PwC says start when you like, leave when you like
31/03/2021 | news | business | 902
Accountancy giant staff can choose the hours they work and mix home and office following pandemic.
1
31/03/2021 14:10:17 28 4
bbc
Good luck to them. You'd hope the goodwill will go a long way, and the commitment from the majority will outweigh the p***takers.
2
31/03/2021 14:10:31 9 8
bbc
"I mean you can.. but all your colleagues will see you not being a team player, because unlike you they're not lazy. But you CAN. Not that you will. Because of the implications. But you can."
3
31/03/2021 14:10:33 60 11
bbc
Who are the sandwich sellers you're trying to protect Rishi? Pret?
11
31/03/2021 14:13:20 18 146
bbc
Bad move for the economy.

Need to do more to encourage people back to work and actively dissuade home-working.
4
31/03/2021 14:11:10 2 3
bbc
I'm off.
5
31/03/2021 14:12:08 5 12
bbc
As if Accountants / Accountancy isn't boring enough as it is. Now we are supposed to get excited about how they organise their work schedules. ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ!
It would be nice if working from home resulted in lower prices for Accountancy Services but I very much doubt that.
65
31/03/2021 14:17:52 3 0
bbc
They're not just Accountants
6
31/03/2021 14:12:09 96 24
bbc
They are not the only ones moving to a more flexible way of working. Dinosaurs like Goldman Sachs are rapidly going to find themselves short of recruits.
40
31/03/2021 14:22:48 33 7
bbc
I think to a certain extent that will be determined by salary levels
46
31/03/2021 14:23:57 12 0
bbc
Maybe you should look at what GS pay vs PWC before saying that
66
31/03/2021 14:18:11 10 2
bbc
Can absolutely assure you that people will still give their left limb to work for Goldman Sachs regardless of working conditions, particularly when you’re earning a high 5 figure salary at the age of 22!
521
31/03/2021 17:47:07 6 0
bbc
But Goldman will offer higher salaries and bonuses and there will always be those for whom money is the prime driver alas.
780
31/03/2021 21:16:23 1 0
bbc
quite possibly the funniest statement i have seen: econ downturn \ shortage of jobs \ massive salaries... THINK before you type.
7
31/03/2021 14:12:24 4 12
bbc
I think this is personally quite dangerous. Will set a culture for people arriving early and finishing late to show their peers they are 'working hard.'
15
Bob
31/03/2021 14:14:24 13 1
bbc
The working late thing already happens.

Maybe it will get people to recognise someone that starts early can go home early without being judged.
827
31/03/2021 22:12:34 1 0
bbc
But what if early and late no longer had any meaning in the geographical sense. What I think may be a problem is digital presenteeism, with people being scared of showing themselves as unavailable.
8
31/03/2021 14:12:25 6 15
bbc
Advisors have to be contactable when their clients want them to be. This isn't going to work.
9
31/03/2021 14:12:29 10 6
bbc
This is a very welcome development which I hope is taken up in other sectors including mine (Higher Education). Working from home is a fantastic option but it's also nice to work from the office sometimes. You can't build the same relationships and get the same mentoring through Zoom that you get from being in the Room.

And staring at/talking to a screen day after day is emotionally draining.
10
Bob
31/03/2021 14:12:48 110 22
bbc
You will still get sad acts staying late just to look good.

Go home get on with living a life.
53
31/03/2021 14:26:12 38 66
bbc
I worked for PwC in the past and have to say they always put their employees interests at the heart of their business.

And this is another excellent example of that. They genuinely believe in the well being of their staff.
131
31/03/2021 14:44:14 4 2
bbc
"You get what you pay for"
191
31/03/2021 14:55:41 7 1
bbc
I think it's called the Fear Factor or FOMO. Unfortunately those who choose to start late and leave early will possibly be those who are chosen for redundancy further down the line. Those who stay late may believe they're impressing the boss in an attempt to save their skin. Many companies don't care about life outside work. It's all about making and saving money.
550
31/03/2021 18:05:20 1 0
bbc
and get fired.
594
31/03/2021 18:26:29 0 1
bbc
But they don't have a life.
777
31/03/2021 21:14:36 0 0
bbc
says the man living in a corporate panacea. Quite funny actually.
814
31/03/2021 22:01:30 1 0
bbc
Part of 'living a life' usually involves making an effort at a job to pay for it. Life isn't always about doing as you please 100% of the time, it requires a bit of input and effort from people. Today's snowflakes can't even be bothered to catch a bus to the office, it upsets their 'work life balance'.
3
31/03/2021 14:10:33 60 11
bbc
Who are the sandwich sellers you're trying to protect Rishi? Pret?
11
31/03/2021 14:13:20 18 146
bbc
Bad move for the economy.

Need to do more to encourage people back to work and actively dissuade home-working.
110
31/03/2021 14:39:25 16 3
bbc
Ain't happening. Laissez-faire Toryism means the government cannot tell ANYONE not to work from home. It is the employer's decision.
154
31/03/2021 14:47:47 29 3
bbc
My staff have been absolute troupers through the pandemic - showing great flexibility, finding new ways of working and generally just getting the job done. I really do not understand why we would force them back to the office. Not a great thankyou for their commitment?. I do think most will want to go in some days but I am happy to look at new ways of working - you need to get with the times!
209
BB1
31/03/2021 14:50:07 32 3
bbc
That statement is factually incorrect - Its bad for certain sectors of the economy, that have profiteered off commuters and office workers.

These days, any money I save still circles back into the economy, I just spend it locally with shops and trades-people.. Which is far better for local economy and for me personally.
269
31/03/2021 15:27:56 11 5
bbc
But if I’m at home I’m more likely to spend on the local high street rather than at low tax low skilled immigrant places like pret.
408
31/03/2021 16:28:09 9 3
bbc
People are working effectively from home..dont you see?
547
31/03/2021 18:04:40 10 2
bbc
Well, if by "the economy", you mean baristas and dodgy developers flogging over-priced city centre office tower blocks. Home working is great for rural communities and rural economies. Cry me a river for the big city centres; they've had their day; no longer necessary.
12
31/03/2021 14:14:07 75 11
bbc
Flexible working being offered.

This will be an excellent staff retention scheme.

Not sure anybody is missing the city centre life. Most of the people I know who work in London hate the commuting and only eat out when they miss their train.
13
31/03/2021 14:14:12 4 6
bbc
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56582566

Well come on TUC; do tell us what EU legislation/directives are needed to bring this change about!
24
31/03/2021 14:19:57 2 5
bbc
Still an EU initiative that we are copying . Not something we have come up with ourselves because we are 'sovereign'
29
31/03/2021 14:21:16 1 4
bbc
Sad and desperate clutching at straws from you.

You Tories cannot wait to take away employment rights.
14
31/03/2021 14:14:15 74 14
bbc
Good for the company and good for their staff , I bet there’s a few Tory property investors sweating on this .
Get back to work!

Start putting other people and the economy firsts as opposed to hiding inside behind a screen!
Removed
50
31/03/2021 14:25:06 15 4
bbc
Haha, "Tory property investors". Have you looked where your pension is invested?
144
31/03/2021 14:45:54 6 3
bbc
So, property investors are all Tory are they?
What's that got to do with the price of fish?
Why be political when there's no need?????
7
31/03/2021 14:12:24 4 12
bbc
I think this is personally quite dangerous. Will set a culture for people arriving early and finishing late to show their peers they are 'working hard.'
15
Bob
31/03/2021 14:14:24 13 1
bbc
The working late thing already happens.

Maybe it will get people to recognise someone that starts early can go home early without being judged.
16
31/03/2021 14:16:11 12 24
bbc
Terrible, terrible development.

Pre lockdown there was a well defined and understood barrier between work and home life, which this will erode.

People should consider whether they want the power that companies exert over you extended into your own home life, permanently?

Anyone believing companies are pushing this line for the good of their employees is living in a hopelessly naive fantasy.
20
31/03/2021 14:17:30 21 6
bbc
Dinosaur
22
Bob
31/03/2021 14:17:43 11 1
bbc
Out of office. Turn the phone off.

Crack open a beer.

Relax.
42
31/03/2021 14:23:21 7 3
bbc
1) Employers already have control over how you spend your hours - that’s the nature of work. What WFH can do is put the power in your hands where you spend those hours.

2) You can still have a separation of work and home life when WFH. Put your laptop away and refuse all work-related contact when your time’s up.

