Nationwide tells 13,000 staff to 'work anywhere'
25/03/2021 | news | business | 838
The UK's biggest building society says it wants to give employees more control over their lives.
1
25/03/2021 10:10:52 22 2
bbc
Makes sense
2
25/03/2021 10:11:08 36 3
bbc
Nationwide by name. Nationwide by nature.
25
25/03/2021 10:19:50 16 3
bbc
Soon as my ISA is finished I'm switching to them.

Natwest are horrendous.
3
25/03/2021 10:11:22 87 8
bbc
Good for them.

A lot of bosses still have the mentality of "I want to see bums on seats", and many businesses won't change, but for those that get to partake of this way of working will see such a huge improvement in their work/life balance I hope it spreads further.
44
25/03/2021 10:26:01 55 13
bbc
Great for the workers not the customer, every time I try contacting any company at the moment I'm told that due to the virus the staff are working from home so expect long delays in answering your call, so I assume that will be the norm from now on.
384
25/03/2021 11:51:53 10 5
bbc
If you need to see an employee's bum on a seat, you're employing the wrong person.
4
Cam
25/03/2021 10:11:28 22 3
bbc
Good to see. Hopefully more companies will go down this path where practical. Will save them office space costs & make them more attractive to work for, so win win.
149
25/03/2021 10:52:13 4 17
bbc
yeah but you got to go to work. i used to get up at 6am to go to work and these people should too. thats the way it is. we must maintain the status quo.
5
25/03/2021 10:11:35 81 4
bbc
Smart move.

I think a natural evolution of this is to have office space in neighbourhoods for a happy medium of being away from home and family affairs and also being able to socialise. Within walking distance.

£5/£10 per day.

Some people don't have the room at home, some struggle to work at home. Some are fine with it.

Biggest issue I see is data security but nothing that can't be overcome.
21
25/03/2021 10:18:59 39 6
bbc
It's called WeWork. They are horrible trendy places, with micro-offices resembling an aeroplane toilet.
26
25/03/2021 10:20:09 12 2
bbc
Bingo, companies know they can work with their employees on this one and the happier the workforce the more productive they generally are.

On an aside though, so much for all of the threats from the anti-lockdown brigade that home working just means that peoples jobs will just be outsourced to india...
207
25/03/2021 11:04:13 7 4
bbc
£5/£10 per day????

Jeez it's cheaper to commute 20 miles each way!

Can't see that catching on!
6
25/03/2021 10:12:05 5 9
bbc
Good for Nationwide employees, poor for security and sandwich bar operators.
54
25/03/2021 10:28:15 1 4
bbc
Poor for anyone who has to be physically present in a workplace; dictated to by the laptop warriors lounging at home....
161
25/03/2021 10:54:30 0 1
bbc
they can get job sweeping roads. a job is a job. its money.
7
25/03/2021 10:12:06 7 9
bbc
Let's hope their laptops/desktops are fully up to date and secure eh ?
12
25/03/2021 10:15:23 22 1
bbc
Considering they'd be issued by the building society and fully encrypted, you can be sure of that.
8
25/03/2021 10:12:52 28 3
bbc
.....as long as it doesn’t give Nationwide (or any other financial institutions) the idea of closing physical branches via the back door.
38
25/03/2021 10:24:01 6 0
bbc
They seem to be better at it than others, but they are only delaying the inevitable...
41
25/03/2021 10:25:01 0 0
bbc
Of course they will
9
25/03/2021 10:12:57 264 12
bbc
It's now one year exactly since I gave up the commute and started working from home, suits me perfectly, cut down on my petrol consumption, one less car on the road so everyone else benefits not just me.
51
25/03/2021 10:27:57 72 137
bbc
You were forced to do that, you wouldn't have done that if there wasn't a pandemic.

Not everyone is lucky enough to have a job which can be done from home.
77
xlr
25/03/2021 10:35:57 48 0
bbc
As someone who had to work all through the lockdown, I do have to say that the clear roads were a dream. No need to get up at 5.45am just so I can beat the M8 traffic for an 8.30am start.

But then the school run ruined it all again.
99
25/03/2021 10:41:05 22 2
bbc
Great that you see a bigger picture than your own considerations. We need this thinking if we are to reach net zero carbon, and we need leadership from the Govt to push things along where people cannot think in this way.

In the time I'm not commuting, I'm growing wonky allotment veg for the cook in a care home. The home love the seasonal veg & I've cut transport miles, food miles and waistline.
103
25/03/2021 10:41:48 26 4
bbc
I used to put £35 of petrol a week into my car for my various travels.

I haven't been to a petrol station since mid-December as it stands...
581
25/03/2021 13:17:57 1 1
bbc
Not if you are a car mechanic.
622
25/03/2021 13:46:22 2 1
bbc
This is all o.k. but a lot of work can't be done from home on a laptop. Bus driver, shop worker, plumber, builder, steelworker and dread to think - what if the internet went down for a month or two?
814
26/03/2021 07:21:40 0 0
bbc
Partially offsets the increased costs for heating our homes during the day.
10
25/03/2021 10:14:18 8 9
bbc
Will this compromise the security of their data and accounts?
35
25/03/2021 10:23:06 6 1
bbc
Doubtful, you can use remote access so that home workers dont have the data on their home pc/laptop and most companies review emails so the likelihood of losing data is mitigated
118
25/03/2021 10:45:16 0 0
bbc
VPN + RDP ... so no.
142
25/03/2021 10:50:55 0 0
bbc
No
269
25/03/2021 11:18:54 1 0
bbc
It's fine; I'm sure customers compromising the security of their own data and accounts will continue as the norm!
11
25/03/2021 10:15:12 14 2
bbc
Move to warmer climates between November to March. Back in the UK, from March to September.

Quite frankly, if Nationwide can do it, would other companies also be brave to do it? something to think about. :-)
24
25/03/2021 10:19:38 17 8
bbc
If only the majority of UK citizens had a totally visa-free way of doing that, somewhere warm but not too far away - I’d vote for it ;-)
39
25/03/2021 10:24:05 1 1
bbc
UK Tax laws don't allow for such a hybrid working approach, if you're an employee based in the UK and paying UK tax, you're limited in your working time outside of your normal place of residency.
68
25/03/2021 10:33:16 3 0
bbc
Why move back?
236
25/03/2021 11:12:37 0 0
bbc
Oooohh!! That's a radical idea, though very forward thinking!! I like the sound of it for sure!
306
25/03/2021 11:24:20 0 0
bbc
Marvellous, we'd then need to build enough houses in the warm place and in the UK to house a each person/family both houses will have to be left empty for 6 months each year.
7
25/03/2021 10:12:06 7 9
bbc
Let's hope their laptops/desktops are fully up to date and secure eh ?
12
25/03/2021 10:15:23 22 1
bbc
Considering they'd be issued by the building society and fully encrypted, you can be sure of that.
23
25/03/2021 10:19:19 2 1
bbc
And hopefully using a VPN and no unauthorised peripherals connected. The more they overthink the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the drain.
55
25/03/2021 10:28:47 0 1
bbc
Can't be sure that only a Nationwide employee can see the personal data on the computer screen if they're 'working from anywhere'.
13
25/03/2021 10:16:07 39 6
bbc
Working from home if definitely the future, with benefits such as reducing pollution caused by the daily commute and giving people more time and flexibility.

I do hope this isn't purely seen as a cost saving measure by Nationwide though, and they'll be contributing towards their staff's increased utility bills and other expenses.
50
25/03/2021 10:27:15 19 6
bbc
Don't be silly of course they won't.
65
25/03/2021 10:32:47 2 3
bbc
For certain industries.
Try running a large infrastructure project remotely with hundreds of labour, suppliers, subcontractors and utility companies on site, whilst liaising with, design houses, delivery teams (PMs, APMs, Engineers), H&S and Local Authority representatives.
143
25/03/2021 10:51:14 15 4
bbc
Why should the employer contribute to increasing utility bills? Employees will be saving transport costs from no commute!
362
25/03/2021 11:39:23 4 2
bbc
They'll save on the commute - that should cover the extra expense, and a few years pay rises.
406
25/03/2021 11:57:19 3 0
bbc
There's at least one major bank in the UK which is moving to this model and will be paying an allowance towards increased utility bills and expenses for buying equipment (chairs, monitors etc.).

For the business it still works out way cheaper than providing a serviced office space.

Win/Win
578
25/03/2021 13:17:10 1 1
bbc
Its because their HQ in Swindon is being sold for housing
595
25/03/2021 13:30:24 2 2
bbc
Why would they contribute to staff utility bills? The money that most seem to think home working will save, train fares, bus fares, petrol costs, no takeaway coffees or lunches will more than offset utility bills. What other expenses? Shoe leather pacing the floor, office attire, hair cut. Work at home if you wish but don't expect others to finance your choice.
14
25/03/2021 10:16:18 188 7
bbc
Good decision. WFH isn’t for everybody. But it’s good that they’re giving their employees the choice.
60
25/03/2021 10:31:02 38 87
bbc
Now and again is fine, but don't surprised if you get a pay cut or don't get a pay increase.

