Deliveroo shares tumble on stock market debut
31/03/2021 | news | business | 1,062
Deliveroo shares close well below their expected price after big investors' attitude to company soured.
1
31/03/2021 09:36:03 107 3
bbc
Sounds like they’re not delivering right now.
124
31/03/2021 10:10:14 19 46
bbc
The best time to buy is when it's low.
2
baz
31/03/2021 09:36:56 31 7
bbc
What surprises me is why anyone would invest in a company that has not made any money at all, and is in fact still making losses. It is the same thing as Ocado. Another online platform that is yet to turn a profit yet is making massive strides in share value... doesn't make sense to me. No profits means no future you would think.
9
JR
31/03/2021 09:39:41 28 1
bbc
this is fundamental lack of understanding of how starting up and funding companies works. this is the whole point of venture investing and scaling companies through early losses. (p.s. this is a different point to the deliveroo business value being completely nuts and disconnected risk on future cash flows)
79
31/03/2021 09:59:39 3 1
bbc
Ocado are like Amazon - making money by selling their technologies to other tech businesses. Ocado are selling their warehouse systems to others and make a profit from that.
396
31/03/2021 11:24:26 1 1
bbc
It took Amazon nearly a decade to make their first profit and even then it was tiny, but just look at them now.

Some businesses only continue to exist on the predication that technology will one day make them profitable and until then they continue to operate at a loss just to keep the brand alive and to hold on to market share - Uber betting on driverless cars, Deliveroo on delivery drones etc.
446
Dee
31/03/2021 11:34:49 1 0
bbc
Most tech companies were hugely overvalued in the beginning. It’s called “future potential”.
606
31/03/2021 12:13:29 1 2
bbc
That argument can be completely shot down with one word. Tesla.
3
31/03/2021 09:36:57 485 9
bbc
If Deliveroo can’t make a profit even in the middle of lockdown when more people would be getting food delivered to home then in my opinion they have no chance of ever making one.
14
31/03/2021 09:41:49 187 8
bbc
Totally agree - once lockdown is over and people are able to dine out again just how many customers will they have left?
32
31/03/2021 09:47:50 11 5
bbc
Amazon have barely made any profit and yet look at how much they are worth. At this stage the company should be all about growth and cornering as much of the market as possible. Obviously there will be competition from the like of Uber. Another example of a company with sky high valuation and yet have made no money are Tesla
44
31/03/2021 09:51:58 7 6
bbc
My understanding is the reason they are not making a profit is due to the constant investment in growth and product etc. I imagine if you just look at revenue generated in uk minus uk operation costs it would show a healthy gross profit.

That's just an assumption tho I could be wrong!
61
31/03/2021 09:55:08 2 2
bbc
That’s not necessarily true if they’re investing a lot of money in growing the business but by adjusted EBITDA they actually were profitable for the last 6 months of 2020.
I haven’t invested in them myself but I don’t think it’s quite as bad an investment as some may think. It’s certainly high risk but potentially high reward too.
104
31/03/2021 10:05:08 1 0
bbc
I agree with you but strangely (as a Deliveroo rider myself) the busiest times are outside of lockdown.
162
31/03/2021 10:19:03 7 2
bbc
I agree. Many restaurants have made the pandemic bearable by offering delivery service when they would not otherwise do it, most do not have capacity for a restaurant and delivery at the same time. Traditionally, restaurants only offer through deliveroo when they are quiet as a top up, once we go back to restaurants and delivery offerings reduce, so will deliveroos revenue.
280
VoR
31/03/2021 10:54:41 4 1
bbc
Not saying the logic doesn't hold up, but don't forget that in lockdown, people spend less time commuting and have more time to cook (all else being equal).
382
31/03/2021 11:20:14 2 2
bbc
Amazon didn't turn a profit for 7 years, Uber still make losses in the billions. If a company grows at the scale Deliveroo does, capital, technology, staff, and marketing costs are going to far outweigh income. Also Deliveroo do fill a market gap that wasn't there (most restaurants have never done delivery before). It might be overpriced on the stock market but don't make such sweeping statements.
398
31/03/2021 11:24:44 3 3
bbc
As a shielder I haven't had a delivery in over a year, whereas I used to have 2 a week. Do I miss them? Nope. Will I go back? Nope. Have I ever used Deliveroo or Just Eat? Not a chance in hell!
500
31/03/2021 11:32:03 3 1
bbc
Because it doesn’t show a profit, doesn’t mean it’s not profitable ??
600
31/03/2021 12:12:45 2 1
bbc
They overestimated their value, by about 7 billion.
31/03/2021 19:45:11 0 0
bbc
the business plan is rather simple, increase brand awareness, increase hype, float on the stock market, profit. What happens after that doesn't matter.
01/04/2021 11:00:38 0 0
bbc
Yep! Seems pretty clear.
4
31/03/2021 09:37:04 73 2
bbc
Mad float price. easy to replicate model. Not even making a profit. You'd have to benust to buy these share at anywhere near the issue price
56
31/03/2021 09:54:14 28 2
bbc
Not disagreeing that it is a mad float price. Is it easy to replicate the model, possible, but for a new company to come into this sector is very unlikely just because of the high cost of entry and cost of gaining market share. Take Amazon for example, you could argue that that is an to easy to replicate model, yet no one has done it.
477
31/03/2021 11:43:34 1 1
bbc
This is easy to say now you have seen they have gone down, Captain Hindsight.

Are you really saying beforehand you had some insight into what the correct price should have been? (No, of course not. But everyone's an expert, aren't they?)
5
31/03/2021 09:37:53 300 9
bbc
Been in business over 7 years...

Floats on the stock market....

Yet to turn a profit.

No thanks.
147
31/03/2021 10:14:59 88 276
bbc
Brexit is slowing down the economy. No wonder deliveroo is down too. Get used to it
239
31/03/2021 10:42:33 16 42
bbc
I'll tell you what, have you been to the vet lately? Our usual bill is up by 200% due to European veterinary drugs costs! There's Brexit prices for you. Project fear my backside! Project penury more like.
304
31/03/2021 11:02:14 6 4
bbc
amazon was like that once upon a time
6
31/03/2021 09:38:39 49 8
bbc
Deliveroo customers need to lose a few pounds.
Probably the BMI lot with COVID as well I suggest Removed
27
31/03/2021 09:46:15 12 0
bbc
Buy shares in the company, they will soon loose a few pounds.
7
31/03/2021 09:39:05 20 6
bbc
Did we not have a HYS on this yesterday? Seems the race report on the front page has been ignored though .......
52
31/03/2021 09:53:06 9 2
bbc
For good reason, you only need to look on Twitter to see what a bad idea that would be.
65
31/03/2021 09:55:43 11 5
bbc
It's amazing how the report has findings the far left and professional diversity shop don't agree with so the BBC fill the article with critiques. If the report had found huge institutional racism you wouldn't have found one passage in the whole article critiquing the findings.
157
31/03/2021 10:18:07 4 0
bbc
As always
757
31/03/2021 12:57:35 2 2
bbc
Madness isn't it, government scripted report....They wont allow discussion or debate over it. We are slowly turning into China.
8
31/03/2021 09:37:26 7 8
bbc
Most takeaway food is very bad for us. It should be heavily taxed, lie fags and booze and diesel.
40
31/03/2021 09:50:35 3 2
bbc
Yeah sure lets tax happiness and copulation too.....
2
baz
31/03/2021 09:36:56 31 7
bbc
What surprises me is why anyone would invest in a company that has not made any money at all, and is in fact still making losses. It is the same thing as Ocado. Another online platform that is yet to turn a profit yet is making massive strides in share value... doesn't make sense to me. No profits means no future you would think.
9
JR
31/03/2021 09:39:41 28 1
bbc
this is fundamental lack of understanding of how starting up and funding companies works. this is the whole point of venture investing and scaling companies through early losses. (p.s. this is a different point to the deliveroo business value being completely nuts and disconnected risk on future cash flows)
364
31/03/2021 11:14:55 0 2
bbc
Yes but. That´s financial engineering if the company has no real reason to exist and the capital is just planning its exit. Punting on 10 start-ups so that there is a short-term killing on one, with mug punters likely to end up paying the tab.

