouth university ripping off its students.
309
FT
01/04/2021 14:08:52 11 1
bbc
I'm a student at university and the lectures are the same and the lab sessions are remote, it's the same course, the same content and we get the same degree. In many ways it could be seen as easier as there are less to no exams and more coursework.

Regardless of this year and how much the year costs, which by the way is covered by loans, I will still be getting the same degree at the end.
310
01/04/2021 14:08:57 6 7
bbc
Try £16,000+ as a foreign student. The locals are subsidised. The foreign students should be compensated.
360
01/04/2021 14:24:12 12 0
bbc
Many university courses are made up of a few hours of lectures a week and the remainder of the time is self-study and coursework. My son has had exactly the same number of lectures and one to one time with his tutors via online sessions as he would have had in uni. Probably doing more self-study as well as not distracted by evening activities!
373
01/04/2021 14:28:23 7 0
bbc
A few on line lessons?! Students have had pretty much full teaching provision, albeit on line. The Unis cant give refunds as that would bankrupt the majority and screw HE pretty much forever.
409
01/04/2021 14:40:58 3 1
bbc
The tax payer will pick up the bill either way
16
01/04/2021 12:43:03 36 24
bbc
Lets not undo all the sacrifices that people of this country have done this past year by risking yet another spike and wave due to students spreading. It was no surprise that after students went back last year that the covid figures rocketed. Let's wait until ALL adults are vaccinated, THEN allow students to have face to face teaching. To do otherwise is too risky and it's not needed.
23
01/04/2021 12:47:26 25 24
bbc
Come off it, Bryce, university term is almost done by now anyway. Exams in May and then done 'til September.

I say let people see each other again. Can't be many people that have made sacrifices to their living as much as students have, of whom the virus barely affects.
25
01/04/2021 12:47:48 5 1
bbc
There is a choice here --- if you listen to the union who by no means represent all staff they want all online but at the same time complain about overwork and make impossible statements about the facilities available and the government should do this and that. How about allowing adults to decide for themselves? Or we could increase online and reduce staff numbers
32
01/04/2021 12:50:09 10 3
bbc
Yes, lets disparage an entire demographic for the explicit benefit of another demographic. Madness.

Most of the vulnerable have been vaccinated which means they're spared the severe illness and death. It's not about case numbers and never has been, time to put on the big boy/girl pants and crack on with living.

Even you must be tired of seeing the back of your sofa by now?
55
01/04/2021 12:49:16 7 1
bbc
As per the article above, an estimated 2/3 of students have already returned to campus, with no evidence to suggest any effect on cases. Asking the remainder to not see their friends or play sport etc. for a nine-month period would be an absolute worst case scenario. That's in addition to the mass expansion of testing in universities since last October.
124
01/04/2021 13:22:09 2 3
bbc
At last, a sensible voice.
344
01/04/2021 14:20:20 2 1
bbc
We’ve sacrificed enough - back to normal now
2
MVP
01/04/2021 12:30:37 70 10
bbc
Even if students return to campuses before 17 May it is likely that most of the lectures will still be on line. I feel for the current generation of students.
17
DrR
01/04/2021 12:44:23 41 6
bbc
You might as well study from home than going back to halls and risk getting locked in due to a Covid out-break.

We all remember the scenes from Manchester last November.
8
01/04/2021 12:40:11 13 19
bbc
Hardly surprising is it?

Last September's increase of Covid was almost certainly down to hundreds of thousands of students returning to uni at same time. Add to that, freshers week parties and general socialising.

Government know this but have kept it quiet because of the very obvious mistake they made in letting it happen.
18
01/04/2021 12:45:10 7 8
bbc
More thumbs down suggest that you have hit the nail on the head. Guilty consciences plus so many people do not like the governments mistakes being pointed out.
34
01/04/2021 12:50:31 4 3
bbc
More thumbs down suggest, rather, that more people disagree than agree about an evidence-free assertion.
19
01/04/2021 12:45:41 6 8
bbc
should copy the german model of industry.less reliance on the financial services.
57
01/04/2021 12:51:33 7 0
bbc
What has that got to do with this story?
3
01/04/2021 12:20:15 37 31
bbc
Even with fees paid, a grant, and travel reimbursed, I would have been really gutted, and probably ended up on the psychiatrist's couch if my time at university had been buggered to hell like this.

Students have been sold down the river for a virus that's hardly any threat to them or their lecturers. What a shameful sacrifice of the young people who are our future.

Unis should never have shut!
20
DrR
01/04/2021 12:45:53 4 1
bbc
Having a gap year would have been the sensible choice, everyone knew what it was going to be like.
26
01/04/2021 12:48:04 4 3
bbc
Yes, an amazing gap year, locked at home indefinitely.

Where do you think money to support that would come from anyway?
1
01/04/2021 12:26:53 30 20
bbc
Nobody cares. Education is not important. Schools are not important. The only thing that matters is COVID.
21
01/04/2021 12:46:24 1 9
bbc
I guess you never went to school then, judging by your uneducated posts.
160
01/04/2021 13:31:48 7 1
bbc
I think it was a sarcastic comment from betsyboo
2
MVP
01/04/2021 12:30:37 70 10
bbc
Even if students return to campuses before 17 May it is likely that most of the lectures will still be on line. I feel for the current generation of students.
22
01/04/2021 12:46:28 13 2
bbc
They've been completely ripped off on all sorts of levels, as if they weren't being already. 5.6% interest is what the current gen pay in interest on their loans from the moment they start studying, absolutely outrageous. And before anyone says it, because of the interest, those doing the higher end degrees pay back about 10k more than they were loaned, essentially subsidising the disney degrees.
132
01/04/2021 13:24:09 6 2
bbc
Some of that is true. Some degrees cost more than fees to run, some less. Fees have been fixed, costs have risen. Take you're ire to the government - they set the fees and the funding conditions. Education should be free...
16
01/04/2021 12:43:03 36 24
bbc
Lets not undo all the sacrifices that people of this country have done this past year by risking yet another spike and wave due to students spreading. It was no surprise that after students went back last year that the covid figures rocketed. Let's wait until ALL adults are vaccinated, THEN allow students to have face to face teaching. To do otherwise is too risky and it's not needed.
23
01/04/2021 12:47:26 25 24
bbc
Come off it, Bryce, university term is almost done by now anyway. Exams in May and then done 'til September.

I say let people see each other again. Can't be many people that have made sacrifices to their living as much as students have, of whom the virus barely affects.
35
01/04/2021 12:51:04 8 8
bbc
Its not whether it affects them - it's whether they pass it on to OTHERS, and then onto others and so on..... I sympathise with the students and they should get refunds, HOWEVER, they cannot be allowed to spread covid. I can't believe that anyone would think that is ok.
81
01/04/2021 13:09:36 2 6
bbc
Maybe for Russell Group Universities, the rest will be teaching into July. Your comment about the virus not affecting students is the kind of selfish behaviour that will lead to another surge in infections, it's not about how sick you get but about the others you infect. Have you not been paying attention in class?
128
01/04/2021 13:23:24 2 4
bbc
Absolutely no idea of reality.
7
01/04/2021 12:39:24 158 21
bbc
As a student, I can say 17 May is after my final exam and coursework submission date. There will literally be no point in returning for many students.