3) Do people miss the commute as a “barrier”? It’s just more time spent ‘at work’.
79
31/03/2021 14:33:59 2 1
bbc
Obviously, anyone with an ounce of sense realises that this is also useful for employers who can now spend less on office space and resources. No-one's assuming it's an act of charity. As for work intruding into your home life, as someone who's worked almost exclusively from home since the mid-90s I always found the reverse to be more of a problem! It's a different mindset, but it's very doable.
17
31/03/2021 14:17:14 141 11
bbc
WFH, or a mixture of both home/office is great for some if not most people and should be encouraged. Better for the environment and better for time saved travelling.
Office blocks can be converted to housing. Cafes/restaurants/convenience stores will surely be required nearby.
Boris and Sunak need to have vision.
202
31/03/2021 14:58:11 60 42
bbc
The mix and flexibility is key.

Being at home full time is just the opposite extreme to being in the office full time. It solves nothing and FORCING your staff into undesirable arrangements is inherently unfair.

Sunak is right about some people perhaps wanting to quit if forced to WFH permanently from now on - I know I definitely would.
246
31/03/2021 15:13:42 4 13
bbc
Not convinced this stacks up for the environment. You need an equipped office at home AND an equipped office in the city.

Unless you can strategically plan to have 50% of the space in the city you need plus hot desking for the 50% who come in then you are in with a chance but for small firms (the majority) not an easy balance.
288
31/03/2021 15:33:56 5 3
bbc
Keep the government out of it and let the market decide.
807
31/03/2021 21:56:10 1 0
bbc
Office blocks cannot be 'converted' to housing. Not good quality housing at any rate. The shell might be retained but virtually the whole of the inside needs to be rebuilt, often at higher cost than a completely new build. Flat dwelling is overrated, especially in 'converted' buildings which have poor noise insulation, insufficient car parking and no communal outside space.
18
31/03/2021 14:17:24 244 21
bbc
I've enjoyed working from home. Beats the commute all ends up. If I was an owner of office space I'd be extremely worried
71
31/03/2021 14:30:01 111 6
bbc
Indeed - just as convenience fresh food and drink businesses that service the office worker will be worried.
98
31/03/2021 14:37:55 29 1
bbc
I don’t think that historically businesses have been overly concerned that their paid staff are enjoying their working life. If businesses thrive as a consequence of staff wfh then it will continue (they’ll save money of course) -if businesses fall behind it will come to an abrupt end. The journey to work of their staff isn’t a consideration
111
MDK
31/03/2021 14:39:25 16 1
bbc
Yes all those pension companies invested in office space... going to be an issue there soon
127
31/03/2021 14:43:29 19 3
bbc
Me too, WFH was always my unicorn job, now the company I work for has reduced their office space by two thirds - from 2 buildings down to 1, so I don't think I'll be a perm office plodder anymore.
186
31/03/2021 14:53:59 23 3
bbc
I think the office will chance, it will stop being lines of desks and turn into collaborative work spaces. Much like the high street, I think business will offer improved work spaces to attract people into the office rather than force them. Either way, change is happening and it can only be seen as a positive in my eyes.
239
31/03/2021 15:11:07 6 1
bbc
If you've a pension invested in said office estate ...... may hit us all!
553
31/03/2021 18:07:53 4 3
bbc
Indeed. And those dinosaurs are worried that the tower block rip off era may be drawing to a close, and have been lobbying hard on the PM and the Chancellor, hence the recent scripted, and rather silly, pro-office statements from both gentlemen.
690
31/03/2021 19:53:11 3 2
bbc
Which is why the big businesses that own those properties are lobbying the Conservatives and the populist press to smash out stories about how horrible for the economy working from home is.
740
mm
31/03/2021 20:46:00 2 2
bbc
If you work from home you will be charged business rates.
759
31/03/2021 21:01:20 2 0
bbc
Or a rail worker. When you’re out on the track and you see empty train after empty train go past you can see the end of your job coming into view!
783
JWG
31/03/2021 21:18:25 3 2
bbc
Yep and there is a correlation with the lockdown maniacs and the comfy at home crew as long as poor people are delivering things to their door they can continue virtue signalling from the comfort of HYS
793
31/03/2021 21:35:13 0 1
bbc
They are worried and lots of them are very powerful and well connected. Just take a look at the language from the Chancellor. We could be converting offices back to living space and city/town centre's would be alive 24/7 less of the silly commute killing the planet might even balance all the data centre's storing pointless drivel emails and IM's.
804
31/03/2021 21:52:16 1 0
bbc
Good for you. Hope you don't end up working in a shop or factory when your management realise they don't need so many 'home workers'.
14
31/03/2021 14:14:15 74 14
bbc
Good for the company and good for their staff , I bet there’s a few Tory property investors sweating on this .
Get back to work!

Start putting other people and the economy firsts as opposed to hiding inside behind a screen!
Removed
32
31/03/2021 14:21:45 12 4
bbc
They are working, from home, some of the time and not being ripped off by train companies for a standing room only season ticket .
34
31/03/2021 14:22:12 19 7
bbc
Nope, we don't want to spend thousands on season tickets or petrol, or naff shop-bought sarnies.

WFH is here to stay.
16
31/03/2021 14:16:11 12 24
bbc
Terrible, terrible development.

Pre lockdown there was a well defined and understood barrier between work and home life, which this will erode.

People should consider whether they want the power that companies exert over you extended into your own home life, permanently?

Anyone believing companies are pushing this line for the good of their employees is living in a hopelessly naive fantasy.
20
31/03/2021 14:17:30 21 6
bbc
Dinosaur
178
31/03/2021 14:35:08 1 1
bbc
Not at all - early to bed on Sunday evening after polishing shoes and ironing shirts for the week ahead. Good disciples at work.
21
31/03/2021 14:17:39 593 28
bbc
Nice bit of advertising for PwC but as someone who used to work for a Big 4 firm, there is no way you are EVER going to be able to choose your own hours. When work is agreed with ridiculous profit margins and impossible timeframes, you have no choice but to work insane hours to get the work done. And if you don't, you will be judged/punished in your reviews.
41
31/03/2021 14:22:56 279 14
bbc
Well said garli. From someone who has spent 35 years in banking I couldn't agree more. There is no way you can achieve the targets they set by working less than 70+ hours per week even though your contract says 38!
82
31/03/2021 14:34:24 21 4
bbc
Well, you'll have to 'condense your working week'. That means working continuously from Monday 8am to Friday 2pm...
106
31/03/2021 14:38:41 52 2
bbc
Exactly. On paper its "flexible working", but the reality is that you are still working 80/90 hour weeks whether that is from home or the office. No point moaning about it as they will replace you like garli says. You learn quite early on that moaning gets the employee nowhere. If the deliverable requires 100 hours of work and needs to be completed in 5 working days, then 100 hours is your week.
122
31/03/2021 14:41:46 2 20
bbc
Rubbish - except perhaps in these types of company.
130
31/03/2021 14:44:07 37 1
bbc
You have to be available when the client wants. Remember these are international firms. A US company wanting a call or reply on a Friday morning US time isn't going to be happy if the UK-based advisor has unliterally packed up for the weekend. Neither are their manager. Time = fees.
152
You
31/03/2021 14:47:18 50 1
bbc
It's no different to those Goldman Sachs bankers situation. These companies make enormous profits and could afford to hire more people to spread the work but choose to maximise profits instead.
172
31/03/2021 14:50:48 30 1
bbc
15-25 years ago I was regularly logging hours between 60 and 98 hours a week (don't ask about the 98 hours, although the sadist in me was gutted I never clocked 100 hour weeks). But in the last 15 years I realised there is more to life than working stupid hours. But for the likes of bankers, they probably see the financial aspect outweighs everything else
214
31/03/2021 15:03:09 14 1
bbc
So this is just an underhand way of getting workers to work long hours that should be illegal but because the workers are “choosing” to work them is not and you make yourself out to be nice employer at the same time.