Workers in America who can WFH have experienced a cut in pay.
152
25/03/2021 10:52:57 7 19
bbc
In order for WFH to be a long term pattern rather than a short term expedient, productivity will have to be no lower than previously. Yes, it's great to be able to WFH and enjoy more time with family etc., but if it comes with, say, 20% lower pay I suspect a lot of people will go off it very quickly.
262
25/03/2021 10:55:00 11 1
bbc
It's more a move to WFH-first. Rather than working from home if there is a reason to do so we now work from home unless there is a reason to do otherwise. Offices will become slimmed down meeting places when teams want to catch-up face-to-face.
815
26/03/2021 07:24:43 0 0
bbc
It suits both sides. Any change would have taken years to negotiate with unions. It's a good move for many and social distancing means that there is less time wasted on pointless gatherings. Just how much did those meetings stifle progress?
15
25/03/2021 10:16:20 51 5
bbc
hybrid working is here to stay.
Win - Win for employee/employer

BTL landlords in major cities will be firmly against it !
204
25/03/2021 11:02:49 3 11
bbc
Damned right! We'll need to open freedom of movement again to ensure I keep my rent incomes up.
528
25/03/2021 12:47:14 2 1
bbc
BTL parasite landlords forced to sell the property they're hoarding, thus cooling down the rampantly inflating housing market - another win!
683
25/03/2021 15:59:58 0 1
bbc
Perhaps if you knew what a BTL Landlord was, you'd stop this nonsensical rant.

Clue: RESIDENTIAL

Or did you imagine the £100m office block was owned by Mr BadLandlord with a 7% mortgage?
786
25/03/2021 21:30:12 0 0
bbc
your pension is tied up in those office spaces.... there are big downsides
16
25/03/2021 10:17:16 5 3
bbc
Anywhere apart from my local branch, apparently
27
25/03/2021 10:20:34 7 1
bbc
"traditional office-based employees" - the article isn't talking about branch staff.

Read the article.
17
25/03/2021 10:18:11 6 9
bbc
If they're over 50 I guess they'll soon be able to go and work from the pub
76
25/03/2021 10:26:50 1 2
bbc
I thought that was tongue & cheek. Don't know why people are voting you down. A lot of sensitive snowflakes these days, and didn't realise how old they are !
133
25/03/2021 10:47:58 3 0
bbc
My local offerred a shared working area last summer

Free power, wifi, coffee and water, large tables for individuals and small teams to work from
Either to reduce isolation or to colaborate locally with other team members

Was so successfull they intend to make it an ongoing arrangement
18
25/03/2021 10:18:27 90 15
bbc
Good for the worker
Good for the enivironment
Good for soceiety

Will only displease greedy landlords who want to rent out more and more offices for extorciante rates
189
25/03/2021 11:00:24 20 27
bbc
You mean "landlords who want to sell their wares at the market price", doubtless a little like all companies.
444
25/03/2021 12:09:56 4 1
bbc
And the owners of the greedy landlord companies, like your pension fund!
596
25/03/2021 13:31:16 0 0
bbc
And bosses who want to “own” big impressive buildings full of “their” people
I spent over a year travelling an extra 150 miles per week for a company that leased a big new office building and then expected to fill it with people who were happily and productivity working closer to home and customers
19
25/03/2021 10:18:27 117 10
bbc
This is amazing news and such a shame that it took a global pandemic for companies to finally realise the true benefits of allowing people to work from home on a regular basis. Improved wellbeing, less time and money wasted on commuting, reduction of traffic on the roads, less office space needed in overcrowded cities, they're endless...
45
25/03/2021 10:26:21 16 33
bbc
and less face to face social interaction and more desolated town centres. Although less traffic is good...means I can get about quicker
169
25/03/2021 10:56:23 0 5
bbc
And just a sheer fantasy....dream on!
229
25/03/2021 11:09:27 3 0
bbc
"...reduction of traffic on the roads, less office space needed in overcrowded cities, they're endless..."

===

This could also be a revival for local libraries. Pre-covid when I WFH and needed a change I would take my tablet and day book for a walk to my village library for a look at a different four walls while working.
230
25/03/2021 11:09:34 2 11
bbc
We have appalling productivity already and now they're encouraging a further drop!

My productivity is almost impossible to maintain at home with constant interruptions from family members, the TV blaring in the next room and the dreaded fridge calling to me all day long!

Stress levels are through the roof.

And my health and wellbeing has deteriorated dramatically over the winter.
283
25/03/2021 11:20:37 2 0
bbc
.. not to mention that a spreading out of employment could help 'level up' the regions in ways that no government funded schemes ever will. Those 'desolated' town centres would make excellent parks and green play areas for families. Throw in a few sensible commercial developments around them for bars, gyms, etc, and we could have cities you'd willingly visit. . Imagine that!
284
25/03/2021 11:20:47 3 3
bbc
Less jobs servicing offices. Loads of closed hospitality in town centres because they haven't got the office footfall. Reduced public transport options for those that need it. Less social interaction. It's not all good.
492
25/03/2021 12:29:27 4 0
bbc
I think most people that are now working from home hadn't received an official pay rise, but it is offset by a reduction in transport costs. This should be the norm and if employers want people to travel into the office, they should be paying for transport and parking costs which we currently need to swallow from our salaries.
497
25/03/2021 12:32:50 0 0
bbc
There were a lot of pubs opening up in the day last summer for people to work from, to make up for the lower footfall due to covid restrictions.

I'd much rather go to a pub (as long as it's a "nice" one) occasionally to work for a day instead of something that resembles an office.

I'd undoubtedly buy a few coffees and maybe order a meal at lunchtime.
20
25/03/2021 10:18:33 409 16
bbc
Anything that cuts down on the terrible waste of time, money and fuel spent on commuting has to be a move forward for society.
138
25/03/2021 10:49:31 97 9
bbc
I agree with the benefits, there is no arguing with them really, I already moved to a new house so my wife and I could have our own home offices. But there are of course down sides. Lets be honest its a massive change to the way we have lived our lives for the last century. The Government need to get to grips with it and ensure the long term implications are realised and planned for
175
25/03/2021 10:57:36 26 1
bbc
Very much so. There are a number of roles that are not 'dependant' on being in an office, or on a shop floor, so working from home allows for a much better work life balance.

With investment in 'remote' infrastructure (better web services) people can be in contact just as easily no matter their location.

Won't work for everyone, nor should it.
But the benefits are undeniable.
339
25/03/2021 11:31:59 11 5
bbc
Reform of stamp duty is also needed to reduce "the terrible waste of time, money and fuel spent on commuting".

Why should people penalised with such a high tax on relocating to a "like for like" property?

Charge stamp duty (albeit at a higher rate) on any INCREASE in property value.
378
25/03/2021 11:48:26 15 8
bbc
Great isn't it you no longer need to commute in from your home that is 40 miles from London. Your company however has worked out that if you don't need to physically be in the office, staff from India or elsewhere can Zoom into conferences and do the job for far less!
495
25/03/2021 12:30:49 3 0
bbc
John Lewis announcing a lot of store closures in commuter towns around London looks very short-sighted.
535
25/03/2021 12:51:54 5 0
bbc
We could knock down offices and build affordable (real affordable ) housing instead of building on greenbelt.
574
25/03/2021 13:15:56 1 2
bbc
For those of us with desk jobs there will be very few people with the same office setup at home - space, lighting, facilities, quality of desk/chair/monitor. I've been suffering with bad ache and that's with a good home office setup. I'm definitely less productive at home - too many distractions (making lunch, tidy after lunch, kids getting home by 4) and meetings are far less productive.
616
25/03/2021 13:41:07 3 0
bbc
Once AI hits offices those jobs like accounting, reception, etc. will go anyway. Only hand on work like engineering won't be mastered for decades, if it fiddly works your safe. Repetitive and meaningless not so safe. Driverless cars but no need to goto the office.
823
26/03/2021 10:09:56 0 0
bbc
Sunak obviously disagrees

More concerned about office buildings being packed
5
25/03/2021 10:11:35 81 4
bbc
Smart move.

I think a natural evolution of this is to have office space in neighbourhoods for a happy medium of being away from home and family affairs and also being able to socialise. Within walking distance.

£5/£10 per day.

Some people don't have the room at home, some struggle to work at home. Some are fine with it.

Biggest issue I see is data security but nothing that can't be overcome.
21
25/03/2021 10:18:59 39 6
bbc
It's called WeWork. They are horrible trendy places, with micro-offices resembling an aeroplane toilet.
31
25/03/2021 10:21:40 6 0
bbc
Yep, I've heard of them, terrible company apparently.

There's also hot-desking.