Which means the entire year has been online, devoid of any social life, sharing of ideas, etc. NOT what was signed up to for £9.5k per year.
24
DrR
01/04/2021 12:47:31 27 11
bbc
Probably not much point in you going back on April 12th either, unless you expect to cram 3 terms in to 3 or 4 weeks.
29
01/04/2021 12:48:37 10 1
bbc
I live on campus mate so been stuck here the whole time. Not that I gain anything from being here!
433
NM
01/04/2021 14:44:12 4 1
bbc
That’s a lot of drinking.
16
01/04/2021 12:43:03 36 24
bbc
Lets not undo all the sacrifices that people of this country have done this past year by risking yet another spike and wave due to students spreading. It was no surprise that after students went back last year that the covid figures rocketed. Let's wait until ALL adults are vaccinated, THEN allow students to have face to face teaching. To do otherwise is too risky and it's not needed.
25
01/04/2021 12:47:48 5 1
bbc
There is a choice here --- if you listen to the union who by no means represent all staff they want all online but at the same time complain about overwork and make impossible statements about the facilities available and the government should do this and that. How about allowing adults to decide for themselves? Or we could increase online and reduce staff numbers
20
DrR
01/04/2021 12:45:53 4 1
bbc
Having a gap year would have been the sensible choice, everyone knew what it was going to be like.
26
01/04/2021 12:48:04 4 3
bbc
Yes, an amazing gap year, locked at home indefinitely.

Where do you think money to support that would come from anyway?
2
MVP
01/04/2021 12:30:37 70 10
bbc
Even if students return to campuses before 17 May it is likely that most of the lectures will still be on line. I feel for the current generation of students.
27
Dee
01/04/2021 12:48:11 12 4
bbc
I think many have returned to ours, just to have some quality of time with their friends. Don't blame them either, they've been asked to give up a year of life which should have been an amazing learning experience. Now all the vulnerable have been vaccinated they should be allowed back.
4
01/04/2021 12:37:51 21 1
bbc
Scientists and academics insisted , so you can't have it both ways.
28
01/04/2021 12:48:33 1 1
bbc
True that you can't have it both ways (university is completely incompatible with distancing measures or reductions in gatherings).
It should have been acknowledged, even though the decision may well have been correct, that attempting to 'control' coronavirus would have more serious implications for sections of the population than an actual outbreak of coronavirus, at least for individuals
24
DrR
01/04/2021 12:47:31 27 11
bbc
Probably not much point in you going back on April 12th either, unless you expect to cram 3 terms in to 3 or 4 weeks.
29
01/04/2021 12:48:37 10 1
bbc
I live on campus mate so been stuck here the whole time. Not that I gain anything from being here!
1
01/04/2021 12:26:53 30 20
bbc
Nobody cares. Education is not important. Schools are not important. The only thing that matters is COVID.
30
01/04/2021 12:48:48 4 2
bbc
Too true unfortunately
3
01/04/2021 12:20:15 37 31
bbc
Even with fees paid, a grant, and travel reimbursed, I would have been really gutted, and probably ended up on the psychiatrist's couch if my time at university had been buggered to hell like this.

Students have been sold down the river for a virus that's hardly any threat to them or their lecturers. What a shameful sacrifice of the young people who are our future.

Unis should never have shut!
31
01/04/2021 12:49:27 4 4
bbc
Unis seem to treat education as a necessary evil, anyone who has sat in classes full of Chinese who can't speak a word of English (but pay huge tuition fees as international students) knows that they exist primarily as money factories these days. They also offer plenty of good opportunities for academics to rinse the system with eyewatering salaries.
61
01/04/2021 13:02:14 8 2
bbc
I was with you until that last sentence.

Universities have indeed been turned into a purely money-spinning enterprise under this (and previous) governments, with education taking a back seat.

But "eyewatering salaries" for academics!?! Crikey, I wish (I am one).

If there are any eyewatering salaries, they're at the overstuffed management and bureaucratic level - NOT lecturers and researchers.
16
01/04/2021 12:43:03 36 24
bbc
Lets not undo all the sacrifices that people of this country have done this past year by risking yet another spike and wave due to students spreading. It was no surprise that after students went back last year that the covid figures rocketed. Let's wait until ALL adults are vaccinated, THEN allow students to have face to face teaching. To do otherwise is too risky and it's not needed.
32
01/04/2021 12:50:09 10 3
bbc
Yes, lets disparage an entire demographic for the explicit benefit of another demographic. Madness.

Most of the vulnerable have been vaccinated which means they're spared the severe illness and death. It's not about case numbers and never has been, time to put on the big boy/girl pants and crack on with living.

Even you must be tired of seeing the back of your sofa by now?
33
BBC
01/04/2021 12:50:09 135 26
bbc
The campaign to give students a discount on their fees needs to be ramped up. Where are you NUS? As useful as a chocolate teapot.
102
01/04/2021 13:12:20 86 35
bbc
Hopefully that will make a few universities go bust. There are three times more unis than there need to be anyway.
145
01/04/2021 13:26:36 17 5
bbc
NUS is only concerned with identity politics, like most student unions they have no interest in the needs and issues faced by 99.9% of their fellow students, they're almost always just weird little in groups.
156
01/04/2021 13:30:45 17 15
bbc
The NUS exists to give students a true feeling for the correct, far left approach to life. No views that do not align with those of the far-left must be expressed, still less debated, because the NUS has its "no platform" policy for anyone not far-left. Pity the NUS is not interested in healthy exchange of ideas and opinions and rational debate, but that's 21st-century UK education for you.
200
01/04/2021 13:44:21 15 14
bbc
The NUS is a training scheme for labour MPs. It is nothing else.
257
01/04/2021 13:57:12 11 8
bbc
They're busy pulling statues down and whipping up social division based on things our ancestors did many hundreds of years ago...
412
01/04/2021 14:41:37 3 3
bbc
The NUS are out on the streets rioting for something, probably.
553
01/04/2021 15:45:05 2 1
bbc
The NUS was only good at one thing back in the 80s

Get the youngsters into the cheap Union bars and turn out lots of left wing idiots to go on marches and demonstrations
564
01/04/2021 15:52:36 1 2
bbc
A sockpuppet making up a complaint without any backing. Three things give you away. 1. What gave you the idea that the NUS would not be campaigning for student refunds for accommodation and courses? 2. You clearly don't like unions anyway, and would hate it more if they did. 3. The Govt, not the NUS, decide the laws on fees. Where is your outraged directed at those actually responsible. Nowhere.
18
01/04/2021 12:45:10 7 8
bbc
More thumbs down suggest that you have hit the nail on the head. Guilty consciences plus so many people do not like the governments mistakes being pointed out.
34
01/04/2021 12:50:31 4 3
bbc
More thumbs down suggest, rather, that more people disagree than agree about an evidence-free assertion.
302
01/04/2021 14:08:10 1 0
bbc
If only it were evidence free. If you know where to look online, and most students are not bright enough to do so, the statistics are all there.
23
01/04/2021 12:47:26 25 24
bbc
Come off it, Bryce, university term is almost done by now anyway. Exams in May and then done 'til September.

I say let people see each other again. Can't be many people that have made sacrifices to their living as much as students have, of whom the virus barely affects.
35
01/04/2021 12:51:04 8 8
bbc
Its not whether it affects them - it's whether they pass it on to OTHERS, and then onto others and so on..... I sympathise with the students and they should get refunds, HOWEVER, they cannot be allowed to spread covid. I can't believe that anyone would think that is ok.
5
01/04/2021 12:38:58 35 12
bbc
Who would be a student in all of this? It has been a very expensive wasted year for them.
36
01/04/2021 12:51:21 56 7
bbc
Not just the cost monetarily either, first year in particular is a huge life experience that they've lost forever. 'First World problem' perhaps, but still. I genuinely feel sorry for them.
48
01/04/2021 12:57:23 8 2
bbc
All true. And for final year students, no graduation and more importantly, a paltry job market.

i.e. more pain and suffering than previous cohorts, with less coping resources and much less reward.