We kind of know how that ends. And the beginning of the end is usually a wide acceptance that this time it´s different.
624
31/03/2021 12:17:04 1 1
bbc
I think there's a difference though: as Deliveroo's supply scales, so do their costs. The unit economics of a delivery just don't work, or rather, they need to be exploitative to even come close to working.
10
31/03/2021 09:39:56 1 1
bbc
I'll just park a comment here before the wheels fall off this business thread.
11
31/03/2021 09:40:00 39 1
bbc
The price will no doubt settle down to a correct level, at which point the shares can be reassessed. But it does reinforce me in my view that a private investor should steer well clear on IPOs - why would a rational person buy sshares on conditions and at a price and time entirely of the seller's choosing?
18
31/03/2021 09:43:15 26 2
bbc
Steer clear of IPO's...... unless Ming Campbell is involved in setting the offer price
427
31/03/2021 11:30:51 1 1
bbc
Because in the past there were HUGE profits made simply buying IPO.
Remember publuc utilitues? GAS/WATER/ELECTRICITY/POST OFFICE
436
Dee
31/03/2021 11:32:29 1 1
bbc
I think the reason why companies do IPOs in the first place is that they don’t want to keep it private & ask hedge funds for money for a huge share in the business. Agree with your view though about share buying investors.
12
31/03/2021 09:40:46 92 4
bbc
Not a business model most intelligent people could invest in.
400
Dee
31/03/2021 11:24:50 17 19
bbc
Why is that? People are getting more & more lazy & obese in this country & the British are known for not for their taste buds. Companies like deliveroo make big money off of that.
13
31/03/2021 09:41:21 6 1
bbc
What a shame that we can't sustain a business model on delivery of McDonalds and other takeaway food for the people who can't get off their derrieres - they will be in the same position as UBER soon in terms of employment law as well in the not to far distant future - think Will needs to get on his bike as well
3
31/03/2021 09:36:57 485 9
bbc
If Deliveroo can’t make a profit even in the middle of lockdown when more people would be getting food delivered to home then in my opinion they have no chance of ever making one.
14
31/03/2021 09:41:49 187 8
bbc
Totally agree - once lockdown is over and people are able to dine out again just how many customers will they have left?
248
31/03/2021 10:44:22 1 1
bbc
Probably just as many as they did before the pandemic, which was seemingly quite a lot.
586
31/03/2021 12:10:19 0 4
bbc
It’s usually the lazy, obese fatties that keep ordering unhealthy food from typically dirty, rat infested food outlets made in sewage filled kitchens. Absolutely ?? disgusting ??! Such punters are too lazy to buy and cook even quick microwaveable healthy meals. This business fuels the HUGE OBESITY EPIDEMIC particularly in the UK. BORIS is a typical example. Sunak, good weight but sycophantic.
978
31/03/2021 16:42:42 0 0
bbc
2 or 3
15
31/03/2021 09:41:51 48 2
bbc
It will be an ok business when the deliveries are by robots rather than people (which will come, on what time scale I don't know). Until then there is too much risk of the courts undermining the business case by, rightly, requiring them to treat their employees as human beings
317
Gav
31/03/2021 11:05:10 8 3
bbc
No, if they use delivery robots it would be an even worse business
417
31/03/2021 11:28:20 1 1
bbc
When the robots and AI comes human beings will soon be made to serve them,... we won't be ordering takeaways on our smart devices anymore.

We will more likely be fighting each other for anything we can forge, for our new masters entertainment.
420
Dee
31/03/2021 11:28:55 0 0
bbc
Except that the people who own & run the robots will be making the money. Companies have already been trialling the robot cool boxes in the UK for a few years now but they may work only in adequate city centre or suburban locations.
6
31/03/2021 09:38:39 49 8
bbc
Deliveroo customers need to lose a few pounds.
Probably the BMI lot with COVID as well I suggest Removed
17
31/03/2021 09:43:10 67 6
bbc
Lockdown is coming to an end. Eat in Takeaways are going to fall off a cliff. Really bad timing.
24
31/03/2021 09:45:36 50 9
bbc
Really - the lazy British public will have continue to have their takeaways delivered don't you worry.
28
31/03/2021 09:46:34 12 0
bbc
No great timing for the founder, take the money and run
384
31/03/2021 11:20:39 0 0
bbc
Probably why they rushed it.
657
31/03/2021 12:22:15 1 0
bbc
Actually good timing for the owners and initial lenders, take the money and run. Once the shares are sold only those who are holding them lose money.
11
31/03/2021 09:40:00 39 1
bbc
The price will no doubt settle down to a correct level, at which point the shares can be reassessed. But it does reinforce me in my view that a private investor should steer well clear on IPOs - why would a rational person buy sshares on conditions and at a price and time entirely of the seller's choosing?
18
31/03/2021 09:43:15 26 2
bbc
Steer clear of IPO's...... unless Ming Campbell is involved in setting the offer price
848
31/03/2021 13:37:24 0 1
bbc
or any Tory since 1979.
19
31/03/2021 09:43:35 116 2
bbc
The CEO has taken his cut. The bankers and lawyers theirs. It's all monopoly money after that
617
31/03/2021 12:15:09 18 28
bbc
It’s usually the lazy, obese fatties that keep ordering unhealthy food from typically dirty, rat infested food outlets made in sewage filled kitchens. Absolutely ?? disgusting ??! Such punters are too lazy to buy and cook even quick microwaveable healthy meals. This business fuels the HUGE OBESITY EPIDEMIC particularly in the UK. BORIS is a typical example. Sunak, good weight but sycophantic.
20
31/03/2021 09:44:53 225 2
bbc
Damned odd time to be floating on the stock market. Just in time for the courts to tell the company they are greedy gits who have to treat their employees like humans.
Oh well.
200
31/03/2021 10:29:09 55 21
bbc
There's me thinking it's Deliveroo's lazy customers who are greedy that can't be bothered to either get up off their backsides and collect or make their own food. If customers don't buy into something then it stops happening.
241
31/03/2021 10:42:44 7 0
bbc
That's a good reason to float now - before it all hits the fan!

Odd time to be BUYING though.
262
31/03/2021 10:49:18 5 0
bbc
They're floating now because they know they will be worth (real value - not necessary price) much less a year later!
403
31/03/2021 11:25:11 2 0
bbc
Not an odd time for the owners.
451
31/03/2021 11:36:05 2 2
bbc
So true, they must have imagined that investors are as lazy as their core customers. It’s very difficult to see where the value is in Deliveroo, but very easy to see the vulnerabilities.
604
31/03/2021 11:54:59 1 0
bbc
To say nothing of just in time for everyone to be bored witless of takeaways and longing to go out.
618
31/03/2021 12:15:10 2 0
bbc
It is all about the founders and initial investors getting their money back with a nice slice of profit. As far as I can see they have achieved that. The fact that the shares are worth less now is largely irrelevant, they have their money back.
993
31/03/2021 17:36:00 0 0
bbc
Yes, and just before restrictions mean we can all go out to eat instead of ordering in.

I'm amazed so many financial institutions fell for it, and agreed to buy shares.

Deliveroo shares will probably be down 75% by summer.
21
31/03/2021 09:44:58 140 4
bbc
Do they even have any assets, other than a website/booking system?
34
31/03/2021 09:48:44 102 3
bbc
Just the back packs by the look of it
214
KO
31/03/2021 10:32:10 7 2
bbc
In fairness, it's not essential to have assets to run a successful business. AirBnB is an example of a business that has very limited assets, but became the first big player in a market. The business model is a no-brainer really.