That idea itself is not new, I just prefer the idea of it being more community based and err, nationwide.
162
25/03/2021 10:54:31 2 0
bbc
Local versions will be allot simpler so I would'nt worry about them being too trendy or having aeroplane style toilets though if Ryan Air did a version I would worry..
22
25/03/2021 10:19:13 14 15
bbc
This is going to really annoy Tory fatcats, who tried bullying people back to work last summer.

Well, home working is the future. So suck it up,
40
25/03/2021 10:24:30 3 7
bbc
Why would it annoy them? Bullying? Fatcats? what or who are they?
49
25/03/2021 10:26:59 1 2
bbc
It won't be.
Hot sunny days and ' unavailability' will prompt change.
There will be a move in many industries to have people centralised on site, certainly for a larger part of the week.
Companies will exercise contract clauses like 'having the right to work from locations 'as required''. Check your paperwork.
12
25/03/2021 10:15:23 22 1
bbc
Considering they'd be issued by the building society and fully encrypted, you can be sure of that.
23
25/03/2021 10:19:19 2 1
bbc
And hopefully using a VPN and no unauthorised peripherals connected. The more they overthink the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the drain.
11
25/03/2021 10:15:12 14 2
bbc
Move to warmer climates between November to March. Back in the UK, from March to September.

Quite frankly, if Nationwide can do it, would other companies also be brave to do it? something to think about. :-)
24
25/03/2021 10:19:38 17 8
bbc
If only the majority of UK citizens had a totally visa-free way of doing that, somewhere warm but not too far away - I’d vote for it ;-)
602
25/03/2021 13:15:29 0 0
bbc
17million didn't in 2016
2
25/03/2021 10:11:08 36 3
bbc
Nationwide by name. Nationwide by nature.
25
25/03/2021 10:19:50 16 3
bbc
Soon as my ISA is finished I'm switching to them.

Natwest are horrendous.
280
25/03/2021 10:58:46 4 1
bbc
As someone who as been a Nationwide customer for well over 30 years, I can say they used to be much better than the high street banks in their offerings - now there is not much difference, same low interest rates, same short term accounts you have to switch every 12 months to get a slightly better rate.

That said I do prefer mutuals to the "Big Four", two of which are closing their local branches
474
25/03/2021 12:20:14 1 2
bbc
NatWest have been horrendous for years.
583
25/03/2021 13:18:41 2 3
bbc
You want to risk having your data viewed by all and sundry go ahead. I'm closing my accounts. Home working is very dangerous when it comes to GDPR laws on data.
5
25/03/2021 10:11:35 81 4
bbc
Smart move.

I think a natural evolution of this is to have office space in neighbourhoods for a happy medium of being away from home and family affairs and also being able to socialise. Within walking distance.

£5/£10 per day.

Some people don't have the room at home, some struggle to work at home. Some are fine with it.

Biggest issue I see is data security but nothing that can't be overcome.
26
25/03/2021 10:20:09 12 2
bbc
Bingo, companies know they can work with their employees on this one and the happier the workforce the more productive they generally are.

On an aside though, so much for all of the threats from the anti-lockdown brigade that home working just means that peoples jobs will just be outsourced to india...
108
25/03/2021 10:43:06 9 1
bbc
Ouch! Cheap shot at an entire fictitious group with a vindictive label, I expected better arcangel!

First comment absolutely agree, the old fashioned bums-on-seats mentality where employees are just resources to be allocated has to stop. If anyone wonders why UK productivity has been stagnant for years would do well to start looking there first.
363
25/03/2021 11:39:30 0 1
bbc
Jobs will be outsourced eventually, no doubt about that. Nationwide have said branches will close and many other businesses will do the same with job losses as a consequence.
16
25/03/2021 10:17:16 5 3
bbc
Anywhere apart from my local branch, apparently
27
25/03/2021 10:20:34 7 1
bbc
"traditional office-based employees" - the article isn't talking about branch staff.

Read the article.
28
25/03/2021 10:20:45 74 6
bbc
They have no choice really, I applaud Nationwide for taking a swift decision on this. Employees will just move to companies that offer this flexibility, this is the new norm. Good for the environment, good for our infrastructure and good for worklife balance.
36
25/03/2021 10:23:10 15 33
bbc
Not good for town centres though.....
132
25/03/2021 10:47:18 5 15
bbc
I think you will find quite the opposite in the next 6 months, as someone whose job it is to fins employment for University leavers I can tell you they are all looking to work for companies where face to face can be guaranteed when they start work. This is nothing but a cost saving exercise while placing more cost and responsibility on the employees.
606
25/03/2021 13:35:52 0 0
bbc
Always very helpful at my local branch
How would It be better talk to someone at a call centre miles away or in another country as happens with many banks
29
25/03/2021 10:20:50 3 1
bbc
hope they think about the extra cost for people who have to go to work in that case in theory working from home is a pay rise
69
25/03/2021 10:22:40 4 1
bbc
Depends...if you walk to work it is extra cost of heating your house, etc.
30
25/03/2021 10:21:02 0 1
bbc
Homework ?
21
25/03/2021 10:18:59 39 6
bbc
It's called WeWork. They are horrible trendy places, with micro-offices resembling an aeroplane toilet.
31
25/03/2021 10:21:40 6 0
bbc
Yep, I've heard of them, terrible company apparently.

There's also hot-desking.

That idea itself is not new, I just prefer the idea of it being more community based and err, nationwide.
32
25/03/2021 10:21:44 3 2
bbc
It's a good idea for many reasons but I cant help but think branch closures will follow in time and there's enough empty shops on the High Street as it is
232
25/03/2021 10:48:38 0 2
bbc
well they're the only high st financial institution who haven't closed branches in the last 5 years while all their competitors did - pre-Covid, so that's a lame argument. NBS have put a premium on maintaining high st presence & branch staff can't work from home, this is predominantly back office roles affected.
241
25/03/2021 11:14:51 0 0
bbc
reopenning some of those shops may become much more attractive if people work from home
A pleasant vilage to the high street is preferable to trapsing into the city when you work from home
It used to be pop to those city shops in the lunch break
449
25/03/2021 12:11:29 0 1
bbc
The real reason for empty shops on the high street is absurd rents. Stop making excuses for the commercial landlords.
33
25/03/2021 10:22:27 6 0
bbc
Well I'd be getting residency somewhere tropical and starting my working day with something appropriate to drink!
Options please!
42
25/03/2021 10:25:23 6 0
bbc
isle of dogs maybe?
34
25/03/2021 10:22:47 164 10
bbc
The main reason this hasn't been done sooner is stuffy and paranoid bosses didn't trust their employees. They have no choice now. Necessity is the mother of invention...
186
25/03/2021 10:59:32 50 139
bbc
Productivity will go down as people dick around at home, justifying how they can look after the kids whilst "working" online. Zoom/Teams etc are poor substitutes for the interactions required to make success. Businesses will return to office working.
200
25/03/2021 11:02:34 8 49
bbc
Maybe those stuffy and paranoid bosses should just make their employees redundant or fire them - whichever is easiest. All this "we have a right to work from home nonsense" boils my blood. Unless you run your own business and make the decisions which you think is best for the business, you have no idea. The World's gone mad.
219
25/03/2021 11:07:40 10 37
bbc
We had remote working for three months in my last job and video conferences were constantly being interrupted by children, dogs, phones ringing, wives barging in with snacks / coffee and (on one occasion) an Amazon delivery directly to the study (he was too damn lazy to get the stuff from the door).

I'm never one to defend management but I fully understand their scepticism about remote working.
336
25/03/2021 11:31:00 4 6
bbc
Are they really paranoid though - there are plenty around who will take advantage if they don't have the constraints of being in an office.