Nice company now on my avoid list.
273
31/03/2021 15:28:46 11 4
bbc
I would never stay in a job that had me working 90 hours a week. My life is far more important than any corporate company.
Luckily my qualifications and skill set are in demand so any employer who tries to push these hours onto me would have my resignation letter swiftly sent to them.
311
31/03/2021 15:42:12 10 0
bbc
I used to work for a Big 4 Firm and they offered flexible working...you could work as many hours as you wanted. This will be window dressing any nothing more.
349
Jim
31/03/2021 16:01:06 5 1
bbc
Is there correlation between these impossible deadlines and the fact that several large organisations have failed despite their passing audits with the big 4? Ie, in the rush were things missed, or was it just of mutual convenience
363
31/03/2021 16:07:10 9 1
bbc
I work for PwC and the BBC reporting is not what the policy says. The policy is not about working any fewer hours; it's about being flexible about where and when you do those hours. So it's really recognising what is already happening and putting some formality and structure behind it. Nothing earth shattering at all but nice to have. PwC have done very well by their staff during the pandemic.
370
31/03/2021 16:09:59 1 0
bbc
It depends on your role.
379
31/03/2021 16:14:03 6 1
bbc
yes I used to subcontract for PwC. Nice company with some clever people there. However you have to devote a large part of your weekly life to getting the job done. Sure you will probably be able to be flexible in the future but many will be working 60+++ hours/week. Then again, they are paid REALLY well. If you slack or are rubbish there will be no bonus and you will leave.
433
31/03/2021 16:52:48 9 0
bbc
Completely agree. I spent five years at PwC and the idea you can go home when you feel like it is laughable. As Kevin Ellis well knows, his staff are working into the small hours every night because they have to in order to reach the ridiculous timeframes they are set. Who would be in the office until 2am on a regular basis if they didn't have to be? My life has improved immeasurable since leaving
441
31/03/2021 16:57:44 2 0
bbc
You made mistake going into audit
446
31/03/2021 17:01:08 5 0
bbc
Absolutely, as someone who worked alongside a number of these firms, they have long hours, and longer hours, that’s it!
460
31/03/2021 17:11:08 0 1
bbc
32 replies (at time of posting) so, including yours (but less the one sensible post), 31 people backslapping each other’s comments, not a single one bearing any relevance whatsoever to the report. All the long hours and large pay versus quality of life without that level of pay is a debate to be had but has NOTHING whatsoever to do with the way companies are adapting post Covid
502
31/03/2021 17:32:57 1 0
bbc
Absolutely.
527
31/03/2021 17:53:50 2 0
bbc
They still want the same number of hours, but say they'll be more flexible about putting them in. Staying late, coming in early, working overnight and coming in at ten, they don't really care.
537
31/03/2021 18:00:08 2 0
bbc
Stop moaning. You get paid very well for your work. If you don't like it, then do something else.
628
31/03/2021 18:49:21 2 0
bbc
yep, I once met a young lady who had worked her socks off for years and ended up totally burned out by one of these companies. She had been off sick for 9 months but under no pressure to return but that was the end of her career progression - it was just their way of sorting the wheat from the chaff (as they saw it).
16
31/03/2021 14:16:11 12 24
bbc
Terrible, terrible development.

Pre lockdown there was a well defined and understood barrier between work and home life, which this will erode.

People should consider whether they want the power that companies exert over you extended into your own home life, permanently?

Anyone believing companies are pushing this line for the good of their employees is living in a hopelessly naive fantasy.
22
Bob
31/03/2021 14:17:43 11 1
bbc
Out of office. Turn the phone off.

Crack open a beer.

Relax.
23
31/03/2021 14:19:52 44 2
bbc
They will still get their pound of flesh, make no mistake!
13
31/03/2021 14:14:12 4 6
bbc
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56582566

Well come on TUC; do tell us what EU legislation/directives are needed to bring this change about!
24
31/03/2021 14:19:57 2 5
bbc
Still an EU initiative that we are copying . Not something we have come up with ourselves because we are 'sovereign'
25
31/03/2021 14:20:01 9 17
bbc
Do PWC do any work of any value at all?

I mean they don't grow food, build houses, help the sick, etc..

Are they not just part of a job creation scheme designed to make rich people even richer?

They sound like a waste of money to me. Maybe they could retrain and become care workers?

There is a real shortage of them and they actually do valuable work.
59
31/03/2021 14:27:57 5 3
bbc
You might be handy with a pitch fork, a trowel or a bed pan, maybe not accounts?
And certified to audit?
26
31/03/2021 14:20:47 11 1
bbc
PWC are a very competitive outfit so core hours at the office will be 8-8 and wfh 7-9
27
31/03/2021 14:21:12 61 7
bbc
It took a deadly pandemic for some leaders who got promoted by staying late all their working life to realise that flexibility is key to productivity. I asked about this a long time ago knowing it would increase my productivity but turned down by a load of companies who didn't understand that.
28
31/03/2021 14:21:13 253 21
bbc
Proven we don’t need to sit on motorways or in pack trains and spend a day in a city centre
Instead we can have choice

Have a mix. I miss the gossip. I miss having colleagues to bounce ideas off but I also like no longer paying for fuel to pollute the planet.

Let’s all find our own work mix.
187
31/03/2021 14:54:46 184 29
bbc
Personally, I'm not bothered what the person opposite me did at the weekend. I have my group of close friends, everyone else (work based) is just a colleague who you will have nothing else to do with when either person leaves wherever you work. WFH benefits for me are massive - no car journeys, extra 30 minute lie in, in the morning etc, Teams/Slack at my fingertips for meetings or work queries.
242
31/03/2021 15:11:54 31 4
bbc
The worrying thing about people who really need a work environment is what's going to happen to them once they retire. Getting dressed up once a month to come back just to 'say hello' even though less and less people remember them..

Start building your hobbies and interests 'NOW' Less time commuting should give you ample opportunity to get a life again :)
625
31/03/2021 18:47:39 1 3
bbc
Absolutely.
838
31/03/2021 22:20:51 1 0
bbc
I'm all for a Hybrid model once we come out of a Global pandemic. You can work from home when you know the job to do, but sometimes you will need that Synergy that gathers pace, you don't always get that with Virtual Meetings or Screen Shares
13
31/03/2021 14:14:12 4 6
bbc
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56582566

Well come on TUC; do tell us what EU legislation/directives are needed to bring this change about!
29
31/03/2021 14:21:16 1 4
bbc
Sad and desperate clutching at straws from you.

You Tories cannot wait to take away employment rights.
75
OwO
31/03/2021 14:31:31 3 0
bbc
No one's trying to
30
31/03/2021 14:21:19 25 5
bbc
Sure, and they definitely won’t keep track of who does and doesn’t work longer. At the end of the day, all these companies care about is profit and there’ll always be fresh meat to feed into the grinder, get a few years of backbreaking work out of and then discard. If you think they care about employee wellbeing, I’ve got a bridge to sell you.
31
31/03/2021 14:21:30 119 12
bbc
The end of daily commuting would be a massive leap forwards. How on earth people have endured the misery of driving or getting public transport into city centres is beyond belief. A couple of days in the office is all that's needed.
306
31/03/2021 15:40:06 24 83
bbc
It would be a massive leap backwards for the economy - small businesses, transport companies, pension funds; not to mention tax revenues.

Try thinking about someone other than yourself for a change.
484
31/03/2021 17:24:08 4 1
bbc
I've always cycled to work. Less stress, cheaper, good exercise.
809
31/03/2021 21:58:20 2 0
bbc
And what about those workers who have no choice? Not everyone can work from home, and my guess is that employers will look less favourably on those who can't be bothered to go out of their front door every morning.
Get back to work!

Start putting other people and the economy firsts as opposed to hiding inside behind a screen!
Removed
32
31/03/2021 14:21:45 12 4
bbc
They are working, from home, some of the time and not being ripped off by train companies for a standing room only season ticket .
33
31/03/2021 14:22:03 24 5
bbc
Whilst we’re all different I’ve been working from home since last March and this has now been confirmed as permanent. Certainly suits me - no commute, meetings via Zoom / Teams, supporting the local economy etc.
722
31/03/2021 20:21:44 5 2
bbc
Meetings via zoom and teams - virtual recluse that’s what people will become!
Get back to work!

Start putting other people and the economy firsts as opposed to hiding inside behind a screen!
Removed
34
31/03/2021 14:22:12 19 7
bbc
Nope, we don't want to spend thousands on season tickets or petrol, or naff shop-bought sarnies.