Yes, they have taken a hit during the pandemic, but that is the same for most in the travel sector. Expect them to bounce back if/when the sector recovers.
268
dan
31/03/2021 10:50:27 9 5
bbc
Why dont you see their booking system as an asset? Until you've worked for a tech company and realise the cost to upkeep an app you really have no idea hows much of a valuable asset it is.
288
VoR
31/03/2021 10:57:13 5 0
bbc
They have a user-base that makes them attractive to restaurants. Whether they can retain that in the face of competition is another matter.
362
31/03/2021 11:14:04 1 3
bbc
Don't forget the complete disregard for the highway code by a large number of its riders/cyclists...

Thats got to be worth something.
470
31/03/2021 11:41:29 2 1
bbc
Many companies' "assets" are their staff, their contracts with customers and their reputation, and that's it. Many of these companies are very successful.

What "assets" do you think Deliveroo should own themselves that would make the company more viable in your eyes?
01/04/2021 12:22:44 0 0
bbc
your data is a big asset to them
22
31/03/2021 09:45:07 2 0
bbc
Predictable!
23
31/03/2021 09:45:25 579 11
bbc
Fast food outlets have been delivering for many years, Deliveroo comes along and says 'We've got an app for that' which makes them worth billions apparently. I remember when the internet started experts said it would make things better by getting rid of the middle man, the internet is now infested with middle men taking their cut.
119
31/03/2021 10:09:02 348 18
bbc
I remember when people physically went to the fast food outlet rather than be so lazy.
123
31/03/2021 10:09:35 8 15
bbc
Buy buy buy low

sell sell sell high

though
133
New
31/03/2021 10:12:19 68 2
bbc
^^ hits nail on head. I've tried a similar app as I had a discount code. I ordered from my local curry house, I paid the delivery price rather than the collection price. Then I paid the app a service fee. And a delivery charge. And was strongly encouraged to pay a tip. If I pick the curry up myself, I pay the collection price, and get free poppadoms & dips, and a beer when I'm waiting (pre covid).
150
31/03/2021 10:16:01 80 0
bbc
Infested with middle men, spot on, squeezing the poor makers of the products.

Order direct and cut out the people like deliveroo
154
31/03/2021 10:17:23 20 92
bbc
Well the economy won't be fixed until brexit is reversed. At least deliveroo is hiring people.
We have little to zero power now.
Have you seen Binden wanna impose 25% tariffs on the uk only.
We are on our own now. What did you expect? Big tech will win
213
31/03/2021 10:31:56 34 5
bbc
No one should be supporting deliverp00.

they steal 35% of the order total as well as the delivery fee.
222
31/03/2021 10:35:01 15 6
bbc
Well obviously there is some value in these services or they wouldn't exist and restaurants wouldn't sign up, right?

These platforms help give restaurants a quick and easy way to get set up on the internet that might've otherwise been too costly for them, and at the very least they give exposure to restaurants that consumers might never have heard of them.
275
31/03/2021 10:51:53 11 1
bbc
My new broker app will let you choose the appropriate middleman for your transaction.

When enough people have copied the idea my mates going to write an app to let you choose the correct broker app for your needs.

He's got a mate ...... ad infinitum
375
31/03/2021 11:17:44 6 0
bbc
Never used any of these companies and never will.
413
31/03/2021 11:27:23 0 6
bbc
Yes but Deliveroo is not just about fast food outlets. They have everything from michelin star restaurants to your local curry that might not have the resources to fulfill delivery needs. I only use Deliveroo sparingly but their market value is clear to see. I don't get why people are so anti-start ups.
506
31/03/2021 11:50:11 4 0
bbc
Yeay for fatties! Even got electric scooter hire for those who have forgotten how to walk...
583
31/03/2021 12:09:54 1 1
bbc
It’s usually the lazy, obese fatties that keep ordering unhealthy food from typically dirty, rat infested food outlets made in sewage filled kitchens. Absolutely ?? disgusting ??! Such punters are too lazy to buy and cook even quick microwaveable healthy meals. This business fuels the HUGE OBESITY EPIDEMIC particularly in the UK. BORIS is a typical example. Sunak, good weight but sycophantic.
608
31/03/2021 12:13:39 3 0
bbc
A few years back, someone hacked my credit card details and treated themselves to a couple of Deliveroo meals in Sydney, Australia.

Thankfully, this stood on like a sore thumb on my statement, so I noticed almost right away and notified my bank before any serious money was spent.

Probably not Deliveroo's fault, yet I've been averse to them ever since.
764
31/03/2021 13:00:04 2 1
bbc
Once their Hijacking app works yeah !

Anything that exploits laziness is a winner these days !

Oh no sorry - its not like that, it is part of the "Service Industry"
17
31/03/2021 09:43:10 67 6
bbc
Lockdown is coming to an end. Eat in Takeaways are going to fall off a cliff. Really bad timing.
24
31/03/2021 09:45:36 50 9
bbc
Really - the lazy British public will have continue to have their takeaways delivered don't you worry.
433
mee
31/03/2021 11:31:34 1 0
bbc
You including yourself in that wild unfounded accusation Dave?
525
31/03/2021 11:55:25 2 1
bbc
Like those people working 60 hour weeks and commuting 4 hours a day and don't have the time or energy to cook in an evening?

They're the laziest of all.

Although I'm a little surprised you've got the time to be on here commenting about the laziness of others...
556
31/03/2021 12:05:34 1 0
bbc
When I was laid up after a serious car crash a few years ago Deliveroo would have been a godsend. Guess I was just being lazy and should have walked off two shattered legs, eh?
623
31/03/2021 12:17:02 0 1
bbc
YES. It’s usually the lazy, obese fatties that keep ordering unhealthy food from typically dirty, rat infested food outlets made in sewage filled kitchens. Absolutely ?? disgusting ??! Such punters are too lazy to buy and cook even quick microwaveable healthy meals. This business fuels the HUGE OBESITY EPIDEMIC particularly in the UK. BORIS is a typical example. Sunak, good weight but sycophantic.
25
31/03/2021 09:46:00 15 3
bbc
Whizz kid hype. In a pandemic restaurants would have invented their own local delivery network. Not fleeced a restaurant of 30%, further damage retail restaurant trade with the invention of dark kitchens and capitalised on reprehensible employment conditions.
821
31/03/2021 13:29:11 1 1
bbc
Its unlikely they would have developed an app nearly as sophisticated or far reaching and actually it was a life-saver for many. Of course they are going to take a cut they are the ones providing a service - restaurants could say no if they so wished. As for "Dark kitchens" these are actually very popular for up and coming restaurants who don't have the finances for long-term rental commitments.
26
31/03/2021 09:46:08 5 5
bbc
I don't know who to believe:
The professional authors of the report or the hys regulars who tell us this country is like 1930s Germany and full of nazis.
They are wrong; there are a much higher number of Nazi's in england than Germany in the 30's. Removed
929
31/03/2021 15:12:05 0 0
bbc
Well honest as the day is long regulars on here can sometimes,no nearly always be wrong.
6
31/03/2021 09:38:39 49 8
bbc
Deliveroo customers need to lose a few pounds.
27
31/03/2021 09:46:15 12 0
bbc
Buy shares in the company, they will soon loose a few pounds.
129
31/03/2021 10:11:53 7 2
bbc
It's "lose" not "loose" but thanks for labouring the joke anyway.
17
31/03/2021 09:43:10 67 6
bbc
Lockdown is coming to an end. Eat in Takeaways are going to fall off a cliff. Really bad timing.
28
31/03/2021 09:46:34 12 0
bbc
No great timing for the founder, take the money and run
987
31/03/2021 17:09:29 0 0
bbc
very good timing to take the money and he will run. If the whole company goes under he will still have his money from the IPO.
29
31/03/2021 09:46:38 5 0
bbc
They lose money on every takeaway delivery order so will need to diversify into the reheat restaurant market delivery service quickly
30
31/03/2021 09:46:39 40 3
bbc
Company assets; lots of bikes and rucksacks.....
419
31/03/2021 11:28:40 11 2
bbc
I think even those would be liabilities on the balance sheet. No unique proposition? Lowish barriers to entry? No patent or intellectual property? Never made a profit? I'm out.
422
31/03/2021 11:29:11 3 0
bbc
Don't the rides have to provide their own bike/vehicle and purchase the rucksack/box from the company?
495
31/03/2021 11:47:56 1 0
bbc
Plus and app and a market share.
560
31/03/2021 12:06:10 1 0
bbc
without the bikes.....
575
31/03/2021 12:08:36 1 0
bbc
The app and network are where the value is.
31
31/03/2021 09:46:58 187 3
bbc
Dont make a profit, do not look after their workers properly whether its a few hours per week or full time and they think they are an attractive investment, the world is making less sense the older I get
236
31/03/2021 10:40:58 166 4
bbc
How can a bloke riding a bike, with a box on his back be hailed by Sunack as a 'Tech success'. He sets a low bar there.
301
31/03/2021 11:01:05 5 0
bbc
They are just like a lot of large businesses. The projections shown to the big investors will look good 2-3 years out. They rarely get called out on the fact that their projections from 2-3 years ago were not met. Even if they start to fail - the deck chairs get shuffled on the titanic with big payoffs for the failing leaders as they jump ship.
3
31/03/2021 09:36:57 485 9
bbc
If Deliveroo can’t make a profit even in the middle of lockdown when more people would be getting food delivered to home then in my opinion they have no chance of ever making one.
32
31/03/2021 09:47:50 11 5
bbc
Amazon have barely made any profit and yet look at how much they are worth. At this stage the company should be all about growth and cornering as much of the market as possible. Obviously there will be competition from the like of Uber. Another example of a company with sky high valuation and yet have made no money are Tesla
71
31/03/2021 09:57:37 8 2
bbc
Amazon are now very profitable - but, having started the market, they make their money by providing web services that the likes of Deliveroo use to deliver their unecessary service.
142
31/03/2021 10:14:14 16 0
bbc
Difference is that with Amazon, they are clearly playing the long game. They are investing in infrastructure and expansion now and will be an absolute nightmare to try and displace going forward. Deliveroo? A food taxi app. Fairly easy to replicate. I know which one I'd invest in long term. As for Tesla? If it wasn't for the cult of Musk, they'd be just another name.
294
31/03/2021 10:58:50 2 1
bbc
Amazon has built warehouses so they have physical asset. They don't show profit so evad the tax. They earn loads of money out of their AWS cloud business, which they are expanding every year. That is their cash cow. Deliveroo is no nowhere near that.
913
31/03/2021 15:05:31 0 0
bbc
Amazon? It makes billions in profit, where do you get the "no profit" thing from.

