John Lewis to permanently close eight more shops
24/03/2021 | news | business | 1,436
The move puts 1,465 jobs at risk and means it has axed a third of its stores in less than a year.
1
24/03/2021 13:12:45 221 9
bbc
Such a shame. Living in Sheffield.. a huge blow to the City Centre
135
24/03/2021 13:33:14 21 123
bbc
They have been effectively blackmailing the city council gor years and blocked many schemes. Reap what you sow
324
24/03/2021 13:59:07 37 0
bbc
If major locations such as Sheffield are closing then John Lewis must be in serious trouble.

John Lewis (formerly Cole Brothers in Sheffield which opened in 1847) is the biggest store in Sheffield and is one of the reasons why people choose to go into Sheffield city centre.

A very sad day.
413
24/03/2021 14:08:41 8 4
bbc
they agreed a very favourable deal with sheff council last year - sold the building to them in return for lower rent... and now they have bailed on the deal. At least sheffield can now flatten that ugly building and replace it with something more useful in the current climate and something flagship for the heart of the city renovations that are slowly making a difference to our centre.
463
24/03/2021 14:24:48 21 4
bbc
Meadowhall finished John Lewis off in Sheffield (IMO) as it made for 2 major shopping centres. Without John Lewis (and I bought plenty of stuff at the Sheffield store) I doubt I will set foot in the city centre (apart from meeting for drinks/meal) again. Very sad day!

Don't really want to visit Meadowhell either - will have to go to Leeds to check out and arrange major purchases.
722
24/03/2021 15:43:03 8 2
bbc
Will kill trade in the city centre and hopefully the useless council along with it.
758
24/03/2021 15:55:27 1 4
bbc
It is a shame, but if you look at the state of the building inside, the righting was on the wall for some time. It is a shame, but at the same time, the service you get in John Lewis is not as good as it used to be. You can still do click and collect at Waitrose in Sheffield.
826
24/03/2021 16:17:50 1 5
bbc
Particularly bad for the trans community
24/03/2021 18:38:05 1 0
bbc
They should bring back Gatecrasher...
24/03/2021 19:34:10 0 0
bbc
I’ve remember starting working in Sheffield just as Meadowhall opened. The city centre was like a horrible ghost town back then!
2
24/03/2021 13:12:59 10 19
bbc
Are JL going to payback the furlough money they have been claiming then?
8
24/03/2021 13:15:11 4 13
bbc
I hope so, the Government needs to go after them and other companies that have claimed furlough payments and then made people redundant.
15
24/03/2021 13:16:16 6 0
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Check the news and you’ll find out. Anything to get your name on HYS!
19
24/03/2021 13:17:09 14 0
bbc
No because the furlough money was then paid it to the staff. Unless of course you want to take the money back from the staff before making them redundant.
55
24/03/2021 13:22:50 4 0
bbc
So instead do you think they should have decided which stores they should close 12 months ago (when no-one at all knew what we were in for) and then made their workers redundant? How do you think they'd be doing now?
24/03/2021 17:45:09 0 0
bbc
Do you mean business rates? Furlough money got paid to staff in closed stores
3
24/03/2021 13:13:45 9 16
bbc
Ok, time moves on /shrug

sad for those employed but that is the nature of progress I am afraid. Bricks and mortar shops are a dying breed.
53
24/03/2021 13:22:39 2 1
bbc
Although the right format WILL survive!
146
24/03/2021 13:35:22 1 0
bbc
Did the same people moaning about Amazon kick off when the supermarkets moved out of town and massively widened their product ranges? Those retailers which adapt will survive. Those that don't won't. It's the way of the world.

Save the VIDEO SHOP!!!
4
24/03/2021 13:13:51 363 25
bbc
I have used John Lewis in lockdown the same amount of times I did prior to lockdown. We need to take this opportunity to adjust to our new shopping behaviours. With that the tax system need to adjust to it too. No point taxing bricks and mortar and not taxing internet shopping.
47
24/03/2021 13:21:39 136 572
bbc
John Lewis becomes another casualty of the government's monumental overreaction to coronavirus.

Shame on you Boris.
102
24/03/2021 13:28:56 17 36
bbc
Where is your evidence that businesses trading on the internet do not pay tax?
136
24/03/2021 13:33:25 19 47
bbc
So penalise new efficient companies to subsidise those companies which have absolutely failed to change? Amazon et al operate under exactly the same tax regime as the bricks and mortar only retailers.
390
24/03/2021 14:09:42 9 2
bbc
You really are completely wrong in your assertion. Any fault with the rules governing tax in the UK is the fault of the Government. Individuals and businesses seek to pay the minimum level of tax within the rules. You want that to change, change the rules! And why should online businesses be taxed for being successful? They chose a trading model same as the high street shops.
Not to mention taxes on people of colour that should be abolished Removed
881
24/03/2021 16:40:12 1 0
bbc
Not all shoppers are young and happy to purchase on-line all the time. Some of us like to see/feel before we buy.
890
24/03/2021 16:45:24 1 0
bbc
VAT is the same. When mail order grew in the ‘60’s I don’t recall it being subject to a tax comparison with physical stores.
920
24/03/2021 16:59:14 1 0
bbc
Soon there will be little left to tax but online orders. It is a real shame they didn't start applying this with the last budget. IT has to happen sooner or later and will be needed even more when they all use EVs and road fuel duty disappears.
5
24/03/2021 13:13:52 535 21
bbc
very sad to see what is happening to John Lewis. Say what you like but the store is still a major draw in many towns
They put someone in charge with no retail experience to tick boxes. Outsourced their TV and white goods repairs, cafes and restaurants. Web support offshored to India and went all WOKE in their adverts. No more to say really. Removed
111
24/03/2021 13:30:15 5 61
bbc
That's why they don't pay rent, unlike the rest of us
198
24/03/2021 13:41:59 40 0
bbc
Fully agree - JL has always been a major draw for our shopping centre in Peterborough. The JL experience for us was ruined several years ago now when they undertook a major reduction in floor area resulting in the store basically becoming a building site. I will miss the visits to buy electrical goods - always our store of choice.
314
24/03/2021 13:58:44 29 1
bbc
If major locations such as Sheffield are closing then John Lewis must be in serious trouble.

John Lewis (formerly Cole Brothers in Sheffield which opened in 1847) is the biggest store in Sheffield and is one of the reasons why people choose to go into Sheffield city centre.

A very sad day.
373
24/03/2021 14:05:44 9 1
bbc
Yes your right it's a big blow for lots of shoppers aswell as the staff. Will leave a huge dent in the high street. Fact of the matter is the landlords are the problem. Business rates are far to high and that's the problem.
424
24/03/2021 14:15:17 0 0
bbc
Well they weren’t really as if they were and they were making money the company would not be closing them
518
24/03/2021 14:39:34 4 0
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If John Lewis are still a major draw in towns, why are they shutting stores?
646
24/03/2021 15:13:45 1 0
bbc
Agreed...along with a good M&S. Something must make high streets into a destination worth going to - even with no intention to buy. If these major draws go then they are done for.
706
24/03/2021 15:39:16 0 0
bbc
It is the staff I feel sorry for. With so many other shops & business going what change for them & they families of finding another job
813
24/03/2021 16:14:44 1 9
bbc
Lack of diversity killed John Lewis. Trans people like me don't feel safe shopping there.
850
24/03/2021 16:30:43 0 0
bbc
that's after they have taken over the high street pushed all the independents out and now they are off. is that fair trade ? or even trading fairly?
957
24/03/2021 17:09:13 1 0
bbc
Absolutely, a major draw for most placed. I can't help but think this is a purely political move, not by the store itself but how the government has shaped the economy in some areas.
24/03/2021 18:34:11 0 0
bbc
Indeed! A significant blow to many cities - not least to Peterborough, mentioned in your top story, in which it filled a significant part of Peterborough's central Queensgate mall, and provided a pleasant upmarket and spacious shopping experience, and a very comprehensive one, over several floors, plus cafe. It'll be much missed - the impact of its closure, a serious blow to the city's appeal.
6
24/03/2021 13:14:33 3 23
bbc
They're over-rated, in my opinion. If you just want good customer service, many of the big online retailers are just as good, if not better at it. JL physical shops used to be a destination in their own right and I think they'll struggle to compete effectively online.
7
24/03/2021 13:15:02 10 1
bbc
Just another victim of today's click and collect culture.

Sadly, the day of the department store is now behind us and folks habits have changed from in store browsing to online selection.
46
24/03/2021 13:21:37 7 2
bbc
Not so sure that is behind us, since MandS will definitely survive. JL would benefit from re-introducing a quality food hall.
2
24/03/2021 13:12:59 10 19
bbc
Are JL going to payback the furlough money they have been claiming then?
8
24/03/2021 13:15:11 4 13
bbc
I hope so, the Government needs to go after them and other companies that have claimed furlough payments and then made people redundant.
80
24/03/2021 13:26:30 5 0
bbc
They weren't in a position to make the decision earlier, since no-one could foresee the consequence of COVID. If they had closed them sooner ALL of the people would have become unemployed and would have used money from the public purse in one form or other. Taking the Furlough money might only have delayed the inevitable, but it saved many people from hardship.
Why can you comment on political news stories anymore on the BBC website?
Hopefully not because Boris has appointed Richard Sharp, a former Goldman Sachs Banker, as BBC Chair
Removed
49
24/03/2021 13:22:01 9 6
bbc
Not to mention the appointment of the former deputy chairman of the Hammersmith and Fulham Conservative party as Director-General. Meanwhile, the deluded Tory followers and trolls on here still whine about the 'lefty' BBC.
56
24/03/2021 13:22:58 5 1
bbc
I agree. Or the immigration news? But they would have to block 50% of the ‘offending’ comments?
97
24/03/2021 13:28:27 7 5
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Nonsense, the majority of the time, the only stories open to HYS are Tory bashing headlines.

