People may quit if forced to work from home, Rishi Sunak warns
26/03/2021 | news | business | 2,932
The chancellor urges firms not to scrap offices altogether, warning employees may leave if they do.
1
26/03/2021 11:03:54 1975 217
bbc
Utter twaddle. Homeworking is here to stay.

And if that means Russian oligarch property developers make less money from inner-city offices, so be it.
And to hell with working class bus drivers and family delis and pubs after work? Yup, another internet troll with unique “angle” on what’s good for mankind.

Stop this lump of rock. I need to get off
Removed
105
26/03/2021 11:16:36 72 121
bbc
Don't complain about the death of the high street then, office workers contribute significant footfall to shops on their breaks and after work.
Do you even work sir? The times of your posts would indicate not. Removed
171
26/03/2021 11:21:33 223 14
bbc
I can't work from home - not got the space, not got the mindset for it.

I can't wait to be back in the office and back to a life where work is work and home is home.

I need my home to be a refuge from all the stress, but that's me and I appreciate others may feel differently.

Flexibility is the key.
215
26/03/2021 11:24:22 49 17
bbc
Totally agree, Sunak always struck me as one of the few ministers with some sense, but this is just stupid. Everyone I know that has had to work from home is in favour of keeping this up. Perhaps a visit to the workplace on 1 or 2 days a week only when unavoidable
293
26/03/2021 11:29:49 17 17
bbc
I really hope lockdown doesn't end.

I have been working from home for many years.

I help firms enable people to work from home.

There is a shortage of people to fill roles in IT. That's where the growth is.

IT professionals don't want to work 9-5 or in an office
339
26/03/2021 11:25:08 14 45
bbc
Yous is the twaddle. You are only seeing this from a cozy employee point of view. Working from home is far less productive and does not allow for essential interaction with colleagues as well as employers. Your growth potential and career opportunities are greatly diminished by home working. OK for some sometimes but it is not here to stay
377
26/03/2021 11:36:07 14 3
bbc
Working from home full time sounds fine if you got a decent sized home and a good work-life balance. However, for single people living in small properties it's a miserable existence. Full time working from home should not be compulsory.
383
26/03/2021 11:36:37 8 18
bbc
Ridiculous post. Businesses survive by people working as a team. Towns and Cities and smaller businesses depend on these office workers. If everyone works from home we will end up as a nation where nobody leaves home, with Amazon delivery vans filling the streets.
385
26/03/2021 11:36:40 4 3
bbc
Not sure they own very many offices in most small towns though. Silly politically motivated comment.
407
Meh
26/03/2021 11:39:00 14 0
bbc
Personally I don’t like full time WFH conditions and would prefer a mix of both.. I enjoyed the daily routine, leaving the house and actually interacting with colleagues. I think in the long term, not having social interaction would really harm my mental health and I would definitely consider moving to a company where people actually liked to see each other from time to time.
548
26/03/2021 11:50:16 2 7
bbc
Be careful what you wish for...

Why pay a British person sitting at home in the UK at £15 an hour, when you can pay someone sitting at home in India/Eastern Europe for a lot less?
589
26/03/2021 11:54:14 9 0
bbc
And funnily enough it's those Russian oligarchs that put money into the Tory party coffers.
Get back to the office threat vibes from Rishi. Probably coincidence that his family have interests in commercial property I'm sure......... Removed
Probably a coincidence he’s the chancellor of the exchequer and city retail generates a lot of money to public services? Nope. Internet trolls always find the silly angle Removed
152
26/03/2021 11:20:07 82 5
bbc
A lot of the tories are landlords, you decrease the stress on the inner city property market you decrease prices and these tories will lose money. simples
344
26/03/2021 11:33:25 47 2
bbc
love your reply. Rishi has it the wrong way round people are likely to leave if they can't homework at all in certain jobs.
686
26/03/2021 12:02:17 7 0
bbc
Or it may have something to do with the £100bn sitting in companies accounts that he can#t touch, which this article strangely overlooks..
936
26/03/2021 12:29:39 0 4
bbc
Groan, change the record.
26/03/2021 12:45:03 2 0
bbc
bs headlines its serving commercial interests.....people save alot o money working from home
26/03/2021 13:53:29 0 0
bbc
Commercial property will be fine - people who do not have a home office will realise they need demarcation between home and office and go to WeWork or Regus type outfits where they can rent an desk for a day.

Two days in the office three days out retains the benefits of the office and saves money for everyone
3
Bob
26/03/2021 11:05:35 376 32
bbc
Well he isn't wrong. Nationwide's report yesterday shows that. Half want to work in the office, and half don't. Probably those with children, annoyances, small homes or those for whom office interaction is part of their social life are itching to get back in an office.

If you don't offer flexibility then yes, people are going to look elsewhere.
52
JGC
26/03/2021 11:11:50 241 2
bbc
Yes this is what it comes down to, flexibility. Not everyone wants to be forced to work from home at all times, or forced to work in an office at all times. A lot of it though will ultimately come down to existing contracts which usually define the "normal place of work".
179
26/03/2021 11:22:09 17 3
bbc
This, 100%. Give people an option if it's possible. Personally I'd rather be in the office 4 days a week. I miss my colleagues. Training staff over zoom is awful. I adore my wife with all my heart but I really need to interact with other people after 12 months!!
226
26/03/2021 11:25:06 13 0
bbc
Flexibility is the key. In an age of 2 working parents that both want to follow careers and chase job opportunities far apart, having the ability to work from home will suit many people. I haven't been to my office in over a year. I am still as productive (maybe more so without 2 hours commute per day), but I do feel I may miss opportunities where some staff are still regularly going in. Balance!
265
26/03/2021 11:20:45 21 13
bbc
The people who want to go back to the office are those who spend all day gossiping, not working.
278
Al
26/03/2021 11:28:28 28 1
bbc
It was only 6% of Nationwide's staff that wanted to return to working in the office 5 days/week. So most people want some kind of working from some
288
26/03/2021 11:29:19 23 1
bbc
It wasn't half and half. 57% wanted to work from home and 36% wanted a mix of home/office. Flexibility is key 8 agree, but it's not half and half.
375
26/03/2021 11:35:56 22 2
bbc
Bob, here's the survey:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56510574

57% want WFH full time
36% want hybrid
7% want office full-time

Your half/half assertion is very incorrect!

You are right that flexibility is key, but if "being forced" is a worry, it seems that being forced to be in the office is the greater concern!
447
26/03/2021 11:41:27 9 0
bbc
Property prices are going up in Norfolk due to people looking for bigger houses. Think about it, save £400 a month in commuting costs gives far greater affordability to buy bigger house to accommodate home working.
Rob
26/03/2021 12:50:49 2 0
bbc
Flexibility, yes.
But that's not what Rishi is saying.
He is blatantly saying people should be back in offices - despite the Nationwide report showing that people make better decisions when working from home.
He is putting commercial property business's income above the public good.
26/03/2021 13:10:00 0 0
bbc
So, to put your point more clearly that you seem capable of doing: he has made unsubstantiated claims and failed to provide the evidential basis for them. Until he does so, I shall pay his unfounded assertions no mind whatsoever; and even less to those who attempt to then justify some sort of sense from daft prattling.
26/03/2021 13:34:32 1 0
bbc
A lot of people (myself included) have changed jobs during the pandemic and its agreed that even when possible I will only go in the office a maximum of one day a week. I know the person who took my old job she lives in a different country so shes never going in so that is 9 days a fortnight not returning to London any day soon
26/03/2021 13:44:30 2 0
bbc
I find it funny the main reasons for going back are not to be more productive but to get away from the family. Productivity in my work has been pretty much the same if not better with everyone wfh
26/03/2021 13:55:02 0 0
bbc
The half that don't want to work in the office are probably the ones being made redundant then so they will get their 'Nationwide' reward.
26/03/2021 14:16:46 0 0
bbc
Yeah I rent one room so working from home full time isn't good for my mental health.
26/03/2021 14:39:23 1 0
bbc
It isn't half and half - from the latest survey: 57% want WFH full time, 36% want hybrid, only 7% want full time in the office...
26/03/2021 14:46:50 1 0
bbc
57% want to WFH and 7% want full time office work. How is that half and half?
26/03/2021 14:53:52 1 0
bbc
Not really an accurate analysis of the survey is it.

57% wanted to work from home full time, so that is already more than half.
36% wanted a hybrid policy so a mix of office and home.
7% wanted to return to work full time, I'm guessing these are the managers who have nothing else to do but keep an eye on their staff.
26/03/2021 15:13:47 1 0
bbc
Yup, now the WFH genie is out of the bottle, it won't be going back in. The company I work for spent a bucket load getting everybody set up to work from home. When they surveyed all of the staff, the majority voted for a hybrid of home and office. The office I worked in full time is now closed and we will be going into the remaining office maybe once every 2 weeks , maybe less.
26/03/2021 17:27:48 0 0
bbc
In that report you quote 7% favoured office only 33% hybrid and 50% WFH. Not sure where you get 50/50 from?
26/03/2021 17:48:49 1 0
bbc
This is really about your working environment. People without the space for a home office or a noisy environment may prefer the office, others will gladly work from home, especially if the alternative is a tiring commute.

I once worked for an American owned multi-national enterprise where video conferencing was very much the norm. Your boss could be in another country & no productivity "issues".
26/03/2021 20:46:06 0 0
bbc
I doubt it's anything like half that want to go back to the office.
4
26/03/2021 11:05:43 174 5
bbc
Perhaps there is some middle ground here?

Some working from home...

Some working in the office for 'constructive' meetings and 'team bonding'.
21
Bob
26/03/2021 11:08:52 118 89
bbc
Which is what he said. But the BBC decided to devote 95% of the article towards the sensationalist part.
79
26/03/2021 11:14:16 14 2
bbc
That's exactly what will happen.