WFH is here to stay.
47
31/03/2021 14:24:03 8 4
bbc
Here , here .
72
OwO
31/03/2021 14:31:01 11 6
bbc
No one was ever stopping you taking your own lunch in
35
NRB
31/03/2021 14:22:16 3 4
bbc
Good luck to all at PWC - should end up with happier customers, workforce and a much more profitable organisation
36
31/03/2021 14:22:25 5 5
bbc
Bet train companies will still force commuters to buy weekly/monthly season tickets even though people only need to travel for two/three days per week.
37
31/03/2021 14:22:27 5 14
bbc
The same should apply to retail, cleaners and everybody else that ‘doesn’t have a choice’. Why should they get up 7 days a week to keep stores, businesses open/clean for the ‘entitled’ to choose how they work and play? This just creates more disparity from an already rich/poor divided Britain. Great how the more your paid the less you justify the need. The less your paid the more your a slave..
94
31/03/2021 14:37:15 2 1
bbc
Footballers are rich and don't have the choice to work from home - this has nothing to do with rich v poor
38
31/03/2021 14:22:31 21 4
bbc
In a task-based culture it can be more efficient to have flexi working. So long as everyone is connected to a good communications system then geographical location is less important than availability to participate. Having worked in such an environment I can attest to its efficiency.
642
31/03/2021 18:58:44 5 1
bbc
Over the last year I have had my fill of being put on hold for over an hour to be connected to someone because they are all working from home. Then I find they have a lousy mobile signal so I can't understand a word, hopeless broadband connection to their work programmes and nobody to ask or pass me on to when my problem is beyond them. They will have to up their game if this is to be longterm.
39
31/03/2021 14:22:33 338 13
bbc
Don't believe a word of this 'knock off when you like' nonsense. When you work for one of these firms, they own your soul. They pay you well for it, but be under no illusions, your work-life balance has a very heavy weight at one end only.
49
31/03/2021 14:24:58 23 368
bbc
Rubbish. These firms actually have very well understood processes for dealing with work life balance etc
148
31/03/2021 14:46:10 27 5
bbc
For many years the problem with British industry has been poor management.
292
31/03/2021 15:34:23 38 2
bbc
Couldn't agree more...my Mrs put almost 10 years in as an actuary at PwC...glass ceiling for women despite their so called 'diversity' and 'equal rights' claims...boys club mentality, stressful targets, 'billable' regimes, she was frazzled most of the time...luckily she was about to leave 5 yrs ago when they offered voluntary redundancies. Told her to snap their hands off and thankfully she did.!
332
31/03/2021 15:53:28 19 0
bbc
"yes, feel free to knock-off when you like...when the job is finished"
465
31/03/2021 17:12:26 2 1
bbc
What has this got to do with post pandemic work patterns? Other than nothing
573
31/03/2021 18:15:17 2 6
bbc
In my day they called it flex-time. Certain core hours & work what you want otherwise so long as you averaged 37.5hrs per week over a 6 week period. Personally I'm quite happy to work 70+hrs pw as I'm my own boss, normally work from home & pretty much set my own schedule. PwC et al are doing nothing new just updating it for the mental health generation of whingers
624
31/03/2021 18:47:05 3 1
bbc
They may own yours - not mine - and I'm a successful high level consultant. Have worked with PWC on numerous occasions and they are high performers. Flexible working of all kinds is not just possible, but beneficial for many reasons. If a compnay has hi calibre people there is not problem what so ever.
751
31/03/2021 20:51:43 0 1
bbc
Pay you well? I assume you’ve never worked for them or have low expectations... I am not paid well ?? (M&A Associate Director)
765
31/03/2021 21:06:54 1 1
bbc
be better at your job and knock-off on time.
785
31/03/2021 21:21:20 0 3
bbc
Try being a teacher - 80 hour weeks and not for hundred grand a year
884
01/04/2021 07:45:47 1 0
bbc
The kind of work that these large organisations undertake and timescales driven by projects (and margins) does take dedication and long hours. They're not regular companies. I was not under any illusion when I started at such a Company. It swings in roundabouts. Great learing for your career, smart colleagues and good pay. You then reach a point where it is time to change.
6
31/03/2021 14:12:09 96 24
bbc
They are not the only ones moving to a more flexible way of working. Dinosaurs like Goldman Sachs are rapidly going to find themselves short of recruits.
40
31/03/2021 14:22:48 33 7
bbc
I think to a certain extent that will be determined by salary levels
366
31/03/2021 16:09:03 6 1
bbc
For some people maybe, but if you value your personal time then not wasting it on commuting is a big benefit
21
31/03/2021 14:17:39 593 28
bbc
Nice bit of advertising for PwC but as someone who used to work for a Big 4 firm, there is no way you are EVER going to be able to choose your own hours. When work is agreed with ridiculous profit margins and impossible timeframes, you have no choice but to work insane hours to get the work done. And if you don't, you will be judged/punished in your reviews.
41
31/03/2021 14:22:56 279 14
bbc
Well said garli. From someone who has spent 35 years in banking I couldn't agree more. There is no way you can achieve the targets they set by working less than 70+ hours per week even though your contract says 38!
80
31/03/2021 14:34:09 18 38
bbc
You've only just realised after 35 years? Hmmm.
107
31/03/2021 14:25:37 49 12
bbc
Get a different job.
146
TV
31/03/2021 14:46:06 47 1
bbc
Crazy hours, surely though, I don't know how much these banks pay, but if your earning 100k, and your doing 80 hours a week, your only earning 50k a year, and having no life or relationships at the same time??
205
31/03/2021 14:59:12 17 4
bbc
Yeah.... this is the exact reason why we need unions. you are working almost twice your contracted hours but getting paid as if you worked half... you are being shafted and you are letting them get away with it.
270
31/03/2021 15:28:11 7 9
bbc
Remind me of the salaries paid?
327
31/03/2021 15:50:31 6 1
bbc
The Question is how much you were getting paid. If it is 70+ hrs "every week", are you getting less than a Tesco worker on hourly basis? If yes, than leave the job.
422
31/03/2021 16:41:08 1 0
bbc
Ah but you get very very well paid don’t you
590
31/03/2021 18:24:00 0 1
bbc
You’re surely in the wrong job then - unless you like being treated that badly?
596
31/03/2021 18:27:18 1 0
bbc
I hope you were remunerated handsomely for your efforts. You must have enjoyed it as well. 35 years!
616
31/03/2021 18:45:02 1 3
bbc
@garli@Phebs; sorry but that's rubbish. You must both be poor performers falling back on presenteeism. I've worked as Operations Dir and Bid Dir for ftse 100's (still do as consultant) and there is nothing as time pressured as bidding. 70hr weeks are mostly not needed apart from periods of additional pressure, the start of the project, review deadlines, end of the project deadlines etc.
16
31/03/2021 14:16:11 12 24
bbc
Terrible, terrible development.

Pre lockdown there was a well defined and understood barrier between work and home life, which this will erode.

People should consider whether they want the power that companies exert over you extended into your own home life, permanently?

Anyone believing companies are pushing this line for the good of their employees is living in a hopelessly naive fantasy.
42
31/03/2021 14:23:21 7 3
bbc
1) Employers already have control over how you spend your hours - that’s the nature of work. What WFH can do is put the power in your hands where you spend those hours.

2) You can still have a separation of work and home life when WFH. Put your laptop away and refuse all work-related contact when your time’s up.

3) Do people miss the commute as a “barrier”? It’s just more time spent ‘at work’.
102
31/03/2021 14:38:04 1 5
bbc
Hopelessly naive!
Once work is an option at any hour day or night, in any location ... a company will legitimately claim that you are their representative 24/7.

If you cant work this out for yourself, I'm afraid I cant explain it to you.

In a few years many will rue this ....
43
31/03/2021 14:23:36 3 7
bbc
Nonsense.
That’s what this is.
Start/finish when you want because you’ll be replaced by someone in India anyway soon.
Still peddling that untruthful and shit meme ? Removed
44
31/03/2021 14:23:40 7 6
bbc
Bit of a non story really as most staff at these firms can work when and where they like as long as they can book their timesheet
45
31/03/2021 14:23:55 9 3
bbc
Unstated but known subtext until their actually change their culture and true commitment to work /life balance: "Oh, but if you actually begin to take advantage of this don't expect a good annual review, a worthwhile bonus or annual raise, decent project assignments or any long-term career prospects".
182
31/03/2021 14:53:17 6 1
bbc
In which case you leave, realising that the material gains of a fat salary and bonuses aren't worth it. Just choose. Ex-Big Four employees are always shoo-ins for related but less stressful jobs in the public sector.
6
31/03/2021 14:12:09 96 24
bbc
They are not the only ones moving to a more flexible way of working. Dinosaurs like Goldman Sachs are rapidly going to find themselves short of recruits.
46
31/03/2021 14:23:57 12 0
bbc
Maybe you should look at what GS pay vs PWC before saying that
34
31/03/2021 14:22:12 19 7
bbc
Nope, we don't want to spend thousands on season tickets or petrol, or naff shop-bought sarnies.

WFH is here to stay.
47
31/03/2021 14:24:03 8 4
bbc
Here , here .
48
31/03/2021 14:24:04 114 12
bbc
If a company can have flexible working and be successful and at the same time make employees more productive and happier , it just has to be the way forward.

Why on earth would anyone be against that?
248
31/03/2021 15:14:45 18 5
bbc
There will be some people who work for old fashioned companies who wont adopt flexible working who'll object.