A poor attempt to crowbar a government bias argument, when the opposite is so true.
108
24/03/2021 13:30:00 3 2
bbc
You're complaining about a couple that come from the right out of 22,749 far lefties ? Still a long way to go yet.
141
24/03/2021 13:34:47 5 0
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Good thing. I'm sick of comments insulting either political party and missing the point of the topic under discussion. Too many trolls. I want to know what other ordinary people think, and those better informed than I am (and than the journo!). Mods should remove insults with nothing to add to the discussion.
10
Bob
24/03/2021 13:15:53 2 7
bbc
5 of the 8 stores closing opens in the 2010s. A similar story could be seen in the previous list of closures.

Blaming the internet is merely there to mask poor judgement in opening the stores in the first place. The internet existed in the 2010s and was doing rather nicely for itself.
34
24/03/2021 13:19:44 1 1
bbc
Or the decision to keep them closed for much of a year?
Dee
25/03/2021 09:12:18 0 0
bbc
10 years ago online shopping was not as all pervasive as it is now & people still shopped as a leisure activity & to try before you buy. JL was, and still is, a premium brand. Today, it’s different & the demographic has changed in many UK towns & cities. They have to prune those unprofitable stores, particularly those in the wrong locations before it’s too late.
11
24/03/2021 13:15:55 416 12
bbc
I did some work with JL a couple of years ago. Couldn't ask for a more pleasant set of colleagues. Motivated, knowledgeable, and good-natured. A real shame.
161
24/03/2021 13:37:03 167 8
bbc
Best place I ever worked, with friendly colleagues and supportive management, a pity it was only for three months many years ago
379
24/03/2021 14:07:08 7 2
bbc
It wasn't in the call centre then? Management just interested in Sales but most of the customers wanted to talk to store staff for advice (which they formerly were able to do).
467
24/03/2021 14:25:58 3 42
bbc
They may have been nice people, but were a big part of the problem. Essentially they are shop workers - putting things on shelve and operating tills. When they elevated themselves to "partners" and demanded annual bonuses, the cost became a drag on the company

I'm afraid it looks like the chickens have come home to roost. Shame, as I used to love browsing there before I bought the item online
815
24/03/2021 16:15:21 2 29
bbc
Shame they couldn't live up to diversity and employ any trans people. That's why nobody wants to go there.
24/03/2021 19:13:24 1 0
bbc
Might have been because it is a workers' cooperative. The profit goes to the store and the people who work there. That is a good incentive for the management and staff.
12
24/03/2021 13:16:01 9 6
bbc
Lock downs deliver, it will keep giving through out this year and for those who do not understand as each business closes it ripples out into other sectors, so you job may well be next.
32
24/03/2021 13:19:10 1 1
bbc
The full effects of the Lockdowns will not fully unfold until the end of 2022 and any economist or politician that tells you differently is being totally unrealistic.
43
24/03/2021 13:21:19 3 1
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Better than being dead though.
247
Bob
24/03/2021 13:49:08 0 0
bbc
John Lewis is using COVID to paper over bad decisions previous chief executives made.

There's a reason that the majority of closures are new format stores. They didn't work and now is an easy time to exit them.

They were heading down the toilet prior to 2020. That's why the turfed out top brass at both JL and Waitrose.
13
24/03/2021 13:16:04 75 19
bbc
Such sad news, the draconian measures of keeping shops closed for so long will prove to be the final straw for many shops. Sad day for Aberdeen and all the rest affected by this news.
72
24/03/2021 13:25:51 59 13
bbc
While I have sympathy with your point, the lock downs have only accelerated the demise of poor business models in an ever changing consumer driven world.

I like JL, I like shopping in JL, but then I'm not 'price sensitive' when I do shop. I buy quality, just less often.

The 'Primark world' may survive, fueled by our disposable buying habits, but otherwise, online is the future.
793
24/03/2021 16:07:36 0 0
bbc
No need for long closures at all. Now we see the results, store closures. Aberdeen the new Ghost Town and they are looking to redevelop the New Market and the railway station. What for??
14
bob
24/03/2021 13:16:10 4 50
bbc
Poor choice, VERY poor service, a dreadful shop - good riddance
27
24/03/2021 13:18:41 26 0
bbc
Exact opposite in my experience I have shopped there for years and have always had excellent service, other family and friends say the same!
50
24/03/2021 13:22:01 7 0
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You have obviously had a conversation with Amazon customer service, ??
67
24/03/2021 13:25:00 5 0
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But the "VERY poor service" you most likely received from one individual may not be any of the individuals who are losing their jobs! I suspect they don't miss your custom.
207
24/03/2021 13:43:21 4 0
bbc
Oh dear, currently 42 down votes compared to 1 up (who was that, I wonder?).
613
bob
24/03/2021 15:01:06 0 1
bbc
Clearly none of you have ever spent over £1500 on a carpet from them - bought in November delivery promised between Christmas and New Year - eventually fitted in late March.
Dyson vacuum cleaner - queue to buy, queue to pay and half an hour in store waiting for it to come from warehouse - a bit like GUM
£350 pots made of stainless steel, rivets holding handles - aluminium - so fell off
2
24/03/2021 13:12:59 10 19
bbc
Are JL going to payback the furlough money they have been claiming then?
15
24/03/2021 13:16:16 6 0
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Check the news and you’ll find out. Anything to get your name on HYS!
16
24/03/2021 13:16:26 97 26
bbc
I don't like to see shops like JL struggle. I've always been impressed by them and their service is second to none. It is however the times we live in and shops and shopping has changed. Even before lockdown, I barely entered a shop if I could help it. Best of luck to the staff affected.
173
24/03/2021 13:37:45 100 13
bbc
You don't like to see shops like JL struggle but won't visit them. You can't make this stuff up, they need shoppers to survive
17
24/03/2021 13:16:45 24 1
bbc
Shame. Last of the "traditional" big department stores here in NE Scotland. Even though I shop a lot online (and from John Lewis online among others) it was sometimes good to visit the store itself. I can (sort of) see the logic in the closures but... that's "progress".

Not sure what the building will be used for - more (student?) apartments I guess.
18
24/03/2021 13:16:59 45 5
bbc
It’s a shame, and I feel really sorry for their lovely employees, but even the great JL are not immune from our changes in buying habits. They won’t disappear as long as they continue to give excellent customer service and have a good range of quality items on display and in stock.
788
ET
24/03/2021 16:06:51 6 2
bbc
And have a great web presence.
Dee
25/03/2021 09:49:11 0 0
bbc
The main problem was the poor location of these stores in the first place, driven by cheap rents rather than footfall. They need to focus on smaller home stores in key locations or home stuff in large profitable Waitrose stores only. The rest is online click and collect, trading on the premium JL brand.
25/03/2021 10:24:37 0 0
bbc
It's going to be hard to have range of quality items on display if they have shut all the shops....
2
24/03/2021 13:12:59 10 19
bbc
Are JL going to payback the furlough money they have been claiming then?
19
24/03/2021 13:17:09 14 0
bbc
No because the furlough money was then paid it to the staff. Unless of course you want to take the money back from the staff before making them redundant.
20
24/03/2021 13:17:42 165 6
bbc
This will affect the greater footfall for retailers located around John Lewis with wider implications . I am especially saddened to read that Aberdeen is closing given its importance to retail in the city.
134
24/03/2021 13:32:50 82 1
bbc
I agree with you. What’ll be left of our city centre? Dying of a slow death.
205
24/03/2021 13:43:03 25 0
bbc
Agreed, it was one of the best shops in the city and almost all my trips down town included a few bits from John Lewis. What with Debenhams closing as well, there won't be much left soon.
420
24/03/2021 14:14:29 23 0
bbc
Affa sad. Toon is a ghost town. Not just pandemic related; the short sightedness of Union Square ripped it's heart out. Another ACC fail.

Unimaginable once to think no E&M, Frasers, Woolies, Littlewoods, BHS, Debenhams and the coopy/John Lewis. Not one dept store left.

Bought all my electricals/white goods from JL. Still second to none for service. Gutted for the staff, all the best to them.
594
24/03/2021 14:54:41 6 0
bbc
I don’t think it was as a result of Covid , certainly not in Aberdeen . The store , indeed the city centre , was dying before then as a result of poor decision making by the council ...also too many highly priced designer clothes , furniture no one wanted to buy . A bit like Grace Brothers . Too many highly paid chiefs .
666
24/03/2021 15:23:01 3 0
bbc
Give it another 5 years and Aberdeen will be all boarded up and they will switch the lights off. What a change in 10 years.
Even worse for the black community Removed
21
24/03/2021 13:17:44 91 7
bbc
A kick in the teeth for Sheffield, right after the local council has bent over backwards to accommodate them. I like to see products before I buy & ask questions of the staff, who are unusually knowledgeable about their goods. Without a car, click and collect is no use.
115
24/03/2021 13:31:02 9 26
bbc
Home delivery?
145
24/03/2021 13:35:21 3 2
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Do you have a clipboard ?
157
24/03/2021 13:36:43 13 0
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I am surprised they stayed open as long as they did with MeadowHall on their doorstep. But it is a great shame for Sheffield.
163
24/03/2021 13:26:29 12 1
bbc
The centre of Sheffield will have little left now - was JL really doing so badly in Sheffield before the pandemic? This will loose them huge numbers of loyal customers.
418
24/03/2021 14:14:12 17 2
bbc
Bent over backwards?
Ever since I can remember the Sheffield council have been making it harder to drive into the town centre and expensive to park.
People then go to out of town centres that are free to park

Councils response: make it harder to drive to the centre and more expensive to park
More people then go to out of town centres that are free to park

Now the shops are shutting. I wonder why
637
24/03/2021 15:10:16 6 4
bbc
If click and collect is 'no use without a car' then how is going to the shop in person any better?