Maybe more work and less office politics too? Will show up those who can and those who just talk about it in endless and often pointless meetings!
923
26/03/2021 12:27:43 13 1
bbc
'team bonding'

I'm sorry, I think I just vomited in my mouth a little..
26/03/2021 12:57:19 2 0
bbc
meetings are done over video conference
26/03/2021 14:40:55 4 0
bbc
No thanks - MS Teams works. Fluorescent lights in offices cause migraines ruining your evening as well as your day.
26/03/2021 15:35:50 2 0
bbc
Of course as you can always ask or they can offer. But they don't have to and so many people think they get to decide. They don't. Plenty of businesses will just get rid of staff generally. I'm just waiting for the next big chrunch when 2000 people get fired versus Teams and thats it as they have no office to empty out and be seen on tv that night,
5
26/03/2021 11:05:47 553 30
bbc
I think this obviously comes from pressure from those vested interests that own the city office space that are worrying like hell about their investments. Of which I believe the man himself is quite tied into.
193
26/03/2021 11:22:42 282 13
bbc
Not just about that. Rishi wants people on the move, transport, fuel, shops etc. All create money churning and lots of VAT.
268
26/03/2021 11:28:06 30 11
bbc
He's a Tory - what did anyone expect? Greed and capitalism.
526
26/03/2021 11:48:00 23 2
bbc
Wfh also offers a levelling up push.. People won't need to live in city, money will be spent locally outside of city.
Also improved life / work balance.. Saving 1hour plus commute each day and associated costs and stresses.
Ian
26/03/2021 12:48:30 9 4
bbc
There is a lot of pension fund money invested in office space. A sustained crash in value here will impact everyone for years. A balanced approach is what is needed.
26/03/2021 13:09:17 7 0
bbc
Just like a lot of people replying on this thread about greed and money. The economy exists so people can work. Like office workers who go out for lunch to Greggs or the sandwich shop. Like large offices that have canteens where actual people work, in a lot of cases on a minimum wage so they can support thier families. Yes people have invested in office buildings retail centres pension funds.
26/03/2021 13:19:07 0 0
bbc
Not just owners of office space, what about the sir humpries of this world (yes PM), just imagine them being told to move to darlington or like with there departments.
26/03/2021 13:47:55 2 0
bbc
Always love how people think businesses can just drop their long term contracts on office buildings or indeed resell the buildings their company will own. They might do deals with staff and be nice to allow some or lots of wfh but they have NO legal requirement to do so. They want you in, you go in. Don't like it then simply leave. Most jobs can be easily replaced.
26/03/2021 13:59:05 0 0
bbc
as opposed to the vested interests working from home and surfing the net on Friday morning
26/03/2021 15:26:20 0 0
bbc
Fishy Rishi.
26/03/2021 15:48:28 0 1
bbc
I think this is clearly an anti-Tory comment, not concerned with the issue, but just looking for an excuse to complain.
26/03/2021 16:57:30 0 0
bbc
In other words, the money grabbers who make more money than sense ;)
6
26/03/2021 11:05:58 59 21
bbc
How would he know? He's never had a proper job in his life. Gambling with other people's money is not exactly a job.
16
26/03/2021 11:08:16 17 46
bbc
Are you this nasty to people you know?
49
26/03/2021 11:11:41 7 16
bbc
Jealous. Much.

He is Chancellor of the Exchequer.

He has obviously done something right.
7
26/03/2021 11:06:21 123 9
bbc
I can only think he is nervous that people won’t work and the economy will stutter if people are not in the office. Most people I know do not want to go back to 40 hours in the office every week, times have changed. He should know better than this.
He does know better than this, but he has vested interests - IE an office property portfolio. Removed
144
b
26/03/2021 11:19:34 9 2
bbc
It's more tax intake and jobs created by from the add-ons than work productivity he's nervous about, i.e. he doesn't want people working from home and so spending less on travel to/from work whether on petrol or public transport, no takeaway coffee on the way in, no lunch from the deli, smaller office spaces needed etc.
26/03/2021 14:16:26 3 0
bbc
I wonder how many are now so depressed and realise they hate their crappy jobs that they will never be useful back at work properly. There's more to life than money and a new Audi. After losing my self employed work last year I took a job homeworking in IT, I can barely do any work each day as I hate it and am so bored. I can see how people end it. There's got to be more to life...!!
8
26/03/2021 11:06:40 17 3
bbc
How is this news?
They may stop buying choccy biccies if they get any smaller too!
9
26/03/2021 11:07:06 2 14
bbc
Working from home is a short step to working from China. I know of two companies who are actively looking at recruiting in far East to replace UK staff
69
26/03/2021 11:13:12 4 1
bbc
Must be Chinese companies as i can see a lot of people boycotting China for the way it is acting lately.
72
26/03/2021 11:13:39 0 2
bbc
Depends on your job though. In any case, if people worked harder to educate themselves and we took hard graft more seriously we’d be the ones out performing China and co. Like it or not we live in a global economy now.
891
26/03/2021 12:24:47 2 0
bbc
I remember many UK companies who have had their fingers burned with this little game. British Airways, Santander to name a few. People vote with their cash.
26/03/2021 14:39:21 0 0
bbc
Good data security in China. Never gonna happen.
10
26/03/2021 11:07:22 392 23
bbc
Some people may also quit if they are not allowed to continue working from home.
323
26/03/2021 11:31:56 159 43
bbc
Let's face it, under current economic circumstances very few people are going to quit for either reason. Especially as the number of countries we have the right to work in has dropped from 28 to two. As ever, the cards are stacked against the ordinary person. Sunak knows that, and isn't speaking up for workers, he's reminding bosses of their part to play in maintaining the status quo.
26/03/2021 12:57:43 9 3
bbc
This may be a first step on the route to removing the legal requirement for employers to consider flexible working requests from employees; which is now possible following the UK leaving the EU.
26/03/2021 13:03:14 21 1
bbc
Let me see...15 minute walk to the station, 15 minute wait for the (late) train, 35 minutes standing on crowded train, 10 minutes on sardine-packed tube, 20 minutes walk to the office.
Or 15 seconds walk to the study.
Let me have a think....
26/03/2021 13:59:08 6 0
bbc
Given that there are quite a lot of people out of work, and many graduates and school leavers coming on to the jobs market I doubt businesses will be bothered if a few people quit. In my experience no one is irreplaceable
26/03/2021 15:49:43 5 1
bbc
And some may quit if they are forced to.
11
26/03/2021 11:07:25 34 4
bbc
Working from home has many benefits, but working closely with colleagues, management and getting "noticed" / advancing your career are not among them.

There should be a sensible combination of (maybe) two days per week in the office, on a rota basis, along with WFH, with people being allowed to nominate a preference for more WFH or more time in the office.
41
26/03/2021 11:11:02 13 2
bbc
That is what the company I work for is moving to. Allowing employees to work from home 2 or 3 days a week.
48
26/03/2021 11:11:38 1 3
bbc
If everyone was working from home, no one would get an advantage from those 'benefits', not that i agree any of those things are definitely benefits.
26/03/2021 13:45:34 1 2
bbc
Not everybody wants to get noticed or promoted. Some of us want to walk from the kitchen to the study, put in a solid 8 hours programming and then walk back to the kitchen to feed the cat and gaze at the freezer.
12
26/03/2021 11:07:41 9 2
bbc
People wont be quitting any job soon, once the true jobless numbers are known they will be glad to work @ anything?
32
26/03/2021 11:10:06 10 7
bbc
I suspect rishi is trying to stave off huge job losses in hospitality
13
26/03/2021 11:07:47 93 15
bbc
, I hate working at home and I've gone into the office when I can. I'm not sure that people will vote with their feet though as the job market isn't booming. This is an attempt to save coffee and sandwich shops which appear to be of huge importance to our economy. If we had a strong manufacturing sector things would be different. Public transport is integral to getting people back to offices.
218
26/03/2021 11:24:29 46 3
bbc
Public transport requires millions tied up in rolling stock (road or rail) which is used intensively for a couple of hours at each end of each weekday and not at all otherwise. There is massive investment in under-utilised assets and this is more significant than a few coffee and sandwich shops in Central London (which is what this is all about really).
650
26/03/2021 11:58:38 7 3
bbc
It's not even about coffee shops. It's about Rishi's investment in office buildings.
959
26/03/2021 12:31:50 6 0
bbc
coffee and sandwich manufacturing is the the new manufacturing in Britain
26/03/2021 13:24:13 2 0
bbc
What industry do you work in?

I'm in IT, and got 3 job offers within a week of being made redundant at the end of January this year.
26/03/2021 15:42:31 0 0
bbc
Fine that's your choice. Better employers will give people a choice. Better to spread expenditure across local towns etc rather than just cities.
That secretary won't shag herself eh matey Removed
14
26/03/2021 11:07:49 28 10
bbc
Who wanted everyone to work from home ?

Ah, that would be your Government then Rishi.

Any fool could see what would happen; i.e. people rather liked it but at the cost of office space income, retail sales spending, spending on transport, loss of supporting jobs etc, etc.

Well, I say any fool....
26/03/2021 21:12:44 0 0
bbc
Rishi was always opposed to lockdown and wanted the UK to follow a more Sweden-like strategy.