Its a benefit that other people get to enjoy that will have no impact on their lives at all, neither positive or negative. They'll just object because its something that they're being denied, so therefore it should be denied to everyone.
263
31/03/2021 15:24:13 5 3
bbc
Because Tory donors are landlords and own huge offices all over the country. When they become worthless the property investor Tory donors will be out of pocket
291
31/03/2021 15:34:23 3 0
bbc
Because I wouldn't trust the company to be doing this in the cut-throat world of Financial & Management consultancy/Audit

Flexible working Vs Work life balance? Quality of life & family commitments

No company which expects 70/80 hour working weeks & longer is being responsible, nor will it make those experiencing these 'shackled to expectations' conditions 'happier' - unless they are drone saps
775
31/03/2021 21:12:56 1 0
bbc
because people slack. Im not tolerating it.
39
31/03/2021 14:22:33 338 13
bbc
Don't believe a word of this 'knock off when you like' nonsense. When you work for one of these firms, they own your soul. They pay you well for it, but be under no illusions, your work-life balance has a very heavy weight at one end only.
49
31/03/2021 14:24:58 23 368
bbc
Rubbish. These firms actually have very well understood processes for dealing with work life balance etc
83
31/03/2021 14:34:31 68 1
bbc
yes, they have processes because HR says they have to. How those processes are implemented is quite another thing. Having worked for a large global corp I know that a lot of this is lip service...
145
31/03/2021 14:46:02 49 1
bbc
Aye. Burn them up and chuck them out.

The people that survive? They're the ones exploiting the productive few and taking the credit, spending their time on politics and self-promotion while others get the work done.

Yes, I've worked with too many consultancies.
298
31/03/2021 15:37:03 31 0
bbc
you clearly don't work at PwC...or some of the others big names. Almost all our social circle do, they all went to uni together, started together and move within the same companies for promotion etc...they all tell the same stories. I married into the group and am in architecture. It's very revealing not being on the inside.
313
xlr
31/03/2021 15:45:09 22 0
bbc
Indeed they do. It's called "burnout". Once people earn lots of money and burn out and quit and get their life back. That's how they deal with work-life balance.
443
31/03/2021 16:59:17 11 0
bbc
Oh dear. Am guessing you've never worked for PwC! They can have all the processes in the world, if your project manager is under pressure to deliver, and that means long hours, that means long hours.
458
31/03/2021 17:09:18 9 0
bbc
There are a group of Managers in my firm who seem to think it is a competition as to who can send the last email of the day. Plenty of discussions/emails around midnight and if you don't respond you're not 'committed' enough.

They firm has plenty of policies on work/life balance, working long hours etc but they could easily prevent this if they switched off access after say 6pm. They refuse.
631
31/03/2021 18:53:25 5 0
bbc
Having worked as an independent with these large firms, they have a culture of attending long hours, but not really working. The culture encouraged is 'Bums on seats for maximum hours'
647
31/03/2021 19:02:31 2 0
bbc
You mean they have a loads of twaddle on their intranet. There is no such a thing as a usable work life balance policy. It's just pie in the sky.
682
31/03/2021 19:43:11 2 1
bbc
The work life balance is pretty simple. Your work is your life, there is nothing to balance. It would burn you out if you did it for too long, but nobody is forced into it. And they have no shortage of applicants.
692
31/03/2021 19:55:07 1 3
bbc
"Rubbish. These firms actually have very well understood processes for dealing with work life balance etc" - grovel away, grandad. You haven't a clue
699
31/03/2021 19:58:52 2 1
bbc
My guess is that you're a partner.
795
31/03/2021 21:36:38 0 1
bbc
Here's your financial services 'middle manager' folks. (i.e. one spouting the usual HR party line drivel......"well understood processes").

Could not be more obvious!

799
31/03/2021 21:38:31 0 0
bbc
Know at least six people who have worked for PWC. They wouldn’t agree with you.
812
31/03/2021 22:00:02 0 2
bbc
You sound unemployed.
900
01/04/2021 14:42:11 0 0
bbc
You must be the partner responsible for HR in the firm or worried about potential litigation.
Worry not, we are not coming for you.
However, I will never recommend these firms or hire them myself - EVER!
14
31/03/2021 14:14:15 74 14
bbc
Good for the company and good for their staff , I bet there’s a few Tory property investors sweating on this .
50
31/03/2021 14:25:06 15 4
bbc
Haha, "Tory property investors". Have you looked where your pension is invested?
61
31/03/2021 14:28:16 6 9
bbc
Yes not there thankfully.
264
31/03/2021 15:25:28 3 5
bbc
So you don’t disagree that Tory donors are property investors.

Have you seen how awful they are ?
51
31/03/2021 14:25:17 58 5
bbc
I will put money on it that PwC as well as many other businesses, know damn well that the vast majority of employees in these types of businesses work far beyond the contractual hours. Probably even more hours when working from home and therefore nice little soundbites like this are good for further improved productivity. 80+ hours a week/weekend work is commonplace. PwC just formalising it.
52
31/03/2021 14:26:03 22 14
bbc
Young employees need direct contact and mentorship that you can only get in the office.
155
31/03/2021 14:47:47 6 4
bbc
Get better managers/trainers.
156
31/03/2021 14:48:02 1 1
bbc
This is entirely true, but it shouldn't be beyond the wit of any worthwhile organisation to come up with a strategy to mix this into the process. In fact, I see a new consultancy sector coming on...
10
Bob
31/03/2021 14:12:48 110 22
bbc
You will still get sad acts staying late just to look good.

Go home get on with living a life.
53
31/03/2021 14:26:12 38 66
bbc
I worked for PwC in the past and have to say they always put their employees interests at the heart of their business.

And this is another excellent example of that. They genuinely believe in the well being of their staff.
223
31/03/2021 15:07:21 5 1
bbc
Why did you leave then?
257
31/03/2021 15:22:14 6 4
bbc
I used to work for pwc and they didn’t.

See, you can say anything in the internet
901
01/04/2021 14:44:12 0 0
bbc
What team were you working with?
Or have you come to believe the fiction they spin you?
Oh no! May be you are one of those who spins that fiction to rest of the staff!
54
31/03/2021 14:26:22 12 3
bbc
It has to start somewhere and good on Pwc for taking the step. I used to have a physical keyboard device that emulated a few benign keystrokes every 2-3 minutes, I wonder if you can still buy them :)
600
31/03/2021 18:30:50 2 0
bbc
Sure, but it doesn't need to be hardware anymore. Check out a little software application called Caffeine.
55
bbc
Better not employ Meghan or Harry - they are confused about whether they were married or not let alone whether they were at work or not when they are at home

So confusing life now
Removed
266
31/03/2021 15:26:42 1 0
bbc
Nice!

Celebrity is not a job

Giving air time and publicity to whinging celebrity 'look at me, me, me'...is not a job the BBC should be doing
56
31/03/2021 14:27:16 3 4
bbc
Perhaps they can afford to be generous at present. Wherever and whenever their staff clock in it is often on work courtesy of lucrative government contracts. As long as we keep picking up the cheques on their billable hours its gravy for all.
57
SAM
31/03/2021 14:27:33 62 4
bbc
Working 100% at home or in the office will not suit everyone. I don't particularly like the office environment - there will always be a bully, an idiot, an idler, a chatterbox, etc. and in my experience they are never told to get on with their work and not to distract others, but you are still supposed to be able to get on with your work! I work from home and have done for years!
782
31/03/2021 21:17:51 2 4
bbc
zzzzz
817
31/03/2021 22:04:08 1 0
bbc
A chap I worked with found it impossible to work from home. He was the laziest guy in the office, always wandering around looking for someone to talk to rather than get on with his job. He couldn't do that on his own at home.
58
bbc
I wonder how many of those 1000's out in the park and on the beaches yesterday should have been working from home... Removed
On furlough having a fab time and can’t be arsed to pick up or take home their own little

80% salary paid to party like animals

Oops this is not PC
Removed
74
31/03/2021 14:31:12 1 1
bbc
.....said a pensioner ?
78
31/03/2021 14:33:51 1 1
bbc
But that’s the point though. Why in a 21st century country do we still associate work as a noun. It is a verb and we should be able to do it when we want as long as it gets done
141
31/03/2021 14:45:42 1 1
bbc
Probably none of them as, oddly enough, you can take days off as leave wherever you work. Now, had you asked about non-homeworkers claiming fake sick leave...
25
31/03/2021 14:20:01 9 17
bbc
Do PWC do any work of any value at all?

I mean they don't grow food, build houses, help the sick, etc..

Are they not just part of a job creation scheme designed to make rich people even richer?

They sound like a waste of money to me. Maybe they could retrain and become care workers?

There is a real shortage of them and they actually do valuable work.
59
31/03/2021 14:27:57 5 3
bbc
You might be handy with a pitch fork, a trowel or a bed pan, maybe not accounts?
And certified to audit?
282
31/03/2021 15:30:41 1 0
bbc
Before the banking financial crash in 2008, according to the FT, hundreds of European banks (including UK banks) were handed clean audit reports..... shortly before they had to be bailed out by governments.