Good luck carrying a TV home on the bus.
781
ET
24/03/2021 16:03:05 8 1
bbc
A kick in the teeth for a council that have:
- Made it ridiculously expensive to park
- Made it Harder to get to the various hospitals
- Made it impossible to park near the hospitals when the hospital car parks are full
-Facilitated the awful Meadowhall
I could go on, but the comparison to most other cities isn’t favourable.
790
24/03/2021 16:07:16 6 1
bbc
Sheffield council were damn lucky JL stayed in the City after the approval of Meadowhall. The persecution of the motorist by the council hasn't helped either. Like most councils, it's run by individuals who have no idea what they are doing.
24/03/2021 19:25:25 1 0
bbc
Really sorry for Cole’s, whatever they may have done.
22
24/03/2021 13:18:09 5 15
bbc
This is actually progress. The day of these sorts of shop are over - and the pandemic is merely speeding up the inevitable.
112
24/03/2021 13:30:21 1 2
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Well said sir.
23
24/03/2021 13:18:15 9 7
bbc
John Lewis has lost its way

Similar story to Marks and Sparks. Instead of sticking to its core and loyal market it tried a bit of this and that and ended up much worse off
Dee
25/03/2021 10:04:50 0 0
bbc
M&S & JL are very different. JL knows who its customers are but its estate management team chose poor locations driven by cheap rents rather than footfall. M&S management does not have a clue about its customer base & needs to turn around a juggernaut.
24
24/03/2021 13:18:15 95 22
bbc
If people want shops to thrive some really need to get off their lazy arses and go to the actual shops. Shopping on-line is ok if you physically can’t shop but is killing the high street and city centres and is causing the loss off important retail jobs.
45
24/03/2021 13:21:27 96 16
bbc
Tried yesterday. It seemed to be shut for some reason
93
24/03/2021 13:28:01 19 9
bbc
So you want me to sit in traffic for ages, spend money on parking, dodge the monkey dust heads and go to a physical shop to find out yet again that my size isn't available? Erm no. I'd rather spend five minutes online and go outside with the kids.
110
24/03/2021 13:30:09 8 0
bbc
then retailers need to think about what's available in shops, some retailers have brilliant clothing ranges online in maternity, tall, petite, larger sizes, yet carry none of the range in store.
118
24/03/2021 13:31:16 20 1
bbc
Taxes are what kills the high streets, the cost of parking for a few hours is more than a meal in our City Centre.
119
24/03/2021 13:31:22 15 1
bbc
Too used to failing to find right colour in my size, or matchine separates. Waste of my time, parking fee, petrol and strength. If assistants say "not in that size, order it online" why bother visiting the shop?
209
24/03/2021 13:43:41 6 1
bbc
It's not just retail jobs at risk here, as the high street declines and our reasons for even venturing into town and city centres narrow, the detrimental knock on effect to the hospitality sector will be as significant in the long term as covid lockdowns have been in the short term.
266
24/03/2021 13:50:51 11 0
bbc
doing wonders for delivery jobs though
487
24/03/2021 14:31:22 8 0
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I have given up trying to shop locally.
I live 15 miles away from our town centre, and every single time I try to shop for anything, regardless of whether it is through an independent seller or a brand store it won't be in the shop. I will be told 'try online' because our shops are small and carry a limited range.
So why would I do a 30 mile round trip when I can just 'try online'?
983
24/03/2021 17:21:29 1 0
bbc
So?

You say that like high streets and city centres have some higher moral imperative demanding they survive.

They don't. they are just another transient concept, life moved on before the mass migration into cities and it will continue to go on when you 3D print all your needs at home licensing patterns from designers.
24/03/2021 19:46:01 0 0
bbc
Why should I, when the online offer is far superior?
25
Me
24/03/2021 13:18:15 332 19
bbc
I can’t wait for shops to reopen again. Online shopping is fine for some things, but nothing beats the browsing, feeling fabrics and buying something that fits instead of spending hours queueing in a post office to send things back.

Not to mention the social aspect, meeting friends and having a spot of lunch while you’re shopping.
297
24/03/2021 13:56:36 86 12
bbc
Quite, and hopefully in a more independant and dynamic high street that isn't a clone of every other town dominated by the same large chains. These are exciting times for those with a more positive mental outlook.
301
24/03/2021 13:57:01 21 1
bbc
Me too .. and we must go shopping or lose our shops. Recently made 3 online purchases... one tin of paint despatched quickly .. but not really the right colour.. An expensive clothes line.. dumped on the path outside my house, and some garden stuff from a well known supplier , 2 parts have arrived, balance outstanding after 3 weeks... but I've paid for it! I do not want my life to go online!
458
24/03/2021 14:23:58 9 2
bbc
“feeling fabrics” . Reminds me of a scene from Father Ted.
629
24/03/2021 15:07:06 12 1
bbc
You're absolutely correct. There's been a big surge towards online shopping the last few years, hence many stores struggled before covid, but as they say, you don't miss the water until the well runs dry. I think a lot of people have had a bellyful of online shopping - it will get worse when you start getting charged VAT at your front door on anything from Europe, before it's handed over!
683
24/03/2021 15:28:02 3 15
bbc
Bogus, no one is queuing in post offices to return goods, not in this century!
692
24/03/2021 15:31:55 9 1
bbc
Agree giving up on mail order dresses, I just want to visit the store and buy all new. I want to fling out all the old and start afresh, cannot do that on line, the sizing fitting are all so varied, impossible and a complete pain
794
24/03/2021 16:08:36 8 1
bbc
Shoes are a real lottery to buy correct fitting ones online. Even different types from the same size and brand can fit differently.
822
24/03/2021 16:16:15 0 0
bbc
Sounds like the script of 'Brief Encounter', you romantic you.
858
24/03/2021 16:32:05 1 1
bbc
I agree. I need a new sofa but really want to sit on some, see the fabrics etc.

Putting up with the bust springs on my ancent one.
24/03/2021 19:26:27 1 0
bbc
If there are any shops left by then ??
24/03/2021 19:32:28 0 2
bbc
I hate shopping full stop but when I have to, i agree that it’s better to have the choice.
24/03/2021 21:12:15 0 2
bbc
Ahh yes...I remember walking past a Jessops shop a few years ago....when they were all shutting dow. A member of staff a printed and stuck a very succint message to the window for the passers by....
' We are closing down. We would like to thank those of you who have visited our store for advice, recommendations, demonstrations......then bought the product at Amazon'
25/03/2021 01:38:50 1 0
bbc
That is fine, you keep using shops. If you see them as entertainment you will have to pay for the performance. Hours of 'entertainment' . Have to be a woman!
Not been in a high street shop in a decade or so.

Never sent a thing back from on line, just order what you want. Some very nasty habits with clothes has developed, complete liars just ordering several and returning most. That has to end.
26
24/03/2021 13:18:17 12 18
bbc
Outsourced everything, put someone in charge with no retail experience, went all WOKe in their ads. Good riddance really.
162
24/03/2021 13:26:07 4 3
bbc
I was waiting for some unimaginative person to mention their pathetic obsession with "woke".

Thanks for not disappointing.

I love John Lewis. A great British brand.

People who slag them off are unpatriotic.
14
bob
24/03/2021 13:16:10 4 50
bbc
Poor choice, VERY poor service, a dreadful shop - good riddance
27
24/03/2021 13:18:41 26 0
bbc
Exact opposite in my experience I have shopped there for years and have always had excellent service, other family and friends say the same!
28
24/03/2021 13:18:43 5 12
bbc
There’s always Amazon ??
65
24/03/2021 13:24:49 2 5
bbc
Amazon do what most of these retailers should have been doing but chose not to.
128
24/03/2021 13:25:06 0 0
bbc
Nah
189
24/03/2021 13:41:06 1 0
bbc
But wouldn't it be nice if they and all other online giants paid Tax appropriate to how much money/profit they make, it's immoral/greedy and not far short of being illegal what they get away with, C'mon Boris and Co lets start taxing them at a rate that is realistic for the profit made.
239
24/03/2021 13:47:47 0 0
bbc
Unfortunately that's true and also a lot of the problem! We've become obsessed with paying the lowest possible price for everything without considering the impact on the entire supply chain...or the environment. As long as we get exactly what we want for next to nothing in next to no time.. personally I don't think that will last forever
29
24/03/2021 13:18:52 16 7
bbc
Doesn’t surprise me. They have next to no stock In the stores. I kept getting told to order the size (or whatever) what I want online. I gave up in the end.
101
24/03/2021 13:28:56 10 0
bbc
Same as M&S, much easier to buy online, but only if sizing is reliable. I don't want to order three sizes in case one fits.
30
24/03/2021 13:18:52 3 3
bbc
JL could improve sales by spending nothing but a bit of time on the appearence of their stores, e.g. Kingston branch's tatty broken blinds hanging from the exterior windows.
31
24/03/2021 13:19:06 5 8
bbc
JL have struggled with online service over the years and relied heavily on their expensive stores. Are the days of the department store numbered? Almost certainly. Debenhams, House of Fraser all going down the pan.

The online superstores are blossoming driven by us, the consumer.