But somehow, there are those who think paying the same fee for the experience is fair?
597
01/04/2021 16:30:29 3 3
bbc
Well a year getting smashed on taxpayer money sorry but I do not feel sorry for them but the ones who for whatever reason don't get to go but day one have to try and find paid employment
12
01/04/2021 12:42:26 34 15
bbc
This has been a complete nightmare for students.
37
01/04/2021 12:51:38 37 28
bbc
And what about the nightmare it has been for University lecturing staff, or have you forgot about them?
44
01/04/2021 12:54:49 21 14
bbc
You mean people who have kept their jobs, paid for by students who are not getting what they are paying for?

No it has not been easy, it has not been easy for anyone except those who are happy to lock themselves away for 12 months (and counting).
84
01/04/2021 13:10:06 20 10
bbc
Couldn't agree more. My freinds who are uni lecturers have been working 24/7 to prepare online teaching from scratch. Effective online teaching is far from talking on zoom, and everyone I know in the uni sector, like the NHS, teachers and others in the public sector have been doing their best with very little extra support. Yes, they have kept their jobs, but at a huge price.
199
01/04/2021 13:45:13 4 0
bbc
Yes! Let us now list everyone impacted!
209
01/04/2021 13:46:06 4 8
bbc
They are still getting paid the same for delivery of course which is not the same as either they or the students would expect for the fees
342
BBC
01/04/2021 14:19:57 2 1
bbc
Yes, we know that, but this is about students, not the hardworking academics. And you're paid, not paying.
439
Tim
01/04/2021 14:53:06 1 2
bbc
What nightmare is that then? Got paid for providing less service
539
01/04/2021 15:40:27 1 1
bbc
forgotTEN Dr (?) Nige!
561
Gaz
01/04/2021 15:49:36 1 1
bbc
You are spot on, Will some of the people on this hys be happy when lecturers are burnout out, commit suicide or leave the profession. Being paid wont be much compensation then. There are surveys taking place at the moment that will show that academics who were contracted for 37 hours per week have been working almost double that. This is not sustainable.
6
01/04/2021 12:39:11 68 28
bbc
Imagine paying £9k per year and getting absolutely nothing for it. Horrendous.
38
01/04/2021 12:51:39 10 10
bbc
I wonder if the people who have been protected at such a high cost to students would feel that they should cover some of the financial cost (for example in taxes)?
My guess is that most wouldn't, which raises the question about which group is truly "selfish"
121
01/04/2021 13:21:23 3 3
bbc
Absolutely. It's easy to preach to others and emotionally guilt trip them when it's for their own benefit.
462
01/04/2021 15:03:39 2 1
bbc
Where do you think the money for all those student loans comes from?
6
01/04/2021 12:39:11 68 28
bbc
Imagine paying £9k per year and getting absolutely nothing for it. Horrendous.
39
01/04/2021 12:51:58 15 7
bbc
All the while paying 5.6% interest on it too. Can't believe more has never been made of that element.
122
01/04/2021 13:16:04 11 6
bbc
That makes up for the fact that most students pick rubbish courses which never lead to a decent salary which means that they never pay anything back. Which means that the students that pick sensible, useful subject subsidise the majority.
126
01/04/2021 13:22:51 12 1
bbc
This is the part that I'd like to see scrapped (in general, but especially during this year).

I don't think asking for tuition refunds is practical, because lecturers have been putting a lot of work in to try and make online courses and assessment work, and the cost of their time needs covering.

But reducing the debt burden of students (by removing interest) is wholly in the governments power.
460
01/04/2021 15:02:57 3 1
bbc
Perhaps because most will never pay it? Google Martin Lewis student loans for an explanation
40
01/04/2021 12:51:58 93 12
bbc
As a student myself, I care less about the in-person teaching, bar practical learning, than the other things university is for. No, I don't mean drinking and clubbing. Sports, libraries, recreation areas... All closed.

I miss seeing and meeting people that like to do things I like.
58
01/04/2021 13:00:36 88 26
bbc
That isn't limited to students. We're all in the same boat! The whole country hasn't been able to see and meet people and do what we like, students aren't the exception.
233
01/04/2021 13:49:53 17 3
bbc
I can empathise a little Mushtaq. However as previous comment says "we're all in the same boat". Unfortunately for me the covid rates where I live were in part driven by a huge Uni population and many many illegal gatherings, one in the flat above me. Everyone has suffered and having just viewed my third virtual funeral of the year I'd just ask for a few more months of patience.
440
01/04/2021 14:53:40 0 4
bbc
I really do feel bad for the 2020 Fresher intake. So much of the student experience has been denied to them and if they dare try to salvage something, they get expelled and fined.

And that's just the social side. Many campus facilities are closed and the university staff ran for cover under WFH guidelines, so you can't reach them as easily.

Thankfully jabs mean September 2021 should be normal.
600
01/04/2021 16:35:47 1 2
bbc
Me me me me me me me etc
15
01/04/2021 12:43:00 224 32
bbc
£9500 for a few online lessons a week. These students should get either an extra year free or some sort of refund.... My daughter's final year course ends in may and since last october she has spent 6 days in uni and a few half days a week online.. this not a fair way to treat the kids.
41
01/04/2021 12:52:20 134 63
bbc
There seems to be no acceptance that the young, students and school children in particular, have been by far the worst affected by this last year with their future's jeperdised and their lives put on hold without a word of thanks from the older generations.
52
01/04/2021 12:58:00 33 14
bbc
Couldn't agree more.

The same group who have demanded as such have then gone on to claim the moral highground by branding anyone who doesn't agree with them as selfish.
Rather ironic.
99
01/04/2021 13:16:53 29 17
bbc
Couldn’t agree more. In fact many young people have been labelled selfish. Seems to me they have given up more than enough to protect the elderly and vulnerable. But the young don’t vote so they will be very low down on the pecking order.
138
01/04/2021 13:25:19 25 47
bbc
"without a word of thanks from the older generations."

The baby boomers have always believed the world revolved around them. The wartime generation would have just got on with Covid but the boomers had an attack of the hysterics and demanded the world shut down for them and hang the consequences.
141
01/04/2021 13:26:06 25 14
bbc
Rubbish, like your perception of spelling.
181
01/04/2021 13:41:22 16 2
bbc
Nice attempt at division there.

Maybe you just associate with grumpy old people? The oldies I know are extremely grateful for the sacrifice of civic-minded youths.
185
Ben
01/04/2021 13:41:59 28 6
bbc
I'd say that the generation who are dying by the bucket load have been worse affected, wouldn't you?
196
DB
01/04/2021 13:44:18 21 12
bbc
From what I have seen of (some) students' behaviour this week in Nottingham they deserve NO thanks at all. Bad selfish and indeed illegal behaviour, resulting in closed parks. Poor example, so I've no sympathy whatsoever. Grow Up and behave I would say!
240
01/04/2021 13:54:26 15 3
bbc
Just a couple of thoughts. It is the older generations that have died though. It is the older generations that are more likely to have lived in real and total isolation for 12 months. Don’t think an intelligent forward thinking student will have any more problems with future life than any other person.
243
01/04/2021 13:55:01 7 20
bbc
Forget any words of thanks, the older generations chose to throw their children and grandchildren under a bus by voting for Brexit. Talk about eating one’s own young.
264
01/04/2021 13:53:54 11 2
bbc
Incorrect, the worst affected are dead
296
01/04/2021 14:07:05 10 4
bbc
You don't speak for me. I'm probably one of the "older generation", as are most of my friends and acquaintances. We all have children who are young adults, and some have young grandchildren. ALL of us have enormous sympathy for young people and are fully aware of how they have been affected. But some of the more draconian aspects of the lockdown restrictions were not conceived in my name......
313
01/04/2021 14:07:55 10 2
bbc
What do you expect - old people to wander round randomly thanking younger people from 2m away?
316
01/04/2021 14:10:14 16 3
bbc
Students STILL HAD THE CHOICE (to go to Uni) or not; many people have lost their jobs and homes... I do not condone students, but there are FAR MORE people in a FAR WORSE situation through NO (of their own) choice at all.
387
01/04/2021 14:33:11 4 2
bbc
Oh Yea there has been an acceptance by them to think it’s ok to have big gatherings and parties and not give a toss. Did you not see Nottingham and Leeds this week? They don’t care.
393
01/04/2021 14:36:26 4 1
bbc
Just cos the BBC doesn't report it doesn't mean it hasn't happened. I am grateful to all student doctors, nurses, engineers and others who need their degrees for professional qualifications, but if you were doing media studies, I'd rather you didn't take the risk of finishing uni broke and unqualified.
42
01/04/2021 12:53:29 31 16
bbc
I think we all agree that it’s been awful for students. Working online. No socialising... oh hang on..that’s what we’ve all been doing. The only difference is they’re out of pocket for student accommodation and the tuition hasn’t been acceptable.
One of the causes of wave 2 was students and kids going back to uni/school. Ie. Spreaders with (often) little self control or impact.
Why do it again?
68
01/04/2021 13:05:38 10 8
bbc
Accommodation and tuition hasn't been acceptable.