That's what we were planning until the numbers got very scary about a year ago. The same strategy was also proposed in the Netherlands, except as usual people on the continent decided it was the 'wrong' approach because the UK was doing it.
15
26/03/2021 11:08:09 48 13
bbc
He's only saying this because he has companies that make all their money from office space hassling him. 90% of the people in my company prefer working from home. The only people that don't are the people that think they have authority and want people to think they are busy. Rishi is so out of touch he doesn't even know how much milk costs.
26/03/2021 15:41:22 0 0
bbc
He should ask Charles Walker about milk.
6
26/03/2021 11:05:58 59 21
bbc
How would he know? He's never had a proper job in his life. Gambling with other people's money is not exactly a job.
16
26/03/2021 11:08:16 17 46
bbc
Are you this nasty to people you know?
96
26/03/2021 11:15:52 3 3
bbc
Probably doesn't 'know' any politicians?
797
xlr
26/03/2021 12:14:08 8 3
bbc
The typical HYS can be VERY nasty to benefits claimants who've never had a proper job in their lives. Should they treat Sunak any different?
26/03/2021 20:56:48 1 0
bbc
No mate, just an honest appraisal
17
26/03/2021 11:08:39 6 8
bbc
As someone who enjoys working I have been going into office every day. It's amazing how many people claim to be online and working and when to phone them they are funnily unavailable for 30 minutes having a break
78
26/03/2021 11:14:14 3 1
bbc
True, but do they not take a break or go to the kitchen area for a coffee and chat, or outside for a smoking break when they are in the office? It's unhealthy to sit on your arse for a full 10 hour working day!
124
26/03/2021 11:17:36 1 1
bbc
Funny, I've found trying to phone people in the office the same, probably talking at the photocopier.
18
26/03/2021 11:08:41 9 3
bbc
Its all about choice. What suits some people will not suit others.
19
26/03/2021 11:08:51 4 3
bbc
Am I missing something?
Most people have been forced to work from home for the past year already.
20
Pud
26/03/2021 11:08:51 141 4
bbc
What about the other way around? If you've enjoyed working from home but your company insists you revert to permanently working in the office you might be tempted to move to an employer who allows home working.
272
26/03/2021 11:28:18 114 1
bbc
Having this very conversion in a team meeting. The general view is most people prefer working from home but will happily go to the office for the odd day if there's a good reason - Team meetings, big project meeting, key deadline dates, and social events being the main reasons to go in
26/03/2021 12:58:57 1 0
bbc
good saviig money wise
26/03/2021 15:41:44 2 2
bbc
You are presuming every job will have that opportunity. Education certainly doesn't. Universities certainly don't. Nor does the NHS, shops, other medical services, postal services. In fact many of us have been going into work all the way through this. We didn't get the choice. Why do people think they are owed it?
4
26/03/2021 11:05:43 174 5
bbc
Perhaps there is some middle ground here?

Some working from home...

Some working in the office for 'constructive' meetings and 'team bonding'.
21
Bob
26/03/2021 11:08:52 118 89
bbc
Which is what he said. But the BBC decided to devote 95% of the article towards the sensationalist part.
147
26/03/2021 11:19:50 30 7
bbc
Have you read the article? BBC said no such thing; Rishi said it might be okay for some businesses but was definitely pushing the workforce back to the office. He spent most of his corporate life at Goldman Sachs, which is pushing for an early return of all staff; the few I know don't want to shlep it back to Blackfriars.

If there is any agenda being pushed here it is by Rishi and by you, Bob.
26/03/2021 13:13:05 8 1
bbc
Oh no: how dare the BBC challenge anything said by your beloved government? Why, that must be that 'woke bias' you hear about nowadays. Yes, we must all simply agree with whatever is said and done. That's what 'freedom of speech' and 'our ancient liberties' must be! To do otherwise is surely some form of treason? :-)
26/03/2021 13:35:40 0 5
bbc
That's the Beeb for you. You would have thought they would welcome their staff working from home. It might result in table top amateurish productions. Like so many of those the BBC produces, would become a thing of the past.
26/03/2021 15:57:13 1 1
bbc
Correct, the BBC did this knowing that there would be torrent of anti-government comments from the Tory-haters. They do the same with the Brexit articles.
26/03/2021 17:25:58 0 0
bbc
Sarcasm just flew by..
22
26/03/2021 11:08:53 53 7
bbc
Man who receives money from offices says not working in an office is bad. Shock horror
23
26/03/2021 11:08:55 316 22
bbc
My company has given us a choice and employees have overwhelmingly chosen 2 days in the office and 3 at home. Work/life balance greatly improved. One of the few good things to come out of this pandemic. So you don’t know what you’re talking about Rishi.
185
26/03/2021 11:22:17 93 16
bbc
This is the ideal for many. But what if your house doesn't have a suitable room (e.g you live in a bedsit with others making noise in the daytime) or if you live in a multi-generational household where working for 7 hours a day without interruption is impossible.
26/03/2021 13:55:18 3 0
bbc
Balance is awesome. I think quite a lot of companies are thinking about going totally remote. This would be bad for people who don't have a good quiet space to work from.
26/03/2021 14:05:52 0 0
bbc
Tongue in Cheek post . As long as they make it Monday & Friday in the Office , so no lazy long weekends haha, plus you can catch up with the weekend activities / gossip on a Monday & In the Office to have an early finish go to the Pub Friday .
26/03/2021 14:51:03 1 0
bbc
But your point supports what Rishi says - overwhelmingly, people do not want to work from home 100% of the time (i.e. they do want to have an office, just not to go there every day).
26/03/2021 15:36:42 0 0
bbc
Nice your company has. Not everyone will have that opportunity. Remember furlough ends at some point too.
26/03/2021 15:54:15 0 0
bbc
He did not say that everyone will be forced to return to the office full time.
You don't know what you are talking about., mate.
24
26/03/2021 11:09:01 12 2
bbc
Finding the best balance between Working at Home and Working in the Office is the challenge on a per person, per team, per project, per building etc basis.

Homeworking suits some of the people some of the time
25
26/03/2021 11:09:01 133 5
bbc
There needs to be the choice. For some people working from home is great, for others it is not practical. Not everyone has the space and it can be quite isolating especially if you live on your own.
133
26/03/2021 11:18:18 45 5
bbc
True. Not everyone lives in a house big enough to accomodate home working. An there may be cultural differences in family living where multi-generational living is more common and more people live in a smaller space.
They're basically saying you must have a house with a room space suitable for use as an office.
592
26/03/2021 11:54:18 3 0
bbc
"There should be no choice. Everyone else should do what I personally want them to. Personal circumstances and desires do not matter" - UK public 2020 - (early) 2021
26/03/2021 12:58:24 0 0
bbc
most people have families so you get to see them more ..also you save alot of money working from home
26/03/2021 14:14:30 2 0
bbc
Before lock down, you could rent a booth in a pub in for £7. Morning Coffee, Sandwich Lunch and a Drink at 5 pm included. Along with use of power and wi-fi. Room for 3 or 4 of you to work together locally. I'd like to see more of this kind of remote working becoming the norm. Need a physical catch-up? why not support a local business?
26/03/2021 15:33:30 1 1
bbc
Maybe we need some tax relief to build extension/garden room. For those in high-rises in the centre of town, how about moving to the country? Must be horrid for those stuck with flammable flats though - awful.
26
26/03/2021 11:09:18 7 2
bbc
The problem is generational balance when it comes from working from home. I as a young person can't afford a large living space/home office to work from, being cooped up at home for the past year has had a significant affect on mental health.
Whereas I know my boss (and others of his generation) have loved working from home (but have more than ample space to work at home) I cant wait to go back.
27
26/03/2021 11:09:33 3 5
bbc
A bit desperate. When all said and done, it was the government that created the problem they now face.
156
26/03/2021 11:20:21 0 1
bbc
Err, really? I think there was a (poorly executed) attempt to save lives involved too.
28
26/03/2021 11:09:40 648 26
bbc
Commercial property prices may drop and millionaire investors may suffer if people work from home, Rishi Sunak cries.

There. Fixed it. Have a great day.
60
26/03/2021 11:12:33 131 11
bbc
So true
120
26/03/2021 11:17:30 7 9
bbc
do you have a pension?
125
26/03/2021 11:17:38 9 8
bbc
Unfortunately your pension pot will suffer too. Everything has knock-on consequences.
577
26/03/2021 11:53:01 6 0
bbc
Also less travel means surplus of oil so prices drop until production is halted, people suddenly won't need 2 cars etc. Less taxable company cars eventually and premises will be closed down based on headcount, so whos concerned about this the business owners or the tax man?
761
xlr
26/03/2021 12:10:55 22 0
bbc
Certainly if you are a landlord who has properties in a city centre, people working from home is a nightmare.

The Conservative Party do have a wildly disproportionate number of landlords with properties in city centres.
787
26/03/2021 12:13:33 16 0
bbc
Remember, your investments may go up as well as down.. even for the likes of Alan Sugar and Sunak.
26/03/2021 12:51:57 6 12
bbc
And your pension may be invested in them. Yes, them millionaire investors are pension funds. So many short-sighted comments. How about those workers who work in canteens who have lost their jobs. Many of them women who just want to earn to support their families. This I'm all right Jack attitude from people who have no idea how the economy works.
Removed
26/03/2021 13:01:56 5 3
bbc
Spot on! The utter contempt for the public is beyond belief.
26/03/2021 13:37:24 2 2
bbc
A lot of those investors are the ordinary man in the street via their pension funds - whether they know that or not - so all lose out.
26/03/2021 13:57:28 0 0
bbc
Spot on
26/03/2021 14:11:51 2 2
bbc
What an idiotic comment driven by your own political prejudices. Millions of normal workers will have part of their pension schemes invested in commercial property.
PJ
26/03/2021 15:10:59 0 0
bbc
LOVE it... have a great day AT HOME :)
26/03/2021 15:46:49 0 3
bbc
Another politically motivated comment, with o clear anti-Conservative bias.
26/03/2021 16:48:52 0 0
bbc
The self interest in this Rishi rant is so obvious it is utterly hilarious. Still it is Friday evening in lockdown week 53 and I will take any entertainment I can get.
26/03/2021 18:38:49 0 0
bbc
...and pension funds!
26/03/2021 21:25:38 0 0
bbc
I am a Landlord it doesn’t bother me commercial’s turning in to flats but the town centres are looking very sad !
29
26/03/2021 11:09:40 911 32
bbc
Yeah right Rishi - it’s far more likely to be the other way around! If my bosses force me to go back to 5 days a week in the office I’ll be moving to another firm that has a flexible working policy!!
300
26/03/2021 11:30:13 791 19
bbc
The nationwide wide survey certainly suggests this:

Of 13000 workers:

57% want WFH full time
36% want hybrid

That only leaves 7% wishing to work full time from the office.