I think the big Malls still have a future, the 'shopping experience', but outside of that there will be more closures
88
24/03/2021 13:21:04 3 0
bbc
Wonder what your apology for Thornton's going down the pan will be They probably had an EU business model no doubt
103
24/03/2021 13:29:04 3 0
bbc
Malls in the US are dying, may happen here when local Government looks around desperately trying to replace lost business rates and the tax from shoppers cars.
12
24/03/2021 13:16:01 9 6
bbc
Lock downs deliver, it will keep giving through out this year and for those who do not understand as each business closes it ripples out into other sectors, so you job may well be next.
32
24/03/2021 13:19:10 1 1
bbc
The full effects of the Lockdowns will not fully unfold until the end of 2022 and any economist or politician that tells you differently is being totally unrealistic.
33
24/03/2021 13:19:33 3 4
bbc
Wont be the last, maybe take this into account before we shut down our economy??
10
Bob
24/03/2021 13:15:53 2 7
bbc
5 of the 8 stores closing opens in the 2010s. A similar story could be seen in the previous list of closures.

Blaming the internet is merely there to mask poor judgement in opening the stores in the first place. The internet existed in the 2010s and was doing rather nicely for itself.
34
24/03/2021 13:19:44 1 1
bbc
Or the decision to keep them closed for much of a year?
149
Bob
24/03/2021 13:35:39 1 0
bbc
They are not closing stores because they were closed for a year. They're closing stores because they blame the rise of the internet and that the locations are "not sustainable for larger stores".

So either way you slice it - poor judgement from JL to expand there.
35
24/03/2021 13:19:46 5 2
bbc
I think that by the end of the decade, department stores as we know them will largely be a thing of the past. You might get the odd one with local heritage like Jarrold in Norwich or Harvey Nichols in Leeds and such that survives but that's probably it. Even then, they'll have to adapt to internet orders. That's just the way it is and will be from now on I reckon.
91
24/03/2021 13:27:32 5 2
bbc
They could be resurrected, but the local councils would have to stop hating cars and using stores and cars as cash cows as the first step.
36
24/03/2021 13:20:04 12 1
bbc
Sad times. Odd that you get bonus Avios from JL for buying online. We go to the store to try stuff on and have a look, then go home to buy online. Should be the other way round surely?
66
24/03/2021 13:24:59 8 0
bbc
That is why stores are struggling to make ends meet. The purchase shows as an online one & the store loses another sale.
I agree with you it should be the other way round but the fact is - it isn't.
Stores are too expensive to run as browsing galleries.
37
24/03/2021 13:20:17 54 2
bbc
The John Lewis in Peterborough is central to the town and that’s disappointing as they guaranteed that one previously. Real shame as the city already has 40% unoccupied stores and losing one of the biggest won’t help
192
24/03/2021 13:41:20 30 1
bbc
John Lewis Peterborough has been since day one, the Cornerstone of the Queensgate Shopping Centre - itself a monument to "doing it right" - Queensgate still looks new and fresh some 40 years or so from opening, whereas most shopping centres from that era have aged badly. I hope the JL Closure does not bring down the standards of the whole centre
960
24/03/2021 17:10:10 5 0
bbc
Lived in Peterborough for 25 years before moving to Germany in 2006. I'm old enough to remember the buildings/pubs that were knocked down to build Queensgate in 1982. Shopping in Queensgate on a Saturday morning was all about bumping into friends and a very socialble experience. JL was always the flagship/anchor store. Such a shame.
969
24/03/2021 17:13:53 1 0
bbc
The sales were down significantly when they did the refurb as half the store was closed, they missed out on the Xmas sales as it was behind schedule, but it was busy and customers were loyal. Shortly after re-opening, customers were back at full swing and then Covid happened, so the store balance sheet is not going to look good after 2 years of reduced sales, but closing it is not the answer.
24/03/2021 19:55:45 1 0
bbc
I thought the massive Primark was a bigger draw for most of the current residents. Grim place and easy to see why JL pulled out.
38
24/03/2021 13:20:24 34 7
bbc
This is so sad. The company under its current CEO have become a nightmare to deal with, and have gone down the toilet. I speak to the staff and they know what customers want, but the CEO seems not to listen. This is death by a 1000 cuts.
However, this is what happens when you put someone in charge without any retail experience.
54
24/03/2021 13:22:42 23 17
bbc
Our politcicans have next to no experience too, learning on the job is the british way.
Look at Mat Hancock, but he quickly learnt how to send money to friends
171
Rob
24/03/2021 13:32:17 5 3
bbc
I agree. My perception is that the CEO is either clueless or arrogant. JL closed our local profitable Waitrose. Why? The belief is that while making a profit, that profit was not enough.
24/03/2021 17:50:05 0 1
bbc
I 100% agree with this comment. I said it when they were given the role. No doubt will move on in a year or two but the damage will have been done.
39
24/03/2021 13:20:31 2 35
bbc
Some businesses such as John Lewis/ Waitrose only help to build more divided society , feeding people's ego and class obsessed society which exists in UK. Without JLWaitrose UK would become fairer, more equal , more like a Scandinavian class-less society of opportunities to all. But it won't change till the government is pro greed and capitalism. Think of it when voting next time.
60
24/03/2021 13:23:37 10 2
bbc
So basically, you'd only be happy with pound shops? There are opportunities for all. Too many people want the excuse not the effort though.
73
24/03/2021 13:25:52 2 4
bbc
John Lewis and you, both casualties of lock-down ,though in your case lock-down would appear to have exacerbated an existing condition - Socialism. No cure except a Socialist Government, though that also can have catastrophic effects, a final detachment from reality. Symptoms being a declaration that there has NEVER EVER been a socialist Government, once the drawbacks of them become obvious.
90
24/03/2021 13:27:24 4 1
bbc
Is this a spoof - you think Waitrose is at the heart of inequality? Think Marx would have delved a little deeper!
Removed
40
24/03/2021 13:20:36 92 15
bbc
John Lewis cannot be allowed to close! It's the only island of sanity remaining in shopping centres. The rest impose 'canned music' on their customers, wrongly assuming it will trick them into buying more! The opposite happens and that is why other department stores have lost their customers. The louder the music the lower the sales!
51
24/03/2021 13:22:34 20 4
bbc
The other department stores lost their customers as they did absolutely nothing to entice you in. No effort and certainly no attempt to get prices to within a country mile of online retailers.
199
24/03/2021 13:42:11 2 0
bbc
do you want to tell Hollister, or shall I?
805
24/03/2021 16:13:08 0 2
bbc
Bit weird but ok
41
24/03/2021 13:20:42 6 3
bbc
Very sad but John Lewis stores have been declining for some years. By that I mean the range of goods for sale in the various departments seemed to have become more and more restricted. Was always the must visit shop for electrical appliances, cookers, fridges etc. and lighting though. I hope they can make a big success of the online presence.
175
24/03/2021 13:37:55 4 0
bbc
I don't think they've been declining as such ... they chose to go down the "designer" shop within a shop route to the detriment of their own brand,good quality every day stuff at a reasonable price, whether it was clothes or a saucepan. Exactly the same as Debenhams. I am not 5'10" and a size 8, neither do I need a Designer to endorse my T towels ..I suspect I'm not alone
42
24/03/2021 13:21:15 19 1
bbc
Sad for the staff, and also sad for Aberdeen... there is literally no reason to go into the town centre there is practically nothing there worth going for. Looks like I'll be doing my annual Christmas trip with my mum in Dundee this year

(I used to use the town centre regularly, not just at Christmas, just to be clear!)
74
24/03/2021 13:25:53 17 0
bbc
Yes, I live in Aberdeen also. It's quite worrying what is happening to the city centre. No Debenhams, John Lewis, Molton Brown any more. I read that Debenhams is being replaced by another Poundland! :-(
129
24/03/2021 13:32:25 2 0
bbc
It is sad. It's a long trek to find the next nearest one. I wonder who will take the old Norco building next!
12
24/03/2021 13:16:01 9 6
bbc
Lock downs deliver, it will keep giving through out this year and for those who do not understand as each business closes it ripples out into other sectors, so you job may well be next.
43
24/03/2021 13:21:19 3 1
bbc
Better than being dead though.
44
24/03/2021 13:21:26 11 6
bbc
this is badly written. The only Cambridgeshire store to close is Peterborough.
62
24/03/2021 13:23:53 5 2
bbc
That's what it says doesn't it? Or have I lost the ability to read.....?!?
257
24/03/2021 13:50:18 1 1
bbc
The writer should have replaced the "," by "in" or left out reference to Cambridge. The majority know Peterborough is on Cambridgeshire.
24
24/03/2021 13:18:15 95 22
bbc
If people want shops to thrive some really need to get off their lazy arses and go to the actual shops. Shopping on-line is ok if you physically can’t shop but is killing the high street and city centres and is causing the loss off important retail jobs.
45
24/03/2021 13:21:27 96 16
bbc
Tried yesterday. It seemed to be shut for some reason
7
24/03/2021 13:15:02 10 1
bbc
Just another victim of today's click and collect culture.

Sadly, the day of the department store is now behind us and folks habits have changed from in store browsing to online selection.
46
24/03/2021 13:21:37 7 2
bbc
Not so sure that is behind us, since MandS will definitely survive. JL would benefit from re-introducing a quality food hall.
685
24/03/2021 15:29:46 3 0
bbc
Err ?
Waitrose (John Lewis)
Made more profits than the whole of M&S Nevermind it's foodhall
24/03/2021 18:31:25 2 0
bbc
Quite agree. The basement of the Oxford Street store is a huge Waitrose, complete with wine-tasting bar. They need to replicate it in the JL stores across the country, in addition to adding the JL section in all the Waitrose stores.
Dee
25/03/2021 09:02:59 0 0
bbc
I think both companies will survive, although JL is better placed than M&S due to concerns about their locations, their expensive Ocado deal, their poor clothing offering & expensive food. However, both need to adapt to the modern age. For JL, their new business model of online & smaller home stores in key prime locations or inside large Waitrose stores is the right one going forward.
4
24/03/2021 13:13:51 363 25
bbc
I have used John Lewis in lockdown the same amount of times I did prior to lockdown. We need to take this opportunity to adjust to our new shopping behaviours. With that the tax system need to adjust to it too. No point taxing bricks and mortar and not taxing internet shopping.
47
24/03/2021 13:21:39 136 572
bbc
John Lewis becomes another casualty of the government's monumental overreaction to coronavirus.

