BT's Openreach to build full-fibre internet 'like fury' after Ofcom move
18/03/2021 | news | technology | 935
Regulator Ofcom will not cap Openreach's fees for full-fibre connections for at least 10 years.
1
18/03/2021 11:04:40 50 8
bbc
BT monopolised our street until a few years ago with something the Broadband choices image above does not show - aluminium line.
Suffice it it say our ADSL speeds were not much better than dial up, but that did not stop rip-off BT charging us the same line rental rate as everyone else.
When 4G internet came out it was our greatest pleasue to give BT the giant middle finger and sign up with Three.
11
18/03/2021 11:11:23 21 20
bbc
Who are part of BT ??.
52
18/03/2021 11:19:12 11 1
bbc
Interestingly, we also have Aluminium to the house as they were built when it was all the rage. Initially this limited us to 1MBit ADSL. A year or so ago BT/Openreach installed a new cabinet at the end of the road and now we have FTTC with a speed of 38/8 Mb/s, even though there is 300m of Aluminium. Fitting that cabinet was slightly surprising as it serves only 30 houses; well done to BT.
681
18/03/2021 15:20:00 1 1
bbc
I think some people are getting confused, 4G is cellular if you have a wired connection then most likely Openreach, we went to 4G Three network £18:00 per month a few years ago, speed went up from around 10Meg to 40Meg also fitted VOIP phones job done BT gone forever!
2
18/03/2021 11:07:04 11 11
bbc
BT - the worst telecom company i have never experienced else where
It's no co-incidence that Blooming Tossers has the same initials as British Telecom !! Removed
3
18/03/2021 11:07:12 269 18
bbc
"That could mean more expensive internet connections for the public than might have been the case."

More like that WILL mean more expensive internet connections.
44
Bob
18/03/2021 11:17:53 242 120
bbc
'I want the better product, I want the faster speeds, I want the more reliable technology, but I don't want to pay for it' - Joe Public.
65
xlr
18/03/2021 11:22:37 16 9
bbc
I'll be sticking to copper. I don't need the extra bandwidth - it's not like I've got time to watch Netflix anyway.
265
18/03/2021 12:10:12 1 8
bbc
Go mobile HOT SPOT - who needs fibre these days ?!
377
18/03/2021 12:37:52 2 0
bbc
Guaranteed.
391
18/03/2021 12:44:30 5 1
bbc
It's not BTs fault that it hasn't rolled out high speed internet to unprofitable areas.Its the fault of the idiots who expected them to do it.Openreach should have been nationalised at the outset,so that everyone got the same service,wherever they live.We are a United Kingdom,I believe.
599
18/03/2021 14:16:18 0 1
bbc
There is no harm in paying extra for something that is actually better.
808
18/03/2021 19:35:37 1 0
bbc
Oh definitely! They’ll rack it up as & when they please,
848
18/03/2021 21:31:01 0 1
bbc
Clearly yes if you want fibre to your home, you will pay for it. Seems fair, not as if have to have it, personal choice. Or is it your human rights to have high speed broadband to play games?
4
18/03/2021 11:07:55 167 23
bbc
"The business has said it can now confirm a plan to build fibre-to-the-premises (FTTP) connections to 20 million homes and offices by the mid- to late-2020s."

---

If past performance of BT/OpenReach is anything to go by then those figures are fantasy.
113
18/03/2021 11:34:28 108 10
bbc
I once tried getting BT Broadband and had 6 weeks of total incompetence from them and it never worked. They would disconnect the landline trying to fix it at the exchange then insist the problem must be in my home. The Indian call centre insisted I keep resetting the router until it works. I ended up getting £400 compenstation from them for my wasted time.
223
18/03/2021 11:59:37 7 0
bbc
so much of the uk is stuck with garbage speeds for 5+ years? lol.

how can these ppl consider speeds like 40mb acceptable?
280
18/03/2021 12:13:43 6 0
bbc
My area does not even have copper local ends; we have aluminiun cable, now rotten, wwhich as put in 46 years ago as a stopgap due to the high price rise of copper.

Virgin has now put in FTTP, a boon.
I was working as an engineering manager in BT ( Formally Post Office Telephones ) back then.
The accountants wouldn"t listen.

Virgin has now put in FTTP, a boon.
542
18/03/2021 13:38:21 2 2
bbc
BT/Openreach actually mean 2120....
5
18/03/2021 11:09:37 3 5
bbc
By the time they're done it'll be obsolete.
6
18/03/2021 11:10:03 7 5
bbc
An utter disgrace, de facto monopoly BT gets to put the screw on customers to fund it's FTTP plans to maintain it's status. Make them borrow it on the open market just like it's FTTP competitors have to.
22
18/03/2021 11:14:50 2 1
bbc
its
32
18/03/2021 11:16:03 0 0
bbc
No the competitors do not have the cap, and you pay for it immediately.
7
18/03/2021 11:10:09 0 2
bbc
Will BT know who needs FTTP or will the broadband provider tell them or will the user need to tell BT ?
8
18/03/2021 11:10:25 2 2
bbc
Too late where I live. City Fibre has beaten them to it.
77
18/03/2021 11:15:30 0 0
bbc
Veni Vidi Cecidi
9
18/03/2021 11:10:50 5 9
bbc
By the time FTTP is installed across the country, 5G will make is redundant.

It's like when the canals were built;

Just as the completed building a canal network, the railways came along and that made the canals obsolete.
34
Bob
18/03/2021 11:16:36 7 0
bbc
You can't even get strong 4G in great parts of the country, what makes you think that 5G is going to fare better when it requires many more nodes?
148
18/03/2021 11:41:19 0 0
bbc
Actually, the roads made canals redundant, not railways. Canals were still in use/busy up until the 1950's.
161
18/03/2021 11:43:20 0 0
bbc
next generation of wired service will probably faster than 5g etc etc
185
18/03/2021 11:49:28 0 0
bbc
Wireless (mobile) broadband will never replace fibre. It's a shared medium, i.e. the more people on it at once, the slower it becomes. It is expensive, and don't forget about the data caps.
10
18/03/2021 11:11:02 12 5
bbc
But it's all still based on infrastructure built by British Telecom, paid for by the taxpayer way back when. I don't know where the government thinks these "competitors" are going to come from? A new telecom company isn't suddenly going to launch and start building all their own exchanges are they?
I just don't see the fantasy in privatising critical national infrastructure...
23
18/03/2021 11:14:55 8 2
bbc
No this is new infrastructure. The old infrastructure is copper, the new cable is glass fibre. We also think that people using the same infrastructure are competitors and we can switch at will. I get my energy from Scottish Power through a plug in London, switching keeps an army of administrators in work and we pay for them!
46
18/03/2021 11:18:18 0 0
bbc
My local area is having full fibre FTTP installed. It's not BT/Openreach. So someone is doing something.
48
18/03/2021 11:18:20 4 0
bbc
Don't take this as a shameless plug.
But with upcoming starlink satellites promising 150mbps low latency broadband it potentially removes the needs for physical infrastructure to homes. This 150Mbps could be had by someone way out in the sticks.

Open reach are the only supplier obligated to try and reach every home. The likes of virgin only set up where its profitable
211
18/03/2021 11:57:07 0 0
bbc
Competitors like CityFibre have been installing FTTP for the past few years.

https://www.cityfibre.com

Have you been asleep?
1
18/03/2021 11:04:40 50 8
bbc
BT monopolised our street until a few years ago with something the Broadband choices image above does not show - aluminium line.
Suffice it it say our ADSL speeds were not much better than dial up, but that did not stop rip-off BT charging us the same line rental rate as everyone else.
When 4G internet came out it was our greatest pleasue to give BT the giant middle finger and sign up with Three.
11
18/03/2021 11:11:23 21 20
bbc
Who are part of BT ??.
21
18/03/2021 11:14:43 23 0
bbc
Think you are getting confused with EE.
42
RPH
18/03/2021 11:17:29 13 0
bbc
No I don;t think they are. They are owned by CK Hutchinson Holdings and have their own network infrastructure..
12
gaz
18/03/2021 11:11:29 6 1
bbc
Good move for roll out.
Bad move for price unless 5g drives it down.
13
18/03/2021 11:11:35 4 5
bbc
We always want something for nothing. If this goes ahead and is done, it will almost be the first major infrastructure investment where the non-Government Company doing it does not go bust. Telewest, remember anyone?
17
18/03/2021 11:13:42 7 1
bbc
Telewest didn't go bust, it merged with NTL and became Virgin Media.
14
18/03/2021 11:12:12 11 3
bbc
But they keep on increasing landline rental when the copper portion is drastically reduced - one big con!!!
26
Bob
18/03/2021 11:15:10 6 1
bbc
Except it isn't because when you get full fibre they're still running your phone line over the copper part.... had hoped to bin our nice dangling wire when we got it, but nope, now we have two wires.
66
18/03/2021 11:22:43 0 0
bbc
Yep, the Openreach LLU line rental is dirt cheap now. Well below £1 per month.