Only hope is that managers get good at spotting these and getting rid, otherwise they'll cancel the advantages for the rest of us.
10
25/03/2021 10:14:18 8 9
bbc
Will this compromise the security of their data and accounts?
35
25/03/2021 10:23:06 6 1
bbc
Doubtful, you can use remote access so that home workers dont have the data on their home pc/laptop and most companies review emails so the likelihood of losing data is mitigated
28
25/03/2021 10:20:45 74 6
bbc
They have no choice really, I applaud Nationwide for taking a swift decision on this. Employees will just move to companies that offer this flexibility, this is the new norm. Good for the environment, good for our infrastructure and good for worklife balance.
36
25/03/2021 10:23:10 15 33
bbc
Not good for town centres though.....
111
25/03/2021 10:43:15 29 0
bbc
Good for the centres of small towns
172
25/03/2021 10:57:05 7 0
bbc
It will be if the empty buildings are re purposed into homes and leisure businesses!
287
25/03/2021 11:01:04 5 0
bbc
As this applies to the non-customer facing head office staff (some of whom may elect to work from high street branches) it should not impact town centres.
399
25/03/2021 11:55:25 5 0
bbc
Quite the opposite, this would be awesome for Town Centres. Large organisations having giant self contained Offices on business parks and retail parks has been awful for Town Centres. Having a large influx of those people now working in Branches would be much higher footfall in the Town Centres.
467
25/03/2021 12:18:08 3 0
bbc
Very good for town centres. They will be knocked down and housing return. Bringing life at a more even day and night ordinary level, not crowds in daytime, desolate at nighttime. Local people living in their town. Not hoards of commuters squatting for a few hours a day.
561
25/03/2021 13:06:00 6 0
bbc
I work in the head office and can say that we don't benefit the town centre in any great way as is. None of the offices being closed are in the town centre and the majority of people stay on site for lunch etc.
576
25/03/2021 13:16:01 0 4
bbc
or safety of your data
591
25/03/2021 13:24:41 1 0
bbc
Not necessarily. If handled well by government and local authorities, we could see redundant office & retail space repurposed for housing, bringing life back to town centres that are now mostly dead after 6 pm, and supporting new businesses serving those new residents.
685
25/03/2021 16:00:33 0 0
bbc
brilliant news .banks to houses
750
25/03/2021 17:54:34 0 0
bbc
Not as harmful to them as online shopping (or even out of town shopping centres).
789
25/03/2021 21:38:14 0 0
bbc
Will be great for town centres and the countryside if we have the brains to turn redundant town centre offices into homes instead of burying more and more countryside under concrete.
805
26/03/2021 00:04:59 0 0
bbc
No but great for local butchers/bakers/cofee shops
37
25/03/2021 10:23:20 9 1
bbc
From an employer's point of view it will give us options going forward.
We can distribute jobs more widely to cheaper parts of the UK, and probably the world!
What's not to like here.
8
25/03/2021 10:12:52 28 3
bbc
.....as long as it doesn’t give Nationwide (or any other financial institutions) the idea of closing physical branches via the back door.
38
25/03/2021 10:24:01 6 0
bbc
They seem to be better at it than others, but they are only delaying the inevitable...
11
25/03/2021 10:15:12 14 2
bbc
Move to warmer climates between November to March. Back in the UK, from March to September.

Quite frankly, if Nationwide can do it, would other companies also be brave to do it? something to think about. :-)
39
25/03/2021 10:24:05 1 1
bbc
UK Tax laws don't allow for such a hybrid working approach, if you're an employee based in the UK and paying UK tax, you're limited in your working time outside of your normal place of residency.
203
25/03/2021 11:02:35 0 0
bbc
Correct.
I believe it's more than 92 days out of the country.
211
25/03/2021 11:05:32 0 0
bbc
The UK will happily keep taking tax from you, regardless of where you are sitting.
22
25/03/2021 10:19:13 14 15
bbc
This is going to really annoy Tory fatcats, who tried bullying people back to work last summer.

Well, home working is the future. So suck it up,
40
25/03/2021 10:24:30 3 7
bbc
Why would it annoy them? Bullying? Fatcats? what or who are they?
52
25/03/2021 10:28:01 2 1
bbc
Priti Patel ?

Eric Pickles ?
8
25/03/2021 10:12:52 28 3
bbc
.....as long as it doesn’t give Nationwide (or any other financial institutions) the idea of closing physical branches via the back door.
41
25/03/2021 10:25:01 0 0
bbc
Of course they will
33
25/03/2021 10:22:27 6 0
bbc
Well I'd be getting residency somewhere tropical and starting my working day with something appropriate to drink!
Options please!
42
25/03/2021 10:25:23 6 0
bbc
isle of dogs maybe?
80
25/03/2021 10:36:48 1 0
bbc
I mean't the drink, but it did make me laugh!
43
25/03/2021 10:25:25 7 12
bbc
Non of this 'work from home' culture is set up to benefit the employee. Once you come to understand that you will realise what in the long term you are setting yourselves up for. What seems good now will not seem quite so good when normality within the country eventually returns.
53
25/03/2021 10:28:05 6 0
bbc
Care to elaborate?
57
25/03/2021 10:29:27 1 1
bbc
Just your opinion - I for one totally disagree with your statement as it is clearly seen through your eyes - just as mine is - so let's agree to disagree :-)
71
25/03/2021 10:33:43 1 1
bbc
What has been said is *in the future * WFH contractors may be paid less due to only needing to travel once/twice a month.

It's going to be one of those things where you get in now and you're good but being later to the party may lead to decreased wages.
115
25/03/2021 10:44:37 0 0
bbc
Absolutely true, this has nothing to do with anything better for the employee and all about cost saving for the employer, if people can not see that then they deserve what is coming
3
25/03/2021 10:11:22 87 8
bbc
Good for them.

A lot of bosses still have the mentality of "I want to see bums on seats", and many businesses won't change, but for those that get to partake of this way of working will see such a huge improvement in their work/life balance I hope it spreads further.
44
25/03/2021 10:26:01 55 13
bbc
Great for the workers not the customer, every time I try contacting any company at the moment I'm told that due to the virus the staff are working from home so expect long delays in answering your call, so I assume that will be the norm from now on.
74
25/03/2021 10:34:47 17 7
bbc
I agree royh. As a business customer this is a nightmare. Many companies are now impossible to contact or you get cut off due to poor internet, hear children screaming in background etc. I have also seen people gloating online that they are WFH and doing absolutely nothing. Then there is the issue of data protection. I understand people enjoy WFH but the customer service is now much worse.
127
25/03/2021 10:46:23 29 5
bbc
Then perhaps it's not being implemented correctly. Just because it's not working doesn't necessarily mean the premise is wrong.

In general British management is far behind the times - we're trying to apply old fashioned management apporaches into a new way of working. Once that part catches up it'll start working well. Progress takes time.
271
25/03/2021 11:19:31 14 2
bbc
"Great for the workers not the customer..."

===

This is not universally the case. Last year my health centre arranged annual diabetic check-ups by phone and I discovered that my nurse was performing this task from home.

You have obviously dealt with an organisation which has not got to grips with the technology required. There are companies now advertising help desk vacancies for those who WFH.
299
25/03/2021 11:06:35 14 1
bbc
The issue is that you need to have the infrastructure right to support work from home. You need to have secure VPN connections to protect data, you need an IP phone system that can support remote handsets etc. Putting the infrastructure in place takes time, which companies didn't have at the start of the pandemic.
563
25/03/2021 13:08:04 5 0
bbc
To an extent I agree with you, however that sounds like a symptom of things not being implemented correctly in the immediate rush after lockdowns have been put in place. Presumably by bosses that don't want to invest in remote working practices, expecting things will "return to normal" soon.

Any company that invests properly into this way of working shouldn't have those issues.
788
25/03/2021 21:33:28 0 0
bbc
Not necessarily. Technology is the answer.
19
25/03/2021 10:18:27 117 10
bbc
This is amazing news and such a shame that it took a global pandemic for companies to finally realise the true benefits of allowing people to work from home on a regular basis. Improved wellbeing, less time and money wasted on commuting, reduction of traffic on the roads, less office space needed in overcrowded cities, they're endless...
45
25/03/2021 10:26:21 16 33
bbc
and less face to face social interaction and more desolated town centres. Although less traffic is good...means I can get about quicker
259
25/03/2021 10:52:57 8 0
bbc
"and more desolated town centres".

The trend over the last few decades has been to close local offices and centralise in out of town business parks. This has turned some places into dormitory towns (you sleep there but work elsewhere).

Working from home might help get more people into the local town (if there are any shops left that is).
787
25/03/2021 21:32:16 0 0
bbc
Offices replaced by homes = Revived town centres. Think about it.
46
25/03/2021 10:26:56 11 1
bbc
its going to be fascinating seeing what happens to City office space over the next 5 years. My solve the housing crisis!
63
25/03/2021 10:32:26 3 1
bbc
Have you seen what happened to the central business district in Johannesburg after companies moved out?
47
25/03/2021 10:26:56 0 2
bbc
What about the Prets....?
58
25/03/2021 10:29:29 0 0
bbc
Make them mobile?
62
25/03/2021 10:31:55 1 0
bbc
Not sure many people care for their dry, flavourless sandwiches.
95
25/03/2021 10:39:51 0 0
bbc
Delivered by drone in the near future.
166
25/03/2021 10:55:45 1 0
bbc
"Would someone please think about the international multi-million dollar companies" HAHA oh come on give over.
48
jon
25/03/2021 10:26:57 41 1
bbc
We shall need to turn those unused office blocks into affordable apartments built around family communities with schools, open spaces, surgeries and clinics etc.
182
25/03/2021 10:59:13 11 14
bbc
Sounds great. Let me know when you sell your 4 bed in Shiresville to live in an over-populated concrete jungle? Were you an architect in the 60s/70s by any chance?
589
25/03/2021 13:24:17 0 1
bbc
Who are the we? You would be very much mistaken if you believe money from Government is forthcoming. Private investment will bring just the same problems bein faced currently. Perhaps a tax hike for all those working from home ring fenced for repurposing of unused office blocks would be appropriate. Those who struggle now to afford a home will be no better off.
22
25/03/2021 10:19:13 14 15
bbc
This is going to really annoy Tory fatcats, who tried bullying people back to work last summer.