Shame on you Boris.
144
24/03/2021 13:35:16 56 16
bbc
Yes, and all those that died were being drama queens I suppose?
147
24/03/2021 13:35:27 52 36
bbc
Shame on you! How do you think Corbyn would have handled an unprecedented pandemic? He presided over the left's fourth general election defeat in a row. That says it all.
154
24/03/2021 13:35:55 34 1
bbc
Along with the general public who complain that the high street is fast disappearing and online retailers such as Amazon do not pay their "fair share of tax" but do not support the high street and line the pockets of Amazon by continually using. Actions rather than words will help the high street players, so use them or use them
218
24/03/2021 13:45:11 62 7
bbc
to quote from the article:
"the eight shops were "financially challenged prior to the pandemic". "

But hey, you blame Boris!
Are you stupid?? Removed
391
24/03/2021 14:09:43 10 1
bbc
You need a particular kind of reasoning to use the overreacting argument to Covid19 plus a callous disregard for the lives of others.
429
24/03/2021 14:16:46 1 4
bbc
lol.
503
24/03/2021 14:38:12 8 0
bbc
What would you rather the Government does? You don’t elaborate your criticism, please elucidate.
509
01
24/03/2021 14:31:52 1 22
bbc
I'm surprised why you got marked down so much for something which is 100% Boris' fault. Go-on BBC, delete yet another comment of mine, can't you handle the truth?
521
24/03/2021 14:40:19 11 1
bbc
No their service has been going downhill for years. This is not caused by COVID.
541
24/03/2021 14:43:55 8 0
bbc
How exactly, it was struggling before Boris was even PM, let alone during lockdown?
584
24/03/2021 14:53:09 7 2
bbc
The high street was dying anyway. Go find something else to blame Boris for.
Removed
651
24/03/2021 15:15:49 4 2
bbc
Tell that to stressed nurses in NHS
677
24/03/2021 15:26:40 2 0
bbc
And just what death toll would you have accepted as a fair reaction?
711
24/03/2021 15:40:22 8 0
bbc
You cant blame the government for people's preference for shopping online. This was coming long before the pandemic and will only vet worse.
745
24/03/2021 15:52:59 3 2
bbc
John Lewis becomes another casualty of the government's failure to address and properly tax the rise of online shopping. Amazon pays a tiny fraction of taxes in this country, compared with similar turnover from UK based retail, the population keep purchasing disposable stuff they don't need, delivered next day. Covid isn't the underlying problem here, even if it is what pushed it over the edge.
773
24/03/2021 15:59:40 5 0
bbc
Did you miss the big in the article which stated that the shops they were closing had been losing money before the pandemic struck?
I’ve heard of “ selective deafness”, but now we have “ selective eyesight”!
811
24/03/2021 16:14:34 1 0
bbc
No, it hasn't.
Read the facts not the hyperbole.
821
24/03/2021 16:15:56 3 0
bbc
Codswallop. The High St was failing long before Covid.

Shoppers don't want to traipse around busy & stuffy shops, hunt for parking spaces, use the park & ride then queue for buses. It's easier to shop online.

Sad but true.
Removed
886
24/03/2021 16:42:50 2 0
bbc
I'll quite happily bash Boris as I have little time for him and just about everything he touches turns sour, but in fairness the article starts with a comment from John Lewis that the stores to close were "financially challenged prior to the pandemic".

The writing was on the wall already, the pandemic just underlined that.

Still, won't be long before Boris offers up a real bashing opp
914
24/03/2021 16:57:42 0 0
bbc
what part of 'these stores were in financial difficulty before covid' do you not understand?
991
24/03/2021 17:21:19 1 0
bbc
Could not agree more.
995
24/03/2021 17:25:47 0 2
bbc
You need to grow up and take note of the situation today!! so it's all Boris's fault is it he started this awful pandemic did he !!!!!!!!! and he over reacted in what way may I ask should we have been allowed to go shopping, drinking etc in a mob passing Covid on to all and sundry I wonder what your age is ?
48
24/03/2021 13:21:44 2 4
bbc
Lovely shops but too dear into today's cut-price online world to survive......
Why can you comment on political news stories anymore on the BBC website?
Hopefully not because Boris has appointed Richard Sharp, a former Goldman Sachs Banker, as BBC Chair
Removed
49
24/03/2021 13:22:01 9 6
bbc
Not to mention the appointment of the former deputy chairman of the Hammersmith and Fulham Conservative party as Director-General. Meanwhile, the deluded Tory followers and trolls on here still whine about the 'lefty' BBC.
14
bob
24/03/2021 13:16:10 4 50
bbc
Poor choice, VERY poor service, a dreadful shop - good riddance
50
24/03/2021 13:22:01 7 0
bbc
You have obviously had a conversation with Amazon customer service, ??
40
24/03/2021 13:20:36 92 15
bbc
John Lewis cannot be allowed to close! It's the only island of sanity remaining in shopping centres. The rest impose 'canned music' on their customers, wrongly assuming it will trick them into buying more! The opposite happens and that is why other department stores have lost their customers. The louder the music the lower the sales!
51
24/03/2021 13:22:34 20 4
bbc
The other department stores lost their customers as they did absolutely nothing to entice you in. No effort and certainly no attempt to get prices to within a country mile of online retailers.
138
24/03/2021 13:34:13 11 1
bbc
No, it's the music. For me it is as effective as a force field. Nothing drives me away more than pop music! I suppose it might trick the lower end of the spectrum.
403
24/03/2021 14:11:26 11 0
bbc
Perhaps because they are not trading on a level playing field? How can you blame owners of physical premises for not being able to price match online retailers, when the former are paying high rents for High Street premises? Let alone the cost of heating shops, training knowledgeable staff etc.
24/03/2021 17:44:42 5 0
bbc
And why do you think those online retailers have such low prices?
Very low business rates (in real terms next to nothing), offshoring revenue and profits. How about allowing goods to be sold in their "market place" with no VAT because they are essentially Chinese imports? That is an instant 20% advantage.
24/03/2021 20:28:00 1 0
bbc
John Lewis is also an online retailer
52
bli
24/03/2021 13:22:34 176 32
bbc
If Amazon paid corporation tax, it would be a game changer. Country by country tax reporting is needed more than ever.
Global corporations need to foot the bill of covid and governments need to ensure they do it. If they don't, eventually no one will have money to spend..
64
24/03/2021 13:24:43 168 84
bbc
Amazon does pay corporation tax. Why not find out the facts instead of bleating the same untruths?

It's tax bill is very low because it abides by the rules which allow it to be very low.

Blame the game, not the player.
78
24/03/2021 13:26:14 21 8
bbc
Pipe dream I'm affraid.
Matt Hancock gave Amazon full access to our NHS data in December 2019.
Any Idea how much this is worth to a company like Amazon?
Why give this to a company that doesnt pay much tax here? for free too?

It could have been sold and money spent on us?
I doubt amazon paid nothing, but "officially" they did.
361
24/03/2021 14:04:33 15 7
bbc
Please explain your assertion that global corporations need to foot the bill for the pandemic. Why? Did they cause it? Or is it just "unfair" that their business model allowed them to increase revenues over the last year?

You may also wish to look up under whose tax laws Amazon, Starbucks et al are allowed to pay, what I agree is, minimal tax in the UK. Clue - it isn't UK legislation.
544
24/03/2021 14:44:19 6 19
bbc
China needs to be held responsible for the world wide spread of Covid which quite evidently originated in Wuhan. Why should global corporations finance one country’s failings? Your logic is flawed
590
24/03/2021 14:53:52 5 8
bbc
Not sure why global corporations need to foot the bill resulting from Covid? they didn't cause the outbreak and spread of the virus.
The real people who need to recompence the world are the Chinese!
631
24/03/2021 15:07:09 7 3
bbc
So Amazon should pay more tax than they are legally obliged to, should they?