Sounds like the basis for some sort of refund to me?
629
02/04/2021 07:24:18 1 0
bbc
"One of the causes of wave 2 was students and kids going back to uni/school. Ie. Spreaders with (often) little self control or impact."
This is the crux of the arguments of the scientists who will be advising the PM. Last year pubs and restaurants opened - no new spike. Kids go back to school at the end of August - no new spike. Universities go back in September - massive second spike.
631
dad
02/04/2021 09:26:43 1 1
bbc
As a parent of a daughter in her first year who has had only two lectures in person and has been home since the 4th of December I think it is disgusting that the Government has not addressed this and made plans to refund them at least some money. She is going back for the 12th of April as unfortunately we do not have very good internet and she is struggling with her mental health.
43
01/04/2021 12:53:44 11 15
bbc
Students have sacrificed the most out of all the age groups.
106
01/04/2021 13:18:18 3 3
bbc
Aw diddums.
37
01/04/2021 12:51:38 37 28
bbc
And what about the nightmare it has been for University lecturing staff, or have you forgot about them?
44
01/04/2021 12:54:49 21 14
bbc
You mean people who have kept their jobs, paid for by students who are not getting what they are paying for?

No it has not been easy, it has not been easy for anyone except those who are happy to lock themselves away for 12 months (and counting).
176
01/04/2021 13:40:16 5 0
bbc
To let the university lecturers lose their job is not the solution but causes more problems, as the students will not be able to complete their courses and start their jobs, or wasting one best year of their life do nothing.
3
01/04/2021 12:20:15 37 31
bbc
Even with fees paid, a grant, and travel reimbursed, I would have been really gutted, and probably ended up on the psychiatrist's couch if my time at university had been buggered to hell like this.

Students have been sold down the river for a virus that's hardly any threat to them or their lecturers. What a shameful sacrifice of the young people who are our future.

Unis should never have shut!
45
01/04/2021 12:56:04 3 0
bbc
You would have been really gutted, and probably ended up on the psychiatrist's couch? I guess my son and his university friends are made of sterner stuff.

Gutted about the fees for a year of online teaching, yes.
46
01/04/2021 12:56:27 130 25
bbc
Students have been mistreated throughout this pandemic:
Ordered back to campus or they'd risk forfeiting their degree.
Asked for all money upfront and not given refunds when they could not longer use their accommodation.
Locked in halls, then blamed for spreading the virus when they were sharing bathrooms and kitchens with hundreds of kids from around the country.
Ordered home, left hanging.
100
01/04/2021 13:17:37 48 141
bbc
Stop wingeing and get a grip on reality.
427
01/04/2021 14:48:53 6 6
bbc
But you don't pay any money 'up front' it's all paid by the government and if you are fortunate enough to earn good money you are asked to pay a small amount of it back.
511
01/04/2021 15:26:55 4 1
bbc
No, they were blamed for spreading the virus when they held illegal house parties
47
01/04/2021 12:57:16 33 9
bbc
I'm currently working at a University campus and if you told me Unis were still closed I wouldn't believe you.
36
01/04/2021 12:51:21 56 7
bbc
Not just the cost monetarily either, first year in particular is a huge life experience that they've lost forever. 'First World problem' perhaps, but still. I genuinely feel sorry for them.
48
01/04/2021 12:57:23 8 2
bbc
All true. And for final year students, no graduation and more importantly, a paltry job market.

i.e. more pain and suffering than previous cohorts, with less coping resources and much less reward.

But somehow, there are those who think paying the same fee for the experience is fair?
113
01/04/2021 13:20:00 7 10
bbc
and still those who don't go to uni seem to survive..
49
01/04/2021 12:57:26 16 7
bbc
There's no advantage to them going back early. The damage has already been done. Let's get through this and let them start afresh in September.
50
01/04/2021 12:57:29 57 20
bbc
I feel incredibly terrible for students. A friend of mine's daughter is just finishing her final year - no socialising, no transfer of ideas around campus, no clubs, no careers guidance, nothing.

And now, the university has sent an email saying that graduation in July is cancelled and degrees will be sent out by post. The students deserve something better.
66
01/04/2021 13:05:21 21 27
bbc
Still, if it saves just one life, eh...?
97
01/04/2021 13:15:57 16 23
bbc
For ‘socialising’ for some, read ‘getting drunk, getting smashed on drugs, getting pregnant, making a xxxxxx nuisance to the more sensible students and public’.
543
Gaz
01/04/2021 15:41:34 3 1
bbc
some universities are still holding graduations and also arranging additional virtual graduations, so your comment about one university is skewed.
572
01/04/2021 15:58:25 2 1
bbc
Surely the point of university is the development of life skills, knowledge and being in contact with experts in their field? Socialising? You don’t have to go to uni for that. Do you really want masses of students and proud families packed together at a degree ceremony. Another super-spreader event.
590
01/04/2021 16:21:41 0 0
bbc
I have this picture of half pissed students studying their subject, my experience is most mixing is outside one's own subject so pull the other one
636
02/04/2021 11:34:13 1 0
bbc
Of course our young people deserve better, but what do you suggest? Just like for the rest of us, students have had to make the best of it, and there is genuinely little purpose in seeking someone to blame, or "do something". Everything that can be done, is being done. The best thing older generations can do is get the jab and maintain social distancing.
51
01/04/2021 12:57:42 22 14
bbc
What's the point in them going back?

Keep them home for the rest of the year.

It was students going to uni at the end of Sep/beginning of Oct that started the large second wave of cases. Absolutely no question about that. Cases went from around 5k a day last week of Sep to 15k a day by Oct 7th. Check the Covid dashboard map, VAST majority of these cases were around big unis.
83
01/04/2021 13:10:02 8 3
bbc
Except that it takes a couple of weeks for infections to show up... and the timing is a better fit for when schools went back. Unis were all testing students and reporting their case numbers, etc. so we'd know if they were the reason.
112
01/04/2021 13:19:54 3 2
bbc
Not totally convinced by your analysis here, but even if it is correct, it is not proportional to cancel the rest of the university year as vaccination has made coronavirus significantly less dangerous
281
01/04/2021 14:02:27 3 2
bbc
At the end of the day most of the deaths are in the over 75s, maybe if they followed the rules they might not have caught it, it’s so easy to blame the young. The rules are there to stop you catching it just as much as they are to stop you spreading it.
41
01/04/2021 12:52:20 134 63
bbc
There seems to be no acceptance that the young, students and school children in particular, have been by far the worst affected by this last year with their future's jeperdised and their lives put on hold without a word of thanks from the older generations.
52
01/04/2021 12:58:00 33 14
bbc
Couldn't agree more.