Well, home working is the future. So suck it up,
49
25/03/2021 10:26:59 1 2
bbc
It won't be.
Hot sunny days and ' unavailability' will prompt change.
There will be a move in many industries to have people centralised on site, certainly for a larger part of the week.
Companies will exercise contract clauses like 'having the right to work from locations 'as required''. Check your paperwork.
13
25/03/2021 10:16:07 39 6
bbc
Working from home if definitely the future, with benefits such as reducing pollution caused by the daily commute and giving people more time and flexibility.

I do hope this isn't purely seen as a cost saving measure by Nationwide though, and they'll be contributing towards their staff's increased utility bills and other expenses.
50
25/03/2021 10:27:15 19 6
bbc
Don't be silly of course they won't.
72
25/03/2021 10:33:50 4 2
bbc
But there are tax breaks for working from home - on use of utilities, phone line/broadband etc.
9
25/03/2021 10:12:57 264 12
bbc
It's now one year exactly since I gave up the commute and started working from home, suits me perfectly, cut down on my petrol consumption, one less car on the road so everyone else benefits not just me.
51
25/03/2021 10:27:57 72 137
bbc
You were forced to do that, you wouldn't have done that if there wasn't a pandemic.

Not everyone is lucky enough to have a job which can be done from home.
67
25/03/2021 10:33:06 26 4
bbc
I wasn't forced, it had been in the planning for over a year and started this day last year.
78
25/03/2021 10:36:08 76 5
bbc
So everyone should go into the office because not everyone can work from home?

People should just do what works for them and their company. Yes it sucks that builders etc can't build from home but that's not the problem of the average office worker now is it.
92
25/03/2021 10:39:26 56 2
bbc
You're right, a lot of jobs do require one to be at certain locations. But not all jobs do, so it makes sense not to force people into a work location they don't have to be. You sound a bit salty about the OP being positive about their situation, no need to be.
I can only hope more companies move away from their 50's manangement style and adopt a more trustworthy approach to their employees.
121
25/03/2021 10:45:42 36 1
bbc
Missed the point entirely
126
25/03/2021 10:46:20 17 1
bbc
And those people will continue to work where they have to, but the tech and the know-how is now tested so WFH can be more widespread
148
25/03/2021 10:51:56 23 2
bbc
Not everyone is lucky enough to be a pilot either! Change career if you want to WFH!
253
25/03/2021 11:17:18 10 1
bbc
Doesn't mean that we should not facilitate having jobs which CAN be done from home done in that way. Grim as the pandemic has been, it has provided us with an opportunity to review how we work and where we work. That was long overdue. It's time we considered our wellbeing, our environment, our infrastructure in the light of making some positive changes.
Removed
340
25/03/2021 11:32:19 6 2
bbc
No they don't, but would you want to quit your job to wfh? If so, do it. But I can't imagine our bin mem fancying my office job.
392
25/03/2021 11:53:54 5 9
bbc
I think you are wrong. The lucky ones are the ones who do have to attend to do their job. The ones who can work online or Zoom into meetings will be replaced by people from lower wage economies.
433
25/03/2021 12:06:43 3 0
bbc
And not everyone has a job that pays a million pounds a year and the lifestyle that brings.........whats your point???
782
25/03/2021 21:20:11 0 0
bbc
How do you know bone rusher wouldn’t have worked from home. Just because some can’t work from home is no reason why those who can shouldn’t be able to.
40
25/03/2021 10:24:30 3 7
bbc
Why would it annoy them? Bullying? Fatcats? what or who are they?
52
25/03/2021 10:28:01 2 1
bbc
Priti Patel ?

Eric Pickles ?
43
25/03/2021 10:25:25 7 12
bbc
Non of this 'work from home' culture is set up to benefit the employee. Once you come to understand that you will realise what in the long term you are setting yourselves up for. What seems good now will not seem quite so good when normality within the country eventually returns.
53
25/03/2021 10:28:05 6 0
bbc
Care to elaborate?
6
25/03/2021 10:12:05 5 9
bbc
Good for Nationwide employees, poor for security and sandwich bar operators.
54
25/03/2021 10:28:15 1 4
bbc
Poor for anyone who has to be physically present in a workplace; dictated to by the laptop warriors lounging at home....
170
25/03/2021 10:56:27 2 1
bbc
Imagine being this bitter in life. wow just wow.
209
25/03/2021 11:05:03 1 0
bbc
Anyone that has to work on site will face reduced traffic if those that can are working from home, no queues at the petrol stations, improved facilities at their local high street - so they win too

But then you showed your colours with "lounging", like nobody in an office does an honest days pay like real workers eh!
If you got paid last week and it got to your bank - people arent lounging
12
25/03/2021 10:15:23 22 1
bbc
Considering they'd be issued by the building society and fully encrypted, you can be sure of that.
55
25/03/2021 10:28:47 0 1
bbc
Can't be sure that only a Nationwide employee can see the personal data on the computer screen if they're 'working from anywhere'.
56
25/03/2021 10:28:59 166 5
bbc
If we no longer need as much office and retail space, can we convert/rebuild it into housing, schools, libraries, etc., much-needed across the UK? No more need to build on green-field sites. And it will bring back life into our city centres.
334
25/03/2021 11:17:17 59 2
bbc
How about a nationwide work-hubs that provide connectivity and access to some social area (cafes, bars, shops) for people that do want to work somewhere not in the office, but also not at home.
403
25/03/2021 11:56:44 2 0
bbc
In a hundred years time I expect our town and city centres will become unrecognisable from what they are now with much more accommodation and far less retail properties. Possibly see far less supermarkets as more and more deliveries are made online. As far as I'm concerned the future looks rosy for my great grand children that I'll never see!!
500
25/03/2021 12:35:47 3 0
bbc
There IS a need for retail space in town centres... ...just not at the exorbitant rents charged by landlords.

Councils need to re-purpose empty shops for new retail start-ups. If shops are empty for more than a year, give councils the right of compulsory purchase.
627
25/03/2021 13:49:52 0 0
bbc
That city center models is dead, planners know it councils know it.
The big boys are leaving town and going virtual, the profits cant be argued with, the new model has been galloping for over a year now cant put the genie back in the lamp now...
714
25/03/2021 16:36:22 0 0
bbc
social housing round here ,kills off the rest of the town
784
25/03/2021 21:24:59 0 0
bbc
True. Instead of trying to revive city centres by forcing unnecessary commuting again revive them by turning offices into homes.
43
25/03/2021 10:25:25 7 12
bbc
Non of this 'work from home' culture is set up to benefit the employee. Once you come to understand that you will realise what in the long term you are setting yourselves up for. What seems good now will not seem quite so good when normality within the country eventually returns.
57
25/03/2021 10:29:27 1 1
bbc
Just your opinion - I for one totally disagree with your statement as it is clearly seen through your eyes - just as mine is - so let's agree to disagree :-)
47
25/03/2021 10:26:56 0 2
bbc
What about the Prets....?
58
25/03/2021 10:29:29 0 0
bbc
Make them mobile?
59
25/03/2021 10:29:39 33 5
bbc
Working from home is an important step in levelling up the country. Now it becomes the job of towns with an abundance of cheap housing but no jobs to lure the WFH crowd to breathe a bit of life back in to their community.
220
25/03/2021 11:07:47 0 1
bbc
Sounds like the new Sims game is going deep!!
326
25/03/2021 11:14:24 1 0
bbc
In which case they need to ensure that the housing stock is suitable - time to put an end to some of the "shoe boxes" they allow to be built and to make sure that decent broadband speeds are available.
14
25/03/2021 10:16:18 188 7
bbc
Good decision. WFH isn’t for everybody. But it’s good that they’re giving their employees the choice.
60
25/03/2021 10:31:02 38 87
bbc
Now and again is fine, but don't surprised if you get a pay cut or don't get a pay increase.

Workers in America who can WFH have experienced a cut in pay.
113
25/03/2021 10:43:20 32 0
bbc
Its called relocation pay and only applies to those that choose to live outside of a defined radius from their work. In some cases the pay is being cut by 20% but given that in these areas the cost of living is 32% above the US average then its still a worthwhile trade off.

btw we have been doing this in the UK for years now. It was called London weighting
139
25/03/2021 10:49:44 29 0
bbc
we are not America

Workers in America very rarely take sick leave or use their annual holiday allowance - thats not transferred to the UK
145
25/03/2021 10:51:30 31 1
bbc
Wow - you seem to have a real downer on WFH. Unless of course, you're just trolling, and I've bitten at the lure ;)

It works for some people, but not for others.
It's possible for some workers, but not for others.
It works for some companies, but not for others.

Nobody is claiming it's the answer to everything for everybody.
187
25/03/2021 10:59:40 8 15
bbc
I would expect a manager that prefers to work in the office will preferentially give his team members that go to the office preferable treatment when it comes to promotions and pay negotiations.