All the sur-charges are just fat for BT - to pay for football rights.

Openreach should never be part of BT.
149
18/03/2021 11:41:40 0 1
bbc
Get rid of your landline. Seriously, who uses this anyway?
For God's sake get a bloody mobile.
455
18/03/2021 13:03:34 0 0
bbc
Switch!
I get my line rental from Shell Energy the company best known for oil but they also do telecoms, they charge £12pm, I don't use it for calls it's internet only.
For calls and also 2GB of mobile internet I'm with Lebara £5pm which includes all the calls and texts any normal person should need.
15
18/03/2021 11:12:32 16 7
bbc
The ducts and poles along which the majority of copper or fibre connections are routed were built by the GPO - then a branch of government - at great public expense in the 20th century.
They are a public asset, like the regular streets and roads of the country. They should not be monopolised by Openreach.
Competition would be great - so open up the ducts and poles for competitors to lay cables.
31
18/03/2021 11:15:42 14 2
bbc
Let every Tom, Dick or Harry into the ducts and see what happens.
57
18/03/2021 11:20:02 2 0
bbc
Nice idea, but the ducts are full in most cases as there are no longer 1 telephone line per 5 houses and no shared lines and many people have more than one line into the house!
73
18/03/2021 11:24:47 1 0
bbc
Already is virgin etc but it’s chaos
91
MT
18/03/2021 11:29:22 0 1
bbc
Too late for that as Cable & Wireless had to lay complete network of fibre, even when BT and others were trying to convince local authorities they had fast proper return path, when that was complete rubbish for years, as the only return path was via a phone line and where it would never have the bandwidth that could be provided by an integrated return path within fibre.
147
18/03/2021 11:36:39 1 0
bbc
"Competition would be great - so open up the ducts and poles for competitors to lay cables."

Ducts and poles have been open for competitors to lay cables since 2018-19. Did you not look into your great idea before posting ?

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/consultations-and-statements/category-1/review-physical-infrastructure-and-business-connectivity-markets
656
18/03/2021 14:51:08 1 1
bbc
They are already shared muppet - get you facts right before making inane comments,,
16
jon
18/03/2021 11:13:30 4 3
bbc
Faster broadband makes it easier to move the BBC TV lisence to streaming.
68
18/03/2021 11:23:10 4 1
bbc
Yes and pay thousands a year to sky Netflix etc. And look on Netflix you get a few crappy American shows when the bbc support children’s learning local radio David Attenborough etc etc. Be careful what you wish for
13
18/03/2021 11:11:35 4 5
bbc
We always want something for nothing. If this goes ahead and is done, it will almost be the first major infrastructure investment where the non-Government Company doing it does not go bust. Telewest, remember anyone?
17
18/03/2021 11:13:42 7 1
bbc
Telewest didn't go bust, it merged with NTL and became Virgin Media.
56
18/03/2021 11:19:53 1 0
bbc
I think BlueYonder were in that mix too weren't they?
60
18/03/2021 11:21:09 0 1
bbc
The merger was forced as I believe it ran out of funds.
18
18/03/2021 11:13:49 2 3
bbc
BT has had to operate with it's "hands tied" since it was created with the privatisation of Post Office Telephones.
Many were encouraged to buy shares in a company that has had to "hive off" much of its business to others, with a massive drop in it share value, this IMHO was illegal, so I welcome this news and look forward to the future.
49
18/03/2021 11:18:53 1 0
bbc
I worked in telecoms industry for 30 years so tell me how this was illegal, because 1) it wasn’t and 2) it was required to get things moving in the industry.
51
18/03/2021 11:19:02 1 0
bbc
Oh, if you managed your share portfolio properly you would have made a packet out of BT shares by now.

Ones I still hold costed me effectively nothing.
19
18/03/2021 11:14:14 130 24
bbc
Openreach couldn't hit a barn door with a banjo if they were standing inside the barn.

The only 'fury' that will emanate from anything they touch will be that of their poor mug customers as their line gets cut of for weeks and months at a time without explanation.

I was with BT for years and they were without doubt the worst company I have ever dealt with. Utterly and totally incompetent.
39
18/03/2021 11:17:15 115 25
bbc
Agree. Will the Openreach employees I see sitting in vans all day reading newspapers be taking part in this superhuman effort?
40
18/03/2021 11:17:15 13 0
bbc
"Utterly and totally incompetent."

Yep, affirmative. And I work in the industry.
205
18/03/2021 11:54:57 7 0
bbc
Agree.
383
18/03/2021 12:40:45 3 4
bbc
I have met some lovely younger BT Employees. These are the next generation and are keen to get on. I have also had the horrible misfortune to meet some of the 'older' BT Employees, whose only focus was on their pending their retirememt, no customer skills evident at all. I really do hope these disgruntled people retire as soon as possible as it is they who drag the company down fastest.
601
18/03/2021 14:17:17 1 0
bbc
Agree. 6 months and 9 failed attempts to put in a new line for my daughter who is a key worker. Then overcharged me and added extra "service" costs to the bill. An I hang my head in shame that I used to work for BT.... but only 8 months as I realised there was no hope for improvement
767
18/03/2021 16:58:16 1 0
bbc
As were all nationalised industries.
871
SD
18/03/2021 22:30:59 1 0
bbc
I had an intermittent fault just before Xmas, Openreach diagnosed and made sure my line would still work over xmas, subsequently found teh underground fault, fixed and paid a loss of service, no complaints.
20
18/03/2021 11:14:15 9 2
bbc
I have had FTTP at home for 2 months now and can say it has made a huge difference to both stability and speed. My provider (Zen Internet) provides options at different prices dependent upon how fast you want. I have the full 900Mpbs, but I could have paid less to restrict it to 500, or 300 or 100. I was surprised we had FTTP as an option as we do not live in a major city, but a semi-rural area.
11
18/03/2021 11:11:23 21 20
bbc
Who are part of BT ??.
21
18/03/2021 11:14:43 23 0
bbc
Think you are getting confused with EE.
69
18/03/2021 11:23:13 8 3
bbc
True. My mistake. Stupid names anyway.
6
18/03/2021 11:10:03 7 5
bbc
An utter disgrace, de facto monopoly BT gets to put the screw on customers to fund it's FTTP plans to maintain it's status. Make them borrow it on the open market just like it's FTTP competitors have to.
22
18/03/2021 11:14:50 2 1
bbc
its
63
18/03/2021 11:22:10 0 1
bbc
Wow ^^
10
18/03/2021 11:11:02 12 5
bbc
But it's all still based on infrastructure built by British Telecom, paid for by the taxpayer way back when. I don't know where the government thinks these "competitors" are going to come from? A new telecom company isn't suddenly going to launch and start building all their own exchanges are they?
I just don't see the fantasy in privatising critical national infrastructure...
23
18/03/2021 11:14:55 8 2
bbc
No this is new infrastructure. The old infrastructure is copper, the new cable is glass fibre. We also think that people using the same infrastructure are competitors and we can switch at will. I get my energy from Scottish Power through a plug in London, switching keeps an army of administrators in work and we pay for them!
137
18/03/2021 11:38:57 1 1
bbc
Hence my comment "based on". New companies are not going to build new infrastructure where it isn't profitable.
It's pretty obvious you don't have much of an understanding of utility infrastructure from your electricity comment.
24
18/03/2021 11:15:05 0 1
bbc
Oh good, another reason to rip up all of the pavements. We've just had one broadband firm do this.
25
18/03/2021 11:15:08 13 2
bbc
Is this the same 'Superfast' broadband for everyone Blair's government were plugging with expensive ads years ago?

Btw when are we ditching FM radio for the vastly inefficient digital system as well?

Jack Straw really was a waste of space
138
18/03/2021 11:39:17 4 4
bbc
Jack Straw? Who he?

We have the *current* government allowing / making these decisions.