here go and look. https://www.marketwatch.com/story/amazon-has-already-had-its-most-profitable-year-ever-and-the-holidays-are-still-on-the-way-11604002512
930
31/03/2021 15:28:11 0 1
bbc
Profits can be hidden
Look at Sunaks "super deduction" tax break

These companies wont have to pay any tax at all soon

And why?
Maybe becasue Sunaks father in law has nearly a billion dollars worth of shares in Amazon? which will one day be his wifes/his

Why would he lower the value of this?
980
31/03/2021 16:48:53 1 0
bbc
the shareholders only make a return if they sell at the right time. Uber etc will never make money therefore the shareholders will only profit if they sell at more than they paid, the people who brought Deliveroo at offer price will lose out.
Tesla are not making money and there biggest market(China) has now got a company undercutting them.
That's 30% off the delivery people's wage.
Please tip generously. We need to establish this culture of tipping generously in Europe and UK. Venues, businesses are there to give you a gig, an opportunity to rake in the money. Become a business person. As a waiter in US I made 2 dollars / hour but in tips... 2000 a month. Minimum wage must go and caps removed. Be kind, hardworking = get rewarded.
38
31/03/2021 09:50:08 21 1
bbc
The last thing we need is an economy based on tips.
41
Dan
31/03/2021 09:50:58 7 0
bbc
1) That's not how shares work
2) The US needs to fix their system, not the rest of the world
42
31/03/2021 09:51:02 7 0
bbc
Tipping is not a good practice to earn min wage, you should be entitled to at least min wage regardless what job it, holding the US as an example of great workers rights is not a shining beacon of hope but a beacon of how not to do it, america is not great
45
31/03/2021 09:52:02 8 0
bbc
We do not need a tip culture we need people to be employed properly and paid a sensible wage. I’m speaking as a ex barman.
58
31/03/2021 09:54:37 6 0
bbc
I don't agree with tipping. Relying on generosity creates a false living. Supermarket workers on minimum wage don't get tips, and some of them are on zero hours too. I pay for my meal and the delivery so why pay extra to help prop up the delivery driver?
70
31/03/2021 09:57:21 5 1
bbc
If you employ someone, you should pay them what they're worth, not leave it to your customers to do it for you.
82
31/03/2021 10:00:21 2 0
bbc
What constitutes tipping generously?
Companies in the UK should be paying a decent (or at least, "minimum") wage to their employees, unlike in the US where there is a reliance on tips to make the wages.
My friend made a good point when he saw me tipping a waiter, he said you don't tip a shop worker even though they may have served and helped you in the same way as the waiter did! Good point!
88
31/03/2021 10:01:40 2 2
bbc
Yes we've all seen old people struggling working in these restaurants, sure there not there through choice, and all the smiles and have a nice day, are false. USA not a good example
98
max
31/03/2021 09:51:04 2 2
bbc
> We need to establish this culture of tipping generously in Europe and UK.

No, we need to establish a culture of the companies charging enough for their product that the drivers are paid properly and not at the whim of customers.
107
31/03/2021 10:05:50 1 0
bbc
What your place of work is actually doing is giving you peanuts and then using tips to top up your money. Bad!

That doesn’t happen in Europe
21
31/03/2021 09:44:58 140 4
bbc
Do they even have any assets, other than a website/booking system?
34
31/03/2021 09:48:44 102 3
bbc
Just the back packs by the look of it
80
31/03/2021 09:59:55 7 0
bbc
I wonder is the rider would see those as an asset or a liability?
207
31/03/2021 10:31:01 9 1
bbc
The rider has to buy the outfit so not a company asset?
567
31/03/2021 12:07:36 0 0
bbc
I’m going to bet they make the riders buy them
35
31/03/2021 09:48:59 2 11
bbc
Failing to produce a profit does not mean the business is not generating cash. Profit is a matter of opinion, cash is a matter of fact.
53
31/03/2021 09:53:10 1 1
bbc
You can't get by for long if you're spending more than you're earning.
66
31/03/2021 09:56:00 0 0
bbc
Whatever you do in life, dont go into business, if you dont make a profit you make a loss, if you make a loss you need to increase your sales to cover the cashflow crisis of making a loss or change your prices and model to make a profit, there is no such thing as generating cash, you cannot just produce it when you want!
130
31/03/2021 10:12:00 0 0
bbc
?
36
31/03/2021 09:49:05 444 8
bbc
I hate UBER Eats, Just eat and deliveroo. They are just marketing machines that spend vast amounts of money getting you to use their app rather than phoning the same local chinese / restaurant that you would have used anyway.
The losers are the restaurants themselves as these companies take vast chunks out of their profitability. Pick up the phone yourself and keep the takeaway in business
46
31/03/2021 09:52:07 130 22
bbc
I agree, but many takeaways don't help themselves by not having an online menu. And also not taking cards over the phone, so easier to go on one of these rip-off sites for convenience.
50
31/03/2021 09:52:52 5 6
bbc
You missed a big part of their business.... delivery. Yes they can be considered marketing machines, mostly because of how accessible they're making local restaurants.
125
31/03/2021 10:10:21 18 0
bbc
There are some outlet that don’t use any of these big delivery firms.
In my own small market town we have one particular Chinese takeaway that do their own deliveries. Order online and they only charge 30p for transaction and £1 for delivery. That’s one up on the big boys!
145
31/03/2021 10:12:57 24 0
bbc
My favourite Indian takeaway offers 20% off if you book direct. Says just eat ect want more then that as their cut.
423
31/03/2021 11:29:39 1 0
bbc
Did somebody say Just eat?
511
31/03/2021 11:51:54 3 0
bbc
Agreed, they either charge for delivery or add to the existing prices or both. Will never use will sooner pay the restaurants own delivery rates or go and collect myself. Personally I'm glad to get out the house at present to go the drive through (spelt properly please not thru!) or collect my food. Give your money directly to the businesses supplying your food and support them not a parasite.
590
31/03/2021 12:11:11 1 7
bbc
It’s usually the lazy, obese fatties that keep ordering unhealthy food from typically dirty, rat infested food outlets made in sewage filled kitchens. Absolutely ?? disgusting ??! Such punters are too lazy to buy and cook even quick microwaveable healthy meals. This business fuels the HUGE OBESITY EPIDEMIC particularly in the UK. BORIS is a typical example. Sunak, good weight but sycophantic.
826
31/03/2021 13:31:10 0 0
bbc
Online menus and being able to track the delivery on a map and know when they are on their way is too useful to give up I'm afraid. The takeaways near me got lazy and were regularly taking 60-90 minutes to deliver until Deliveroo arrived. I'd like to support local businesses but they needed a kick in the pants to be competitive and this seems to have done it
835
31/03/2021 13:34:45 0 0
bbc
Same as MyBuilder, the leeches of the construction industry.
896
31/03/2021 14:43:29 1 0
bbc
The curry house I like to use if I go on their website & enter my postcode it says I'm outside of their delivery area but I can get delivery from them via just eat for £1 so I'm going to use them. if the restaurant is losing out its their own fault.
945
Meh
31/03/2021 15:48:43 1 0
bbc
Uber eats and Deliveroo’s success is built upon providing delivery from chains who don’t have their own delivery service, including the biggest chains in the world (McDonalds, Subway, KFC etc).