So over time the office will turn into a place for the ambitious and home working will be viewed as lacking drive.
251
25/03/2021 11:16:25 26 1
bbc
I have confirmed with my boss I'll be WFH on a 3 home, 2 office basis from now on. I've just been confirmed for a promotion with a pay rise.

Not every boss is a dinosaur.
275
25/03/2021 10:55:58 9 1
bbc
If I can work anywhere I could potentially buy a similar sized house for much less. The drop in my mortgage would more than offset a pay-cut.
345
25/03/2021 11:35:03 5 0
bbc
The comical thing about all this is that I could 'take a pay cut' and as long as I was mostly contractually based remotely, be better off!

So my employer could cut costs, get the same work, hire more people from a wider catchment area and as a bonus give it's employees an increase in actual pay... It's a win win for both parties.
349
25/03/2021 11:36:08 9 0
bbc
Odd. Why would that be? I could drive 10 mins to work or 2 hours. My commute isn't linked to my salary pet.
352
25/03/2021 11:37:05 4 0
bbc
Ooooh unless you just mean removing London weighting if you move out of London. Which is entirely reasonable.
417
25/03/2021 12:01:21 3 4
bbc
If you can work from home you can work from the other side of the world. Wave goodbye to your job to be replaced with someone from a lower wage economy.
450
25/03/2021 12:11:34 1 0
bbc
So it should. Lower pay will come and reflect the numbers wanting the jobs that can be done from home. That is just normal market forces. Lower pay will not even make people worse off which is why they will still want those jobs. Not running a car, paying for trains, big spend saving. Still gain life time and better environment.
764
25/03/2021 19:17:49 0 0
bbc
I guess the answer is don't live in America! I certainly wouldn't through choice
776
25/03/2021 20:32:13 0 0
bbc
You are a cheery old soul aren't you!
783
25/03/2021 21:22:00 0 0
bbc
Every day is fine. What’s all this now and again nonsense?
61
25/03/2021 10:16:04 10 10
bbc
Globalisation will mean that these jobs will eventually go to low cost countries and the UK workers will have plenty of time for family and socialising because they wont have a job.
168
25/03/2021 10:56:04 2 1
bbc
It already happens.
Design houses issue work to offices in India and the like to continue work overnight, retrieved the next morning.
Resource rates are significantly lower to undertake more basic elements of the work.
47
25/03/2021 10:26:56 0 2
bbc
What about the Prets....?
62
25/03/2021 10:31:55 1 0
bbc
Not sure many people care for their dry, flavourless sandwiches.
46
25/03/2021 10:26:56 11 1
bbc
its going to be fascinating seeing what happens to City office space over the next 5 years. My solve the housing crisis!
63
25/03/2021 10:32:26 3 1
bbc
Have you seen what happened to the central business district in Johannesburg after companies moved out?
208
25/03/2021 11:04:15 0 0
bbc
Do tell.
806
26/03/2021 00:11:40 0 0
bbc
I’d imagine it became a ghetto of violence, begging, drugs & prostitution? This is happening in most city centres now shops/offices are closing but i live miles from one so couldn’t care less.
64
25/03/2021 10:32:36 19 3
bbc
Horses for courses. Home working is a great option to have, but doesn't suit everyone. I struggle with the solitude, in terms of mental health. My employer refuses to have me on site, seeing me as a COVID risk to the production workers. I work more effectively alongside technical colleagues, but am prevented from doing so. Aged 54 with very specialised experience, so little chance to change job.
88
25/03/2021 10:38:40 11 16
bbc
i agree we should make everyone pointlessly sit in an office for 40 hours per week wishing their live away and resorting to alcohol to cope just so profits can be higher and higher and higher what an accomplishment of our species
420
25/03/2021 12:02:20 0 0
bbc
And it looks like these measures are going to be offered as an option rather than a mandatory change. At least for now.

There's recognition that people with young families, or who need the social contact will be better off working in office (or in branches if they choose to in the Nationwide case).

It's worth noting that things will change post-covid, we haven't had REAL wfh yet
791
25/03/2021 21:45:26 0 0
bbc
Quite agree. No one should be forced to work from home but those who want to should be allowed to.
13
25/03/2021 10:16:07 39 6
bbc
Working from home if definitely the future, with benefits such as reducing pollution caused by the daily commute and giving people more time and flexibility.

I do hope this isn't purely seen as a cost saving measure by Nationwide though, and they'll be contributing towards their staff's increased utility bills and other expenses.
65
25/03/2021 10:32:47 2 3
bbc
For certain industries.
Try running a large infrastructure project remotely with hundreds of labour, suppliers, subcontractors and utility companies on site, whilst liaising with, design houses, delivery teams (PMs, APMs, Engineers), H&S and Local Authority representatives.
464
25/03/2021 12:16:49 1 0
bbc
Having worked on major projects a lot of that is done by phone/computer already, WFH doesn’t prevent site visits where needed.
66
25/03/2021 10:33:02 4 5
bbc
Whilst I agree with working from home some of the time it all seems like a bit of a knee jerk reaction to the current circumstances. clearly firms want to cust costs but this could have far reaching consequences long term for society from mental health to the economy and culturally aswell as we all become more insular, the only time alot of us mix up our social interactions are at work.
51
25/03/2021 10:27:57 72 137
bbc
You were forced to do that, you wouldn't have done that if there wasn't a pandemic.

Not everyone is lucky enough to have a job which can be done from home.
67
25/03/2021 10:33:06 26 4
bbc
I wasn't forced, it had been in the planning for over a year and started this day last year.
11
25/03/2021 10:15:12 14 2
bbc
Move to warmer climates between November to March. Back in the UK, from March to September.

Quite frankly, if Nationwide can do it, would other companies also be brave to do it? something to think about. :-)
68
25/03/2021 10:33:16 3 0
bbc
Why move back?
29
25/03/2021 10:20:50 3 1
bbc
hope they think about the extra cost for people who have to go to work in that case in theory working from home is a pay rise
69
25/03/2021 10:22:40 4 1
bbc
Depends...if you walk to work it is extra cost of heating your house, etc.
70
25/03/2021 10:33:42 5 19
bbc
this is a bad move and one that I would discourage if I were not already retired from my director-level position. Most people can't be trusted to work effectively from home and are easily distracted. It is better to have your staff working in the office where they will perform better. Offices are expensive to maintain - staff should be lucky to have them and make the most of them.
81
25/03/2021 10:37:08 1 2
bbc
Office life is full of distractions too - see what happens when someone brings in a photo of a new-born baby. Or the day after an Old Firm match or similar!
83
TV
25/03/2021 10:37:44 2 0
bbc
Unfortunately that comment is out of touch with the vast majority of the current working population. Most want a mix of office and home, and in my experience working from home is far more effective for most (not all) roles. Distractions are far more common in office environments
87
25/03/2021 10:38:36 1 0
bbc
Yet all evidence points to increased productivity from WFH workers.

You'll get the odd person who messes about, and they can be treated the same way as in office - shape up or get out.

This is with hybrid working is popular - people get that social contact but less time on commutes etc.

Regardless of what a few fat cats have said, it's the way forward.
105
25/03/2021 10:42:09 0 0
bbc
If you based your judgement on the operational evidence rather than what is good for your property portfolio you would not hold this view.
110
25/03/2021 10:43:07 2 0
bbc
"Offices are expensive to maintain - staff should be lucky to have them and make the most of them."

I know right? Nothing like working hard for low wages just so your business can keep an office open, its not as if the money can be passed on to the employees, why would they want that when they should be "making the most of it" sheer luxury and ecstasy!
120
25/03/2021 10:45:36 1 0
bbc
I'd agree. I much prefer an office environment. A bit of chat about the footy/rugby. Human interaction suits me.

When I've productively worked from home it's been a heads down all day number/data crunching exercise, something that would have been the same in the office.
124
JPG
25/03/2021 10:37:13 1 1
bbc
Can see why you are retired - your thinking is from the 1950s. If you can't engage and trust your staff replace your management and hiring team and get a better comms team to explain your corporate mission and goals to employees.
130
25/03/2021 10:46:45 1 1
bbc
Such utter nonsense.

People value flexibility over everything else. The companies that are willing to provide it will find they have a more motivated workforce and in turn make the staff more valued and more productive.