Can you find anything to say that is relevant to this century?
14
18/03/2021 11:12:12 11 3
bbc
But they keep on increasing landline rental when the copper portion is drastically reduced - one big con!!!
26
Bob
18/03/2021 11:15:10 6 1
bbc
Except it isn't because when you get full fibre they're still running your phone line over the copper part.... had hoped to bin our nice dangling wire when we got it, but nope, now we have two wires.
27
18/03/2021 11:15:16 73 12
bbc
And there we all were thinking that BT openreach was in receipt of funding assured by previous chancellors in a decade of budgets to roll out 'world leading' connectivity across the Uk for every community. It turns out BT profit mongers were taking the money , then not really doing this at all, but simply looking at the bottom line. Leading nation? no more effective than my left little toe
43
18/03/2021 11:17:43 14 24
bbc
Really, I do not think BT got the money, that is what all the negotiations have been about.
503
18/03/2021 13:18:26 0 0
bbc
You really don’t know what you’re talking about.
28
18/03/2021 11:15:27 10 2
bbc
Load of spin because BT and others have just hiked all their prices during a pandemic
84
Pip
18/03/2021 11:27:23 1 0
bbc
Obviously insider knowledge............?
29
18/03/2021 11:15:33 517 83
bbc
Openreach should never be part of BT. It's a complete racket.

Ideally it should be nationalised to provide level playing field for all telcos.
41
18/03/2021 11:17:18 146 40
bbc
Absolutely correct.
54
18/03/2021 11:19:30 22 51
bbc
It's not. please keep up.
146
18/03/2021 11:35:11 17 60
bbc
Typical stupid unionised Britain style reaction
150
18/03/2021 11:41:45 50 13
bbc
Err it used to be Publically owned. But in the 80’s the Tories drive to sell off the Family Silver, due to their Hatred of Public Ownership and the plebs having something. It was flogged off really cheap. Now it’s just there to make as much money for the Spivs as it can. Openreach is mandated to treat all companies equally.
153
Vid
18/03/2021 11:42:12 14 24
bbc
Thing is Virgin Media, TlakTalk and Sky have their own networks which they also sell wholesale to other telco's. Are they to be nationalised too? Or just take away their licence and make thousand's of worker redundant?
169
18/03/2021 11:41:25 32 11
bbc
Couldn't agree more. BT have been underinvesting and overcharging for years.
186
18/03/2021 11:49:31 8 2
bbc
Then it would become the Openreach infrastructure monopoly, same problem, different name. I don't think full nationalisation is the answer but the Government should have say 10-15% of the equity to have an influence.
187
18/03/2021 11:49:55 19 19
bbc
Not all telcos use OpenReach so it isn't the monopoly the socialists think it is.
201
18/03/2021 11:50:34 16 7
bbc
Openreach is the network part of the company, how can that not be part of a telecoms company ??????????????????????
246
18/03/2021 12:07:07 5 4
bbc
You mean like when it was all nationalised pre-1984 and part of one state-owned company, when people were still complaining about it being a monopoly? Making
it state-owned has its own complications.
278
Ron
18/03/2021 12:13:22 9 8
bbc
I work for a local authority for the last few years and you really don't want these moron types messing around with this. I really cant understand why people want public ownership? Public employees would not know customer service if it ran them over.
289
18/03/2021 12:15:33 4 4
bbc
It was. But the Conservatives flush with the north sea oil windfall decided to sell it off
294
18/03/2021 12:16:32 4 0
bbc
And, to be honest, the other telecommunication companies never seemed interested outside the cities. They cherry picked. Not stupid.
312
18/03/2021 12:22:24 4 3
bbc
They're 2 separate companies now for exactly that reason.
345
18/03/2021 12:29:57 6 1
bbc
Erm Openreach was once BT and before that GPO Telecoms. The training was done at GCHQ. You simply can't divorce Openreach from its mother. Technology has changed for sure and Openreach is now a subsiduary company of BT but like a child grows up and leaves home so too here. You cannot disconnect the two.
372
18/03/2021 12:36:04 6 0
bbc
Going back a few decades, BT shouldn't have been Privatised. As a few year before it was Privatised, it was planning to roll out Fibre To The Home (FTTH).

Then it was Privatised, then Ofcom split it up, FTTH plans came to a grinding Halt.
390
18/03/2021 12:43:58 2 6
bbc
Good idea in principle, but once nationalised the union vermin move in to make well paid / satisfied workers feel victimised in order to justify their membership fees. Then you have the eternal stand off between "organisational objectives" and the people who need to make it happen.

There is no single panacea solution.
414
18/03/2021 12:51:24 1 1
bbc
Yes I have been shocked at its dismal performance in our street.
427
18/03/2021 12:54:21 4 0
bbc
It was publicly owned. I'm still waiting for my money from the government after they sold BG, BT, Post office, Royal Mail... all part owned by me, and i've not been paid for my part ownership
447
18/03/2021 13:00:54 2 5
bbc
so all telcos are nationalised?, Sky, Virgin Media, Talk Talk, so we are back to the British Telecom days of the 1970's when you waited 6 months for a phone if you are lucky and the unions ran the show
457
18/03/2021 13:03:57 0 0
bbc
Wonder how much that would cost to re-privatise it, also need to take on all pension legacy payments to ex-wrokers and then also invest the minimum £12 billion to spread fibre throughout the UK. Willing to pay more tax for all of that?
30
18/03/2021 11:15:34 30 1
bbc
Dwight Payne

But they keep on increasing landline rental when the copper portion is drastically reduced - one big con!!!
+
Get FTTP and you dont need the landline.

We went from a 1MB ADSL copper line at the start of lockdown to 1GB FTTP in summer last year and its just stepping into the next century in comparison.
78
Pip
18/03/2021 11:26:09 25 0
bbc
Living in rural Devon, ours will be the century after next for comparison...........?
714
18/03/2021 15:47:11 1 0
bbc
One thing to remember if the "Land Line" is anything like Virgin Media, your phone will be connected to the router and go through VoIP - this means that if your broadband goes down (or there is a power cut) then you have no working land line (not a problem with the current copper wire phone lines - one reason keep one wired phone on a copper phone line).
15
18/03/2021 11:12:32 16 7
bbc
The ducts and poles along which the majority of copper or fibre connections are routed were built by the GPO - then a branch of government - at great public expense in the 20th century.
They are a public asset, like the regular streets and roads of the country. They should not be monopolised by Openreach.
Competition would be great - so open up the ducts and poles for competitors to lay cables.
31
18/03/2021 11:15:42 14 2
bbc
Let every Tom, Dick or Harry into the ducts and see what happens.
61
18/03/2021 11:22:01 3 0
bbc
That's not what I'm suggesting. You have to manage access to the ducts and poles, of course, it's not rocket science is it?
72
xlr
18/03/2021 11:24:37 1 0
bbc
Just tightly regulate it.
6
18/03/2021 11:10:03 7 5
bbc
An utter disgrace, de facto monopoly BT gets to put the screw on customers to fund it's FTTP plans to maintain it's status. Make them borrow it on the open market just like it's FTTP competitors have to.
32
18/03/2021 11:16:03 0 0
bbc
No the competitors do not have the cap, and you pay for it immediately.
33
18/03/2021 11:12:12 284 31
bbc
I would like to have an internet that is of good quality, fast and reliable.

I'm a bit confused why £100 Billion is being spent on a toy train for the very wealthy when the majority want and need good internet access.

Combine internet infrastructure with the ability to index & host UK companies selling UK products and I'm sure it would pay for itself very quickly.
166
18/03/2021 11:44:08 185 18
bbc
Improve broadband infrastructure and the need for HS2 diminishes - as more and more people will be able to work effectively from home, reducing the need to shave a few minutes off commuting times for £100B.

Interesting that HS2 is paid for by Government (i.e. us) and the fibre-roll out will be able to be profited from by the company that was gifted our telephone infrastructure on privatisation.
193
18/03/2021 11:48:14 2 8
bbc
I don't think there's ever been a more idiotic suggestion than this. Force people who have websites to pay for everyone else to have fast internet?! What planet are you living on?