Before the likes of deliveroo existed, you couldn’t order it to home, so they’ve seized a gap in the market, nothing wrong with that!
986
31/03/2021 17:09:20 0 0
bbc
This is just not true. I have used different restaurants as a result of these apps showing me new options.
994
31/03/2021 17:36:56 0 0
bbc
I've sat in a few takeaways waiting for a meal and I often watch the ways the staff work just out of general interest. Order receiving priorities are usually:

1. Walk-in orders
2. Phone-in orders
3. Web order terminal / Just Eat

I've tested phone-in versus Just Eat at a few takeaways and phone-in orders nearly always arrive quicker. These apps are for the lazy and people scared of phone calls.
31/03/2021 18:45:08 0 0
bbc
The best thing with online orders over phone orders is that they cant argue the toss when they inevitably get the order wrong as you have a digital confirmation
37
31/03/2021 09:49:42 9 2
bbc
Yes its a floater for now but even this will sink like all T***s do.
193
31/03/2021 10:27:13 2 0
bbc
Tanks?
That's 30% off the delivery people's wage.
Please tip generously. We need to establish this culture of tipping generously in Europe and UK. Venues, businesses are there to give you a gig, an opportunity to rake in the money. Become a business person. As a waiter in US I made 2 dollars / hour but in tips... 2000 a month. Minimum wage must go and caps removed. Be kind, hardworking = get rewarded.
38
31/03/2021 09:50:08 21 1
bbc
The last thing we need is an economy based on tips.
39
31/03/2021 09:50:10 28 2
bbc
how much extra pay will the actual deliveroo workers get after the company floatation ? will they share in the success ? or will they just ride their bikes in all weathers getting paid minimum wage to line the pockets of the fat cat owner ?
47
31/03/2021 09:52:37 33 1
bbc
Its not min wage at times, that is the problem with gig economy
51
31/03/2021 09:52:52 3 4
bbc
Erm without communism that is the model of every business.
103
31/03/2021 10:04:47 1 4
bbc
The riders have been given payments of up to £10,000 each...
438
31/03/2021 11:33:04 2 0
bbc
Existing staff were promised a bonus upto £10,000 dependant on past performance - method of measurement obviously not published.

Now just have to see if this materialises.
480
31/03/2021 11:43:58 6 0
bbc
Errrr... they don't get paid a minimum wage. They don't get paid a wage at all, just a small amount per delivery made. No wage, no sick pay, no holiday pay, just hard work in all weathers and a lot of covid risk.
I will certainly not invest in a company that treats people so badly.
849
31/03/2021 13:38:46 1 0
bbc
the rules will have to change to even make it minimum wage.
942
31/03/2021 15:42:44 1 0
bbc
min wage? i do admire optimism
8
31/03/2021 09:37:26 7 8
bbc
Most takeaway food is very bad for us. It should be heavily taxed, lie fags and booze and diesel.
40
31/03/2021 09:50:35 3 2
bbc
Yeah sure lets tax happiness and copulation too.....
That's 30% off the delivery people's wage.
Please tip generously. We need to establish this culture of tipping generously in Europe and UK. Venues, businesses are there to give you a gig, an opportunity to rake in the money. Become a business person. As a waiter in US I made 2 dollars / hour but in tips... 2000 a month. Minimum wage must go and caps removed. Be kind, hardworking = get rewarded.
41
Dan
31/03/2021 09:50:58 7 0
bbc
1) That's not how shares work
2) The US needs to fix their system, not the rest of the world
That's 30% off the delivery people's wage.
Please tip generously. We need to establish this culture of tipping generously in Europe and UK. Venues, businesses are there to give you a gig, an opportunity to rake in the money. Become a business person. As a waiter in US I made 2 dollars / hour but in tips... 2000 a month. Minimum wage must go and caps removed. Be kind, hardworking = get rewarded.
42
31/03/2021 09:51:02 7 0
bbc
Tipping is not a good practice to earn min wage, you should be entitled to at least min wage regardless what job it, holding the US as an example of great workers rights is not a shining beacon of hope but a beacon of how not to do it, america is not great
43
31/03/2021 09:51:33 16 4
bbc
Good. The sooner more of us eat out again the better for society.
453
Dee
31/03/2021 11:36:06 0 4
bbc
If you can afford to do so.
649
31/03/2021 12:20:30 0 0
bbc
They have to open first !
3
31/03/2021 09:36:57 485 9
bbc
If Deliveroo can’t make a profit even in the middle of lockdown when more people would be getting food delivered to home then in my opinion they have no chance of ever making one.
44
31/03/2021 09:51:58 7 6
bbc
My understanding is the reason they are not making a profit is due to the constant investment in growth and product etc. I imagine if you just look at revenue generated in uk minus uk operation costs it would show a healthy gross profit.