The same group who have demanded as such have then gone on to claim the moral highground by branding anyone who doesn't agree with them as selfish.
Rather ironic.
73
01/04/2021 13:07:14 27 9
bbc
Yes. I know this article is about university students but for the last 12 months, children haven't been allowed to be children.

Beyond the personal impact, that is absolutely terrible for the long term future of this country.
53
01/04/2021 12:58:48 19 14
bbc
Being at University is so much more than education. It's a life experience. Making new friends and connections. A transition from childhood to adulthood. Studying from home doesn't provide that. Missing out on the Uni experience can damage mental wellbeing, as well as personal development. (Said as a father of two children who have not been able to return to university but are hoping to soon)
75
01/04/2021 13:07:30 12 4
bbc
Unfortunately too many, like you, believe education is about schooling and university courses. Education is about life experiences which will, hopefully, inspire one to become a better more caring person and live a fulfilling life. Time at home should provide some of that education and university may provide more. If you want to be educated open your mind to every experience and learn from it.
82
01/04/2021 13:09:51 6 5
bbc
What a little d of whimps today’s students seem to be.
85
mc
01/04/2021 13:04:28 6 3
bbc
and get drunk, no social distance and litter patks is their experience
175
01/04/2021 13:40:10 5 1
bbc
"Being at University is so much more than education. It's a life experience."

Prior to B.Liar, untold millions of us never had this "life experience" and you know what? Untold millions of us made something of our lives, got on, progressed through the ranks, raised families, paid taxes and added to our "life experience" regularly. Not everyone needs to go to university. Glad I never did.
189
01/04/2021 13:42:53 4 0
bbc
And yet those who don't go to uni seem to survive..
4
01/04/2021 12:37:51 21 1
bbc
Scientists and academics insisted , so you can't have it both ways.
54
01/04/2021 12:45:41 2 2
bbc
If people hadn't been paid furlough and the like there would have been vastly fewer lockdown cheerleaders.

I've hardly been touched by lockdown, but many millions have been crucified by it. This is especially true for our young people. And I'm under no illusion that we will ALL eventually pay dearly for the government's profligacy.
16
01/04/2021 12:43:03 36 24
bbc
Lets not undo all the sacrifices that people of this country have done this past year by risking yet another spike and wave due to students spreading. It was no surprise that after students went back last year that the covid figures rocketed. Let's wait until ALL adults are vaccinated, THEN allow students to have face to face teaching. To do otherwise is too risky and it's not needed.
55
01/04/2021 12:49:16 7 1
bbc
As per the article above, an estimated 2/3 of students have already returned to campus, with no evidence to suggest any effect on cases. Asking the remainder to not see their friends or play sport etc. for a nine-month period would be an absolute worst case scenario. That's in addition to the mass expansion of testing in universities since last October.
56
01/04/2021 13:00:03 31 12
bbc
If education was the priority then Universities would restart in April. But Johnson wants pubs and restaurants fully open by mid-May, and he doesn't want to do that against a backdrop of rising cases. I'm afraid the students will have to wait.
65
01/04/2021 13:04:25 22 12
bbc
So some refund would be fair, no?
19
01/04/2021 12:45:41 6 8
bbc
should copy the german model of industry.less reliance on the financial services.
57
01/04/2021 12:51:33 7 0
bbc
What has that got to do with this story?
40
01/04/2021 12:51:58 93 12
bbc
As a student myself, I care less about the in-person teaching, bar practical learning, than the other things university is for. No, I don't mean drinking and clubbing. Sports, libraries, recreation areas... All closed.

I miss seeing and meeting people that like to do things I like.
58
01/04/2021 13:00:36 88 26
bbc
That isn't limited to students. We're all in the same boat! The whole country hasn't been able to see and meet people and do what we like, students aren't the exception.
71
01/04/2021 13:06:51 9 7
bbc
Prior to March 29th, you'd be right. But the situation has changed. Now students are isolated from their university friends at home, unable to participate in college sport or outdoor chats. Anyone at home can play in their usual local clubs and meet with their local friends, so it's a very different situation. Meanwhile, those already at campus are left isolated waiting for others to return.
74
01/04/2021 13:07:18 15 31
bbc
At least the students seem to realise what they're missing.

Most of the country seems to just shrug their shoulders and accept that they've just had a year of their lives stolen from them to try and buy some 82.3 year old a few extra months in a care home.
103
01/04/2021 13:17:38 14 15
bbc
And that's the kind of empathetic and understanding that riles up the younger folk like nothing else. And rightly so.

Students have almost nothing to fear themselves from this virus but are still paying a heavy price on many fronts. Show some respect.
151
01/04/2021 13:29:24 21 10
bbc
In fairness to students, the rest of us haven’t paid upwards of £15k in tuition and accommodation fees to stay at home.
261
01/04/2021 13:57:29 9 9
bbc
You aren’t paying £9500 a year to do that though. Those in paid employment have been given furlough, we’ve not seen any change in maintenance loans and I’m paying tuition for a neuroscience degree in which I haven’t been able to go into a lab.
291
01/04/2021 14:06:21 5 6
bbc
but they did spend £9500 for an experience they did not get!
306
01/04/2021 14:06:57 1 1
bbc
In fairness we really aren't all in the same boat; it's not affected everyone in the same way. We're all on the same ocean, but some of us have sturdier boats and some are in calmer waters.
388
01/04/2021 14:33:21 4 4
bbc
Are you paying £9.5k not to do these things this year? Because students are.
401
01/04/2021 14:39:05 2 5
bbc
True but they are having to pay a lot for very, very little.
456
01/04/2021 15:01:31 3 3
bbc
What??? The point is you are not paying £9.5k for a sub-standard education & experience!!!
581
01/04/2021 16:08:44 4 0
bbc
I predict once we can all meet normally again we will spend the next 12 months moaning about the last 12 months.
606
01/04/2021 16:55:14 1 1
bbc
It's not a competition. How about "yes, it must be really hard for you". What happened to empathy in this country?
59
01/04/2021 12:53:53 2 2
bbc
Our university teaching for the year ended in March. This is a bit late
60
01/04/2021 13:01:39 19 7
bbc
Loads of students travelling all over the country to resume studies. What could go wrong?
479
01/04/2021 15:11:33 0 1
bbc
Most of them got it in October so I wouldn’t worry. One of my daughter’s flat mates tested positive in week 2 of term 1 and most of the rest of them had symptoms after so had to isolate for 2 weeks
495
01/04/2021 15:18:56 0 1
bbc
That's what testing is for. Boarding schools reopened and students travelled from all over. Testing made sure they didn't spread the virus.
609
01/04/2021 17:01:59 0 1
bbc
Probably nothing.
31
01/04/2021 12:49:27 4 4
bbc
Unis seem to treat education as a necessary evil, anyone who has sat in classes full of Chinese who can't speak a word of English (but pay huge tuition fees as international students) knows that they exist primarily as money factories these days. They also offer plenty of good opportunities for academics to rinse the system with eyewatering salaries.
61
01/04/2021 13:02:14 8 2
bbc
I was with you until that last sentence.

Universities have indeed been turned into a purely money-spinning enterprise under this (and previous) governments, with education taking a back seat.

But "eyewatering salaries" for academics!?! Crikey, I wish (I am one).