Presumably -you- would be happy to give Bojo and his cronies a few extra beer tokens to help out, would you?
24/03/2021 17:50:40 1 1
bbc
Global corporations need to foot the bill of covid???
Why? Did they cause it?
What nonsense being spouted on here.
24/03/2021 20:13:12 0 0
bbc
Why, John Lewis sells a lot of items online, indeed 50% of its business is online as that is what customers want now. John Lewis wasn’t in most towns anyway so it’s physical stores are irrelevant to a lot of shoppers.
25/03/2021 07:12:02 0 0
bbc
Of course Amazon pays Corporation Tax. But by clever manipulation of the worlds' tax laws and moving money around they pay tax at approx 3% if you compare it to the UK income tax. How would you like Income Tax at 3%.
But we only have ourselves to blame as we continue to want to pay nothing for everything. Government must take full responsibility to allow our High Streets to continue to fail.
3
24/03/2021 13:13:45 9 16
bbc
Ok, time moves on /shrug

sad for those employed but that is the nature of progress I am afraid. Bricks and mortar shops are a dying breed.
53
24/03/2021 13:22:39 2 1
bbc
Although the right format WILL survive!
38
24/03/2021 13:20:24 34 7
bbc
This is so sad. The company under its current CEO have become a nightmare to deal with, and have gone down the toilet. I speak to the staff and they know what customers want, but the CEO seems not to listen. This is death by a 1000 cuts.
However, this is what happens when you put someone in charge without any retail experience.
54
24/03/2021 13:22:42 23 17
bbc
Our politcicans have next to no experience too, learning on the job is the british way.
Look at Mat Hancock, but he quickly learnt how to send money to friends
2
24/03/2021 13:12:59 10 19
bbc
Are JL going to payback the furlough money they have been claiming then?
55
24/03/2021 13:22:50 4 0
bbc
So instead do you think they should have decided which stores they should close 12 months ago (when no-one at all knew what we were in for) and then made their workers redundant? How do you think they'd be doing now?
Why can you comment on political news stories anymore on the BBC website?
Hopefully not because Boris has appointed Richard Sharp, a former Goldman Sachs Banker, as BBC Chair
Removed
56
24/03/2021 13:22:58 5 1
bbc
I agree. Or the immigration news? But they would have to block 50% of the ‘offending’ comments?
57
24/03/2021 13:23:07 1 1
bbc
a long way from the days of Brian O'Callaghan and Andy Street - they appear to have no leadership anymore.
58
24/03/2021 13:23:18 0 1
bbc
That’s the eb
59
24/03/2021 13:23:21 248 41
bbc
“ Department stores in Aberdeen, in Peterborough, Cambridgeshire and in Sheffield and York in Yorkshire, are also closing “

Who at the BBC decided this was good enough English ?
70
24/03/2021 13:25:26 103 188
bbc
You can complain directly to the BBC instead of bleating in here about it.

Did you have any comment on the article?
79
24/03/2021 13:26:18 26 5
bbc
Grammar and spelling? In schools ? Whatever next?
109
24/03/2021 13:30:02 39 10
bbc
to be fair, your phrase 'good enough English' is also less than perfect
191
24/03/2021 13:41:18 27 2
bbc
Yesterday they used ‘peal’ as opposed to ‘peel’ in an article. I’m still in recovery mode??
231
xlr
24/03/2021 13:46:24 17 9
bbc
Aberdeen is in Aberdeenshire by the way.
327
24/03/2021 13:59:15 8 3
bbc
The BBC Charter is to Entertain, Educate and Inform.
If the BBC were to ‘Educate’ there would be no need for these comments.
354
24/03/2021 14:03:12 0 1
bbc
It is almost as good as yours.
621
24/03/2021 15:02:57 2 3
bbc
you is not dan wiff modurn langwidge is you$
688
24/03/2021 15:30:19 2 3
bbc
Please explain what is wrong with this sentence?
Your comment isn't a great example either.
763
ET
24/03/2021 15:56:12 1 1
bbc
And they’ve probably got a degree in English.....
You're actually being racist by language shaming the (black) BBC writer. Just an observation, check your privilege before making these remarks please. Removed
835
24/03/2021 16:21:43 2 1
bbc
Pedants!
24/03/2021 18:14:54 1 1
bbc
Or bothered to find out that Peterborough isn’t part of Cambridgeshire.
24/03/2021 22:38:26 0 0
bbc
Given they are all arts graduates you might expect them to know their language. But i daresay they qualify to work for the BBC from a range of other important aspects.
Some businesses such as John Lewis/ Waitrose only help to build more divided society , feeding people's ego and class obsessed society which exists in UK. Without JLWaitrose UK would become fairer, more equal , more like a Scandinavian class-less society of opportunities to all. But it won't change till the government is pro greed and capitalism. Think of it when voting next time.
60
24/03/2021 13:23:37 10 2
bbc
So basically, you'd only be happy with pound shops? There are opportunities for all. Too many people want the excuse not the effort though.
61
24/03/2021 13:23:51 7 1
bbc
JL was flagship store for many shopping centres: we hoped they would lead the redevelopment in Croydon. No, the Croydon site has been dropped by JL and by Westfield, and JL At Home won't reopen here, either. Too much space, too high rental, shopping centres too expensive to be profitable. Sooner centre owners realise this the better.
120
24/03/2021 13:31:29 2 0
bbc
Its all very well blaming high rents, but I would imagine the investment firms looking after everyones pension pot are heavily invested and reliant upon commercial rents coming in.....there's more at risk than the death of the high street.
44
24/03/2021 13:21:26 11 6
bbc
this is badly written. The only Cambridgeshire store to close is Peterborough.
62
24/03/2021 13:23:53 5 2
bbc
That's what it says doesn't it? Or have I lost the ability to read.....?!?
63
24/03/2021 13:23:56 0 5
bbc
well they wouldn't close the one in leeds that only just opened. too bad for those in york and sheff, you'll have to come and park here in the lovely expensive buildings JL purchased with your pennies!
52
bli
24/03/2021 13:22:34 176 32
bbc
If Amazon paid corporation tax, it would be a game changer. Country by country tax reporting is needed more than ever.
Global corporations need to foot the bill of covid and governments need to ensure they do it. If they don't, eventually no one will have money to spend..
64
24/03/2021 13:24:43 168 84
bbc
Amazon does pay corporation tax. Why not find out the facts instead of bleating the same untruths?

It's tax bill is very low because it abides by the rules which allow it to be very low.

Blame the game, not the player.
237
xlr
24/03/2021 13:47:31 28 1
bbc
Blame the rule writers, not the game.
437
24/03/2021 14:19:08 22 0
bbc
Yes they do pay tax according to the rules and that's one reason that many of us will pay more tax to the government to compensate for this. If only individuals could set up shell companies, pay them overinflated fees for services in order to move income around the world and pay lower tax than they otherwise would have in the country that income was derived from. (Apparently you can if your rich)
451
24/03/2021 14:22:13 1 2
bbc
It’s a game. It’s real life and peoples lives. It’s a putty you can’t understand that.
494
24/03/2021 14:34:11 7 3
bbc
But it's much easier to blame a company for following the law, than actually asking difficult questions like that...

To be cruel but honest: not enough people were using these shops pre-COVID, they've all been struggling for years. Repurpose the town centres into public places, parks and so on, and face reality. We could do with some accessible, safe, green spaces more than retail.
672
24/03/2021 15:24:30 3 0
bbc
The point with all these internet retailers that they pretend they are trading from Luxemburg, Ireland or Holland to dodge tax. Bricks and mortar retailers don't do that.
24/03/2021 20:10:00 0 0
bbc
Spot on, blame the HMRC and not companies sticking to the rules. What numpty would pay tax if they don't have to?
28
24/03/2021 13:18:43 5 12
bbc
There’s always Amazon ??
65
24/03/2021 13:24:49 2 5
bbc
Amazon do what most of these retailers should have been doing but chose not to.
36
24/03/2021 13:20:04 12 1
bbc
Sad times. Odd that you get bonus Avios from JL for buying online. We go to the store to try stuff on and have a look, then go home to buy online. Should be the other way round surely?
66
24/03/2021 13:24:59 8 0
bbc
That is why stores are struggling to make ends meet. The purchase shows as an online one & the store loses another sale.
I agree with you it should be the other way round but the fact is - it isn't.
Stores are too expensive to run as browsing galleries.
14
bob
24/03/2021 13:16:10 4 50
bbc
Poor choice, VERY poor service, a dreadful shop - good riddance
67
24/03/2021 13:25:00 5 0
bbc
But the "VERY poor service" you most likely received from one individual may not be any of the individuals who are losing their jobs! I suspect they don't miss your custom.
68
24/03/2021 13:25:03 9 7
bbc
Until they kill the charges for parking, shopping will die. We don’t all want to sit on a bus that stops every 500 yards for 15 miles?
105
24/03/2021 13:29:16 0 3
bbc
Aww baba!
69
24/03/2021 13:25:17 34 9
bbc
All of the people who have migrated to online shopping will regret it when there are no shops where you can buy anything anymore. I buy nothing online. Nothing.....Just wait until there is nowhere you can buy from, bank with, go to the hospital at or see a dentist unless it's got the Amazon logo on it........... It'll be your own fault.
415
24/03/2021 14:13:11 5 2
bbc
I don't buy anything on-line either - all adds to our becoming isolated from others and therefore less tolerant and wanting everything to be available in the right price, size, colour etc., right now.
491
37p
24/03/2021 14:33:26 1 0
bbc
There are products that are unavailable in shops because they can't carry the range and often if they do it's more expensive.
I'm fed up with scrabbling through hardware in B&Q and Wickes which are mixed up and been opened. It's much easier online
657
24/03/2021 15:17:35 0 0
bbc
I remember all the lovely department stores of my childhood in Knightsbridge and Oxford St. Even Gamages in Holborn and Whiteleys in Bayswater. Those were the days. Such quality products. They all went the way of the British Empire.
59
24/03/2021 13:23:21 248 41
bbc
“ Department stores in Aberdeen, in Peterborough, Cambridgeshire and in Sheffield and York in Yorkshire, are also closing “

Who at the BBC decided this was good enough English ?
70
24/03/2021 13:25:26 103 188
bbc
You can complain directly to the BBC instead of bleating in here about it.

Did you have any comment on the article?
My comment on the article is get your facts straight BBC - Cambridge store is NOT closing & will remain open. Removed
622
24/03/2021 15:03:22 0 0
bbc
They did, how poorly it was written.
718
24/03/2021 15:42:02 0 1
bbc
Your English is just as bad, did tou write the article?
863
24/03/2021 16:32:44 2 1
bbc
no point in complaining to the bbc, they simply just ignore it.
24/03/2021 19:03:45 1 0
bbc
Complaints to the BBC are utterly pointless.
24/03/2021 22:42:01 1 0
bbc
Have you tried complaining Ng to the BBC? It has no effect on them. If it is very important they give you some waffle. They never actually fix their problems, whether that is bias, inaccurate or factually wrong reports or for taking bribes. For example the BBC claimed the iPhone was the first smartphone and then promoted it shamelessly.The iPhone was not the first smartphone by over 10 years
71
JGC
24/03/2021 13:25:39 8 9
bbc
Blame the Government. How can you run a shop when you can be shut down, for months at a time, at a moments notice, but still have to pay many of your costs? Even when the Government allows you to open you have to limit the number of customers allowed in. And see on-line rivals continue to be able to sell whatever they want.
131
24/03/2021 13:32:29 0 1
bbc
" And see on-line rivals continue to be able to sell whatever they want."