They lost any last semblance of credibility they had.

And what do they call there "tax reduction services" now? Oh yes "tax efficiency".
Isn't it great that we can comment on this, but not on the fantastic news that we're not a racist country. Removed
126
31/03/2021 14:43:00 1 1
bbc
That finding surprised me, but only up to a point - their are many countries, including several of our near neighbours, that are more racist than the UK by a huge degree.
50
31/03/2021 14:25:06 15 4
bbc
Haha, "Tory property investors". Have you looked where your pension is invested?
61
31/03/2021 14:28:16 6 9
bbc
Yes not there thankfully.
62
31/03/2021 14:28:54 4 10
bbc
Is there a danger that this furthers the rift between public and private sector?
Nurses can't work from home and often exceed allotted shifts. Nor can firefighters, police officers or even teachers. Many of whom commute into cities because of the disproportionately high cost of living.

The dichotomy being woven into our society can only cause division.
92
31/03/2021 14:37:10 3 1
bbc
Don’t be silly - we can’t not work from home because it’s not fair on nurses. Nurses are very well paid many need to be at work - newly qualified nurses get 24k rising to 30k then after that 30k to 37k then 37k to 72k- a lot more than the average office worker gets paid. The rift is that public sector pay and benefits such as final salary pension scheme are better that the private sector.
103
31/03/2021 14:38:10 2 0
bbc
I think that if you became a nurse or firefighter because you thought it had parity in working conditions with the private sector, you made a very bad decision. It's more likely that nurses are nurses because they want to help people.
108
31/03/2021 14:39:00 1 0
bbc
Don’t be silly - we can’t not work from home because it’s not fair on nurses. Nurses are very well paid many need to be at work - newly qualified nurses get 24k rising to 30k then after that 30k to 37k then 37k to 72k. They won’t mind on those salaries - alot more than average office worker’s paid. public sector pay and benefits, final salary pension scheme are better that the private sector.
112
31/03/2021 14:39:28 0 2
bbc
Or maybe with less demand for urban office space there'll be more affordable room for essential workers to live closer to their workplaces?
63
31/03/2021 14:28:59 5 5
bbc
Presumably the staff working on auditing other businesses won’t be able to work from home -this all sounds like a PR exercise or an attempt to destabilise their competitors
76
31/03/2021 14:31:58 6 2
bbc
Why there’s been 12 months of auditing completely remotely
81
31/03/2021 14:34:22 0 2
bbc
They are working from home right now so not sure why they wouldn't be able to continue working from home
95
31/03/2021 14:37:27 0 2
bbc
Of course they will - most of the data auditors need is now held on servers, not in leather-bound ledgers on a shelf. My neighbour does exactly this. His only problem is having inadvertently grown a lockdown mullet.
64
31/03/2021 14:29:03 69 4
bbc
You get the best only from happy people
90
31/03/2021 14:36:41 51 11
bbc
Explains the poor productivity of UK workers.
5
31/03/2021 14:12:08 5 12
bbc
As if Accountants / Accountancy isn't boring enough as it is. Now we are supposed to get excited about how they organise their work schedules. ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ!
It would be nice if working from home resulted in lower prices for Accountancy Services but I very much doubt that.
65
31/03/2021 14:17:52 3 0
bbc
They're not just Accountants
6
31/03/2021 14:12:09 96 24
bbc
They are not the only ones moving to a more flexible way of working. Dinosaurs like Goldman Sachs are rapidly going to find themselves short of recruits.
66
31/03/2021 14:18:11 10 2
bbc
Can absolutely assure you that people will still give their left limb to work for Goldman Sachs regardless of working conditions, particularly when you’re earning a high 5 figure salary at the age of 22!
604
31/03/2021 18:34:23 4 0
bbc
I agree. It seems having Goldman Sachs on your cv opens so many doors ...........
I wonder how many of those 1000's out in the park and on the beaches yesterday should have been working from home... Removed
On furlough having a fab time and can’t be arsed to pick up or take home their own little

80% salary paid to party like animals

Oops this is not PC
Removed
68
31/03/2021 14:29:38 2 4
bbc
You reckon he has pals own offices? Or they’re in his portfolio? Any analysis BBC.
69
31/03/2021 14:29:51 214 25
bbc
Rishi Sunak can say what he likes but I know one person who wants to go back to the office. Home working is here to stay and his mates in the city could do with losing a few million quid to smaller town and village centres. Any company that doesn't allow working from home will lose a lot of employees to more progressive forward thinking companies.
303
31/03/2021 15:39:05 159 46
bbc
Careful what you wish for, if you can remote homework in the UK then you can remote homework from anywhere in the World. You may be talking yourself out of a job.
317
31/03/2021 15:47:10 26 15
bbc
I have always been able to wfh whenever I want, and I can't wait to go back to the office. Miss the banter with my colleagues, the Friday night pint and random lunches out. Wfh is convenient, but you're missing out on networking with colleagues, potential business contacts and (if you're single, or maybe not, wink wink) meeting a partner. I've had enough of being stuck at home now tbh.
479
31/03/2021 17:22:15 3 3
bbc
In the long term jobs which can be done from home will see lower salaries and those that involve having to travel to a place of work will have higher salaries. Simply a result of supply and demand. Too many people will battle for jobs working from home, too few will opt for jobs involving a commute.

Teachers, hospital staff, retail workers etc will see increased pay. Admin staff decreased pay.
766
31/03/2021 21:08:14 1 1
bbc
nah
70
31/03/2021 14:29:56 134 24
bbc
Stop pretending that the office must be where you work. Remote and flexible working is here to stay. I will think twice about working for a company that expects me to be in the office 5 days a week. My current role is International. 95% of my calls are with those in other countries. I don't need to go to an office to do that.
86
31/03/2021 14:35:33 123 67
bbc
The overseas person who will replace you for 40% of the cost won’t need to be in an office either.
342
Ian
31/03/2021 15:58:51 2 3
bbc
And I would think twice about employing you!
653
AC
31/03/2021 19:05:32 2 2
bbc
same here, my nearest colleage is the other end of the UK and everyone else ranges from Santiago in Chile to Beijing.. and everywhere in between... plus 5k saved on terrible overpriced trains and queuing for overpriced food that i need to eat during my 5 minute lunch.... no thanks.
770
31/03/2021 21:10:51 1 0
bbc
"i will think twice about working for a company...". Hyperbole. You'll work where want you to me ole son.
18
31/03/2021 14:17:24 244 21
bbc
I've enjoyed working from home. Beats the commute all ends up. If I was an owner of office space I'd be extremely worried
71
31/03/2021 14:30:01 111 6
bbc
Indeed - just as convenience fresh food and drink businesses that service the office worker will be worried.
247
31/03/2021 15:14:41 12 3
bbc
Although the owner and staff of the nice, sit down for a meal, kind of place, should (post lock downs etc) be in for a pleasant surprise at the amount of weekday, late afternoon punters they'll be pulling in this year or whenever it all ends. Nice bit of revenue for them.

Lockdown is a problem, not working from home
284
31/03/2021 15:32:05 8 4
bbc
Indeed. We are heading to a future with one global store called Amazon.

They own you.
383
31/03/2021 16:17:55 15 2
bbc
Maybe for a year or two, but not after all the redundant office space is repurposed for housing, or even while the builders are on-site doing that work.
In the long term, those businesses can look forward to having local customers 24/7, instead of commuting customers 8/5.
721
31/03/2021 20:18:49 3 2
bbc
Supply and demand, if there is no demand in the office you have to think of new ways for your business to work, deliveries etc. If there is still no demand then unlucky. I have read a few bbc articles that push for the return to office just to keep Pret etc. open, im fine but no thanks.
34
31/03/2021 14:22:12 19 7
bbc
Nope, we don't want to spend thousands on season tickets or petrol, or naff shop-bought sarnies.

WFH is here to stay.
72
OwO
31/03/2021 14:31:01 11 6
bbc
No one was ever stopping you taking your own lunch in
105
31/03/2021 14:38:34 11 7
bbc
Oooh, wow. You're so a-ma-zing. I never thought to make my own packed lunch. Thanks for the patronising tip, grandad.

Seriously though, I was just wanting to make a point about shop-bought sandwiches being overpriced. It seems to have wound you up. Oh well.
73
31/03/2021 14:20:25 19 8
bbc
It tends to be the right wingers don't like this. Which is ironic - its just market forces. Make you workplace flexible and attractive, better balance, more holidays etc etc and you'll attract the people. The others will struggle to compete so will have to do the same. It's just competition
84
31/03/2021 14:34:47 9 18
bbc
“ It tends to be the right wingers don't like this” - because they have jobs?
87
31/03/2021 14:35:43 9 4
bbc
Totally market forces.