If there are any eyewatering salaries, they're at the overstuffed management and bureaucratic level - NOT lecturers and researchers.
62
01/04/2021 13:02:32 8 6
bbc
We have had students on campus throughout for those that have nowhere else to study. These students seem to have trouble wearing masks and social distancing. Getting them all back will pretty much guarantee a surge in infections. Universities are worried about having to give refunds to students rather than the health and wellbeing of their staff.
63
01/04/2021 13:02:47 5 11
bbc
And what exactly have the lecturers and Tutors etc been doing all this time ?
64
01/04/2021 13:03:52 2 7
bbc
Getting paid... by the students...
67
01/04/2021 13:05:35 5 0
bbc
doing lectures and tutorials via video
70
01/04/2021 13:06:21 4 1
bbc
Teaching students online! Working a lot harder than usual!
94
01/04/2021 13:15:36 4 1
bbc
Working extra hard. Providing additional learning materials. Having a lot of contact in terms of 1 to 1 tutorials. Walking into a class and delivering a lecture was a breeze compared to this. Your comment sounds like a scene from a well known Monty Python film - 'what have the Romans ever done for us?' You should check your facts.
190
01/04/2021 13:43:24 0 1
bbc
Never one afraid to show their ignorance eh?
63
01/04/2021 13:02:47 5 11
bbc
And what exactly have the lecturers and Tutors etc been doing all this time ?
64
01/04/2021 13:03:52 2 7
bbc
Getting paid... by the students...
56
01/04/2021 13:00:03 31 12
bbc
If education was the priority then Universities would restart in April. But Johnson wants pubs and restaurants fully open by mid-May, and he doesn't want to do that against a backdrop of rising cases. I'm afraid the students will have to wait.
65
01/04/2021 13:04:25 22 12
bbc
So some refund would be fair, no?
77
01/04/2021 13:07:52 8 7
bbc
No!
50
01/04/2021 12:57:29 57 20
bbc
I feel incredibly terrible for students. A friend of mine's daughter is just finishing her final year - no socialising, no transfer of ideas around campus, no clubs, no careers guidance, nothing.

And now, the university has sent an email saying that graduation in July is cancelled and degrees will be sent out by post. The students deserve something better.
66
01/04/2021 13:05:21 21 27
bbc
Still, if it saves just one life, eh...?
63
01/04/2021 13:02:47 5 11
bbc
And what exactly have the lecturers and Tutors etc been doing all this time ?
67
01/04/2021 13:05:35 5 0
bbc
doing lectures and tutorials via video
42
01/04/2021 12:53:29 31 16
bbc
I think we all agree that it’s been awful for students. Working online. No socialising... oh hang on..that’s what we’ve all been doing. The only difference is they’re out of pocket for student accommodation and the tuition hasn’t been acceptable.
One of the causes of wave 2 was students and kids going back to uni/school. Ie. Spreaders with (often) little self control or impact.
Why do it again?
68
01/04/2021 13:05:38 10 8
bbc
Accommodation and tuition hasn't been acceptable.

Sounds like the basis for some sort of refund to me?
169
01/04/2021 13:37:03 3 1
bbc
Agreed. Whatever one's views of university, students and all the rest of it, those who have no received anything in return for their fees should of course have the fees refunded. I know paying through the nose and getting damn all back is normal in adult life in the UK, so perhaps that's the idea, but really the universities have no excuse at all not to refund monies.
69
01/04/2021 13:05:55 3 3
bbc
The whole point on the RG promoting a fast return to the lecture halls is so they can say they offered a face to face service and not offer refunds for a totally online experience
63
01/04/2021 13:02:47 5 11
bbc
And what exactly have the lecturers and Tutors etc been doing all this time ?
70
01/04/2021 13:06:21 4 1
bbc
Teaching students online! Working a lot harder than usual!
58
01/04/2021 13:00:36 88 26
bbc
That isn't limited to students. We're all in the same boat! The whole country hasn't been able to see and meet people and do what we like, students aren't the exception.
71
01/04/2021 13:06:51 9 7
bbc
Prior to March 29th, you'd be right. But the situation has changed. Now students are isolated from their university friends at home, unable to participate in college sport or outdoor chats. Anyone at home can play in their usual local clubs and meet with their local friends, so it's a very different situation. Meanwhile, those already at campus are left isolated waiting for others to return.
180
01/04/2021 13:41:06 15 2
bbc
That literally makes NO sense.

What do you mean students are unable to participate in outdoor chats?

Did you see the scenes at Woodhouse Park, Leeds the other day. Students were very much participating in outdoor chats!
72
01/04/2021 13:07:01 88 7
bbc
I'm a lecturer and have been providing very high levels of support to my students. Extra long online sessions with lots of email support. We're doing our very best and student feedback has been excellent. I won't be doing face to face teaching any time soon as I'm in a very vulnerable group and not had second jab. I feel sorry for the students who are missing out on social life etc but we all are.
218
BBC
01/04/2021 13:50:22 42 5
bbc
No sane person would deny your right to protect yourself, or that you have done your best by your students in extraordinary circumstances, but it is outrageous if the students affected are not given a discount on their fees in recognition of what they have lost out on.
428
01/04/2021 14:49:05 2 1
bbc
As per schools, there are some providing good online teaching and some who are still technologically deficient and some who have not adapted their teaching style. Feedback maybe that it is good online support but this does not mean everyone would rather discuss the subject face to face i.e. the point of a university. Otherwise why not an online university without 9500 fees and without buildings
435
01/04/2021 14:50:57 7 0
bbc
It’s ironic, that many students are actually getting a better teaching experience than normal. The pandemic has required online lecturers to be edited and designed specifically for online delivery, in previous years this would have just been a video of the lecture hall. I’ve spent more time giving one 2 one feedback online than I would’ve done face 2 face in normal times.
521
01/04/2021 15:33:00 2 1
bbc
Thank you paulinhackney
That said, from my experience, you are in a minority of one of lecturers who has been giving a quality service to their students. Most of your peers appear that they could not give 2 hoots about the students, lectures or learning, only securing the next grant for their research.
52
01/04/2021 12:58:00 33 14
bbc
Couldn't agree more.

The same group who have demanded as such have then gone on to claim the moral highground by branding anyone who doesn't agree with them as selfish.
Rather ironic.
73
01/04/2021 13:07:14 27 9
bbc
Yes. I know this article is about university students but for the last 12 months, children haven't been allowed to be children.

Beyond the personal impact, that is absolutely terrible for the long term future of this country.
402
01/04/2021 14:39:16 4 1
bbc
Agree, if a 3 year old has been isolating with her parents since last March owing to a parent's health risks, she has missed out on a lot. Teenagers, though, don't appear to have followed the rules except in class, and that doesn't say much for their long term future.
58
01/04/2021 13:00:36 88 26
bbc
That isn't limited to students. We're all in the same boat! The whole country hasn't been able to see and meet people and do what we like, students aren't the exception.
74
01/04/2021 13:07:18 15 31
bbc
At least the students seem to realise what they're missing.

Most of the country seems to just shrug their shoulders and accept that they've just had a year of their lives stolen from them to try and buy some 82.3 year old a few extra months in a care home.
53
01/04/2021 12:58:48 19 14
bbc
Being at University is so much more than education. It's a life experience. Making new friends and connections. A transition from childhood to adulthood. Studying from home doesn't provide that. Missing out on the Uni experience can damage mental wellbeing, as well as personal development. (Said as a father of two children who have not been able to return to university but are hoping to soon)
75
01/04/2021 13:07:30 12 4
bbc
Unfortunately too many, like you, believe education is about schooling and university courses. Education is about life experiences which will, hopefully, inspire one to become a better more caring person and live a fulfilling life. Time at home should provide some of that education and university may provide more. If you want to be educated open your mind to every experience and learn from it.
76
01/04/2021 13:07:38 6 3
bbc
Students who wish to return should be allowed to return from 12 April.

Ignoring the online/in person teaching debate, enforcing a ban on the return to university deprives students of:
- a location conducive to study
- study resources such as libraries
- participation in organised sports (which is already permitted in England)
- the growth in independence brought by university.
65
01/04/2021 13:04:25 22 12
bbc
So some refund would be fair, no?
77
01/04/2021 13:07:52 8 7
bbc
No!
87
01/04/2021 13:12:05 7 3
bbc
And why is that?