Offices are expensive to maintain though, I'll give you that. Most of them are also germ breeding cesspits which are best avoided, especially in winter.
157
25/03/2021 10:42:12 1 0
bbc
Maybe it's a good thing you are retired if you have such little trust in employees to have pride and ambition to do the best job they can. My team regularly work much longer hours now from home, unpaid - because they can, with no offices/branches closing at 5pm & forcing them to leave. The separation of work from home life is a different challenge to manage. Enjoy retirement & living in the past
276
25/03/2021 10:56:09 0 0
bbc
Perhaps people couldn't be trusted 'back in your day' but the evidence seems to suggest home (or at least flexible) working is good for productivity, and what the majority of people want. Enjoy your retirement, don't worry about the rest of us :)
43
25/03/2021 10:25:25 7 12
bbc
Non of this 'work from home' culture is set up to benefit the employee. Once you come to understand that you will realise what in the long term you are setting yourselves up for. What seems good now will not seem quite so good when normality within the country eventually returns.
71
25/03/2021 10:33:43 1 1
bbc
What has been said is *in the future * WFH contractors may be paid less due to only needing to travel once/twice a month.

It's going to be one of those things where you get in now and you're good but being later to the party may lead to decreased wages.
102
25/03/2021 10:41:27 0 0
bbc
outside of London, very few salaries are based on commuting costs
50
25/03/2021 10:27:15 19 6
bbc
Don't be silly of course they won't.
72
25/03/2021 10:33:50 4 2
bbc
But there are tax breaks for working from home - on use of utilities, phone line/broadband etc.
470
25/03/2021 12:18:32 1 0
bbc
There is a potential down side to claiming these if when you come to sell your home the tax man assesses part of it to CGT as an office!
73
25/03/2021 10:33:56 8 1
bbc
As a country we seem to have too many shops and offices, too few houses and flats. The solution is obvious to all apart from the council planners. Although I have heard that there is an idea being considered to convert Debenhams in Glasgow into flats. Well done!
97
25/03/2021 10:40:14 4 4
bbc
sounds good in theory in practice they just end up as squalid little apartments, some with no natural light at all. They will be filled with asylum seekers amd economic migrants just ghettos waiting to happen basically.
104
25/03/2021 10:41:58 2 0
bbc
You'll end up with city centres being all accomodation, poundland and coffee shops, though I'd expect those to die put as Plump Britain gets everything delivered.
44
25/03/2021 10:26:01 55 13
bbc
Great for the workers not the customer, every time I try contacting any company at the moment I'm told that due to the virus the staff are working from home so expect long delays in answering your call, so I assume that will be the norm from now on.
74
25/03/2021 10:34:47 17 7
bbc
I agree royh. As a business customer this is a nightmare. Many companies are now impossible to contact or you get cut off due to poor internet, hear children screaming in background etc. I have also seen people gloating online that they are WFH and doing absolutely nothing. Then there is the issue of data protection. I understand people enjoy WFH but the customer service is now much worse.
321
25/03/2021 11:27:28 7 0
bbc
I hope that the contact will improve after lockdown ends. More people are likely to go back into offices for part of the time when the furlough ends. The security aspect could be concerning though. Anyone could be looking over their shoulder or listening to a customer call when working at home. Not a problem in most cases, but what about banking and other financial companies?
75
25/03/2021 10:35:27 6 7
bbc
Be careful what you wish for here folks. I have WFH for years but always had weekly visits to the office. That is now gone and the feeling of isolation has kicked in. I have work "colleagues" I have never met. My gas/elec bills are through the roof in winter and the paltry tax relief allowance will be nowhere near the additional costs. My company is using my house as a rent-free workspace.
82
25/03/2021 10:37:25 8 1
bbc
Still sounds better than 10 hours a week sitting in a car for no reason
96
25/03/2021 10:40:10 4 0
bbc
Just because your position has gotten worse doesn't mean it has for others. I know of call centre workers who were stuffed in to tiny cubicles who can now do their job in a comfy chair at home with a laptop.
112
25/03/2021 10:43:18 1 0
bbc
Agree with you. When I was working from home back in the early 2000’s and into the office for two hours a week, felt isolated. Times have changed, people these days seem more reclusive just looking at their phones all the time without needing to talk. Sad for society. No one seems very friendly these days. What goes around comes around and offices will return to fashion in a couple of years.
17
25/03/2021 10:18:11 6 9
bbc
If they're over 50 I guess they'll soon be able to go and work from the pub
76
25/03/2021 10:26:50 1 2
bbc
I thought that was tongue & cheek. Don't know why people are voting you down. A lot of sensitive snowflakes these days, and didn't realise how old they are !
9
25/03/2021 10:12:57 264 12
bbc
It's now one year exactly since I gave up the commute and started working from home, suits me perfectly, cut down on my petrol consumption, one less car on the road so everyone else benefits not just me.
77
xlr
25/03/2021 10:35:57 48 0
bbc
As someone who had to work all through the lockdown, I do have to say that the clear roads were a dream. No need to get up at 5.45am just so I can beat the M8 traffic for an 8.30am start.

But then the school run ruined it all again.
454
25/03/2021 12:12:40 10 0
bbc
next thing looked at....school holidays.
Why are we using an archaic system based on the harvest season from hundreds of years ago, so children were free to work in the fields??
In the 90's we were told computers were the future, we'd work from home with no need for business meetings all over the world because of this new thing "video-calling"
Why did it 30 years and a pandemic to get here!
51
25/03/2021 10:27:57 72 137
bbc
You were forced to do that, you wouldn't have done that if there wasn't a pandemic.

Not everyone is lucky enough to have a job which can be done from home.
78
25/03/2021 10:36:08 76 5
bbc
So everyone should go into the office because not everyone can work from home?

People should just do what works for them and their company. Yes it sucks that builders etc can't build from home but that's not the problem of the average office worker now is it.
194
25/03/2021 11:01:32 10 14
bbc
Not everyone works in an office, is my point.

In fact more people don't work in an office than do...
614
25/03/2021 13:40:57 1 1
bbc
100% Sadly some jobs can't/won't benefit but that's like saying that because SOME roles require night shifts then we ALL have to work nightshifts.
79
25/03/2021 10:36:11 73 5
bbc
So if a lot of companies do this do we really need to throw £100billion plus at the vanity project train set? Maybe that money could be put to better use, rather than filling up the wallets of very wealthy conmen, sorry business men and consultants, who may or may not have links to the current, and probably any future, government.
Just asking...
119
25/03/2021 10:45:27 18 2
bbc
It's funny the UK trying to play catch up to countries with efficient public transport.

Its OK, after years of chronic under investment, people will be able to get to "that London" <20mins faster. After the "consultants" have filled up, mind.
201
25/03/2021 11:02:35 2 1
bbc
Come on now, with all this increased accountability and auditing going on nowadays, HS2 has been a lifeline for our Brown Envelope industry!!
202
25/03/2021 11:02:35 2 0
bbc
They may need it more

With staff maybe only visiting the office once a week, they have the option to relocate and catch the train into the office for their weekly meetings
763
25/03/2021 19:04:58 1 0
bbc
You may find more people commute longer distances so HS2 actually has more relevance for those comminuting from further afield on a semi regular basis.

Not to mention there are still hundreds of thousands of Scotland to London flights a year.
42
25/03/2021 10:25:23 6 0
bbc
isle of dogs maybe?
80
25/03/2021 10:36:48 1 0
bbc
I mean't the drink, but it did make me laugh!
153
25/03/2021 10:53:05 2 0
bbc
how refreshing that some people haven't lost the abillity to "have a larf", sometimes I read forums and everyone is so opinionated and seem to enjoy slagging others off..I'd start the day with a good single Laphroaig malt whisky,NO rocks.thats sacrilige! and no more than one good measure
70
25/03/2021 10:33:42 5 19
bbc
this is a bad move and one that I would discourage if I were not already retired from my director-level position. Most people can't be trusted to work effectively from home and are easily distracted. It is better to have your staff working in the office where they will perform better. Offices are expensive to maintain - staff should be lucky to have them and make the most of them.
81
25/03/2021 10:37:08 1 2
bbc
Office life is full of distractions too - see what happens when someone brings in a photo of a new-born baby. Or the day after an Old Firm match or similar!
106
25/03/2021 10:42:21 4 0
bbc
Get in. Faff around for ten minutes setting your hot desk up. Log on. Wait until log on is complete then go for a coffee. Chat. Make coffee. Return to desk. Talk to person at next desk. Actually start to work. Pointless team meeting which takes far longer in person. Look at time. Think about lunch. Lunch. Coffee. Clock watch and hope the train isn't late/traffic is busy. Totally productive.
75
25/03/2021 10:35:27 6 7
bbc
Be careful what you wish for here folks. I have WFH for years but always had weekly visits to the office. That is now gone and the feeling of isolation has kicked in. I have work "colleagues" I have never met. My gas/elec bills are through the roof in winter and the paltry tax relief allowance will be nowhere near the additional costs. My company is using my house as a rent-free workspace.
82
25/03/2021 10:37:25 8 1
bbc
Still sounds better than 10 hours a week sitting in a car for no reason
286
25/03/2021 11:00:37 1 0
bbc
I can't see how, if you've WFH for years with weekly visits to the office how your home fuel bills have increased so much (assuming those weekly visits weren't 3 or 4 days per week).