Completely agree about HS2 though
274
18/03/2021 12:12:54 3 9
bbc
Muppet is a good user name. Rich people fly or use chauffeur driven cars. Ordinary people travel by train. What's wrong with HS2 is the route. It's London centric thinking again. It should bypass London and join HS1 to allow direct travel and reduce further the need for London.
287
18/03/2021 12:15:09 17 0
bbc
HS2 "Could" save Nottingham commuters "Up to 30mins" but... they are moving the station to Toton 8 miles away and it takes 1:20mins on the new tram or 35 mins in a car (plus parking time). Brilliant!
538
18/03/2021 13:37:10 6 1
bbc
Because our country is run by a bunch of dillusional crackheads we elected....
9
18/03/2021 11:10:50 5 9
bbc
By the time FTTP is installed across the country, 5G will make is redundant.

It's like when the canals were built;

Just as the completed building a canal network, the railways came along and that made the canals obsolete.
34
Bob
18/03/2021 11:16:36 7 0
bbc
You can't even get strong 4G in great parts of the country, what makes you think that 5G is going to fare better when it requires many more nodes?
58
18/03/2021 11:20:10 1 0
bbc
Plus a fiber network will be a lot more stable and less susceptible to environmental factors.
35
18/03/2021 11:16:42 69 12
bbc
So thanks for nothing. I live in a village, and if It want more than a few megs through the long copper wire that leads to the box, I will have to pay through the nose for it.
157
18/03/2021 11:42:37 29 115
bbc
Move to a town?
176
18/03/2021 11:46:44 10 19
bbc
Always struggled to get the logic of people that live out of build up areas but want similar infrastructure. You don't hear people in build up areas complaining there's no money to knock down houses and surround their houses with fields.
214
18/03/2021 11:58:47 2 11
bbc
It's all about you.
257
18/03/2021 12:08:52 12 0
bbc
I live in a village, 7 villages are getting FTTP installed. I go live tomorrow. You might find there are other companies doing biz. BT isn't involved in our rollout.
413
18/03/2021 12:50:44 2 0
bbc
Also no mention by bbc of starlink and one Web broadband satellites rolling out in very near future.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/OneWeb_satellite_constellation

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starlink
493
Km
18/03/2021 13:15:57 1 0
bbc
Have search for mobile broadband it may get you a better speed. There will be a cost, maybe an aerial on your dwelling etc. but you never know it may be worth it.
593
18/03/2021 14:07:28 3 0
bbc
We're the Peak District National Park. Very rural, 65 scattered houses, hilly. BT old copper wires c. 2 meg. 3 years ago BT quoted us £500,000/£9k each for fibre. We chose a local firm to get wireless superfast broadband. £400 each installation, and now £30 per month for 50mbps. Great customer service, reliable broadband. We've all ditched our BT internet and landlines. Good riddance!
634
18/03/2021 14:39:54 2 1
bbc
Get with the other villagers and dig your own channel to the nearest fibre connection. Don't wait for BT, empower yourselves... it's like running an extension lead (only safer).
36
18/03/2021 11:16:56 131 45
bbc
45 years behind most of Europe. 50 Years behind developed Asia. This isn't fantastic world beating news - it's a National embarrassment!
64
18/03/2021 11:22:31 63 29
bbc
You have a point. I remember now in the mid 80's people in the rest of the world going on the net and surfing at warp speeds. Oh no wait a minute that was in a parallel universe. For goodness sake, keep it real
82
Ray
18/03/2021 11:27:07 10 1
bbc
In context - like the London underground we were first to launch telephony in Europe and like the underground it now looks dated compared to Europeans. So with these legacy circuits commissioned & as capacity and quality increase is needed we were in the 1970s the first country to embrace digital (system X) but it was a voice system. We are not behind we just have more massive demands to meet.
104
18/03/2021 11:32:56 14 0
bbc
Well, some bits of Europe anyway. The maximum 'ADSL' speed that I can get at my property in France is 100k. Hardly broadband.
172
18/03/2021 11:45:33 12 0
bbc
Eh? What did people use network connectivity for 45-50 years ago? The world wide web was first proposed 31 years and 5 days (give or take) ago by a certain individual at the CERN.

Hope you are not talking about permanent data connections, and university loops? Which were globally driven by Unisource and KPNQwest...
426
18/03/2021 12:53:57 7 0
bbc
Yes online ranked UK 47th in broadband speed.
No mention cost per megabyte second either.
If other countries took sensible decisions and rolled out fibre but UK rolled out copper, then ripped out copper and all equipment, then installed fibre and new equipment.. Which route do you think cost less?
490
18/03/2021 13:15:22 5 2
bbc
LOL most of Europe???!!! Don't know where you grabbed that bit of gold from, but I can tell you that France, Germany, Spain and Italy all have the same bandwidths available as here in the UK. Granted, the pricing here is a joke compared to EU but sorry, your comment is actually just plain ignorant.
536
18/03/2021 13:36:58 1 1
bbc
The problem is that BT developed and so were an early adopter of ADSL and Broadband over copper, whilst much of the former soviet union started upgrading their creaking networks once FTTC had become the norm, so their networks are miles ahead of ours and BT are reluctant to scrap work that they did in the last 15 to 20 years
660
18/03/2021 14:54:21 0 0
bbc
Well they did have a plan to roll out fibre across the country before Thatcher sold them off. So I guess you can thank the Tory's for us being behind most of Europe and developed Asia.
866
18/03/2021 21:55:09 2 1
bbc
Dial up access & US Robotics 56k modems were about as good as it got until 2000 when first ADSL introduced. And 1990 for dial up internet to arrive...

The current telecomms infrastructure in UK is generally very good.
37
18/03/2021 11:17:09 4 3
bbc
BT had the underground and overhead infrastructure in place before fibre and people should remember that that was paid for by public money from the then Post Office Telecommunications. Come fibre and put privatisation to BT it’s hands were tied by the regulators in the name of competition.
This is good news as that network can be fully utilised.
79
MT
18/03/2021 11:26:19 2 0
bbc
That is not a reason to subsidise or grant BT special privilege. Cable & Wireless had to put in fibre throughout the network, which was then Nynex, then Virginmedia. They received nothing, and when then other companies like BT try to come into the 21st century Government allows them special privileges. Its quite wrong. It allows BT to raise its costs and of course the others can then up theirs.
38
18/03/2021 11:17:09 11 4
bbc
Not long from now we'll all have an option of going Starlink. They will go live in my area this summer with 80-150 Mbps and double that after the beta. 10 years from now we'll all be laughing over a pint... 'Remember how we used to dig up the pavement to run an Internet connection?'.
405
18/03/2021 12:22:19 3 0
bbc
what impact does the satellite latency have on video conferences/gaming? assume it isn't as good as fibre
19
18/03/2021 11:14:14 130 24
bbc
Openreach couldn't hit a barn door with a banjo if they were standing inside the barn.

The only 'fury' that will emanate from anything they touch will be that of their poor mug customers as their line gets cut of for weeks and months at a time without explanation.

I was with BT for years and they were without doubt the worst company I have ever dealt with. Utterly and totally incompetent.
39
18/03/2021 11:17:15 115 25
bbc
Agree. Will the Openreach employees I see sitting in vans all day reading newspapers be taking part in this superhuman effort?
219
18/03/2021 11:59:53 29 8
bbc
How is it that you have time to watch these people "all day"?

Do you, like so many, believe that people are not entitled to refreshment/meal breaks (except you yourself, of course)?

Or are you exaggerating as per HYS standards?
227
18/03/2021 12:01:42 9 2
bbc
With the engines running
266
18/03/2021 12:10:13 11 4
bbc
At least when they're sitting in the van reading a paper they aren't screwing up some poor so-and-so's connection. I lost my internet for 18 days when one of them screwed up. And they couldn't "locate the problem" until I pointed out where their employee had been working just prior to my losing the service. Couldn't organise the proverbial booze-up in the brewery.
497
18/03/2021 13:16:14 6 0
bbc
So you sit & watch them all day do you? I think you might be exaggerating just a tad. We work like navvies I assure you. I do on average between 30 & 40 hours of overtime a month.
819
18/03/2021 20:06:06 2 0
bbc
Hi, as an Openreach engineer who has worked throughout the pandemic to provide faster broadband to people when they need it most, I am disheartened to see comments like this. The vast majority of my fellow engineers are hard working and care about providing the best service they can. Take care and be kind.
19
18/03/2021 11:14:14 130 24
bbc
Openreach couldn't hit a barn door with a banjo if they were standing inside the barn.

The only 'fury' that will emanate from anything they touch will be that of their poor mug customers as their line gets cut of for weeks and months at a time without explanation.