Seeing Tories getting wound up by things that happen due to market forces and laissez-faire is ironic and hilarious !
128
31/03/2021 14:43:54 4 2
bbc
Absolutely. Capitalism Bro. Adapt to survive.
836
31/03/2021 22:19:28 2 0
bbc
What are you talking about? Stop trying to see the world as left or right and see it as a vast and complex spectrum.

You sound ridiculous. Like one of those "there are two kinds of people" types who actually believe that everything is binary.
I wonder how many of those 1000's out in the park and on the beaches yesterday should have been working from home... Removed
74
31/03/2021 14:31:12 1 1
bbc
.....said a pensioner ?
29
31/03/2021 14:21:16 1 4
bbc
Sad and desperate clutching at straws from you.

You Tories cannot wait to take away employment rights.
75
OwO
31/03/2021 14:31:31 3 0
bbc
No one's trying to
113
31/03/2021 14:39:36 0 1
bbc
You obviously havent seen the various bills the government have sneaked through using 'emergency powers' and therefore negating parliament and debate
63
31/03/2021 14:28:59 5 5
bbc
Presumably the staff working on auditing other businesses won’t be able to work from home -this all sounds like a PR exercise or an attempt to destabilise their competitors
76
31/03/2021 14:31:58 6 2
bbc
Why there’s been 12 months of auditing completely remotely
140
31/03/2021 14:45:37 0 0
bbc
That’s a relief to hear -the people I’ve known who’ve audited for pwc have found it a thoroughly unpleasant experience -if this could have been achieved remotely all along, then I’m not sure why they’ve been put through this
77
31/03/2021 14:33:48 3 14
bbc
It's a cultural thing, the British worker cannot be trusted, try and it will start okay but soon the wheels will come off and you'll have a disaster on your hands!
120
31/03/2021 14:41:15 3 2
bbc
You're either not British, or despise your fellow countrymen and women.

If the latter, perhaps you should emigrate ?
I wonder how many of those 1000's out in the park and on the beaches yesterday should have been working from home... Removed
78
31/03/2021 14:33:51 1 1
bbc
But that’s the point though. Why in a 21st century country do we still associate work as a noun. It is a verb and we should be able to do it when we want as long as it gets done
16
31/03/2021 14:16:11 12 24
bbc
Terrible, terrible development.

Pre lockdown there was a well defined and understood barrier between work and home life, which this will erode.

People should consider whether they want the power that companies exert over you extended into your own home life, permanently?

Anyone believing companies are pushing this line for the good of their employees is living in a hopelessly naive fantasy.
79
31/03/2021 14:33:59 2 1
bbc
Obviously, anyone with an ounce of sense realises that this is also useful for employers who can now spend less on office space and resources. No-one's assuming it's an act of charity. As for work intruding into your home life, as someone who's worked almost exclusively from home since the mid-90s I always found the reverse to be more of a problem! It's a different mindset, but it's very doable.
41
31/03/2021 14:22:56 279 14
bbc
Well said garli. From someone who has spent 35 years in banking I couldn't agree more. There is no way you can achieve the targets they set by working less than 70+ hours per week even though your contract says 38!
80
31/03/2021 14:34:09 18 38
bbc
You've only just realised after 35 years? Hmmm.
63
31/03/2021 14:28:59 5 5
bbc
Presumably the staff working on auditing other businesses won’t be able to work from home -this all sounds like a PR exercise or an attempt to destabilise their competitors
81
31/03/2021 14:34:22 0 2
bbc
They are working from home right now so not sure why they wouldn't be able to continue working from home
21
31/03/2021 14:17:39 593 28
bbc
Nice bit of advertising for PwC but as someone who used to work for a Big 4 firm, there is no way you are EVER going to be able to choose your own hours. When work is agreed with ridiculous profit margins and impossible timeframes, you have no choice but to work insane hours to get the work done. And if you don't, you will be judged/punished in your reviews.
82
31/03/2021 14:34:24 21 4
bbc
Well, you'll have to 'condense your working week'. That means working continuously from Monday 8am to Friday 2pm...
49
31/03/2021 14:24:58 23 368
bbc
Rubbish. These firms actually have very well understood processes for dealing with work life balance etc
83
31/03/2021 14:34:31 68 1
bbc
yes, they have processes because HR says they have to. How those processes are implemented is quite another thing. Having worked for a large global corp I know that a lot of this is lip service...
118
31/03/2021 14:40:40 8 54
bbc
I have worked in this area for 30 years and still do and it’s certainly not lip service
73
31/03/2021 14:20:25 19 8
bbc
It tends to be the right wingers don't like this. Which is ironic - its just market forces. Make you workplace flexible and attractive, better balance, more holidays etc etc and you'll attract the people. The others will struggle to compete so will have to do the same. It's just competition
84
31/03/2021 14:34:47 9 18
bbc
“ It tends to be the right wingers don't like this” - because they have jobs?
85
ren
31/03/2021 14:35:17 5 5
bbc
Not everyone can work from home in fact I would say 65percent or more can't therefore people are getting fed up with all stories about the poor office worker what about the real workers not people who hit key boards now and again
117
31/03/2021 14:40:32 3 6
bbc
Absolute correct. Who fed all the “work from home” lot during lockdown? Who delivered their bog rolls to keep theirs and little ‘Timmy and Suzy’ bums clean while they worked from their privileged positions. No body would be working from home if key workers did the same. They would be out manning tills! Spoilt brats
119
31/03/2021 14:40:59 4 3
bbc
Where does that stat come from and why don't you think people who write code, design systems, produce documents or make other uses of their keyboards are not real workers? Do you spend your time running about smashing up factory machinery by any chance?
134
31/03/2021 14:44:53 2 3
bbc
If it wasn't for the backroom staff, you wouldn't have any materials to do your job, and you wouldn't get paid. How's that sound?
70
31/03/2021 14:29:56 134 24
bbc
Stop pretending that the office must be where you work. Remote and flexible working is here to stay. I will think twice about working for a company that expects me to be in the office 5 days a week. My current role is International. 95% of my calls are with those in other countries. I don't need to go to an office to do that.
86
31/03/2021 14:35:33 123 67
bbc
The overseas person who will replace you for 40% of the cost won’t need to be in an office either.
121
31/03/2021 14:41:22 15 17
bbc
Lol such a misguided comment. Low level admin has mostly been replaced by automation. The level of education needed to do these roles outstrip the ability of other nations
Still peddling that shit meme ? Removed
136
31/03/2021 14:45:03 14 5
bbc
But they never did. PwC already outsource all their Accountant work to India, and just get a manager to put the PwC badge over whatever comes back.
164
31/03/2021 14:49:46 10 5
bbc
If you're wholly or mainly working from home then there's less incentive to offshore your role than if you're office based. Offices cost a lot of money - upkeep, heat, power, security, furniture, IT systems, etc... There's no saving to be made for your company there if you don't need a workstation in an office.
194
31/03/2021 14:55:57 10 13
bbc
Are you still living in 2001?
AI/ML is the future and ALL admin roles will be outsourced to a quantum computer
259
31/03/2021 15:22:58 5 9
bbc
Why haven’t they done so already and b) will the government let all the good jobs go abroad ?

Only a weak Tory government would allow good office jobs to offshore
297
31/03/2021 15:36:49 4 3
bbc
Definitely a consideration
318
31/03/2021 15:47:13 13 1
bbc
Doesn't work that way, if they thought the could out source to another country they would have already. It cheaper to employ a home worker than an office worker. A mixed approach is the way and the have to be UK based to do that.
371
31/03/2021 16:10:25 6 1
bbc
BT tried that with call centres in India about 20 years ago. All BT call centres are back in the UK now........
614
31/03/2021 18:42:07 1 3
bbc
Dont fight Localisation .. Its back ... for good ....
The economy will be smaller and GDP will quietly be dropped as a measure ..
Capitalism messed up and stopped floating all boats from 2008 .. Now people have seen less is more..
646
31/03/2021 19:02:05 2 2
bbc
And going to an office will make a difference? Get real.
771
31/03/2021 21:11:12 1 0
bbc
well-said.
73
31/03/2021 14:20:25 19 8
bbc
It tends to be the right wingers don't like this. Which is ironic - its just market forces. Make you workplace flexible and attractive, better balance, more holidays etc etc and you'll attract the people. The others will struggle to compete so will have to do the same. It's just competition
87
31/03/2021 14:35:43 9 4
bbc
Totally market forces.