That's just an assumption tho I could be wrong!
74
31/03/2021 09:58:17 4 4
bbc
You are correct, the gross profit was £358m for the last half of 2020.
931
31/03/2021 15:29:11 0 1
bbc
Investments means they dont have to pay tax, Sunak brought it in for his father in law
i.e Big Amazon share holder
That's 30% off the delivery people's wage.
Please tip generously. We need to establish this culture of tipping generously in Europe and UK. Venues, businesses are there to give you a gig, an opportunity to rake in the money. Become a business person. As a waiter in US I made 2 dollars / hour but in tips... 2000 a month. Minimum wage must go and caps removed. Be kind, hardworking = get rewarded.
45
31/03/2021 09:52:02 8 0
bbc
We do not need a tip culture we need people to be employed properly and paid a sensible wage. I’m speaking as a ex barman.
36
31/03/2021 09:49:05 444 8
bbc
I hate UBER Eats, Just eat and deliveroo. They are just marketing machines that spend vast amounts of money getting you to use their app rather than phoning the same local chinese / restaurant that you would have used anyway.
The losers are the restaurants themselves as these companies take vast chunks out of their profitability. Pick up the phone yourself and keep the takeaway in business
46
31/03/2021 09:52:07 130 22
bbc
I agree, but many takeaways don't help themselves by not having an online menu. And also not taking cards over the phone, so easier to go on one of these rip-off sites for convenience.
81
31/03/2021 10:00:10 9 5
bbc
And the food is often very late as they go between various restaurants to fill up their boxes before delivering.
87
31/03/2021 10:01:36 10 2
bbc
A lot don’t take cards in store either. I’ve always had to pay cash for a Chinese takeaway. And now my local chip shop too
112
31/03/2021 10:07:26 14 8
bbc
Cook your own. You know whats gone in it !
197
31/03/2021 10:27:57 4 2
bbc
Just walk/cycle/drive down to the place and pick it up in person. Will end up with warmer food when you get home anyway!
717
31/03/2021 12:38:22 0 0
bbc
All takeaways make the same thing. I use 1 menu for them all.
731
31/03/2021 12:43:29 2 0
bbc
Forget online. Use a paper menu and ring up.
850
31/03/2021 13:41:18 0 0
bbc
Many outlets ,not just food seem to have invested in an online presence during the last year.
921
31/03/2021 15:11:58 0 0
bbc
I don't know a takeaway that doesn't take cards over the phone. That would be a weird business model, especially during lockdown.
39
31/03/2021 09:50:10 28 2
bbc
how much extra pay will the actual deliveroo workers get after the company floatation ? will they share in the success ? or will they just ride their bikes in all weathers getting paid minimum wage to line the pockets of the fat cat owner ?
47
31/03/2021 09:52:37 33 1
bbc
Its not min wage at times, that is the problem with gig economy
830
31/03/2021 13:33:14 1 0
bbc
The biggest problem with the gig economy is people debasing themselves; making out that they're making out like bandits when all they really do is drive around all night every night, away from family, away from sport, away from productive meaningful work . . . wasting their lives trying to make a million delivering fish and chips
48
31/03/2021 09:52:38 14 3
bbc
Why on earth if you have a brain would you buy overpriced shares in this company, who basically are delivery boys on bikes sorry girls I missed you out
49
31/03/2021 09:52:44 6 2
bbc
It looks to me like "The Emperors New Cloths" (Bitcoin) with no substance and no chance of succeeding in the long run. South Sea Bubble.
55
MrP
31/03/2021 09:54:06 2 5
bbc
New cloths?
110
31/03/2021 10:06:47 1 0
bbc
Keep telling yourself that Bitcoin will fail, even though each coin is now worth over £42K and rising.

They said the same about Apple and Tesla
127
31/03/2021 10:00:55 1 0
bbc
Yet 1 bitcoin is worth £42,000 currently
670
31/03/2021 12:24:23 1 0
bbc
You do realize that bitcoin has been one of the best long term investments on the planet?
36
31/03/2021 09:49:05 444 8
bbc
I hate UBER Eats, Just eat and deliveroo. They are just marketing machines that spend vast amounts of money getting you to use their app rather than phoning the same local chinese / restaurant that you would have used anyway.
The losers are the restaurants themselves as these companies take vast chunks out of their profitability. Pick up the phone yourself and keep the takeaway in business
50
31/03/2021 09:52:52 5 6
bbc
You missed a big part of their business.... delivery. Yes they can be considered marketing machines, mostly because of how accessible they're making local restaurants.
99
31/03/2021 10:03:12 8 7
bbc
No!
Local restaurants ARE accessible.
39
31/03/2021 09:50:10 28 2
bbc
how much extra pay will the actual deliveroo workers get after the company floatation ? will they share in the success ? or will they just ride their bikes in all weathers getting paid minimum wage to line the pockets of the fat cat owner ?
51
31/03/2021 09:52:52 3 4
bbc
Erm without communism that is the model of every business.
7
31/03/2021 09:39:05 20 6
bbc
Did we not have a HYS on this yesterday? Seems the race report on the front page has been ignored though .......
52
31/03/2021 09:53:06 9 2
bbc
For good reason, you only need to look on Twitter to see what a bad idea that would be.
652
31/03/2021 12:21:36 3 1
bbc
Don't do Twitter. Problem is that Governments think a few thousand activists on Twitter represent public opinion.
35
31/03/2021 09:48:59 2 11
bbc
Failing to produce a profit does not mean the business is not generating cash. Profit is a matter of opinion, cash is a matter of fact.
53
31/03/2021 09:53:10 1 1
bbc
You can't get by for long if you're spending more than you're earning.
54
31/03/2021 09:54:04 1 1
bbc
If a business does not manufacture a product (software or physical item) that it sells for a markup then in my view it is not a viable business worth investing in. I have seen so many dot com companies that float on a dream and people are mad enough to invest their hard earned cash which they will ultimately loose or fail to see any real return.
105
31/03/2021 10:05:24 0 1
bbc
So in your view Facebook, Google, Twitter & Uber are not viable business.

You stick to BP and BT boomer!
131
31/03/2021 10:12:06 0 0
bbc
So services are not viable businesses? No other delivery service viable in your eyes, like DHL, UPS, Royal Mail, DPD? How about barbershops, hairdressers and nail bars? Or taxi drivers, bus companies and trains?
49
31/03/2021 09:52:44 6 2
bbc
It looks to me like "The Emperors New Cloths" (Bitcoin) with no substance and no chance of succeeding in the long run. South Sea Bubble.
55
MrP
31/03/2021 09:54:06 2 5
bbc
New cloths?
85
31/03/2021 10:01:06 0 0
bbc
Use your brain MrP
4
31/03/2021 09:37:04 73 2
bbc
Mad float price. easy to replicate model. Not even making a profit. You'd have to benust to buy these share at anywhere near the issue price
56
31/03/2021 09:54:14 28 2
bbc
Not disagreeing that it is a mad float price. Is it easy to replicate the model, possible, but for a new company to come into this sector is very unlikely just because of the high cost of entry and cost of gaining market share. Take Amazon for example, you could argue that that is an to easy to replicate model, yet no one has done it.
139
31/03/2021 10:13:51 4 4
bbc
High cost of entry? App would be easy enough, start in a limited area and establish brand and wait for word of mouth.
250
31/03/2021 10:44:47 4 0
bbc
Err, I think not. Have you seen the size of those warehouses? And the fleets of trucks?
319
31/03/2021 11:05:47 3 1
bbc
But why would you want to invest shedloads to compete against players who are still losing money 7 years down the road?

Start-up is the new Ponzi.
406
31/03/2021 11:25:52 1 2
bbc
The problem with Amazon is the highly successful marketing which has convinced millions into thinking they cannot live without it like air. So they hand over that £75+ per year without a thought.

Whenever I browse Amazon for something guess what pops up? The £75 'trial' subscription offer - I accept and always make sure to cancel before 30 days.
Guess what happens next? It's like Groundhog day..
828
31/03/2021 13:28:23 0 0
bbc
Amazon is a very different model to this.
997
31/03/2021 17:44:39 1 0
bbc
That's one of the problems with the internet. It's a winner takes all environment.

They'll be a few businesses that start out doing something similar. But eventually, there can be only one. Once dominant, like Amazon, Facebook, eBay, Uber they're almost untouchable. They stifle innovation, remove competition, and drive down the salary and working conditions of average employees.
31/03/2021 22:39:12 0 0
bbc
There are plenty of other market places similar to Amazon, in every country . Amazon just happens to be the biggest one
57
31/03/2021 09:54:26 6 1
bbc
Just proceeding towards the scene of the accident, 100% foreseeable.
That's 30% off the delivery people's wage.
Please tip generously. We need to establish this culture of tipping generously in Europe and UK. Venues, businesses are there to give you a gig, an opportunity to rake in the money. Become a business person. As a waiter in US I made 2 dollars / hour but in tips... 2000 a month. Minimum wage must go and caps removed. Be kind, hardworking = get rewarded.
58
31/03/2021 09:54:37 6 0
bbc
I don't agree with tipping. Relying on generosity creates a false living. Supermarket workers on minimum wage don't get tips, and some of them are on zero hours too. I pay for my meal and the delivery so why pay extra to help prop up the delivery driver?
254
31/03/2021 10:46:53 0 0
bbc
I'll round up a bill and say "keep the change" or add a little for a server who has made the effort (especially with my children) but I'm reluctant to pay twice which is what the American model of tipping seems to be.
59
31/03/2021 09:55:02 9 1
bbc
Heaven knows how much they paid some rapper bloke to make an awful advert the "tone" of which in my humble opinion is questionable.