I was with BT for years and they were without doubt the worst company I have ever dealt with. Utterly and totally incompetent.
40
18/03/2021 11:17:15 13 0
bbc
"Utterly and totally incompetent."

Yep, affirmative. And I work in the industry.
244
18/03/2021 12:06:18 7 0
bbc
It's not even the guys on the front line that are to blame either. It's the whole structure of the company - and their 'help' line! A 45 minute wait to speak to someone so disinterested in your plight and so eager to transfer you through for another half hour wait for another disinterested agent.

I spend 17 HOURS one weekend waiting for someone to help as my service had been cut off for a month.
29
18/03/2021 11:15:33 517 83
bbc
Openreach should never be part of BT. It's a complete racket.

Ideally it should be nationalised to provide level playing field for all telcos.
41
18/03/2021 11:17:18 146 40
bbc
Absolutely correct.
11
18/03/2021 11:11:23 21 20
bbc
Who are part of BT ??.
42
RPH
18/03/2021 11:17:29 13 0
bbc
No I don;t think they are. They are owned by CK Hutchinson Holdings and have their own network infrastructure..
27
18/03/2021 11:15:16 73 12
bbc
And there we all were thinking that BT openreach was in receipt of funding assured by previous chancellors in a decade of budgets to roll out 'world leading' connectivity across the Uk for every community. It turns out BT profit mongers were taking the money , then not really doing this at all, but simply looking at the bottom line. Leading nation? no more effective than my left little toe
43
18/03/2021 11:17:43 14 24
bbc
Really, I do not think BT got the money, that is what all the negotiations have been about.
239
RR
18/03/2021 12:05:04 3 0
bbc
"BT upped its profit guidance by £100million for the full-year, to between £7.3billion and £7.5billion.

And Jansen said he expects profits to return to pre-Covid levels of around £7.9billion in the financial year 2022/23."

"Openreach, which maintains every part of the UK's phone and broadband network, is BT's most profitable division".

Yeah, they're really short of cash.
3
18/03/2021 11:07:12 269 18
bbc
"That could mean more expensive internet connections for the public than might have been the case."

More like that WILL mean more expensive internet connections.
44
Bob
18/03/2021 11:17:53 242 120
bbc
'I want the better product, I want the faster speeds, I want the more reliable technology, but I don't want to pay for it' - Joe Public.
90
18/03/2021 11:28:24 58 8
bbc
Joe public is happy to pay for it, he just doesn't want to pay through the nose for it.
112
18/03/2021 11:34:13 12 7
bbc
Thats tax payers money they just agreed not to cap....
but then again, - you never read the article .
126
18/03/2021 11:37:28 27 19
bbc
People like Bob are the perfect example of the problems of a capitalist society.
Companies charge you for 500mb, but you receive about 300mb if you have copper to your house. Why should we pay more to receive what we should already be getting??
Typical boomer mentality...
144
18/03/2021 11:40:45 23 4
bbc
Joe Public has already paid for it.

Openreach have received millions in public grants already.

They will install fibre up to a town or village and then tell the locals to apply for grants to have it installed further. They did something similar with ADSL.

Not being a BT fan, I was happy to support my local Broadband wireless company and now have fast speeds via a microwave link.
159
18/03/2021 11:43:03 6 16
bbc
In a nutshell!
168
18/03/2021 11:44:52 22 2
bbc
Not so - I just don't want to be ripped off by a company with a monopoly!
181
18/03/2021 11:42:22 5 5
bbc
You silly person. You already have it. Virgin Media's under the pavement fibre optic to your house lines put down by Telewest years ago

Richard

Richard

to your ouse laid down bt Telewest
317
18/03/2021 12:23:30 3 1
bbc
Don't mind paying, want to be have a choice over who I pay to prevent monopoly pricing. Just common sense Bob.
330
18/03/2021 12:26:59 4 2
bbc
'I want the better product, I want the faster speeds, I want the more reliable technology. I want what was promised in 2012, 2020 and whichever promise they reneged on in past fanfares.
I just want internet that allows me to work at home in a sensible way. No, not 900mbps+ just a sensible speed. My bills have gone down so I'm not in the pay less camp. I don't mind paying for a useful tool!
380
18/03/2021 12:39:06 3 0
bbc
A small, local fibre company in a nearby city is currently offering full fibre internet at around 20x the speed I currently get for less than the BT FTTC service I use - for less money, and significantly less than the Virgin offering (which would be 4x my current speed).

This seems to show it is economically possible to provide and not excessively profiteer.
389
18/03/2021 12:43:39 3 1
bbc
Well as usual from bbc the report is UK centric. How does EU, Japan, S Korea etc compare?
Quick Google puts UK 47th in world speed rankings.
How does UK compare on costs worldwide?
Given covid push to homeworking, online shopping, digital streaming set to continue post covid where is plan & dates for broadband improvements in UK?
Obvious questions.. Unasked by bbc.
'I want the better product, I want the faster speeds, I want the more reliable technology, and the best way to do this is to share the burden of upgrade costs fairly across society via taxation so everyone can access and enjoy the benfits - Joe Public.

There - I fixed that for you.
402
GW
18/03/2021 12:47:14 0 0
bbc
Are u a BT shareholder
423
18/03/2021 12:53:36 0 0
bbc
It is the fees for services that yo do not want, but have to pay for that annoys most people I know.
437
18/03/2021 12:57:26 1 0
bbc
I don't. I just want a system that works.
524
18/03/2021 13:31:01 0 0
bbc
Sounds just like corporate Britain, let the public pay for it so the fat cats get richer
602
18/03/2021 14:17:39 0 0
bbc
I'm paying £48 for vodaphone/cityfibre, i'm happy to pay...
614
18/03/2021 14:25:02 1 0
bbc
No. I want a fair priced product that has been available in some countries for some 20-years. We are so far behind with our over-priced under-delivered infrastructure it is criminal. Imagine, BT persuaded government to go with ADSL for their own selfish interest to get 20-years of mandatory over-priced landline charges from every household wanting internet!
626
18/03/2021 14:33:57 0 0
bbc
'I want the better product, I want the faster speeds, I want the more reliable technology, but I don't want huge profits going to the pockets of the privileged few who bought shares on the cheap in a company built with public money' - Joe Public.
693
18/03/2021 15:27:00 0 0
bbc
How about “I wan’t proper, fair and open competition” - Joe Public
719
18/03/2021 15:53:03 2 0
bbc
My current Virgin connection - at 200Mb - costs nearly a third less than BT's 'superfast' 60Mb connection.

It's a racket, plain and simple
760
18/03/2021 16:31:15 1 0
bbc
You missed a very important point there. 'I am happy with what I have and don't need the better product, faster speeds, but I will now be forced to pay for it as the existing option will be removed'.

And before anyone says I should use a mobile service, I live in a small village and don't currently get mobile reception so they will have a total monopoly for me.
779
18/03/2021 18:32:08 0 0
bbc
If you choose to upgrade to a faster and more reliable connection, then obviously you pay more. But there are people who don't need to upgrade, but their prices are likely to go up too, as a result of this. That's what they're complaining about. To begin with there will be 2 sets of cables, so why should those sticking with the old ones pay more?
849
18/03/2021 21:31:20 0 0
bbc
Well said!
45
18/03/2021 11:18:11 110 15
bbc
How many times is this that BT has been paid by Gov to install fibre?
94
18/03/2021 11:29:56 55 15
bbc
As often as their donations are still needed to party coffers and to prop up their share price - that’s all it’s about - cannot accept thatchers dream was a nightmare so we keep pouring cash into it.
128
18/03/2021 11:29:13 6 1
bbc
Too many
208
18/03/2021 11:55:50 1 0
bbc
In the context of this announcement, where do you believe the Gov is paying BT? The investment is coming from BT now that there is some certainty that rental prices won't be capped. There is a lot of additional Gov funds to capture the non commercially economic areas (which include Wireless) but these have not been tendered yet.
553
18/03/2021 13:42:52 1 1
bbc
None. The government gave money to councils to engage telcos to do specific work. It didn’t all go to BT.