I think this is the largest survey done to date, the BBC have only reported the opinions of an office space owner and the chancellor who also has a vested interest (both from a treasury and personal perspective).
563
26/03/2021 11:51:16 24 1
bbc
I already decided to retire when told (when Covid was rampant) to come back into the office.
693
26/03/2021 12:03:01 6 4
bbc
And if that doesn't exist? People need to realise that you can freely walk away from your job if you want. But unless you are more special than everyone else you are just jumping into a market that has limited opportunities.
743
26/03/2021 12:09:11 19 0
bbc
I seem to recall similar messages from big property owners and their friends in government last autumn.....that didn’t end well
26/03/2021 12:42:11 2 1
bbc
Let me see, we have soaring unemployment and before CV19 we had a huge problem with under employment and people on low wages, and you and Sunak reckon people will leave their safe jobs!

All both statements prove to me is that neither of you has a grip on reality. I'm more worried that the Chancellor hasn't got a clue to be frank!!
26/03/2021 12:44:48 2 1
bbc
Gunna be a lot of people looking for new jobs then
26/03/2021 12:45:47 1 1
bbc
nearly everyone prefers working from home and saving loads of cost...he has commercial interest for this statement
26/03/2021 12:47:05 1 5
bbc
We are thinking of having a flexible policy. When you work at home you are saving money on transport & time, therefore we'll pay you a bit less for the benefit/savings to make it 'win/win'. Seems flexible and fair to me as an employer.
26/03/2021 13:55:21 0 0
bbc
let's hope you are an attractive employee in that case
26/03/2021 13:56:24 0 1
bbc
Good luck with that when the pandemic is a distant memory
26/03/2021 14:15:23 0 0
bbc
An if my boss forces me to work from home I will be looking for another job, being forced to work from home isn't a flexible work policy.
26/03/2021 15:42:27 0 0
bbc
He is not suggesting that everyone is forced back to 5 day office working.
30
26/03/2021 11:09:49 22 2
bbc
Of course a few people might quit their jobs if they are only allowed to work from home, it doesn't work well for everybody, but I'm sure more people will vote with their feet if they are forced to commute into the office rather than having the flexibility to work where it suits them. Most workers appreciate having a choice to work at home occasionally if it's appropriate for the work they do.
31
26/03/2021 11:10:01 3 3
bbc
Having dealt with clients that have sensitive data covered by GDPR Im concerned how WFH staff can comply.
No doubt the staff wont know the risk until ICO takes some poor sap through the courts
287
26/03/2021 11:29:14 0 0
bbc
Perhaps you could explain to them what the rules actually are, and that my 5 y/o son won't really be selling their data to 4chan?

If the "poor sap" cannot comply with the very basic rules, their employer will be fined, not the employee. If the employer doesn't know the rules, they're pretty much doomed already.
12
26/03/2021 11:07:41 9 2
bbc
People wont be quitting any job soon, once the true jobless numbers are known they will be glad to work @ anything?
32
26/03/2021 11:10:06 10 7
bbc
I suspect rishi is trying to stave off huge job losses in hospitality
26/03/2021 13:00:14 0 0
bbc
He would do better growing a balanced economy Coffee and Sandwiches, isn't going to pay this countries massive debts in the years ahead? We have an over reliance on the service sector 70% of jobs. Hilda killed all manufacture bless her.
33
Ben
26/03/2021 11:10:10 6 1
bbc
Going forward, job adverts will highlight if working from home is an option as a standard, it'll be choice. If it is forced, then those working from home who hate it will seek alternative employment.
34
JGC
26/03/2021 11:10:18 145 2
bbc
It depends some people like working from home, some don't. For example if your only workspace is the kitchen table or a laptop on the sofa (I know people working both ways) you might well prefer to go to the office. Likewise if you live walking distance from the office, as I do, it's actually a cost saving to be at work (don't have to pay for the heating on all day and electricity, etc).
500
26/03/2021 11:46:02 56 2
bbc
Sensible, balanced comment. Thank you.
873
26/03/2021 12:23:45 10 0
bbc
That's right. I enjoy working from the office. I park in the Memorial Park, have a nice 20 min walk to the office, pick a coffee up on the way, do my work, have social interaction and return the same route to a tidy room that doesn't look like an office.
26/03/2021 13:01:27 4 0
bbc
Good comment. I'm walking distance as well but do work from home. Heating and all those costs has been extra this last year. I do like having a kitchen for lunch though, better than just a microwave at work.
26/03/2021 13:48:19 2 6
bbc
and your now commercially uncompetitive for your employer as their costs are higher than someone who doesn't want (or need) the office space....just
a thought...
26/03/2021 13:57:33 5 0
bbc
One of the things that will change is more people will factor in do they need office space where they live. I moved in October and a large factor was giving myself a professional environment at home to work in. It will take a few years for it to establish itself but having a home office working space may very well become a norm for properties.
26/03/2021 14:06:57 0 5
bbc
"For example if your only workspace is the kitchen table or a laptop on the sofa" - in ultima underworlds II there is a man in rags who is cold and wet and miserable living on a frozen world. - playing as the avatar you have the option to tell him to stop whimpering in the cold and to build himself a fire.
26/03/2021 17:02:29 1 0
bbc
What is clear is that in order to work around the issues of the pandemic and getting as many people as possible to work a lot of the normal issues have been buried. Many do not have proper office or work space, appropriate desks & chairs. Just because you are working from home does not mean that H&S goes out of the window. This all needs to be factored in.
26/03/2021 20:57:17 0 0
bbc
The whole "WFH forever" argument is flawed because it's just assumed everyone commutes into London and pays a phone number per year for their season ticket.

I don't. Yet these people are projecting, telling me I'm supposed to become a hermit in the big comfy house I don't own surrounded by the loving nuclear family I don't have.

Just eff off. I love my office and my colleagues are great.
26/03/2021 21:32:50 1 0
bbc
I'm lucky enough to live close enough to walk to work(actually it's not luck.10 years ago I looked at prospective employers within walking distance) & since Covid I have mostly worked in the office but have worked from home when asked to but I too have no practical space,or inclination, to do so.I have already made it clear that if asked to work from home post-Covid I would look for work elsewhere
35
26/03/2021 11:10:20 1770 73
bbc
Alternatively, people may quit if forced to work in the office.
64
26/03/2021 11:12:50 682 35
bbc
Agreed Jainz - I know I'll look for another job if forced to work 100% in an OFFICE. I enjoy Balanced/home working.
232
26/03/2021 11:16:04 30 71
bbc
Forced? If your Normal place of work is an office then you work from the office when rules are relaxed. If you don’t want to then yes you quit - your choice. Not forced.
235
26/03/2021 11:25:26 107 6
bbc
In the age of computers and global communication any company that requires me to travel and sit in an "office" to prove I am working will rapidly find my resignation being tendered. Work is about delivering results not occupying office space for 8 hours per day
382
26/03/2021 11:36:35 32 2
bbc
The job market will decide. There are companies already advertising flexible working. Which shows that hybrid working is already considered as a perk.
475
26/03/2021 11:44:06 36 6
bbc
Spot on. On what planet does Sunak live.
People wanna work from home.
517
26/03/2021 11:38:43 66 0
bbc
I joined my current company based on being a fully remote worker, they've said the entire company (50 - 60 people) can go into the smaller office they now have whenever they feel like it, and that there is no expectation for anyone to use it, much better in my opinon.

It feels like comments like this from the Government are due to landlords being scared of a major rental bubble bust.
544
26/03/2021 11:50:09 6 0
bbc
Completely agree with this...
564
qaz
26/03/2021 11:51:25 5 1
bbc
Agreed. Having to clock in and out at particular times is meaningless. I work for an institution which offers relatively flexible working hours and the hierarchy don't have to clock. Needless to say, this system has long been abused by all - especially by those who didn't have to. Plus people waste time talking about absolutely anything but work. You're paid for the work you accomplish.
616
01
26/03/2021 11:45:36 15 0
bbc
I agree, I'll resign the moment that I'm asked to commute again.
692
26/03/2021 12:02:22 11 0
bbc
Yes my public sector employer is looking like it’s following the government line of forcing people to go in a minimum of 2 days for roles that are all pc based. I’ll be looking elsewhere.
754
26/03/2021 12:10:08 10 0
bbc
not news to anyone. people may quit if forced to do anything - I know of people who might never be required to work in an office again who want to go back more than anything (social reasons), conversely I know people who have to work in an office who hate being there. Flexibility is the key!
789
26/03/2021 12:13:45 0 7
bbc
Good, anti social so and so's.
791
26/03/2021 12:13:49 5 0
bbc
Working from home full time sounds fine if you got a decent sized home and a good work-life balance. However, for single people living in small properties it's a miserable existence. Full time working from home should not be compulsory.
977
26/03/2021 12:33:55 5 0
bbc
I alternate each day between home and office working.

And home-working takes a little of the sting out of the fact that since Covid caused the redundancy of 50% of my department; I'm mostly working 10 - 11 hours per day instead of my contracted 8 hours, for no additional pay, just to cope with the workload.