Seem to treat delivery people non too well from what I have read and an unnecessary business model any food I want they will supply their own delivery.
101
31/03/2021 10:04:24 6 0
bbc
"Heaven knows how much they paid some rapper bloke to make an awful advert."

Somewhere between £0 and £0.00 I suspect!

You're confusing Deliveroo with Just Eat.
126
31/03/2021 10:00:07 3 0
bbc
Yeah that advert was for a totally different company
595
31/03/2021 12:12:00 1 0
bbc
That was Just Eat and the “some rapper bloke” was the incredibly famous Snoop Doggy Dogg
884
31/03/2021 14:25:54 0 0
bbc
Poster gets things wrongs, yet currently has 9 thumbs up and 2 down?

The world is full of idiots.
60
31/03/2021 09:55:02 16 4
bbc
Investors can see 'self-employed' deliverers (if that's a word) being given fuller employee rights, so are shying away. Most deliverers I see are young males who cannot ride a bicycle and are terrifying on a moped, sooner the company goes bust the safer our towns and cities roads will be.
3
31/03/2021 09:36:57 485 9
bbc
If Deliveroo can’t make a profit even in the middle of lockdown when more people would be getting food delivered to home then in my opinion they have no chance of ever making one.
61
31/03/2021 09:55:08 2 2
bbc
That’s not necessarily true if they’re investing a lot of money in growing the business but by adjusted EBITDA they actually were profitable for the last 6 months of 2020.
I haven’t invested in them myself but I don’t think it’s quite as bad an investment as some may think. It’s certainly high risk but potentially high reward too.
286
31/03/2021 10:56:48 2 0
bbc
You could be ok in the very long term but there will be a massive drop in their customers as places reopen to eat in and just eat is a far bigger company who will squeeze them. A big share price drop on their first day does not bode well
26
31/03/2021 09:46:08 5 5
bbc
I don't know who to believe:
The professional authors of the report or the hys regulars who tell us this country is like 1930s Germany and full of nazis.
They are wrong; there are a much higher number of Nazi's in england than Germany in the 30's. Removed
78
31/03/2021 09:59:39 0 0
bbc
Here's one.
Removed
63
31/03/2021 09:55:11 3 1
bbc
May they please ride off into the sunset and disappear for good.
64
31/03/2021 09:55:14 109 2
bbc
A clear sign of the emperor's New clothes

Fails to make a profit but promises wealth beyond belief in the future

But only if delivery staff treated like pond scum
439
Dee
31/03/2021 11:33:24 11 1
bbc
I expect they will treat robots rather better when they buy them.
486
31/03/2021 11:45:45 0 4
bbc
They're not aiming to make profit, they're aiming to make market share.
579
31/03/2021 12:09:03 2 1
bbc
Bitcoin comes to mind as another example of the emperor’s new clothes. The one where they say it’s better than fiat money, whatever that means, but boast about their “success” in fiat money terms.
Rude awakenings for quite a few I suggest.
635
31/03/2021 12:18:26 0 0
bbc
It might help if that actually had competent delivery staff
31/03/2021 17:55:35 1 0
bbc
The result of vast unskilled immigration.

If the supply of which was limited, they would have no business. But mass immigration goes hand-in-hand with capitalism.
7
31/03/2021 09:39:05 20 6
bbc
Did we not have a HYS on this yesterday? Seems the race report on the front page has been ignored though .......
65
31/03/2021 09:55:43 11 5
bbc
It's amazing how the report has findings the far left and professional diversity shop don't agree with so the BBC fill the article with critiques. If the report had found huge institutional racism you wouldn't have found one passage in the whole article critiquing the findings.
580
31/03/2021 12:09:06 4 3
bbc
If I close my eyes I can imagine exactly what you look like.
763
31/03/2021 12:59:39 1 1
bbc
I think as more and more experts have pointed out how flawed the report is. Its harder for serious news outlets to report on it. I'm sure the right wing rags will pick it up in full tomorrow in a bid to fuel their ''culture war''.
35
31/03/2021 09:48:59 2 11
bbc
Failing to produce a profit does not mean the business is not generating cash. Profit is a matter of opinion, cash is a matter of fact.
66
31/03/2021 09:56:00 0 0
bbc
Whatever you do in life, dont go into business, if you dont make a profit you make a loss, if you make a loss you need to increase your sales to cover the cashflow crisis of making a loss or change your prices and model to make a profit, there is no such thing as generating cash, you cannot just produce it when you want!
67
31/03/2021 09:56:24 1 0
bbc
Well it looks like this band flopped at there first live public gig.
68
31/03/2021 09:56:29 5 1
bbc
Reminds me of the Video of the guy ordering a Pizza from Dominos to be delivered to his home 20 yards across the street. Same as Startbucks etc, just marketing and brainwashing exercise to make you think you "have to" use these services are you somehow are out of touch
173
31/03/2021 10:23:02 0 1
bbc
Exactly
Had a delivered takeaway once -about eight years ago-when our son was young.everyone’s doing it dad never again,no point go out or make it yourself
Good.
In London it’s used for drug dealing.
Removed
75
31/03/2021 09:58:20 4 1
bbc
evidence ??
91
31/03/2021 10:02:17 0 0
bbc
Although you just made up this lie, drug dealing is a growth industry.
That's 30% off the delivery people's wage.
Please tip generously. We need to establish this culture of tipping generously in Europe and UK. Venues, businesses are there to give you a gig, an opportunity to rake in the money. Become a business person. As a waiter in US I made 2 dollars / hour but in tips... 2000 a month. Minimum wage must go and caps removed. Be kind, hardworking = get rewarded.
70
31/03/2021 09:57:21 5 1
bbc
If you employ someone, you should pay them what they're worth, not leave it to your customers to do it for you.
32
31/03/2021 09:47:50 11 5
bbc
Amazon have barely made any profit and yet look at how much they are worth. At this stage the company should be all about growth and cornering as much of the market as possible. Obviously there will be competition from the like of Uber. Another example of a company with sky high valuation and yet have made no money are Tesla
71
31/03/2021 09:57:37 8 2
bbc
Amazon are now very profitable - but, having started the market, they make their money by providing web services that the likes of Deliveroo use to deliver their unecessary service.
72
31/03/2021 09:58:03 13 1
bbc
Well as it hasn't made any profit yet and probably never will I would give the shares a value of around 0p each.
73
31/03/2021 09:58:16 5 2
bbc
When delivering food strapped to your back on a bicycle can be listed on the same index as Rolls Royce aerospace, Tesco, Lloyds - this bubble is epic.

Well done to the vulture capitalists making use of the retail money.
44
31/03/2021 09:51:58 7 6
bbc
My understanding is the reason they are not making a profit is due to the constant investment in growth and product etc. I imagine if you just look at revenue generated in uk minus uk operation costs it would show a healthy gross profit.

That's just an assumption tho I could be wrong!
74
31/03/2021 09:58:17 4 4
bbc
You are correct, the gross profit was £358m for the last half of 2020.
915
31/03/2021 15:06:57 0 0
bbc
thought $358 billion was their sales. Profits are vast, in the billions globally.
981
31/03/2021 16:51:32 1 0
bbc
Most companies make a "gross" profit the problem is making a net profit.
Good.
In London it’s used for drug dealing.
Removed
75
31/03/2021 09:58:20 4 1
bbc
evidence ??
76
31/03/2021 09:58:50 2 2
bbc
Phone any restaurant that has a takeaway service yourself, if it’s possible. Delivery and the competitors eat into the restaurants’ profit.