Of course. That is what the word "competition" means. Competition is good for business and for the consumer - Maggie told us all that, interminably - so don't complain when the result of competition is not what you personally think it should be. Nothing stopping JL selling whatever it wants on-line, was there?
258
Bob
24/03/2021 13:50:21 0 0
bbc
Well they're perfectly entitled to operate click and collect, but guess what - they decided not to. Can't moan about rules when they're not even taking the opportunities they do have.
13
24/03/2021 13:16:04 75 19
bbc
Such sad news, the draconian measures of keeping shops closed for so long will prove to be the final straw for many shops. Sad day for Aberdeen and all the rest affected by this news.
72
24/03/2021 13:25:51 59 13
bbc
While I have sympathy with your point, the lock downs have only accelerated the demise of poor business models in an ever changing consumer driven world.

I like JL, I like shopping in JL, but then I'm not 'price sensitive' when I do shop. I buy quality, just less often.

The 'Primark world' may survive, fueled by our disposable buying habits, but otherwise, online is the future.
98
24/03/2021 13:28:27 1 1
bbc
Hello
yes indeed , so right,
442
37p
24/03/2021 14:20:14 0 3
bbc
"I like JL, I like shopping in JL, but then I'm not 'price sensitive' when I do shop. I buy quality, just less often."

How is the same product available cheaper elsewhere show "quality" (I'm assuming you mean higher quality)
24/03/2021 22:50:30 0 0
bbc
I think you are right but I really hope you are wrong. I think the JL business model is the way forward - employees are owners and have a stake in the company's success. Their customer service is excellent, their staff seem happy and motivated and they are always helpful. I feel sorry for them and as someone who regularly uses the Aberdeen store, I hope thy change their mind. I'll miss it.
Some businesses such as John Lewis/ Waitrose only help to build more divided society , feeding people's ego and class obsessed society which exists in UK. Without JLWaitrose UK would become fairer, more equal , more like a Scandinavian class-less society of opportunities to all. But it won't change till the government is pro greed and capitalism. Think of it when voting next time.
73
24/03/2021 13:25:52 2 4
bbc
John Lewis and you, both casualties of lock-down ,though in your case lock-down would appear to have exacerbated an existing condition - Socialism. No cure except a Socialist Government, though that also can have catastrophic effects, a final detachment from reality. Symptoms being a declaration that there has NEVER EVER been a socialist Government, once the drawbacks of them become obvious.
42
24/03/2021 13:21:15 19 1
bbc
Sad for the staff, and also sad for Aberdeen... there is literally no reason to go into the town centre there is practically nothing there worth going for. Looks like I'll be doing my annual Christmas trip with my mum in Dundee this year

(I used to use the town centre regularly, not just at Christmas, just to be clear!)
74
24/03/2021 13:25:53 17 0
bbc
Yes, I live in Aberdeen also. It's quite worrying what is happening to the city centre. No Debenhams, John Lewis, Molton Brown any more. I read that Debenhams is being replaced by another Poundland! :-(
75
24/03/2021 13:26:00 6 2
bbc
Whilst its sad that these bigger stores are closing, its the business that smaller retailers get off the back of John Lewis stores like pubs, restaurants and coffee shops. Especially city centres where more people spend longer shopping will always look for somewhere else to have a real and a sit down before they continue shopping.
76
24/03/2021 13:26:02 12 4
bbc
Birmingham & Sheffield 2 of the largest cities in the UK, losing money really? or high business rates from the local councils?
92
24/03/2021 13:27:52 9 0
bbc
Business rates are set by Central government, not greedy local Councils. The latter set all the other excessive charges, such as for parking, Council tax, etc., etc. but business rates is one that isn't down to them.
148
24/03/2021 13:35:29 0 0
bbc
Government sets Business Rates. Local councils have services they must provide and Government has cut all grants to less well off areas over the last 10 years, so there's no RSG. Councils raise council tax, car parks etc., or services will not happen. Think social care, etc., and ignore tabloid obsession with the odd silly sounding job name
24/03/2021 18:01:57 0 0
bbc
Business rates are part of the costs, if your outgoing are more than income it is a loss.
77
MVP
24/03/2021 13:26:03 8 6
bbc
Wondering if this article was written by a trainee and Emma Simpson is putting her feet up?

It does not read very well.
52
bli
24/03/2021 13:22:34 176 32
bbc
If Amazon paid corporation tax, it would be a game changer. Country by country tax reporting is needed more than ever.
Global corporations need to foot the bill of covid and governments need to ensure they do it. If they don't, eventually no one will have money to spend..
78
24/03/2021 13:26:14 21 8
bbc
Pipe dream I'm affraid.
Matt Hancock gave Amazon full access to our NHS data in December 2019.
Any Idea how much this is worth to a company like Amazon?
Why give this to a company that doesnt pay much tax here? for free too?

It could have been sold and money spent on us?
I doubt amazon paid nothing, but "officially" they did.
59
24/03/2021 13:23:21 248 41
bbc
“ Department stores in Aberdeen, in Peterborough, Cambridgeshire and in Sheffield and York in Yorkshire, are also closing “

Who at the BBC decided this was good enough English ?
79
24/03/2021 13:26:18 26 5
bbc
Grammar and spelling? In schools ? Whatever next?
8
24/03/2021 13:15:11 4 13
bbc
I hope so, the Government needs to go after them and other companies that have claimed furlough payments and then made people redundant.
80
24/03/2021 13:26:30 5 0
bbc
They weren't in a position to make the decision earlier, since no-one could foresee the consequence of COVID. If they had closed them sooner ALL of the people would have become unemployed and would have used money from the public purse in one form or other. Taking the Furlough money might only have delayed the inevitable, but it saved many people from hardship.
5
24/03/2021 13:13:52 535 21
bbc
very sad to see what is happening to John Lewis. Say what you like but the store is still a major draw in many towns
They put someone in charge with no retail experience to tick boxes. Outsourced their TV and white goods repairs, cafes and restaurants. Web support offshored to India and went all WOKE in their adverts. No more to say really. Removed
140
24/03/2021 13:34:29 29 14
bbc
Dame SW - she has the biggest brains in the company! blame the fact that as consultant 10 years ago we told them that their online business was bigger than the oxford street branch sales, and they continued opening stores. This isn't just covid. This is the blue rinse brigade.
172
24/03/2021 13:37:42 41 23
bbc
And Woke matters how?
190
24/03/2021 13:41:12 43 34
bbc
Twaddle.
The hard rght obsessives. No HYS they can't twist.
Cheers for the casual bandying of the word 'woke', it serves as a convenient flag telling us the following:

A) that you don't really know what it means
B) that you're a sociopath who believes care for the wellbeing of others is 'weak'
C) all of the above.

I'm guessing you're 'C', but don't worry, I'm sure there's a sale of 'Atlas Shrugged' on somewhere..
Removed
281
24/03/2021 13:53:01 25 13
bbc
A year ago you hadn't even heard of the term "woke" but now you use it to mean "something that isn't from my own narrow corridor of existence".
377
24/03/2021 14:06:45 2 2
bbc
All White good repairs are carried out by the manufacturers.
The rest hasn’t got anything to do with it. On Line and the retail High Street sector have the same issues.
401
RC
24/03/2021 14:11:20 1 6
bbc
In a nutshell, yes.
469
24/03/2021 14:26:15 7 2
bbc
haha, Deltic get a grip - you clearly haven't had your bigoted views challenged for a while.
493
24/03/2021 14:34:05 7 0
bbc
Genuine question: Why do you write the word "woke" in caps? I've seen a few people do this and I don't understand why.

Again, this isn't a dig at your comment, I'm just interested.
514
24/03/2021 14:39:14 0 0
bbc
Agreed. No experience in retail or in leading business diversification with all the risks that this holds. And no shareholders to be accountable too, with partners that could be made redundant. On there online platform so many products are out of stock, with lost sales - not good for any retailer. I would not invest in this business.
517
24/03/2021 14:39:30 2 1
bbc
Outsourcing is why I stopped using them. I had a series of problems which JL were slow to fix. One of their support staff was rude to me on the phone. So I resolved never to use them again and wrote to SW. If service is rubbish then JL are no better than any other retailer who sells cheaper than them. The following week I spent almost £3k on tech elsewhere. JL are doomed.
82
24/03/2021 13:14:16 4 2
bbc
Isn't Aberdeen in Aberdeenshire?
104
24/03/2021 13:29:08 4 1
bbc
no
117
24/03/2021 13:31:08 2 0
bbc
No Aberdeenshire is the surrounding area
143
24/03/2021 13:35:07 1 0
bbc
No Aberdeen city is not within Aberdeenshire. These are 2 different council areas. Aberdeenshire surrounds Aberdeen city.
158
24/03/2021 13:36:47 0 4
bbc
No, it's in "Scotland" as is everywhere else North of the border.
83
24/03/2021 13:17:25 69 3
bbc
Devastated for Sheffield. It’s the only shop worth going to in the city centre.
223
lse
24/03/2021 13:38:14 18 3
bbc
isn't it the only shop left in the city centre?!! (apart from primary and the ilk)
452
24/03/2021 14:22:14 7 0
bbc
Who would have guessed that family-owned Atkinsons would out-survive all the other department stores?