Otherwise I'd hardly see my family.

I'd seriously resent being forced back to the office
26/03/2021 12:42:49 0 2
bbc
Alternatively, companies may find someone else to the job if existing staff dont like the facts. Lets face it there will be plenty of competition for jobs.
26/03/2021 12:44:21 3 0
bbc
its a bs headlines...these companies have high rents to pay for these office buildings and people prefer working from home
26/03/2021 13:12:36 1 0
bbc
Came here to say just that! beat me to it! What bollocks!!!!!!

Right to work from home!! We demand it now!!!! No more excuses!!!!!!
FB
26/03/2021 13:13:10 4 1
bbc
My firm is making 25% redundant and whilst I do enjoy my job the thought of returning to the office after a year of home working with a much better work/life balance has prompted me to take voluntary redundancy and retire aged 54. It's too early for me really and if future finances insist then I shall just look for another homeworking job.
26/03/2021 13:48:30 1 0
bbc
Yes I had to re-read the title because I was sure it was meant to say that!
CA
26/03/2021 14:11:19 1 0
bbc
People need flexibility. Too much time in one place is bad.

Some work suits being face to face, office suits this but could be elsewhere. Studying or report writing can be easiest in a quiet home space or similar in an office.

What is needed is employers who value both and measure results not hours or hours spent visibly be it online or in office.

It is what works for the individual and work.
26/03/2021 14:41:22 1 0
bbc
This was my first thought as well. People might like putting their kids to bed rather than being on a long commute. Or going for a run / walk or doing some gardening at lunch time. Not having to own two wardrobes because of archaic dress codes. People should be given a choice which is actually what these companies are doing for the most part.
Get back to the office threat vibes from Rishi. Probably coincidence that his family have interests in commercial property I'm sure......... Removed
Probably a coincidence he’s the chancellor of the exchequer and city retail generates a lot of money to public services? Nope. Internet trolls always find the silly angle Removed
135
26/03/2021 11:18:27 46 4
bbc
Lol. Is that you Rishi?
165
26/03/2021 11:21:00 57 3
bbc
Your definition of "internet troll" seems to be anyone who disagrees with you and/or Rishi Sunak. I'm not sure the OED would agree.
176
26/03/2021 11:21:57 31 5
bbc
No offence but unless your parents are multi billionaires he's probably not going to marry you or even riff with you (cringe)
244
26/03/2021 11:26:36 38 2
bbc
Not that the gov has any form on cronyism and vested interests at all?
452
26/03/2021 11:41:39 14 0
bbc
City retail? Like interest payments to banks for the huge loans and the money mens large salaries/
Trolls? Ah the next go-to abuse. Check what trolls do. it's not the same as suggesting your mates will lose out
572
26/03/2021 11:52:16 2 2
bbc
Coincidences are not a thing.
841
26/03/2021 12:20:03 0 0
bbc
Yes you do .
871
26/03/2021 12:23:08 0 0
bbc
I'm not hearing a "no".
Rob
26/03/2021 12:46:32 0 0
bbc
Retail generates a lot of tax. That's because of VAT and is independent of where it operates from.
37
26/03/2021 11:10:33 116 13
bbc
Point missed by Chancellor heavily invested in commercial property no doubt.
311
ceb
26/03/2021 11:31:15 32 41
bbc
His wife is a billionaire, he doesn’t need to risk his political reputation for some investments that he maybe has. He’s clearly not in it for the money! More likely he’s afraid for all the jobs that are supported by an office full of employees.
26/03/2021 16:01:45 2 1
bbc
Perhaps he has an interest in reviving the economy for everyone's benefit? But don't let the wider considerations get in the way of your conspiracy theory.
38
26/03/2021 11:10:51 40 3
bbc
Well are literally seeing the opposite - people turn down good offers for a position elsewhere that lets them work from home full time.
39
26/03/2021 11:10:59 34 3
bbc
And some people will quit if they are forced back into the office. Ultimately the market will work out new normal working practices, not the not-so-invisible hand of the Chancellor.
40
26/03/2021 11:11:00 345 27
bbc
Rubbish. If anything, we’ll quit if forced to work from the office.

The pandemic has proved that, in many cases, wfh is just as practical and effective and office working. Why should we have to suffer the time and cost of commuting when we don’t need to?
231
26/03/2021 11:14:27 60 207
bbc
Many see wfh as a skivers charter. Plus, offices are owned by pension funds. They have to be functioning otherwise pensions , your pension, will be nowt.
989
26/03/2021 12:35:21 10 1
bbc
Be careful iwhat you wish for f you are paid more for working in London (travel costs etc) you may find that pay increment cut. Not many can WFH full time, a balance is better all round.
26/03/2021 12:49:50 3 4
bbc
My experience is it works for a bit, certainly is not as efficient overall, prohibits quality communication/on the job training, does not enable people to judge performance properly, enable hiders to hide and does not facilitate social interaction which is very important in small businesses.
26/03/2021 12:50:09 1 2
bbc
not me! I love going to work in my office! I don't want to be stuck at home
26/03/2021 13:04:10 2 0
bbc
Work from home is not always as effective - can't wait to work from the office again, albeit I know it won't be full-time in future. Hoping for three days in office, two days at home . Also, not everyone has a suitable home to work from - several of my colleagues house-share or live in studio flats so only have a small space to work from, not ideal.
26/03/2021 14:01:17 1 1
bbc
I doubt firms will be that bothered if you do, there are plenty of people out there who are looking for a job. How easy do you really think it would be to quit your job and find another one working from home?
26/03/2021 14:17:27 0 0
bbc
Some people need to get out of the house, about a month into home working I asked to go back to the office, I rent a room so having one room as my office, living room and office seriously did a number on my mental health.
26/03/2021 15:52:51 0 0
bbc
Few people will be forced to work only from the office. You are creating a grievance which will not exist.
26/03/2021 17:22:30 0 0
bbc
Expect pay cuts then or generally next to no pay rises. You won't need the extra pay to cover for travel costs that a lot of companies pay extra for to get people to work in offices.
11
26/03/2021 11:07:25 34 4
bbc
Working from home has many benefits, but working closely with colleagues, management and getting "noticed" / advancing your career are not among them.

There should be a sensible combination of (maybe) two days per week in the office, on a rota basis, along with WFH, with people being allowed to nominate a preference for more WFH or more time in the office.
41
26/03/2021 11:11:02 13 2
bbc
That is what the company I work for is moving to. Allowing employees to work from home 2 or 3 days a week.
725
26/03/2021 12:06:39 2 0
bbc
Flexibility is good, but a hybrid approach like that needs a change in season tickets. To buy a weekly or monthly travelcard/Oyster will mean half of the expense being wasted on days when we're working from home. That seems unfair, so couldn't we move to a "carnet" system where you buy x number of days of travel that you "cancel" as and when you use them, rather than a period charging basis?
26/03/2021 13:17:48 0 0
bbc
It is going to be about economics - office space is expensive and if you can get twice as many people into the same office space via flexible working that will reduce costs which is an option that no sensible company can avoid. If they do they will become uncompetitive just like the shops that have remained on the high street.
42
26/03/2021 11:11:11 21 5
bbc
I think he’s got his comments / thoughts back to front!
43
26/03/2021 11:11:20 3 2
bbc
People may quite but it's the same as when as business re-locates. The staff either move with their job, opt for a longer commute...or quit.

The pandemic has brought some changes. It's pushed us towards work from home, shop from home, eat from home but it remains to be seen to what extent will these be permanent changes.
44
26/03/2021 11:11:23 3 2
bbc
The problem with working from home is that you need a proper space to work in, i.e. a room that's an office.

Sitting in the kitchen or on a settee with a laptop on your knee just does not work in the long run.

And not everyone has such space available to work with a proper set up.
45
26/03/2021 11:11:31 4 4
bbc
Is this guy on the same planet as the rest of us. Must have invested in INTU.
46
26/03/2021 11:11:31 3 11
bbc
As an employer of 40 in an office environment I can't wait to get everyone back in. It is far more efficient, creative, and builds a real sense of team that working from home does not deliver. Allow some flexible working absolutely, but they will be here the majority of the time. I'd imagine many employers are thinking the same. Employees want to come back too for a better work/life balance.
160
26/03/2021 11:20:42 0 1
bbc
I think you will find the employees you have probably don't think the same jolly thoughts about your business that you do. They don't own it, they turn up for a salary. I think you will find a fair percentage bothered enough about having to come in full time to leave. It's not like they won't have a good choice of companies that do support more flexibility.
175
26/03/2021 11:21:51 0 0
bbc
Also, better work life balance? What have you been smoking, the whole point of working from home is it provides a better work life balance as you don't waste hours commuting in a week and can get life things sorted around your work easier.
47
26/03/2021 11:11:37 3 2
bbc
Seems to me that working from home would be ideal for the Goldman Sachs staff working 95 hours a week. It would give them the chance to see their family once in a while.
234
26/03/2021 11:25:24 0 1
bbc
While I applaud your Goldman reference, it's a shame you didn't read the article which explained the 18 hour days are for people ALREADY WFH. No time to eat or sleep, let alone see their family.
11
26/03/2021 11:07:25 34 4
bbc
Working from home has many benefits, but working closely with colleagues, management and getting "noticed" / advancing your career are not among them.

There should be a sensible combination of (maybe) two days per week in the office, on a rota basis, along with WFH, with people being allowed to nominate a preference for more WFH or more time in the office.
48
26/03/2021 11:11:38 1 3
bbc
If everyone was working from home, no one would get an advantage from those 'benefits', not that i agree any of those things are definitely benefits.
6
26/03/2021 11:05:58 59 21
bbc
How would he know? He's never had a proper job in his life. Gambling with other people's money is not exactly a job.
49
26/03/2021 11:11:41 7 16
bbc
Jealous. Much.