Seeing Tories getting wound up by things that happen due to market forces and laissez-faire is ironic and hilarious !
88
31/03/2021 14:35:49 4 7
bbc
More obese,lazy, diabetic, alcoholic individuals created that will die early, but just can’t see it. The only flexi they are offering is it’s cheaper for them because they have less office space to rent. Your still doing the same hours. Can’t wait to see mental health issues this will create. The UK is NO Sweden with a work/life balance. It’s a polluted,smelly overcrowded dump of an island.
100
31/03/2021 14:37:59 3 1
bbc
Is it really. God help where you live. It’s beautiful where I live and the places I visit
109
31/03/2021 14:39:01 1 2
bbc
Not all of it my friend, not all of it. Out here in the fabulous British countryside we are seeing a revolution as home working follows broadband and fresh life is breathed into local businesses now that commuters are not spending their money in the cities.
115
31/03/2021 14:40:10 1 2
bbc
Rubbish. Since working from home I've been able to switch my commute for a morning run, am able to spend more time prepping and cooking healthier lunches and spend more time with my family. I'm both physically and mentally healthier for not having to work in an office. The whole point of flexible working is choosing how best to split your time and achieve a better work/life balance.
149
31/03/2021 14:46:24 0 1
bbc
Many people I know have seen a mental health boost from working from home. Everyone is different

Obesity and alcohol abuse will be down to lockdown, not working from home
89
31/03/2021 14:36:25 4 1
bbc
I've had semi-flexible working for years and have been 100% WFH for a year.
It's certainly not the easy option - I find I've done more hours WFH full time, and the distinction between work and free time has become blurred - with an expectation people will answer that 7pm email
138
31/03/2021 14:45:19 5 1
bbc
Sorry to hear that. I've had the opposite experience. I've worked longer hours overall, but it turns out the biggest 'grind' related to my job was commuting and being stuck in a crappy town all day. I do extra work at home but it's still less hours than I used to spend out of the house.
258
31/03/2021 15:22:25 1 1
bbc
So agree...

it is difficult to say, but in last 12 yrs of work, I chose to tell the 3 Orgs I worked what I'd do (once offered the job! :-) - and that was to be available Mon to Thurs 7 to 6 (30 min lunch) i.e. to work 42.5 hrs on a 37.5 hr contract.

Outside that time I'd be in my home125, 130 & 179 miles away - & I would read my emails when I returned to work...all agreed & it worked well
261
31/03/2021 15:23:47 3 0
bbc
I had a boss once who used to send emails at 4am. He would appear at my office door “have you read my emails . I would reply “no I’ve just arrived in the office “He then gave up with that tact and went and bullied other staff. Moral of the story is stick to your guns and stand firm. By the way he departed long before I retired.
64
31/03/2021 14:29:03 69 4
bbc
You get the best only from happy people
90
31/03/2021 14:36:41 51 11
bbc
Explains the poor productivity of UK workers.
256
31/03/2021 15:21:54 2 1
bbc
really - our low per capita income may have something to do with that. All the countries who are more productive have higher per capita incomes and greater investment per capita.
694
VoR
31/03/2021 19:56:35 2 1
bbc
It does. Among with the chronic investment (to keep costs low), and the fact that a poor work ethic has become a habit for many because they've been dumped on for so many thankless years. And some business leaders whose only talent is their Teflon coating.
781
31/03/2021 21:17:19 0 1
bbc
silly
91
31/03/2021 14:36:54 13 1
bbc
PWC has a history of expecting its workers to massively exceed their contracted hours. It's likely to be abused with people being expected to be available 24/7.
62
31/03/2021 14:28:54 4 10
bbc
Is there a danger that this furthers the rift between public and private sector?
Nurses can't work from home and often exceed allotted shifts. Nor can firefighters, police officers or even teachers. Many of whom commute into cities because of the disproportionately high cost of living.

The dichotomy being woven into our society can only cause division.
92
31/03/2021 14:37:10 3 1
bbc
Don’t be silly - we can’t not work from home because it’s not fair on nurses. Nurses are very well paid many need to be at work - newly qualified nurses get 24k rising to 30k then after that 30k to 37k then 37k to 72k- a lot more than the average office worker gets paid. The rift is that public sector pay and benefits such as final salary pension scheme are better that the private sector.
93
MDK
31/03/2021 14:37:15 17 2
bbc
This is just hot air from a company that treats the little staff like hamsters on treadmills. How about paying your staff better? Maybe give a little respect to the graduates you send out to audit companies. We’ve had them come in unable to afford food in the canteen and they work under immense fear. Terrible top heavy backward institutions. Break the monopolies...
244
31/03/2021 15:12:49 7 0
bbc
I too watched audit teams running scared and with zilch communication skills.

Where there is poor employee/individual performance - there is ALWAYS poor supervisory/management performance...and naturally this stems from poor corporate, and poor board performance
37
31/03/2021 14:22:27 5 14
bbc
The same should apply to retail, cleaners and everybody else that ‘doesn’t have a choice’. Why should they get up 7 days a week to keep stores, businesses open/clean for the ‘entitled’ to choose how they work and play? This just creates more disparity from an already rich/poor divided Britain. Great how the more your paid the less you justify the need. The less your paid the more your a slave..
94
31/03/2021 14:37:15 2 1
bbc
Footballers are rich and don't have the choice to work from home - this has nothing to do with rich v poor
63
31/03/2021 14:28:59 5 5
bbc
Presumably the staff working on auditing other businesses won’t be able to work from home -this all sounds like a PR exercise or an attempt to destabilise their competitors
95
31/03/2021 14:37:27 0 2
bbc
Of course they will - most of the data auditors need is now held on servers, not in leather-bound ledgers on a shelf. My neighbour does exactly this. His only problem is having inadvertently grown a lockdown mullet.
96
31/03/2021 14:37:34 2 1
bbc
I wonder if there will be a re-structuring of rail fares if this becomes widely accepted?

I'd like to see something akin to Holland where you don't buy a weekly/monthly season ticket, but a seven day pass which you can use on whatever day you wish, rather than within a calendar week.

Wouldn't want to buy a weekly pass which I only use for two or three days. Just like Oyster cards I suppose.
97
31/03/2021 14:37:48 1 2
bbc
How are H&S regs and proper working practices enforced when people are WFH?
116
31/03/2021 14:40:17 2 1
bbc
People are smart enough to make their own homes a safe place.

Don't patronise them.
151
31/03/2021 14:46:44 0 1
bbc
Through audit, the same as all others.
18
31/03/2021 14:17:24 244 21
bbc
I've enjoyed working from home. Beats the commute all ends up. If I was an owner of office space I'd be extremely worried
98
31/03/2021 14:37:55 29 1
bbc
I don’t think that historically businesses have been overly concerned that their paid staff are enjoying their working life. If businesses thrive as a consequence of staff wfh then it will continue (they’ll save money of course) -if businesses fall behind it will come to an abrupt end. The journey to work of their staff isn’t a consideration
99
31/03/2021 14:37:58 20 4
bbc
Interesting that all the negative comments about working from home here are from people who think that working from home = not working.
171
31/03/2021 14:50:43 9 12
bbc
Hardly. Wouldn’t it be good though If all shops closed one day a week. reward for staying open 24/7 lockdown. They have NO choice like you lot working from home. You have zero outlay public transport,no clothes expenditure. Not everyone in high paid jobs lives in houses with several spare rooms! Try doing that in a flat, with a retired other half or kids running about. Entitled is half of it.
226
31/03/2021 15:08:33 5 2
bbc
No, my negative comments are not about working from home = not working.

I am concerned that work stress is more likely to be visited on the family...no 30 min commute to wind-down before reconnecting with family
Anxiety may lead to overworking at home, not under working
Support & learning is easier in face to face workspaces
Invisibility

But agree that some working from home is a genuine win-win
376
31/03/2021 16:12:57 3 2
bbc
In our company update our CEO said he wanted to get us all back "working". I thought it was disgusting comment after all the work the team have done - productivity has not dropped, we are working and not on furlough. #dinosaur
883
01/04/2021 07:44:43 1 0
bbc
Quite the opposite it makes everything a lot more difficult. If your job needs no interaction then I guess AI is waiting in the wings.
88
31/03/2021 14:35:49 4 7
bbc
More obese,lazy, diabetic, alcoholic individuals created that will die early, but just can’t see it. The only flexi they are offering is it’s cheaper for them because they have less office space to rent. Your still doing the same hours. Can’t wait to see mental health issues this will create. The UK is NO Sweden with a work/life balance. It’s a polluted,smelly overcrowded dump of an island.
100
31/03/2021 14:37:59 3 1
bbc
Is it really. God help where you live. It’s beautiful where I live and the places I visit