I'm WFH currently, so am currently (in theory) getting 1.5 hours per day more at home as opposed to commuting, which is also saving my car journeys which far outweighs gas & electric usage at home.

But tea bags...
70
25/03/2021 10:33:42 5 19
bbc
this is a bad move and one that I would discourage if I were not already retired from my director-level position. Most people can't be trusted to work effectively from home and are easily distracted. It is better to have your staff working in the office where they will perform better. Offices are expensive to maintain - staff should be lucky to have them and make the most of them.
83
TV
25/03/2021 10:37:44 2 0
bbc
Unfortunately that comment is out of touch with the vast majority of the current working population. Most want a mix of office and home, and in my experience working from home is far more effective for most (not all) roles. Distractions are far more common in office environments
84
25/03/2021 10:37:50 4 3
bbc
I'm sick and tired of the solitude and sheer lonely place of working from home, I have to go out walking/running just to keep myself mentally sane, thus my productivity suffers big time. Can't wait to get back to the office...
100
KRR
25/03/2021 10:41:11 3 0
bbc
I think both responses to enforced working from home - this is great, I prefer it, and reacting negatively to the isolation - are common, but yours is perhaps getting less publicity. I'm in a job where no one argues that it works better to be on-site so there should be no argument about an eventual return.
488
25/03/2021 12:28:10 1 0
bbc
I'm sorry you feel like that. Will your company be able to reach a compromise and allow those that enjoy the office environment to return and allow those who enjoy WFH to do that or a hybrid solution? I love working from home and the solitude is what I enjoy as I am not a fan of the open plan office.
85
25/03/2021 10:38:19 0 1
bbc
I wish they would open branches at least one Saturday a month. I work for the NHS full time and need face to face for several of my transactions. Now I have to use up holiday to visit a branch mid week!
86
25/03/2021 10:38:34 2 1
bbc
I wonder how many people have actually -read- the article?

There seem to be a lot of folks arguing for or against their idea or experience of "working from home" who haven't read it...

Why am I not surprised?
238
25/03/2021 11:13:17 2 0
bbc
There is an article?

This is HYS -
Read the headline, cut and paste the same old arguments
extra points for condemnation of the PM, the Government, Brexit or enconomic growth :D
70
25/03/2021 10:33:42 5 19
bbc
this is a bad move and one that I would discourage if I were not already retired from my director-level position. Most people can't be trusted to work effectively from home and are easily distracted. It is better to have your staff working in the office where they will perform better. Offices are expensive to maintain - staff should be lucky to have them and make the most of them.
87
25/03/2021 10:38:36 1 0
bbc
Yet all evidence points to increased productivity from WFH workers.

You'll get the odd person who messes about, and they can be treated the same way as in office - shape up or get out.

This is with hybrid working is popular - people get that social contact but less time on commutes etc.

Regardless of what a few fat cats have said, it's the way forward.
64
25/03/2021 10:32:36 19 3
bbc
Horses for courses. Home working is a great option to have, but doesn't suit everyone. I struggle with the solitude, in terms of mental health. My employer refuses to have me on site, seeing me as a COVID risk to the production workers. I work more effectively alongside technical colleagues, but am prevented from doing so. Aged 54 with very specialised experience, so little chance to change job.
88
25/03/2021 10:38:40 11 16
bbc
i agree we should make everyone pointlessly sit in an office for 40 hours per week wishing their live away and resorting to alcohol to cope just so profits can be higher and higher and higher what an accomplishment of our species
532
25/03/2021 12:49:55 4 0
bbc
Great job on twisting his words. All he said was that WFH doesn't work for him but his boss won't let him go into the office. He said WFH is a great OPTION to have but currently it's the only option available to him.
89
KRR
25/03/2021 10:38:54 15 1
bbc
They can let their staff work wherever suits, plus please stop those terrible smug performance poets in their telly ads.
90
25/03/2021 10:39:12 1 7
bbc
I can't see how they can hope to maintain decent security with so many locations. This is a recipe for ongoing security breaches. Who knows who else is living in a house or whether they would pass screening? You won't be getting my business!
122
25/03/2021 10:46:05 1 0
bbc
Really? I'm sure the largest building society in the UK are quaking in their boots. Personally, I have a mortgage with this company and if this is how they treat their staff then I'll be happy to stay with them.

It's only the same as working on site and is the employee's responsibility to maintain local security just like they wouldn't have people peering over their shoulders in the office.
264
25/03/2021 10:55:07 1 0
bbc
every financial institution in the UK have adjusted to the pandemic by closing their offices or at least vastly reducing numbers and having most people WFH. Do you think Lloyds, Barclays, etc have their normal numbers of back office staff in huge admin sites over last year? Wake up
91
25/03/2021 10:39:13 16 2
bbc
At last a major shift in management culture. This pandemic, if nothing else, has proven to management that generally employees are to be trusted and do not need the massive oversight hitherto used. An excellent and most welcome shift.
51
25/03/2021 10:27:57 72 137
bbc
You were forced to do that, you wouldn't have done that if there wasn't a pandemic.

Not everyone is lucky enough to have a job which can be done from home.
92
25/03/2021 10:39:26 56 2
bbc
You're right, a lot of jobs do require one to be at certain locations. But not all jobs do, so it makes sense not to force people into a work location they don't have to be. You sound a bit salty about the OP being positive about their situation, no need to be.
I can only hope more companies move away from their 50's manangement style and adopt a more trustworthy approach to their employees.
469
25/03/2021 12:18:27 5 0
bbc
actually there are already programs available that the boss can check on what you're doing on your computer and how much work you're getting done or not as the case may be ;-)
93
GWL
25/03/2021 10:39:27 4 5
bbc
I am trying to resolve an issue with a major Comms company but the various people are working from home and due to computer security and GDPR and 7 weeks later the right person cannot press the right button to proceed. Hours of phonecalls on-hold, countless emails and live chats would be solved if some of the various people were back onsite.
107
25/03/2021 10:42:41 4 1
bbc
Not really, it's just not a well run operation.
94
25/03/2021 10:39:42 2 3
bbc
I see raft of legal cases ahead from ill-informed employees not realising that you work for the company and they pay you, and unless their behaviour is 'unreasonable' you work where they tell you, unless your contract specifically states you can work from where you like.
131
25/03/2021 10:46:51 0 0
bbc
Nah.

This is something that'd be discussed pre-contract and places are advertising remote/hybrid working.
47
25/03/2021 10:26:56 0 2
bbc
What about the Prets....?
95
25/03/2021 10:39:51 0 0
bbc
Delivered by drone in the near future.
75
25/03/2021 10:35:27 6 7
bbc
Be careful what you wish for here folks. I have WFH for years but always had weekly visits to the office. That is now gone and the feeling of isolation has kicked in. I have work "colleagues" I have never met. My gas/elec bills are through the roof in winter and the paltry tax relief allowance will be nowhere near the additional costs. My company is using my house as a rent-free workspace.
96
25/03/2021 10:40:10 4 0
bbc
Just because your position has gotten worse doesn't mean it has for others. I know of call centre workers who were stuffed in to tiny cubicles who can now do their job in a comfy chair at home with a laptop.
73
25/03/2021 10:33:56 8 1
bbc
As a country we seem to have too many shops and offices, too few houses and flats. The solution is obvious to all apart from the council planners. Although I have heard that there is an idea being considered to convert Debenhams in Glasgow into flats. Well done!
97
25/03/2021 10:40:14 4 4
bbc
sounds good in theory in practice they just end up as squalid little apartments, some with no natural light at all. They will be filled with asylum seekers amd economic migrants just ghettos waiting to happen basically.
98
25/03/2021 10:40:46 0 1
bbc
This seems be the way forward for so many companies whom have people office based working this will be the new type off normal we have to adopt with going forward. Probably will effect a lot people in differnt ways but if this is how life will be for office workers going forward then they have to adopt just like everyone whoms work life will change going forward
9
25/03/2021 10:12:57 264 12
bbc
It's now one year exactly since I gave up the commute and started working from home, suits me perfectly, cut down on my petrol consumption, one less car on the road so everyone else benefits not just me.
99
25/03/2021 10:41:05 22 2
bbc
Great that you see a bigger picture than your own considerations. We need this thinking if we are to reach net zero carbon, and we need leadership from the Govt to push things along where people cannot think in this way.

In the time I'm not commuting, I'm growing wonky allotment veg for the cook in a care home. The home love the seasonal veg & I've cut transport miles, food miles and waistline.
84
25/03/2021 10:37:50 4 3
bbc
I'm sick and tired of the solitude and sheer lonely place of working from home, I have to go out walking/running just to keep myself mentally sane, thus my productivity suffers big time. Can't wait to get back to the office...
100
KRR
25/03/2021 10:41:11 3 0
bbc
I think both responses to enforced working from home - this is great, I prefer it, and reacting negatively to the isolation - are common, but yours is perhaps getting less publicity. I'm in a job where no one argues that it works better to be on-site so there should be no argument about an eventual return.