BDUK is the only government programme I can remember that has delivered more than promised, for less than the budget, ahead of schedule.
722
18/03/2021 15:54:40 2 1
bbc
Gov offered the money. 9 companies put there hands up. 8 dropped out when they found out they had to do some investments as well...guess who didn't pull out?? BT
10
18/03/2021 11:11:02 12 5
bbc
But it's all still based on infrastructure built by British Telecom, paid for by the taxpayer way back when. I don't know where the government thinks these "competitors" are going to come from? A new telecom company isn't suddenly going to launch and start building all their own exchanges are they?
I just don't see the fantasy in privatising critical national infrastructure...
46
18/03/2021 11:18:18 0 0
bbc
My local area is having full fibre FTTP installed. It's not BT/Openreach. So someone is doing something.
47
18/03/2021 11:18:19 189 40
bbc
Working in the industry I have to work with BT a lot. It's like working with a company from the 1970's. They're still a monolithic monopoly as the majority of the infrastructure is still theirs. If there's a hold up, it's always at BTs end.
They should be broken up completely. The Govt has bottled this decision.
55
18/03/2021 11:19:47 147 28
bbc
Private sector monopoly paying big bucks to shareholders and directors-should be nationalised service
588
18/03/2021 14:02:54 4 1
bbc
Been dealing with them for years and will very soon be glad to be completely rid of them, from accounts to physical infrastructure. Happy days.
623
18/03/2021 14:32:23 2 6
bbc
Nationalisation never works! No way should we go back to that failed, union controlled mess where nothing worked half of the time and there were so many non-jobs. We have the 4th cheapest broadband in Western Europe out of 29 and reliability is excellent in comparison as well. Some people just like to moan.
636
18/03/2021 14:41:02 2 0
bbc
Yep, agreed and the copper/aluminium network cables (local loop) are from the '60's here. I would like more local cabinets (FTTC) so shorter connections to houses or even FTTP to everyone. I am rural so I am not expecting any change out of this. When the Terrestrial tv aerials don't work anymore we are going to have just sub-SD tv quality theough poor wiring. :-(
646
18/03/2021 14:44:13 1 0
bbc
I'd love to know what part of the business you work in? Totally different from my experience. Always poor communication channels throughout Openreach.
673
18/03/2021 15:11:16 0 1
bbc
They are a company from the 70s. You don't need to work with them, just try getting them to do something as a paying customer.
778
18/03/2021 18:19:37 0 0
bbc
It’s not a decision made by the govt. Ofcom are a completely independent organisation, who are regularly critical of govts (of all colours).
807
18/03/2021 19:35:17 1 0
bbc
I agree with your first paragraph, but technically they are excellent.
10
18/03/2021 11:11:02 12 5
bbc
But it's all still based on infrastructure built by British Telecom, paid for by the taxpayer way back when. I don't know where the government thinks these "competitors" are going to come from? A new telecom company isn't suddenly going to launch and start building all their own exchanges are they?
I just don't see the fantasy in privatising critical national infrastructure...
48
18/03/2021 11:18:20 4 0
bbc
Don't take this as a shameless plug.
But with upcoming starlink satellites promising 150mbps low latency broadband it potentially removes the needs for physical infrastructure to homes. This 150Mbps could be had by someone way out in the sticks.

Open reach are the only supplier obligated to try and reach every home. The likes of virgin only set up where its profitable
18
18/03/2021 11:13:49 2 3
bbc
BT has had to operate with it's "hands tied" since it was created with the privatisation of Post Office Telephones.
Many were encouraged to buy shares in a company that has had to "hive off" much of its business to others, with a massive drop in it share value, this IMHO was illegal, so I welcome this news and look forward to the future.
49
18/03/2021 11:18:53 1 0
bbc
I worked in telecoms industry for 30 years so tell me how this was illegal, because 1) it wasn’t and 2) it was required to get things moving in the industry.
50
18/03/2021 11:18:59 45 9
bbc
Let’s hope BT Open Reach get their contractors in order over their approach to digging holes everywhere and knackering up the pavements, parking their vans all over the place. hazards for disabled people the blind and parents with buggies and push chairs. When they were in our street recently the supervisor was smoking joints everyday and then driving off site.
116
18/03/2021 11:26:13 15 9
bbc
Good for him nice to see someone happy in their work, as to the vehicles at least they are not parked on the pavement ALL the time like every car owning idiot in my street
120
18/03/2021 11:35:58 2 1
bbc
And what was the police response when you reported the illegal activities?
921
Bob
19/03/2021 09:50:29 0 0
bbc
Well installing fibre does involve lots of digging holes . How do you expect them to do it without digging up pavements ?
18
18/03/2021 11:13:49 2 3
bbc
BT has had to operate with it's "hands tied" since it was created with the privatisation of Post Office Telephones.
Many were encouraged to buy shares in a company that has had to "hive off" much of its business to others, with a massive drop in it share value, this IMHO was illegal, so I welcome this news and look forward to the future.
51
18/03/2021 11:19:02 1 0
bbc
Oh, if you managed your share portfolio properly you would have made a packet out of BT shares by now.

Ones I still hold costed me effectively nothing.
1
18/03/2021 11:04:40 50 8
bbc
BT monopolised our street until a few years ago with something the Broadband choices image above does not show - aluminium line.
Suffice it it say our ADSL speeds were not much better than dial up, but that did not stop rip-off BT charging us the same line rental rate as everyone else.
When 4G internet came out it was our greatest pleasue to give BT the giant middle finger and sign up with Three.
52
18/03/2021 11:19:12 11 1
bbc
Interestingly, we also have Aluminium to the house as they were built when it was all the rage. Initially this limited us to 1MBit ADSL. A year or so ago BT/Openreach installed a new cabinet at the end of the road and now we have FTTC with a speed of 38/8 Mb/s, even though there is 300m of Aluminium. Fitting that cabinet was slightly surprising as it serves only 30 houses; well done to BT.
122
18/03/2021 11:36:17 9 2
bbc
If you rented something for decades you would expect it to be updated every now and then.
Paying top rates of rent for aluminium for 30+ years is taking the piss.
53
18/03/2021 11:19:27 7 12
bbc
Anyone remember in the 80's when computer companies boasted about providing a display with so many million colours but the human eye can only recognise a fraction of this? Seems to me this endless pursuit of speed is on the same level. I have virgin and they upped my speed for free. My page may now load a nanosecond faster but there is no appreciable benefit.
70
MT
18/03/2021 11:23:58 2 1
bbc
Of course there is a benefit...Virginmedia then lock you in to a contract after offering you a half price introductory deal where then at the end of your contract, they double it, even if someone else wants to take a new contract with Virginmedia from the same address, where then VIrginmedia suggest its outside the terms of the contract, which it isn't, as there's nothing in there to prevent it.
109
18/03/2021 11:33:32 0 0
bbc
May be no benefit if you already have fast broadband speeds, but what about folks like me who really only want a fast enough connection to be able to stream something to watch without waiting for the middle of the night when the rest of the village is asleep?
114
18/03/2021 11:24:54 0 0
bbc
Its for downloads and streaming, not really web browsing
115
18/03/2021 11:25:59 1 0
bbc
Upload speeds are now more important than the 1980's. You may still be using your internet to check emails, but there are hundreds of thousands of people using it to make a living, particularly in the gaming industry, that rely on significantly faster speeds.
29
18/03/2021 11:15:33 517 83
bbc
Openreach should never be part of BT. It's a complete racket.

Ideally it should be nationalised to provide level playing field for all telcos.
54
18/03/2021 11:19:30 22 51
bbc
It's not. please keep up.
108
18/03/2021 11:33:23 50 6
bbc
"Openreach is a functional division of telecommunications company BT plc, that maintains the telephone cables, ducts, cabinets and exchanges that connect nearly all homes and businesses in the United Kingdom to the national broadband and telephone network."

It really is.
378
Ray
18/03/2021 12:38:27 1 9
bbc
to That_Ian

Openreach should never be part of BT.

N00bT00b replied:
It's not. please keep up.
Reply
like = 10 dislike = 22

Thats his comment which is a fact, Openreach is NOT owned by BT yet 22 commies dislike the truth ? This thread is a communist conspiracy !!!
47
18/03/2021 11:18:19 189 40
bbc
Working in the industry I have to work with BT a lot. It's like working with a company from the 1970's. They're still a monolithic monopoly as the majority of the infrastructure is still theirs. If there's a hold up, it's always at BTs end.
They should be broken up completely. The Govt has bottled this decision.
55
18/03/2021 11:19:47 147 28
bbc
Private sector monopoly paying big bucks to shareholders and directors-should be nationalised service
103
18/03/2021 11:32:05 6 9
bbc
You obviously aren't a BT shareholder are you?