We have paid the same as previous cohorts, but got much less from it.
10
01/04/2021 12:41:48 84 22
bbc
Similar to my council tax!
78
01/04/2021 13:08:07 2 2
bbc
Would be funny if it wasn't true!
79
01/04/2021 13:08:20 58 23
bbc
Students have been the losers in this pandemic. And still the university chancellors sit there with their huge salaries and refuse to refund any tuition fees. They should be made to. Young people have been well and truly shafted.
384
01/04/2021 14:32:20 7 4
bbc
What's the average chancellor fee per student?
80
01/04/2021 13:08:21 13 10
bbc
As a grandparent I am disgusted that students are paying full whack for 2nd rate tuition.
Its time that the fat cat Vice Chancellors and Lecturers got off their backsides and supported reduction in fees for students. Yes everyone has suffered in this pandemic but there are opportunities for providing value for money. Universities aren't giving this.
110
01/04/2021 13:18:56 4 4
bbc
Those reductions will have to be underpinned by the government though, otherwise universities will have to reduce facilities for students in the future. Several universities and colleges in the UK will go bust. If that happens, your grandchildren will have worse experiences for the rest of their courses and may even be forced to attend a different university that they didn't originally choose.
23
01/04/2021 12:47:26 25 24
bbc
Come off it, Bryce, university term is almost done by now anyway. Exams in May and then done 'til September.

I say let people see each other again. Can't be many people that have made sacrifices to their living as much as students have, of whom the virus barely affects.
81
01/04/2021 13:09:36 2 6
bbc
Maybe for Russell Group Universities, the rest will be teaching into July. Your comment about the virus not affecting students is the kind of selfish behaviour that will lead to another surge in infections, it's not about how sick you get but about the others you infect. Have you not been paying attention in class?
227
01/04/2021 13:51:59 1 1
bbc
Do you have any evidence to support these claims, i.e., hard evidence that students moving caused mass infections? It should not be difficult to find an `expert' to look for minute changes in data, produce a `publication' and then `warn' about the consequences? Publication here means `in a paper published today but not yet peer-reviewed'. Many false tales have just this starting point.
53
01/04/2021 12:58:48 19 14
bbc
Being at University is so much more than education. It's a life experience. Making new friends and connections. A transition from childhood to adulthood. Studying from home doesn't provide that. Missing out on the Uni experience can damage mental wellbeing, as well as personal development. (Said as a father of two children who have not been able to return to university but are hoping to soon)
82
01/04/2021 13:09:51 6 5
bbc
What a little d of whimps today’s students seem to be.
51
01/04/2021 12:57:42 22 14
bbc
What's the point in them going back?

Keep them home for the rest of the year.

It was students going to uni at the end of Sep/beginning of Oct that started the large second wave of cases. Absolutely no question about that. Cases went from around 5k a day last week of Sep to 15k a day by Oct 7th. Check the Covid dashboard map, VAST majority of these cases were around big unis.
83
01/04/2021 13:10:02 8 3
bbc
Except that it takes a couple of weeks for infections to show up... and the timing is a better fit for when schools went back. Unis were all testing students and reporting their case numbers, etc. so we'd know if they were the reason.
155
01/04/2021 13:30:32 4 2
bbc
Completely wrong

An example. Manchester Uni, one of main areas for students is Fallowfield. In the 7 days to 2nd October there were 1025 cases reported. That is 881 more than the prior week. I could give dozens more similar examples
It is an absolute fact that students travelling all around the country & then not social distancing caused cases to spike massively at the end of Sep/beginning of Oct
37
01/04/2021 12:51:38 37 28
bbc
And what about the nightmare it has been for University lecturing staff, or have you forgot about them?
84
01/04/2021 13:10:06 20 10
bbc
Couldn't agree more. My freinds who are uni lecturers have been working 24/7 to prepare online teaching from scratch. Effective online teaching is far from talking on zoom, and everyone I know in the uni sector, like the NHS, teachers and others in the public sector have been doing their best with very little extra support. Yes, they have kept their jobs, but at a huge price.
140
01/04/2021 13:25:44 17 16
bbc
I'd wager that your friends are the exception; most uni lecturers are there for the research and couldn't give a monkeys about the teaching because it's an inconvenience. The universities tacitly accept this because ultimately most of them are money machines hungry for research investment.
Most rank and file uni employees are so slack they even put the public sector to shame.
150
01/04/2021 13:29:17 8 1
bbc
Very nice that some are doing it live. We get some pre-recorded videos from 2017 and at the end get asked "any questions?"
215
01/04/2021 13:48:38 2 12
bbc
public sector skiver supporting other public sector skivers - no surprises
603
01/04/2021 16:43:19 2 0
bbc
I doubt they have been working 24/7. You probably meant a few hours each weekday and got carried away.
53
01/04/2021 12:58:48 19 14
bbc
Being at University is so much more than education. It's a life experience. Making new friends and connections. A transition from childhood to adulthood. Studying from home doesn't provide that. Missing out on the Uni experience can damage mental wellbeing, as well as personal development. (Said as a father of two children who have not been able to return to university but are hoping to soon)
85
mc
01/04/2021 13:04:28 6 3
bbc
and get drunk, no social distance and litter patks is their experience
86
01/04/2021 13:11:18 3 3
bbc
Miserable Univ students

Don't forget to get refund for a zoom teaching or if they reject, go on streets like students in Bristol !!!
77
01/04/2021 13:07:52 8 7
bbc
No!
87
01/04/2021 13:12:05 7 3
bbc
And why is that?

We have paid the same as previous cohorts, but got much less from it.
104
01/04/2021 13:17:48 1 3
bbc
It the "Cohort" word again.

Sounds like a tribe of Mongolise Tribesmen to me or a group of blackshirts at a Nuremburg rally.

Must be a nicer word to use for a grouping of people
228
Ben
01/04/2021 13:52:00 4 0
bbc
You are still getting the exact same degree, aren't you?
88
mc
01/04/2021 13:06:21 7 10
bbc
it is students who have caused this and still are as they do not care how they behave , crowding parks, leaving litter, illegal parties -keep them away from us
89
01/04/2021 13:12:56 34 7
bbc
A major 'shakedown' of Universities is long over due. Their near-total reliance on overseas students to make them financially viable, is a major issue and needs addressing. Many students have been 'ripped off' this year due to the fact that their money is keeping many Universities afloat. The fall out from the pandemic will hopefully lead to some of the lesser, lower-league, Universities closing.
249
01/04/2021 13:55:23 17 8
bbc
Hoping that institutions close is a very selfish approach. It won't be great for the students that go to those universities, or the people who work there, or the local economies that rely on their students.
7
01/04/2021 12:39:24 158 21
bbc
As a student, I can say 17 May is after my final exam and coursework submission date. There will literally be no point in returning for many students.

Which means the entire year has been online, devoid of any social life, sharing of ideas, etc. NOT what was signed up to for £9.5k per year.
90
01/04/2021 13:13:03 21 7
bbc
If you are moaning about the 9.5k, blame the government for monetising what, in a civilised society, should be free to all who want to benefit from it - education.
109
01/04/2021 13:18:42 10 5
bbc
I am aware of that.

However we have had less for it than previous cohorts - because of covid - and will get less than future cohorts too. Online lectures, solitary confinement, no graduation, a p**** poor graduate jobs market.