He is Chancellor of the Exchequer.

He has obviously done something right.
187
b
26/03/2021 11:22:25 15 3
bbc
Got born into the right family, went to the right schools, married well.
7
26/03/2021 11:06:21 123 9
bbc
I can only think he is nervous that people won’t work and the economy will stutter if people are not in the office. Most people I know do not want to go back to 40 hours in the office every week, times have changed. He should know better than this.
He does know better than this, but he has vested interests - IE an office property portfolio. Removed
951
26/03/2021 12:30:25 2 2
bbc
he just needs to give himself some tax breaks then and leave the rest of us alone
26/03/2021 16:00:02 0 0
bbc
And your vested interest is to complain about everything that he might suggest, goo or bad.
51
26/03/2021 11:11:46 115 4
bbc
So i had a job offer - one working onsite each day... the other onsite 3 days and home 2 days... guess which one I chose... employers need to be flexible, hybrid system of working has to be new norm.
26/03/2021 21:02:26 1 5
bbc
Yes, absolutely.

My employer has always offered this - unfortunately, the pandemic has seen that put on ice and everyone is at home. No say, no consultation, no warning.

I am sick and tired of cantankerous middle aged shut-ins, with their enormous comfy house and nuclear family in a bland suburb, telling us why we must all WFH forever because they want to.

Can't wait for my office to reopen.
3
Bob
26/03/2021 11:05:35 376 32
bbc
Well he isn't wrong. Nationwide's report yesterday shows that. Half want to work in the office, and half don't. Probably those with children, annoyances, small homes or those for whom office interaction is part of their social life are itching to get back in an office.

If you don't offer flexibility then yes, people are going to look elsewhere.
52
JGC
26/03/2021 11:11:50 241 2
bbc
Yes this is what it comes down to, flexibility. Not everyone wants to be forced to work from home at all times, or forced to work in an office at all times. A lot of it though will ultimately come down to existing contracts which usually define the "normal place of work".
908
26/03/2021 12:26:21 1 0
bbc
Did exactly that for three years, put my hand on a handrail to find gum of on it and that was it, I decided the last time. I moved to Cornwall and never looked back WFH !
53
26/03/2021 11:11:52 1141 38
bbc
He is joking, right!?.. spending an hour and a half on dirty, smelly public transport. Picking up every cold and flu going around and feeling exhausted when FINALLY getting home in the late evening due to cancelled trains whilst wasting hours of your day commuting back and forth compared to hopping out of bed, making a hot drink and wandering into your study. Yeah, I’d REALLY miss the office, NOT!
132
26/03/2021 11:18:04 264 12
bbc
What isnt clear is how public transport will support the return to work . Scientists argue masks and distancing will be with us for sometime so how does rishi think that people will want or to be able to go back with potential restrictions in place for users of public transport?
208
26/03/2021 11:24:07 12 33
bbc
I suspect he's talking about more than just you personally. Many people miss the office, feel trapped WFH, and suffer as a result.

Your job being so far from your home, and the problems with trains are very unfortunate. He's doing and saying nothing about that.

Perhaps read what he did say?
274
26/03/2021 11:28:18 32 2
bbc
I do actually miss the office though as do many of my colleagues. Working from home 100% of the time can be very isolating. My own employer is looking at a hybrid model going forward where those of us who want to work from the office can, those who want to work from home can, and those of us (including myself) that would like the flexibility to work from both, also can. Happy days!
456
26/03/2021 11:41:57 3 0
bbc
Crime and Anti-Social Behaviour is another reason.
509
26/03/2021 11:46:31 0 0
bbc
It has its attractions, just trying to think of one....
624
26/03/2021 11:56:25 19 1
bbc
I drive to work and have a nice commute. I work (normally) in a nice office with good people that I like to interact with in person both from a work aspect and social aspect. I don't enjoy being at home on my own and only talking to colleagues over video calls.

Although I appreciate many people will be wanting to work from home more, that doesn't mean everybody does.
684
daz
26/03/2021 12:01:52 3 1
bbc
Not to mention the extortionate train fares !!!
804
26/03/2021 12:16:22 5 0
bbc
If large towns and cities are made too expensive, (e.g. public transport fares, parking fees, emissions charges), and/or inconvenient, (e.g. too few trains and busses, too few parking places), to visit then commuters, shoppers and tourists will go elsewhere or continue to work, shop and socialise locally
819
26/03/2021 12:17:24 6 6
bbc
It's not healthy to be at home all the time 7 days a week 24/7. Something will give in the end. The 'new normal' will go back to the old normal, and I cant wait.
26/03/2021 12:40:47 11 2
bbc
Indeed, days that would start at 7am, child to breakfast club (costs), train (costs), in work late, have to stay late, evening train delayed, home by 8.30pm. Quick dinner, and an hour of home life before bed. That was not a life, but it was happening multiple times a week for millions of people. And people were losing relationships. They never saw their children's bedtimes.
26/03/2021 12:46:46 1 1
bbc
Just what I tried to say, but you put it much better....
26/03/2021 12:46:03 3 0
bbc
he is just looking out for commercial interests
26/03/2021 12:49:51 4 0
bbc
I'm so glad you can roll out of bed into your 'study'. Good for you, how lovely. Living in a small flat with a couple of young kids, I don't have that luxury. So, if it's OK for you, I'd like my employer to provide me somewhere I can actually work.
26/03/2021 12:51:46 2 2
bbc
Spot on. My train to and from the office is one train an hour. If that train is cancelled (which happens often) you're waiting at least an hour for the next. Why would I want to spend up to 4 hours getting to and from work? The guy is so out of touch
26/03/2021 13:04:52 1 0
bbc
And paying an extortionate amount for the privilege to boot.
26/03/2021 13:14:13 2 1
bbc
You choose where you work and where you live. So accept responsibility for having to commute.
As for "wandering into your study", that smacks of middle-aged, middle-class 'I'm alright, Jack'. Not so easy for young people sharing rented accommodation.
26/03/2021 13:59:14 2 0
bbc
Its not just about the commute, but also about the face to face interactions that Zoom just cant replace.

Working from home is good, but so is spending time with my team in the office.
26/03/2021 14:14:17 3 0
bbc
Some people need to get out of the house, about a month into home working I asked to go back to the office, I rent a room so having one room as my office, living room and office seriously did a number on my mental health.
26/03/2021 14:32:17 1 0
bbc
Not everybody has your commute.
26/03/2021 15:08:14 1 0
bbc
I couldn't agree more James
26/03/2021 15:41:20 1 0
bbc
Not everybody agrees with you, and there are various combinations of home and office working.
26/03/2021 16:12:49 1 0
bbc
aren't you so lucky to have a study!

Many of us don't and like to have our home as our home and our haven AWAY from work. My living room is now my office as well as my work out space and apparently i'm meant to be able to switch off in my living room too and relax.
Not always possible
26/03/2021 16:37:18 0 0
bbc
Yet you will no doubt complain when your Salary is reduced by 30-40% as it will no longer be London weighted :) I imagine you'll soon be hopping back on that train at lest 3 times a week. A mix of office and WFH is key!
26/03/2021 16:40:30 0 1
bbc
Er, presumably you chose the job that you are in and the commuting costs were part of that. Whilst it is better for many at the moment, in the long run 100% homeworking that many are forced to do now, is not sustainable.
Home working tends to benefit the employee more that the employer.
54
26/03/2021 11:11:58 239 12
bbc
They will also quit if they are forced to go back into the office including myself.
I can do my job perfectly well from home as has been proved over the last 12 months.I don't have to get on a packed train at 06:40 every morning and I can save approx £2000 a year from not having to buy a season train ticket. I do not want or need to go back into an office work space.
373
26/03/2021 11:28:02 50 92
bbc
you just like watching this morning and loose women really.....come on admit it....
632
26/03/2021 11:57:01 13 1
bbc
And not taking that energy burning commute helps save the Environment. A Win-Win.
922
26/03/2021 12:26:45 11 1
bbc
I've been working remotely for 8 years now. I have no plans whatsoever to return to an office unless I had absolutely no choice.
932
26/03/2021 12:29:26 4 12
bbc
would you be happy to take a pay cut working from home as you dont need it for travel costs
26/03/2021 12:57:45 4 1
bbc
its a big saving plus more time with family
26/03/2021 13:43:47 0 0
bbc
Simon, if you refuse to go back to the office at all, then eventually your job will be off-shored, an equally qualified person in Asia will do your job for a fraction of the cost.