Do yourself a favour, go to any share website, put in the symbol BT.A, pull up a 20 year chart and let me know how shareholders have got on.
178
18/03/2021 11:46:47 14 4
bbc
Shareholders are not getting any dividends at the moment.

But you are right it should be nationalized. Public networks are not an area where privatization works.
192
18/03/2021 11:46:28 7 25
bbc
Nationalising is work causes all the problems in the first place, only people lacking iq and basic knowledge of history and economics argue for socialism and left flag waving take downs of private property. Total fool, your embarrassing yourself
296
18/03/2021 12:17:41 4 0
bbc
Aegreed. I am ex- BT, but left when they privatised.
625
18/03/2021 14:33:34 2 0
bbc
If you have a private pension you probably own some of BT and benefit from them when they do pay dividends.
686
Ade
18/03/2021 15:22:34 1 1
bbc
Nice one Einstein, "big bucks" - Clearly not that well informed.
852
18/03/2021 21:32:28 0 0
bbc
Dream on statement with no facts.
17
18/03/2021 11:13:42 7 1
bbc
Telewest didn't go bust, it merged with NTL and became Virgin Media.
56
18/03/2021 11:19:53 1 0
bbc
I think BlueYonder were in that mix too weren't they?
15
18/03/2021 11:12:32 16 7
bbc
The ducts and poles along which the majority of copper or fibre connections are routed were built by the GPO - then a branch of government - at great public expense in the 20th century.
They are a public asset, like the regular streets and roads of the country. They should not be monopolised by Openreach.
Competition would be great - so open up the ducts and poles for competitors to lay cables.
57
18/03/2021 11:20:02 2 0
bbc
Nice idea, but the ducts are full in most cases as there are no longer 1 telephone line per 5 houses and no shared lines and many people have more than one line into the house!
74
18/03/2021 11:24:47 1 0
bbc
I promise you, most ducts aren't full.
The poles in more rural areas - where the need is more acute - certainly aren't full.
111
18/03/2021 11:33:53 2 0
bbc
Not strictly true. The use of fibre cable and multiplexing equipment can massively increase the duct capacity. It does, of course, require a programme of removal of redundant copper cable and the issue is that this is a “no benefit” (i.e. costly) activity for which there will be little appetite.
34
Bob
18/03/2021 11:16:36 7 0
bbc
You can't even get strong 4G in great parts of the country, what makes you think that 5G is going to fare better when it requires many more nodes?
58
18/03/2021 11:20:10 1 0
bbc
Plus a fiber network will be a lot more stable and less susceptible to environmental factors.
59
18/03/2021 11:20:48 17 7
bbc
Just got my FTTP on Monday. 900Mb d/l - woohoo! Finally caught up with South Korea - 25 years late. SK upgrading to 10GB so we are already behind :-/
17
18/03/2021 11:13:42 7 1
bbc
Telewest didn't go bust, it merged with NTL and became Virgin Media.
60
18/03/2021 11:21:09 0 1
bbc
The merger was forced as I believe it ran out of funds.
118
18/03/2021 11:35:32 1 0
bbc
No it wasnt, I left Telewest just before the merger. Virgin wanted to buy them both, so they never actually merged, they were just taken over by the same parent company at the same time.
And besides, Cable & Wireless (which was split into TWest and NTL) was part funded with taxpayer money.
31
18/03/2021 11:15:42 14 2
bbc
Let every Tom, Dick or Harry into the ducts and see what happens.
61
18/03/2021 11:22:01 3 0
bbc
That's not what I'm suggesting. You have to manage access to the ducts and poles, of course, it's not rocket science is it?
886
19/03/2021 00:49:02 0 0
bbc
So you've managed a nationwide duct & pole network then, do tell, which country.
62
MT
18/03/2021 11:22:05 25 8
bbc
Why is BT given such a special privilege when others are pushing faster internet without any grant or subsidy?
95
18/03/2021 11:30:01 10 0
bbc
Is there a grant or subsidy here?
99
18/03/2021 11:30:32 3 2
bbc
Probably regulator and BT in cahoots. UK regulators have never worked in interest of customers in any field
513
18/03/2021 13:22:38 2 1
bbc
Because they’re not.
584
18/03/2021 14:00:27 7 1
bbc
Give the others the same universal obligation as that imposed on BT (and the Post office for mail delivery) or let BT cherry pick the really most lucrative areas in the same way as VM et al have being doing for decades
612
18/03/2021 14:22:56 3 1
bbc
are they? on what planet is that. They only cherry pick the big cities whereas BT has to provide it everywhere
637
18/03/2021 14:41:08 2 1
bbc
BT is not being given any privileges. Any of the SP’s could have bid for the opportunity to roll-out Rural Fibre but none wanted to because they don’t want to risk the investment that BT is. As for others “pushing faster internet” they only do this selectively or on new build sites where deployment is relatively cheap and guess what, they then hold a monopoly and charge Customers accordingly!!
884
19/03/2021 00:15:31 0 0
bbc
Have you asked one of these "others" to provide you with faster internet access, if yes and they have what have you to complain about, if they said no to you, that answers your original question.

VM aside (and even their network is very limited outside highly urban areas), none of the "others" have done anything more than roll out to a few cherry picked trial sized areas.
22
18/03/2021 11:14:50 2 1
bbc
its
63
18/03/2021 11:22:10 0 1
bbc
Wow ^^
36
18/03/2021 11:16:56 131 45
bbc
45 years behind most of Europe. 50 Years behind developed Asia. This isn't fantastic world beating news - it's a National embarrassment!
64
18/03/2021 11:22:31 63 29
bbc
You have a point. I remember now in the mid 80's people in the rest of the world going on the net and surfing at warp speeds. Oh no wait a minute that was in a parallel universe. For goodness sake, keep it real
121
18/03/2021 11:36:11 3 3
bbc
welcome to 2020...

you missed 40 years.
3
18/03/2021 11:07:12 269 18
bbc
"That could mean more expensive internet connections for the public than might have been the case."

More like that WILL mean more expensive internet connections.
65
xlr
18/03/2021 11:22:37 16 9
bbc
I'll be sticking to copper. I don't need the extra bandwidth - it's not like I've got time to watch Netflix anyway.
768
18/03/2021 17:11:14 1 0
bbc
I suspect that investment in copper networks will decline and you will be forced on to fibre through lack of alternatives.
781
18/03/2021 18:47:55 0 0
bbc
I think that the worry, is that your prices won't be capped either. Whether that will mean an increase in cost or not, we don't know yet. We just need to wait to find out what happens.
14
18/03/2021 11:12:12 11 3
bbc
But they keep on increasing landline rental when the copper portion is drastically reduced - one big con!!!
66
18/03/2021 11:22:43 0 0
bbc
Yep, the Openreach LLU line rental is dirt cheap now. Well below £1 per month.

All the sur-charges are just fat for BT - to pay for football rights.

Openreach should never be part of BT.
67
18/03/2021 11:23:01 9 1
bbc
The service that provides the internet should be liable for maintaining the infrastructure. As it stands the ISP and Openreach just blame each other when something goes wrong.
16
jon
18/03/2021 11:13:30 4 3
bbc
Faster broadband makes it easier to move the BBC TV lisence to streaming.
68
18/03/2021 11:23:10 4 1
bbc
Yes and pay thousands a year to sky Netflix etc. And look on Netflix you get a few crappy American shows when the bbc support children’s learning local radio David Attenborough etc etc. Be careful what you wish for
204
18/03/2021 11:54:39 0 0
bbc
"David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet | Netflix Official Site"

All those crappy American shows. Can't stand those 'yanks' in Only Fools and Horses either, or that daft American Vicar in that American suburb of Dibley.

Let's not mention the rubbish over-Americanised sci-fi rom-com 'Red Dwarf' either, or even worse those typical American Doctors in Dr. Who.
21
18/03/2021 11:14:43 23 0
bbc
Think you are getting confused with EE.
69
18/03/2021 11:23:13 8 3
bbc
True. My mistake. Stupid names anyway.
53
18/03/2021 11:19:27 7 12
bbc
Anyone remember in the 80's when computer companies boasted about providing a display with so many million colours but the human eye can only recognise a fraction of this? Seems to me this endless pursuit of speed is on the same level. I have virgin and they upped my speed for free. My page may now load a nanosecond faster but there is no appreciable benefit.
70
MT
18/03/2021 11:23:58 2 1
bbc
Of course there is a benefit...Virginmedia then lock you in to a contract after offering you a half price introductory deal where then at the end of your contract, they double it, even if someone else wants to take a new contract with Virginmedia from the same address, where then VIrginmedia suggest its outside the terms of the contract, which it isn't, as there's nothing in there to prevent it.
71
18/03/2021 11:24:16 46 4
bbc
Hmm, not sure the regulator knows how the economics of this work

OpenReach say they will build fast but why rush when there is more money to be made (and saved) by taking it slowly?