Universities have "no detriment" in place (for exams etc), but the above smacks precisely of "detriment", which we will carry for many years.
153
01/04/2021 13:29:57 19 6
bbc
In 1997 Labour insisted tuition fees would be kept free. Blair said: “Labour has no plans to introduce tuition fees for higher education.” Cook said: “We are quite clear that tuition costs must be met by the state.” Just two months after becoming PM Blair introduced tuition fees.
Then in 2003 he increased fees to £3k a year. Gradss would have to start repaying them aT £15,000.
Screwed by Labour.
204
01/04/2021 13:45:06 3 4
bbc
By "government" do you mean "the labour party"?
417
01/04/2021 14:43:18 3 1
bbc
Not everyone is able to progress as far as university so it would be inherently unfair to make the less fortunate pay for the fortunate to gain an even greater advantage (education) over them.
91
sue
01/04/2021 13:08:54 42 6
bbc
Interesting this, as my daughter appears to have pretty much finished her second year of university today, with just 'Assessment Weeks' over two weeks in May. I think she's had one or two face to face lectures in March. Value for money? No. The whole thing is a debacle, she's doing a practical course which is pretty near impossible online. I'm supporting her financially, I feel aggrieved too!
545
Gaz
01/04/2021 15:42:12 4 7
bbc
you should check if your daughter is telling the truth.
584
01/04/2021 16:15:46 5 0
bbc
Just as students may not attend lectures, they’re not forced to view the online lectures either. There are those who have made good use of the time in accepting the help the lecturers are offering, there are, of course, those who haven’t. Human nature.
592
01/04/2021 16:23:35 2 1
bbc
Pity you don't give her subject/s, but have to expect you think she will fail then
92
01/04/2021 13:14:13 8 8
bbc
And what will the students probably do the minute they go back? Same as usual, out on the lash, gathering in irresponsibly large numbers, potentially spreading the plague? Perhaps Boris wants to reward the long-suffering grownups with a few pleasant evenings out with friends before the hordes arrive in college towns?
123
01/04/2021 13:22:01 0 3
bbc
Some of us have been on campus the whole time, and I can tell you there is more activity down the local cemetery.
93
01/04/2021 13:15:05 23 8
bbc
Universities are no longer about providing a good education and a useful degree.

For the last 15 years or so they have been about feather bedding and overpaying Vice Chancellors and their ilk.

How can a uni Vice Chancellor justify a salary of 3X that of the Prime Minister?

Sack them all and bring in people who will simply run the place on a salary of £60-£80k a year. There will be a queue.
192
01/04/2021 13:43:53 8 3
bbc
I know Inspector Morse was fiction but the author went to university. I always remember Morse, when discussing how "poverty-stricken" some colleges were, commented that there was always money for gallons of claret and banquets, etc. Perhaps all these super-brains should try a little prioritising and budgeting like everyone else has to do.
451
01/04/2021 14:59:50 1 0
bbc
I remember seeing a league table of Principal and VC salaries some years back.

The bottom spot went to someone who was in charge of a 'university' that had worse metrics than a nearby secondary school. The Principal there had to make do on a paltry £105k - meanwhile his counterpart at said school would be doing very well to scrape 60% of that.
633
ww
02/04/2021 09:38:07 0 1
bbc
Vice Chancellor pay is less than it would be if they were running a company of that size with that amount of revenue and employees. It's a business they run, after all..
63
01/04/2021 13:02:47 5 11
bbc
And what exactly have the lecturers and Tutors etc been doing all this time ?
94
01/04/2021 13:15:36 4 1
bbc
Working extra hard. Providing additional learning materials. Having a lot of contact in terms of 1 to 1 tutorials. Walking into a class and delivering a lecture was a breeze compared to this. Your comment sounds like a scene from a well known Monty Python film - 'what have the Romans ever done for us?' You should check your facts.
95
01/04/2021 13:15:38 0 0
bbc
I mean, they are naturally going to be concerned with those kinds of fees...
96
01/04/2021 13:11:05 13 7
bbc
If I was a student I'd drop my course and go and do some on the job training. Britain is booming and we are crying out for people to come and learn skills from us old hands.
116
01/04/2021 13:20:34 3 5
bbc
Learn how to harvest shellfish for the booming export market?
120
01/04/2021 13:21:21 5 2
bbc
Might be more viable if you weren't on your second or third year and already at least £18k in student debt!
206
01/04/2021 13:46:08 2 4
bbc
Comments like that suggest that u never were and never will be a student.
219
01/04/2021 13:50:22 3 3
bbc
Britain is booming? Okay...
330
01/04/2021 14:12:48 3 2
bbc
Britain is booming? It's gone midday, you're too late for April Fools jokes.
50
01/04/2021 12:57:29 57 20
bbc
I feel incredibly terrible for students. A friend of mine's daughter is just finishing her final year - no socialising, no transfer of ideas around campus, no clubs, no careers guidance, nothing.

And now, the university has sent an email saying that graduation in July is cancelled and degrees will be sent out by post. The students deserve something better.
97
01/04/2021 13:15:57 16 23
bbc
For ‘socialising’ for some, read ‘getting drunk, getting smashed on drugs, getting pregnant, making a xxxxxx nuisance to the more sensible students and public’.
143
01/04/2021 13:26:23 10 3
bbc
For "some". "Some" also applies to everyone else.
98
01/04/2021 13:16:02 7 6
bbc
Keep them at home, the premature return to college last September was the most significant reason for the resurgence of the second wave. In recent days, you only have to see how irresponsible young people are, thronging in local parks, disregarding social distancing or any other social behaviour and leaving their mess!
114
01/04/2021 13:20:21 4 3
bbc
I agree that the mess they've left behind is a poor show.

But otherwise I 100% endorse them getting on with their lives while the bedwetters cower behind their sofas.
115
01/04/2021 13:20:26 0 3
bbc
Actually evidence from the local University indicates that around 95% were infected last Autumn, the great majority tested positive but were asymptomatic which meant it spread faster. There fore there is a low risk now and students return April face to face teaching from May. Some of them got mighty fed up of living with their parents and returned to independent living out accommodation ages ago!
117
01/04/2021 13:20:40 4 4
bbc
Here we go again with more ageist rubbish.

IDIOTS are responsible for this mess. Young AND old.
41
01/04/2021 12:52:20 134 63
bbc
There seems to be no acceptance that the young, students and school children in particular, have been by far the worst affected by this last year with their future's jeperdised and their lives put on hold without a word of thanks from the older generations.
99
01/04/2021 13:16:53 29 17
bbc
Couldn’t agree more. In fact many young people have been labelled selfish. Seems to me they have given up more than enough to protect the elderly and vulnerable. But the young don’t vote so they will be very low down on the pecking order.
248
01/04/2021 13:55:14 6 0
bbc
Most uni students vote!
46
01/04/2021 12:56:27 130 25
bbc
Students have been mistreated throughout this pandemic:
Ordered back to campus or they'd risk forfeiting their degree.
Asked for all money upfront and not given refunds when they could not longer use their accommodation.
Locked in halls, then blamed for spreading the virus when they were sharing bathrooms and kitchens with hundreds of kids from around the country.
Ordered home, left hanging.
100
01/04/2021 13:17:37 48 141
bbc
Stop wingeing and get a grip on reality.
148
b5
01/04/2021 13:28:55 28 12
bbc
This is their reality and it has been very hard. Would you want to be in this position? Have some compassion.
161
01/04/2021 13:33:36 11 16
bbc
Anyone with a real grip would see that this is all hysterical over reaction!
194
01/04/2021 13:44:06 18 11
bbc
The reality is that students aren’t affected by Covid, but they’ve had to give up so much for the people who are.
289
01/04/2021 14:05:27 8 6
bbc
This is the reality - when have you spent £9500 and have nothing to show for it
317
BBC
01/04/2021 14:10:16 5 1
bbc
You're all heart.
416
01/04/2021 14:42:56 5 2
bbc
As a father of a student in her third year I know where I would like to get grip of
They’ll be paying for your pension you cretin Removed