It's likely that one day a week in the office will ensure this doesn't happen.
26/03/2021 14:01:36 0 0
bbc
In that case you don't require any salary rises for many years. Its a win win.
26/03/2021 14:03:55 0 0
bbc
Let’s hope there is NOT an abundance of skills you can offer if you decide to quit because you don’t want to go to your place of work!
26/03/2021 15:40:16 0 0
bbc
Then get yourself another job. If you can. Not everyone will be able to make that jump. And of course you'd need to find a job that doesn't do the same. Not all jobs are going to expect people back but it's going to be a LOT higher than some people are expecting. We have NO rights to get it or indeed keep our jobs if we refuse.
26/03/2021 15:55:37 0 0
bbc
Fine, but not everyone is in your position. Workers should be given the choice. Some will prefer to be in the office for at least some if the time.
26/03/2021 16:56:38 0 0
bbc
You may be saving that at the moment but I think there are many who are not looking at where things could go. Downward pressure on salaries is likely.
26/03/2021 17:26:36 0 0
bbc
And your company can pay you £2000 less a year as well.......
tex
26/03/2021 19:47:12 1 1
bbc
I guess from your comment that you - like a lot of people on this HYS - are London based. Most people in this country don't have those commute times or costs. We should be looking at the bigger picture. We will all become more insular and our society will suffer as a result because of decreased human interaction. We are social creatures and need to mix with other people directly, not via Zoom.
55
26/03/2021 11:12:07 2 10
bbc
Well said Rishi. There is some shortsighted behaviour going on (shutting offices etc) which fails to recognise the importance of offices and human contact to most businesses and their people.
56
26/03/2021 11:12:20 7 2
bbc
Good! Let's all work from home and see how quickly TFL union members, wasteful Councils manage without a steady flow of our cash coming in from extortionate fares, and business rates. Best way to reduce the deficit Chancellor!
57
26/03/2021 11:12:24 11 1
bbc
So Rishi Sunak prefers to work in an office, rather than from home. So would I. But there are lots of people who wouldn't, and it really shouldn't be difficult to accommodate them.
Forcing people to do one or the other just seems silly.
95
26/03/2021 11:15:49 5 2
bbc
I would too if I worked in the House of Commons!! Meanwhile, back in the real world..
177
26/03/2021 11:22:02 0 0
bbc
Did you read the article where Sunak said "don't force people to do one or the other?"
58
26/03/2021 11:12:31 34 7
bbc
Is there anything Sunak says that isn't connected to some financial benefit for his backers?
199
26/03/2021 11:23:10 13 3
bbc
No.
59
26/03/2021 11:12:31 19 7
bbc
Less people in offices = less people commuting = less money for the Tory Donors who have investments in office buildings, transport companies and hedge funds based around oil

Rishi's family is one that will be impacted.
85
26/03/2021 11:14:37 3 6
bbc
While you are correct don't forget all the people who work in hospitality that rely on office workers spending money.
128
26/03/2021 11:17:44 0 2
bbc
And more unemployment
28
26/03/2021 11:09:40 648 26
bbc
Commercial property prices may drop and millionaire investors may suffer if people work from home, Rishi Sunak cries.

There. Fixed it. Have a great day.
60
26/03/2021 11:12:33 131 11
bbc
So true
26/03/2021 15:47:26 0 0
bbc
Yeah, right.
1
26/03/2021 11:03:54 1975 217
bbc
Utter twaddle. Homeworking is here to stay.

And if that means Russian oligarch property developers make less money from inner-city offices, so be it.
And to hell with working class bus drivers and family delis and pubs after work? Yup, another internet troll with unique “angle” on what’s good for mankind.

Stop this lump of rock. I need to get off
Removed
88
26/03/2021 11:15:00 42 4
bbc
I think most people live near a pub
129
26/03/2021 11:17:53 24 2
bbc
Don't let us stop you. Plenty of opportunities.
134
26/03/2021 11:18:23 74 24
bbc
Grow up. Delis and Pubs will thrive as they don't depend entirely on city centre office workers. And still plenty of buses driving around here during lockdown. You're decidedly in the minority here.
143
26/03/2021 11:19:19 121 14
bbc
Those who work from home will have more disposable income to spend on trips or takeaways so would that not actually reshape the economy away from the billions of sandwich shops out there and more towards higher end products etc

also it's not as if home workers will be locked in their own homes forever. I imagine most would opt for a mix, i know I would
146
26/03/2021 11:19:43 119 8
bbc
Why don't you ask "working class bus drivers" how much they love the rush-hour, how they delight in being late because of traffic congestion and then getting disciplined by office-bound fools in management who don't understand why a bus cannot just fly over the jams? Try driving a bus for a living before you claim to speak for them.
154
26/03/2021 11:20:20 23 4
bbc
Off you toddle, then.
168
26/03/2021 11:21:17 65 8
bbc
Stop using the internet, you're killing the libraries.
203
26/03/2021 11:23:28 6 4
bbc
How ironic that you label others as "trolls".
296
26/03/2021 11:29:59 46 5
bbc
People working at home after the pandemic very likely to use businesses in their neighbourhoods at lunch and in early evenings. Bonus: more community spirit.
301
26/03/2021 11:30:14 60 2
bbc
Now what would I miss by homeworking? oh yes, the 2 hour journey to work, with cancelled trains and buses that don't turn up, only to repeat same on the 2 hour journey home. Homeworking - bring it on.
306
26/03/2021 11:30:42 7 1
bbc
Bye.
322
26/03/2021 11:31:56 6 0
bbc
What? If you’re Going to reply as least say something that has some relevance to what you’re replying to!
328
26/03/2021 11:32:27 5 0
bbc
you sound like a dinosaur.
351
26/03/2021 11:33:55 32 4
bbc
Dig into your own pocket and shell out tens of thousands of pounds per annum and join the daily grind and rip off of Britain's clapped-out travel network and rip off tin-pot dried sandwich bars and/or purveyors of weak "coffee" all sold at a kings ransom.

Yes, that's it! *YOU* go into work and do all that and make Rishi and his mates very happy and far more wealthy peeps than you.

You first!
366
26/03/2021 11:35:06 33 3
bbc
Few people commute to offices so they can support bus drivers and delis. They endure that torture for rather more selfish reasons - to earn a wage.

You may not know this.
372
26/03/2021 11:26:50 18 1
bbc
It is entirely down to individual employers and employees as to where they work. They will be deciding in their own interests, not in the interests of delis and pubs. They will have to adapt.

I say this as a lockdown sceptic who always believed that the daily commute was also an affront to quality of life.
389
Dan
26/03/2021 11:37:22 20 0
bbc
So... You'd prefer an awful lot of people to lose several hours of their day to travelling, in order to protect working class bus drivers and family delis and pubs in cities or near office parks? It's noble that you're fighting for those sectors, but I'm sure there are a lot of people who would disagree with you.

Delis and pubs near home will boom. Local buses will see an increase in passengers.
473
26/03/2021 11:43:57 4 0
bbc
If a business relies on encouraging/pressuring/bullying people to behave in ways that they don't want to then it's a bad business model. But if a business can exploit how people want to behave anyway then that's a good one which "deserves" to thrive. These are the "rules" and harsh realities of capitalist free market; you seem to advocate "stacking the deck", prioritising businesses over people.
62
26/03/2021 11:12:44 42 5
bbc
There speaks a man with friends in corporate property.
63
26/03/2021 11:12:44 2 2
bbc
Funny, most people I speak to are hoping for 4 days a week at home as standard going forward at the minimum
35
26/03/2021 11:10:20 1770 73
bbc
Alternatively, people may quit if forced to work in the office.
64
26/03/2021 11:12:50 682 35
bbc
Agreed Jainz - I know I'll look for another job if forced to work 100% in an OFFICE. I enjoy Balanced/home working.
92
26/03/2021 11:15:27 58 3
bbc
Exactly, being forced either way isn't good for anyone. If people have proven they can work effectively from home, they should be given the choice.
420
26/03/2021 11:39:18 5 2
bbc
Good, plenty of jobs around to choose from
444
26/03/2021 11:41:12 15 51
bbc
You can't watch daytime TV from the office so easily......we know what you are up to!!
666
26/03/2021 11:59:45 5 0
bbc
Good luck. Not everyone can take the risk of leaving their job though,
963
26/03/2021 12:32:12 2 0
bbc
Not always easy with millions on the dole
26/03/2021 12:43:59 0 2
bbc
My view would be 'seeya'. For goodness sake, get over yourself. How terrible having to go to work every day. Millions would be just grateful for a job!
26/03/2021 13:55:28 0 0
bbc
Depends if there are jobs to go to doesn’t it. At moment most don’t have a choice about working from home, could easily change to the opposite when the pandemic becomes a distant memory
Rob
26/03/2021 13:57:09 0 1
bbc
you can work from home fine, as long as you tell your local council that where you live is now an OFFICE and not resendential and you must pay business rates instead of council tax.
26/03/2021 14:17:45 0 0
bbc
Happy job hunting!
65
26/03/2021 11:12:53 91 5
bbc
somewhat of a disconnect from reality here. Personally, I don't want to go back to spending £200/wk and 4 hours a day travelling to London to do a job that myself/co-workers have totally smashed over the last 12 months from home. WFH is not for everyone, but dragging me back to a London office *will* make me quit and find another job. Suspect it's the same for many.
26/03/2021 14:25:09 21 1
bbc
Different for different people, I need to get out of the house at least some of the time for work or I'd lose my mind (what's left of it)
66
26/03/2021 11:13:05 2 3
bbc
More jobs for those that are happy to then.
67
26/03/2021 11:13:08 9 1
bbc
Surely companies just offer employees the choice? Some will vote home, some will vote office, some will vote mixture. Am sure most large companies can make that work. trickier probably for small businesses.
68
26/03/2021 11:13:11 10 4
bbc
And his evidence is .....?

He's made this up because city office workers buy loads of coffee and sandwiches from Starbucks and Pret and buy expensive train tickets.
163
26/03/2021 11:20:53 3 7
bbc
And your evidence is...?

Is Sunak a shareholder in either of those firms?

Do you really believe all companies are the same company, and all shareholders are the same shareholders, and that all transactions personally benefit Rishi?
9
26/03/2021 11:07:06 2 14
bbc
Working from home is a short step to working from China. I know of two companies who are actively looking at recruiting in far East to replace UK staff
69
26/03/2021 11:13:12 4 1
bbc
Must be Chinese companies as i can see a lot of people boycotting China for the way it is acting lately.
70
26/03/2021 11:13:16 5 2
bbc
I won't quit but I want to work in an office
71
26/03/2021 11:13:17 5 3
bbc
Remote working is not ideal, especially for young people who will not pick up experience from co-workers as efficiently. MS Teams/Zoom/Skype calls lack access to the overheard and casual conversations of the office. However, lockdown has highlighted to many the benefit of remote working (no commute time for starters), and we are looking at a more work happening remotely, but offices are essential.
9
26/03/2021 11:07:06 2 14
bbc
Working from home is a short step to working from China. I know of two companies who are actively looking at recruiting in far East to replace UK staff
72
26/03/2021 11:13:39 0 2
bbc
Depends on your job though. In any case, if people worked harder to educate themselves and we took hard graft more seriously we’d be the ones out performing China and co. Like it or not we live in a global economy now.
73
26/03/2021 11:13:48 6 3
bbc
It will become a generation issue. Older experienced staff are fine working at home. They know what they are doing.