Maybe they should change their name to Cole Brothers and relocate to Barkers Pool!
625
24/03/2021 15:04:16 2 0
bbc
My wife is devastated for York. It's the only shop worth going to on the outer ring road.
808
24/03/2021 16:13:47 6 1
bbc
Blame the council for pushing shoppers away. They were lucky JL stayed as long as they did. Sheffield is a horrible place to shop, the grimness of the Moor and the cost of parking don't help, also the dodgy characters that hang around the bottom of Haymarket...
84
24/03/2021 13:17:41 4 0
bbc
Not surprised about Ashford as it was literally on it’s own with no other shops nearby. Feel sorry for the staff.
85
24/03/2021 13:26:55 18 0
bbc
Very sad, we've had an account with them for the fifty years of our married life. Almost everything in our house is from JL including curtains, carpets, wallpaper and paint. They have reupholstered sofas and armchairs several times. Thankfully our local is staying (for now) I guess as they have owned the entire building for years. I agree things are not what they were, but what is?
106
24/03/2021 13:29:39 4 7
bbc
No, they don't own it and they don't pay rent, they act to draw in footfall for the area.
809
ET
24/03/2021 16:14:08 0 0
bbc
They aren’t closing down!
86
24/03/2021 13:18:33 0 3
bbc
Why is Cambridgeshire mentioned but then on the cambs news website it states that it will remain open?
https://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/news/cambridge-news/john-lewis-closures-cambridge-store-20244208
132
24/03/2021 13:32:38 0 0
bbc
why would the BBC know? Is there more than one store in the area?
185
24/03/2021 13:39:53 1 0
bbc
Cambridgeshire includes Peterborough
87
24/03/2021 13:20:10 10 0
bbc
So sorry to hear that Chester shop is shutting. It was one of my favourite shops. I loved to browse and bought many quality products. Choosing online is just not the same. With JL and Debenhams gone I dont know where I will shop now. ??
31
24/03/2021 13:19:06 5 8
bbc
JL have struggled with online service over the years and relied heavily on their expensive stores. Are the days of the department store numbered? Almost certainly. Debenhams, House of Fraser all going down the pan.

The online superstores are blossoming driven by us, the consumer.

I think the big Malls still have a future, the 'shopping experience', but outside of that there will be more closures
88
24/03/2021 13:21:04 3 0
bbc
Wonder what your apology for Thornton's going down the pan will be They probably had an EU business model no doubt
137
24/03/2021 13:34:09 2 3
bbc
Oh dear. I'm pointing out that online is the future and poor business plans have led to closures, and you shoehorn an EU comment in?

Your bitterness really isn't healthy.
392
24/03/2021 14:09:50 0 0
bbc
Just far too expensive thats all!
89
24/03/2021 13:21:29 3 7
bbc
A friend of mine is a John Lewis "Partner".

Seems a great company to work for - but their ridiculously generous perks must be the reason they are going bust.

For example if a high paid role get abolished, they can take any other role and get the same salary for 3 years, so senior manager can be a delivery driver on 100k.

So right now, of those 1400 jobs cut, they wont be actually saving money
248
24/03/2021 13:49:14 1 0
bbc
Please be aware the same happens in NHS when redeployed. Salaries are protected for anywhere between 1 and 3 years. Mine was protected for five years (albeit some years back). You do however lose out on increments.
Some businesses such as John Lewis/ Waitrose only help to build more divided society , feeding people's ego and class obsessed society which exists in UK. Without JLWaitrose UK would become fairer, more equal , more like a Scandinavian class-less society of opportunities to all. But it won't change till the government is pro greed and capitalism. Think of it when voting next time.
90
24/03/2021 13:27:24 4 1
bbc
Is this a spoof - you think Waitrose is at the heart of inequality? Think Marx would have delved a little deeper!
35
24/03/2021 13:19:46 5 2
bbc
I think that by the end of the decade, department stores as we know them will largely be a thing of the past. You might get the odd one with local heritage like Jarrold in Norwich or Harvey Nichols in Leeds and such that survives but that's probably it. Even then, they'll have to adapt to internet orders. That's just the way it is and will be from now on I reckon.
91
24/03/2021 13:27:32 5 2
bbc
They could be resurrected, but the local councils would have to stop hating cars and using stores and cars as cash cows as the first step.
152
24/03/2021 13:35:42 0 0
bbc
" local councils would have to stop hating cars"

No chance. Didn't you know, we are all being "encouraged" to walk and cycle. In other news, gas lighting is about to be installed and pubs must have stables and employ an ostler or two. Mail will in future travel by horse-drawn carriages.
228
24/03/2021 13:46:02 0 0
bbc
I used to live in Norfolk when I was younger and to get to Norwich without using a car, you had to get a bus from the village (20-30 minutes to Norwich) that went once an hour and you had to be finished by 6pm latest or get a taxi back. Even 10-15 years ago, Amazon and online shopping seemed so much easier as alternatives.
76
24/03/2021 13:26:02 12 4
bbc
Birmingham & Sheffield 2 of the largest cities in the UK, losing money really? or high business rates from the local councils?
92
24/03/2021 13:27:52 9 0
bbc
Business rates are set by Central government, not greedy local Councils. The latter set all the other excessive charges, such as for parking, Council tax, etc., etc. but business rates is one that isn't down to them.
24
24/03/2021 13:18:15 95 22
bbc
If people want shops to thrive some really need to get off their lazy arses and go to the actual shops. Shopping on-line is ok if you physically can’t shop but is killing the high street and city centres and is causing the loss off important retail jobs.
93
24/03/2021 13:28:01 19 9
bbc
So you want me to sit in traffic for ages, spend money on parking, dodge the monkey dust heads and go to a physical shop to find out yet again that my size isn't available? Erm no. I'd rather spend five minutes online and go outside with the kids.
269
24/03/2021 13:51:16 4 0
bbc
You’re so right about this, at times I’ve shopped online and delivered to store (avoiding postage) because going to the store could be a wasted trip if the right size isn’t there. Give me free postage and I won’t even do that. I don’t know if that says more about stock levels or that my spare time became increasingly scarce.
94
24/03/2021 13:28:06 14 2
bbc
You can buy a broader range of John Lewis goods on line and have them delivered to your door. Sadly the days of large department stores where you can browse and touch the product are numbered. It makes no economic sense to staff and maintain expensive real estate to cater for customers who may look but likely ultimately buy on-line anyway
121
24/03/2021 13:31:36 7 0
bbc
Paul that's the trouble. Look at it - then buy elsewhere. Online as you say. The government wont tax online selling, so online is cheaper.
95
24/03/2021 13:28:13 3 0
bbc
You would think with the demise of Debenhams that JL wouldn't close anywhere?
96
24/03/2021 13:28:16 18 0
bbc
I can't believe it's going from Sheffield (the old Coles Bros.).
346
24/03/2021 14:01:47 7 0
bbc
If major locations such as Sheffield are closing then John Lewis must be in serious trouble.

John Lewis (formerly Cole Brothers in Sheffield which opened in 1847) is the biggest store in Sheffield and is one of the reasons why people choose to go into Sheffield city centre.

A very sad day.
Why can you comment on political news stories anymore on the BBC website?
Hopefully not because Boris has appointed Richard Sharp, a former Goldman Sachs Banker, as BBC Chair
Removed
97
24/03/2021 13:28:27 7 5
bbc
Nonsense, the majority of the time, the only stories open to HYS are Tory bashing headlines.

A poor attempt to crowbar a government bias argument, when the opposite is so true.
72
24/03/2021 13:25:51 59 13
bbc
While I have sympathy with your point, the lock downs have only accelerated the demise of poor business models in an ever changing consumer driven world.

I like JL, I like shopping in JL, but then I'm not 'price sensitive' when I do shop. I buy quality, just less often.

The 'Primark world' may survive, fueled by our disposable buying habits, but otherwise, online is the future.
98
24/03/2021 13:28:27 1 1
bbc
Hello
yes indeed , so right,
99
24/03/2021 13:28:27 1 2
bbc
So much for companies accepting furlough payments for staff, that was supposed to be paid so you don't lay staff off, you'd best pat that back "Mr Lewis"
179
24/03/2021 13:38:52 0 0
bbc
Pat whose back ?
100
24/03/2021 13:28:49 48 4
bbc
There will be nothing left of our high streets. Soon no alternative but amazon.
My thoughts are with employees whose livelihood is at risk.
226
Bob
24/03/2021 13:45:48 16 21
bbc
More human employees touch your online purchase than your physical one. You just can't see them.
245
24/03/2021 13:48:18 15 0
bbc
The irony of Amazon's business plan to rid the high street of competitors using, amongst other things, carefully negotiated tax breaks and now opening a checkout free bricks and mortar store in the UK isn't lost on me.
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24/03/2021 13:58:27 17 2
bbc
Buy from a store on line. Avoid Amazon at all costs. It is destroying other suppliers. If only Amazon stocks it I do without.
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ET
24/03/2021 16:06:18 1 0
bbc
Try johnlewis.com. Far, far better than any rival. “Never knowingly undersold”. They mean it.
24/03/2021 17:27:58 2 0
bbc
We should thank our inept politicians (all parties equally at fault here) for driving these companies to ruin
24/03/2021 21:18:21 0 0
bbc
Refering to other comments; it's upto other retailers to get up to speed and deliver a good service, not whine about how unfair the market they've monopolised for years has changed. This has been coming for years. Retailers should have had a plan B. Some have and will survive. Dont blame amazon blame the CEOs who have lazily swallowed profits without thinking of their customers or employees.