They can’t even be arsed to look after their staff properly. Are any of the deliveroo cyclists going to benefit from this flotation, or just the owners and head office staff?
96
31/03/2021 10:03:07 0 0
bbc
Sadly the delivery agents do not get shares, only permanent staff members do.
77
31/03/2021 09:59:38 3 0
bbc
The Gig economy is just the equivalent of Victorian piecework. You can offer flexibility whilst also guarateeing a fair wage and paying pension contributions and sick leave. Don't let the capitalists tell you otherwise.
They are wrong; there are a much higher number of Nazi's in england than Germany in the 30's. Removed
78
31/03/2021 09:59:39 0 0
bbc
Here's one.
2
baz
31/03/2021 09:36:56 31 7
bbc
What surprises me is why anyone would invest in a company that has not made any money at all, and is in fact still making losses. It is the same thing as Ocado. Another online platform that is yet to turn a profit yet is making massive strides in share value... doesn't make sense to me. No profits means no future you would think.
79
31/03/2021 09:59:39 3 1
bbc
Ocado are like Amazon - making money by selling their technologies to other tech businesses. Ocado are selling their warehouse systems to others and make a profit from that.
34
31/03/2021 09:48:44 102 3
bbc
Just the back packs by the look of it
80
31/03/2021 09:59:55 7 0
bbc
I wonder is the rider would see those as an asset or a liability?
46
31/03/2021 09:52:07 130 22
bbc
I agree, but many takeaways don't help themselves by not having an online menu. And also not taking cards over the phone, so easier to go on one of these rip-off sites for convenience.
81
31/03/2021 10:00:10 9 5
bbc
And the food is often very late as they go between various restaurants to fill up their boxes before delivering.
That's 30% off the delivery people's wage.
Please tip generously. We need to establish this culture of tipping generously in Europe and UK. Venues, businesses are there to give you a gig, an opportunity to rake in the money. Become a business person. As a waiter in US I made 2 dollars / hour but in tips... 2000 a month. Minimum wage must go and caps removed. Be kind, hardworking = get rewarded.
82
31/03/2021 10:00:21 2 0
bbc
What constitutes tipping generously?
Companies in the UK should be paying a decent (or at least, "minimum") wage to their employees, unlike in the US where there is a reliance on tips to make the wages.
My friend made a good point when he saw me tipping a waiter, he said you don't tip a shop worker even though they may have served and helped you in the same way as the waiter did! Good point!
83
31/03/2021 10:00:41 2 0
bbc
Maybe, one day, the company might be able to deliver jam for their investors...
84
31/03/2021 10:00:47 1 1
bbc
I looked at investing in Deliveroo, but decided that at £3.90 per share they where overvalued for a company that has not yet delivered a profit, even during lockdown where they have a captive population, along with their treatment of delivery personnel.
55
MrP
31/03/2021 09:54:06 2 5
bbc
New cloths?
85
31/03/2021 10:01:06 0 0
bbc
Use your brain MrP
86
31/03/2021 10:01:08 14 3
bbc
Great,too many lazy fatties in the UK,save the NHS and tax them more.
651
31/03/2021 12:21:16 2 1
bbc
And too many inflated egos with wagging fingers.
46
31/03/2021 09:52:07 130 22
bbc
I agree, but many takeaways don't help themselves by not having an online menu. And also not taking cards over the phone, so easier to go on one of these rip-off sites for convenience.
87
31/03/2021 10:01:36 10 2
bbc
A lot don’t take cards in store either. I’ve always had to pay cash for a Chinese takeaway. And now my local chip shop too
134
31/03/2021 10:12:19 13 2
bbc
Because they under-report income
the Chinese only want cash so the they can remove the traceability & declare next to no turnover / profit , consequently fiddling the VAT and spnking the cash in the local bookmaker Removed
148
31/03/2021 10:15:45 8 0
bbc
Now HMRC are becoming far more aggressive in checking takeaways cash handling, I can see them shifting towards cards going forward.
That's 30% off the delivery people's wage.
Please tip generously. We need to establish this culture of tipping generously in Europe and UK. Venues, businesses are there to give you a gig, an opportunity to rake in the money. Become a business person. As a waiter in US I made 2 dollars / hour but in tips... 2000 a month. Minimum wage must go and caps removed. Be kind, hardworking = get rewarded.
88
31/03/2021 10:01:40 2 2
bbc
Yes we've all seen old people struggling working in these restaurants, sure there not there through choice, and all the smiles and have a nice day, are false. USA not a good example
89
31/03/2021 10:01:41 1 0
bbc
Interesting that it says slim margins. Deliveroo charge 30% of the order value. It is the real food businesses that get screwed as well as the drivers which is why we are starting to see more local versions starting up where the developers aren’t so greedy so both they and the food operators can make money. Deliveroo yet to make one.
90
31/03/2021 10:01:46 2 0
bbc
They said their delivery staff would get shares. To my mind they woud have stood a far better chance if the restaurants got shares in recompense for the margins they are expected to handover to these gross profit hoovers.
113
31/03/2021 10:07:34 0 0
bbc
Incorrect they stated that delivery staff would receive cash bonuses, provided they had worked for the company for 2 years and completed 2000 deliveries getting £220, and it would increase up to a maximum of £10,000 for the longest serving staff.
Good.
In London it’s used for drug dealing.
Removed
91
31/03/2021 10:02:17 0 0
bbc
Although you just made up this lie, drug dealing is a growth industry.
92
ian
31/03/2021 10:02:23 1 0
bbc
Close the company down
93
31/03/2021 10:02:45 3 1
bbc
Deliveroo shares drop 30% on stock market debut...why would you invest in a company that treats its employees so poorly.
106
31/03/2021 10:05:33 1 2
bbc
Socialist nonsense!!! Deliveroo realise that in competitive times, staff need to earn competitive wages!!!
The biggest asset any company has, is its workforce. If a company doesn't value its own workers, don't be surprised when others don't value the company.
95
31/03/2021 10:03:00 0 0
bbc
Avoid like the plague, no pun intended.
76
31/03/2021 09:58:50 2 2
bbc
Phone any restaurant that has a takeaway service yourself, if it’s possible. Delivery and the competitors eat into the restaurants’ profit.

They can’t even be arsed to look after their staff properly. Are any of the deliveroo cyclists going to benefit from this flotation, or just the owners and head office staff?
96
31/03/2021 10:03:07 0 0
bbc
Sadly the delivery agents do not get shares, only permanent staff members do.
Removed
That's 30% off the delivery people's wage.
Please tip generously. We need to establish this culture of tipping generously in Europe and UK. Venues, businesses are there to give you a gig, an opportunity to rake in the money. Become a business person. As a waiter in US I made 2 dollars / hour but in tips... 2000 a month. Minimum wage must go and caps removed. Be kind, hardworking = get rewarded.
98
max
31/03/2021 09:51:04 2 2
bbc
> We need to establish this culture of tipping generously in Europe and UK.

No, we need to establish a culture of the companies charging enough for their product that the drivers are paid properly and not at the whim of customers.
50
31/03/2021 09:52:52 5 6
bbc
You missed a big part of their business.... delivery. Yes they can be considered marketing machines, mostly because of how accessible they're making local restaurants.
99
31/03/2021 10:03:12 8 7
bbc
No!
Local restaurants ARE accessible.
156
31/03/2021 10:18:01 7 0
bbc
Not everybody lives in or near the Town/City centre with takeaways on their doorstep!
838
31/03/2021 13:37:41 0 0
bbc
If you know they exist. These sites put them on an easily readable list, discoverable by anybody that looks for that variety of restaurant.
You may not like that they take a cut but you can't argue that they are positive marketing for the restaurants and way cheaper than sending out thousands of menus door to door that usually end up in the bin
100
31/03/2021 10:04:04 2 0
bbc
Are we surprised? Delivering McDs by a zero hours cyclists who get piece work rates. What could go wrong? This looks like a corporate disaster waiting to happen. Offloading this to the market during this lockdown chaos is very canny. Even at 30% mark down they are taking everyone for a ride.