But how will younger staff learn from them, receive training or mentoring if they never see them? Could end up in a few years with younger staff not being ready to set up and progress their careers as older staff move on
99
26/03/2021 11:16:10 0 2
bbc
This is a big problem with the company I work for, having recruited graduates and who are not allowed to work on site
499
26/03/2021 11:45:50 0 0
bbc
It is an interesting problem, new hires, but it can be dealt with, you just have to be very proactive in having video calls with them and screen sharing when needed.
74
26/03/2021 11:13:50 6 2
bbc
the gov't just voted to extend covid powers. that means the gov't are aware that office working may not be safe
75
26/03/2021 11:13:59 13 1
bbc
what he means is our big business cronies and purveyors of cheap labour have told us that we must force the plebs back in to offices. the likes of mitie, serco. g4s, iss etc etc all depend on office space in order to exploit zero hour contract plebs for billions of pounds . greed and capitalism just like boris said only a few days ago !!
76
26/03/2021 11:14:08 17 2
bbc
Whether people work from home, office or a mix of both is a matter for the company with the individual.

Politicians need to deal with the fallout - loss of business rates, empty offices, social impacts etc - not direct the outcome!
77
26/03/2021 11:14:09 4 2
bbc
I'm sure working at home is fine for those people who are already married, have kids etc. Those of us who are single are never going to meet anyone IRL without a growing network of friends, and the workplace is where most friendships are made in adulthood.

This is the exact reason that I am looking to get a job in London once this nonsense is over. Great social scene (and more money!)
94
26/03/2021 11:15:45 1 1
bbc
Wear your belt tight down in London, they rip off Northerners
122
Al
26/03/2021 11:17:36 0 1
bbc
Was a great social scene may be a more accurate description. It will be different now as fewer people are going to commute and provide the footfall for the hospitality sector.
17
26/03/2021 11:08:39 6 8
bbc
As someone who enjoys working I have been going into office every day. It's amazing how many people claim to be online and working and when to phone them they are funnily unavailable for 30 minutes having a break
78
26/03/2021 11:14:14 3 1
bbc
True, but do they not take a break or go to the kitchen area for a coffee and chat, or outside for a smoking break when they are in the office? It's unhealthy to sit on your arse for a full 10 hour working day!
4
26/03/2021 11:05:43 174 5
bbc
Perhaps there is some middle ground here?

Some working from home...

Some working in the office for 'constructive' meetings and 'team bonding'.
79
26/03/2021 11:14:16 14 2
bbc
That's exactly what will happen.

Maybe more work and less office politics too? Will show up those who can and those who just talk about it in endless and often pointless meetings!
80
26/03/2021 11:14:20 6 2
bbc
What does Sunak actually know about anything?
Hes a banker, and a bad one, what does he know about going to work.
140
26/03/2021 11:18:50 0 1
bbc
Perhaps he met his fabulously rich wife at work?
81
26/03/2021 11:14:20 12 4
bbc
wow what a statement from the "in touch Tories"...is this guy for real??!
82
26/03/2021 11:14:20 29 4
bbc
I think perhaps it's the other way round Rishi, I know many people (including myself) who will be looking for other jobs if they're made to go back to the office full time.

Desperate tactics from people with a vested interest in all the city centre office properties
83
26/03/2021 11:14:29 4 5
bbc
Another comment to ponder - how many people who advocate for working from home will moan when their inflated London wages are reduced as they are no longer based in London?
138
26/03/2021 11:18:41 0 2
bbc
"inflated" wages? Surely market forces. The wages are the wages for the job.

Do you think an employer can unilaterally reduce wages and it somehow NOT be an unfair dismissal?
164
26/03/2021 11:21:01 0 2
bbc
Here's a shocker - not everyone lives or works in London.

My employer definitely does not pay me any extra for working in Somerset city, and the majority of jobs pay according to skill not office location
205
26/03/2021 11:23:33 0 1
bbc
Or jobs moved remotely to countries where wages are so much lower
84
26/03/2021 11:14:35 23 2
bbc
When you’re normally counting every penny because of commuting costs and being away from your family for 10 hours a day, what’s not to like about working from home?
59
26/03/2021 11:12:31 19 7
bbc
Less people in offices = less people commuting = less money for the Tory Donors who have investments in office buildings, transport companies and hedge funds based around oil

Rishi's family is one that will be impacted.
85
26/03/2021 11:14:37 3 6
bbc
While you are correct don't forget all the people who work in hospitality that rely on office workers spending money.
86
26/03/2021 11:14:37 23 7
bbc
Presumably those who have interests in commercial property have been having a word in his ear.
106
26/03/2021 11:16:39 9 3
bbc
His next door neighbour probably rents out 75% of the commercial properties in the UK
87
26/03/2021 11:14:38 12 2
bbc
I love working from home. It means I can support my family better, and get more time at work and more time at home too! Lack of a commute is a great advantage.

We need a mix - some folks can escape the crying baby by being in the officec- but we've proved we can work 'separated' - that's not the same as remote from the office.
And to hell with working class bus drivers and family delis and pubs after work? Yup, another internet troll with unique “angle” on what’s good for mankind.

Stop this lump of rock. I need to get off
Removed
88
26/03/2021 11:15:00 42 4
bbc
I think most people live near a pub
89
26/03/2021 11:15:04 4 5
bbc
Surely working from home is more better suited to people who don't like to socialise or who have a set set of friends or live on there own and that's it. At least going into work you get the chance to meet others. Have stuff to talk about when you get home.
162
26/03/2021 11:20:52 0 2
bbc
Why don’t you write about yourself and leave others to themselves! “Have a set of friends” blah blah blah
455
26/03/2021 11:41:50 0 0
bbc
If thats all you have to talk about when you get home, id suggest you find other things to do outside of work. You can meet people doing other activities too you know.
90
26/03/2021 11:15:17 3 2
bbc
Hahaha! Pull the other one. April 1st isn't until next week.
91
26/03/2021 11:15:22 1 7
bbc
Here we go. New HYS and I’m sitting here amused as all the usual bampots come crawling out of the woodwork with all these opinions about how they won’t be told where to work (you’d never guess most of them may as well have ‘dole’ tattooed across their buttocks they’ve been on it long enough)
64
26/03/2021 11:12:50 682 35
bbc
Agreed Jainz - I know I'll look for another job if forced to work 100% in an OFFICE. I enjoy Balanced/home working.
92
26/03/2021 11:15:27 58 3
bbc
Exactly, being forced either way isn't good for anyone. If people have proven they can work effectively from home, they should be given the choice.
93
26/03/2021 11:15:34 4 2
bbc
He's right. You can do "work" from home, sometimes better than in the office. Regular processes are fine and having time and space to think about projects is fine. However when it comes to synergies and team work being in the office has so many benefits.
I think employers will get into a half-way house where teams are required to be in the office 2 or 3 days a week, giving the benefits of both.
356
26/03/2021 11:34:19 0 0
bbc
Going to an office two or three days a week is going to be very expensive in terms of rail fares - a season ticket you mainly don't use, or sky-high daily fares. Be fine for those who commute by car, of course.
77
26/03/2021 11:14:09 4 2
bbc
I'm sure working at home is fine for those people who are already married, have kids etc. Those of us who are single are never going to meet anyone IRL without a growing network of friends, and the workplace is where most friendships are made in adulthood.

This is the exact reason that I am looking to get a job in London once this nonsense is over. Great social scene (and more money!)
94
26/03/2021 11:15:45 1 1
bbc
Wear your belt tight down in London, they rip off Northerners
123
26/03/2021 11:17:36 0 1
bbc
.... Im from stevenage :-/ I'm basically already a londoner.
57
26/03/2021 11:12:24 11 1
bbc
So Rishi Sunak prefers to work in an office, rather than from home. So would I. But there are lots of people who wouldn't, and it really shouldn't be difficult to accommodate them.
Forcing people to do one or the other just seems silly.
95
26/03/2021 11:15:49 5 2
bbc
I would too if I worked in the House of Commons!! Meanwhile, back in the real world..
16
26/03/2021 11:08:16 17 46
bbc
Are you this nasty to people you know?
96
26/03/2021 11:15:52 3 3
bbc
Probably doesn't 'know' any politicians?
759
26/03/2021 12:10:40 2 0
bbc
he knows them well enough
97
26/03/2021 11:16:08 4 2
bbc
I'll quit if I'm made to go back to the office.
139
26/03/2021 11:18:46 0 3
bbc
i wander why
98
26/03/2021 11:16:09 2 2
bbc
He neglects to mention that people may quit if forced back! I like home working and will be looking to strike a balance between home and office in future.
73
26/03/2021 11:13:48 6 3
bbc
It will become a generation issue. Older experienced staff are fine working at home. They know what they are doing.

But how will younger staff learn from them, receive training or mentoring if they never see them? Could end up in a few years with younger staff not being ready to set up and progress their careers as older staff move on
99
26/03/2021 11:16:10 0 2
bbc
This is a big problem with the company I work for, having recruited graduates and who are not allowed to work on site
100
26/03/2021 11:16:17 4 2
bbc
Chancellor says people may make the value of his investments fall by deserting commercial properties.

Lots of people in the news recently saying that people are desperate to get back to offices, who then turn out to have a vested interest in the value of commercial property.