A slower roll-out of fast fibre holds customers to ransom (pushes up prices through scarcity) and reduces the cost of building a network (going slowly reduces annual costs).

Worked for housebuilders - why not here?
107
18/03/2021 11:33:22 34 1
bbc
There's absolute fast and BT fast, not necessarily the same
511
18/03/2021 13:21:33 1 0
bbc
Because if they don’t meet their minimum service levels set by OfCom they are fined hundreds of millions.
640
18/03/2021 14:42:02 0 0
bbc
Dave, Openreach will build fast because competitor networks are walking in. That's what has scared them into their "fibre first" current philosophy.

Former BT CEOs were determined to sweat copper assets, which is why they invested in the failure that g.fast became. We could have had a decade more of fibre rollouts if some of the BT dinosaurs had gone extinct several years earlier.
31
18/03/2021 11:15:42 14 2
bbc
Let every Tom, Dick or Harry into the ducts and see what happens.
72
xlr
18/03/2021 11:24:37 1 0
bbc
Just tightly regulate it.
15
18/03/2021 11:12:32 16 7
bbc
The ducts and poles along which the majority of copper or fibre connections are routed were built by the GPO - then a branch of government - at great public expense in the 20th century.
They are a public asset, like the regular streets and roads of the country. They should not be monopolised by Openreach.
Competition would be great - so open up the ducts and poles for competitors to lay cables.
73
18/03/2021 11:24:47 1 0
bbc
Already is virgin etc but it’s chaos
57
18/03/2021 11:20:02 2 0
bbc
Nice idea, but the ducts are full in most cases as there are no longer 1 telephone line per 5 houses and no shared lines and many people have more than one line into the house!
74
18/03/2021 11:24:47 1 0
bbc
I promise you, most ducts aren't full.
The poles in more rural areas - where the need is more acute - certainly aren't full.
75
18/03/2021 11:25:23 6 5
bbc
Look out across that vast trading area the Uk just left. Fibre connects most houses in NL already, with EU wide 4g moving to 5 G connectivity everywhere. Uk children are suffering the profit centred UK administration of piecemeal Broadband roll out. Some Scottish communities now got themselves connected wifi to fibre completely privately, without any subsidy. By passing BT wire, to reach fibre.
76
Dan
18/03/2021 11:14:15 22 1
bbc
mid- to late-2020s seems ... late? with 5G / Star Link and whatever else already here and coming in the next decade. At least someone's getting grossly overpaid I guess.
617
18/03/2021 14:28:20 5 0
bbc
5G will be fine for people who just want to browse the net, get lot's of people using it for Netflix etc and the network suffers.

Starlink is not designed for use in Cities but instead designed for people who live in the wilderness etc or small villages in the middle of no where to get internet access.

Neither services offer good latency either so will be useless where low latency is required.
8
18/03/2021 11:10:25 2 2
bbc
Too late where I live. City Fibre has beaten them to it.
77
18/03/2021 11:15:30 0 0
bbc
Veni Vidi Cecidi
30
18/03/2021 11:15:34 30 1
bbc
Dwight Payne

But they keep on increasing landline rental when the copper portion is drastically reduced - one big con!!!
+
Get FTTP and you dont need the landline.

We went from a 1MB ADSL copper line at the start of lockdown to 1GB FTTP in summer last year and its just stepping into the next century in comparison.
78
Pip
18/03/2021 11:26:09 25 0
bbc
Living in rural Devon, ours will be the century after next for comparison...........?
183
18/03/2021 11:48:12 0 5
bbc
Have you considered a move to Reading or London? Plenty of people willing to swap for a bigger house and green hills :)
431
18/03/2021 12:56:43 1 3
bbc
There is starlink and oneweb satellite systems coming on stream soon.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starlink
37
18/03/2021 11:17:09 4 3
bbc
BT had the underground and overhead infrastructure in place before fibre and people should remember that that was paid for by public money from the then Post Office Telecommunications. Come fibre and put privatisation to BT it’s hands were tied by the regulators in the name of competition.
This is good news as that network can be fully utilised.
79
MT
18/03/2021 11:26:19 2 0
bbc
That is not a reason to subsidise or grant BT special privilege. Cable & Wireless had to put in fibre throughout the network, which was then Nynex, then Virginmedia. They received nothing, and when then other companies like BT try to come into the 21st century Government allows them special privileges. Its quite wrong. It allows BT to raise its costs and of course the others can then up theirs.
80
18/03/2021 11:26:22 233 18
bbc
Ditch HS2, turbo-charge full fibre rollout with £20 billion more funding, and save £80 billion+ from ditching a white elephant project.
162
18/03/2021 11:43:27 15 106
bbc
Naive thibkibg. Hs2 passed by law
337
18/03/2021 12:28:10 17 3
bbc
Completely agree - it's a non brainer. HS2 = vanity project to make a few folks that bit richer!
474
18/03/2021 13:08:07 0 15
bbc
All this attitude will do is free up office space in London, and keep regional connectivity to London poor.

The result? Companies keep their offices in London, and everywhere else dies out.

The reason the home counties are prosperous is their connection to London. HS2 will spread wealth north.

And why not build all this stuff? Shouldn't be this or that.
484
Leo
18/03/2021 13:12:47 9 1
bbc
Doing this will also increase local spending in areas where that spending would otherwise be relocated to London. Going out to lunch at local venues, etc.

Rather than boost the economy in regions other than London, HS2 will diminish them. Increased housing prices brought about in areas served by HS2 means lower paid workers will have to relocate - that's not a benefit.
809
18/03/2021 19:36:22 0 0
bbc
What the reply facility needs is a smelling checker.
81
18/03/2021 11:26:29 53 10
bbc
They promised to install fibre 25 years ago, a private monopoly paid for by the tax payer, break it up not shove more money into it!
504
18/03/2021 13:19:06 18 4
bbc
No, nationalise it.
650
18/03/2021 14:46:31 3 0
bbc
Harry, you can blame Maggie for that one. She stopped the BT fibre rollout in the late 80s, early 90s because she wanted the US cable networks to invest in the UK. You can see from the current state how much of an idiotic decision that was.

It's not often you can show a politician has managed to set technology back by around 50 years but there you go. Thanks Maggie.
36
18/03/2021 11:16:56 131 45
bbc
45 years behind most of Europe. 50 Years behind developed Asia. This isn't fantastic world beating news - it's a National embarrassment!
82
Ray
18/03/2021 11:27:07 10 1
bbc
In context - like the London underground we were first to launch telephony in Europe and like the underground it now looks dated compared to Europeans. So with these legacy circuits commissioned & as capacity and quality increase is needed we were in the 1970s the first country to embrace digital (system X) but it was a voice system. We are not behind we just have more massive demands to meet.
520
18/03/2021 13:29:15 6 1
bbc
I suggest people have a read of this article: https://www.techradar.com/uk/news/world-of-tech/how-the-uk-lost-the-broadband-race-in-1990-1224784/2 It explains how Tatcher's decision to nationalise BT stopped it's Full Fibre rollout in the 80';s and we haven't recovered since. All our Expertise was sold of, stripped from the UK and taken abroad by companies now reaping the benefits at their home.
83
18/03/2021 11:27:20 8 0
bbc
Worked in telecoms industry and until the copper to your door is replaced there will always be restrictions.
28
18/03/2021 11:15:27 10 2
bbc
Load of spin because BT and others have just hiked all their prices during a pandemic
84
Pip
18/03/2021 11:27:23 1 0
bbc
Obviously insider knowledge............?
85
18/03/2021 11:27:30 61 14
bbc
Well of course you'll build like fury now you can charge what you like. Not so keen when you couldn't fleece people more than you do already. Same old broken Britain.
188
18/03/2021 11:49:59 37 9
bbc
Indeed - privatisation of profits and socialisation of costs is this Goverment's mantra - gotta keep the donors happy!
86
18/03/2021 11:18:08 4 4
bbc
Usual BT bashing and ignoring the fact that aside of Virgin the other providers have failed to build their own fibre networks. Meanwhile in Scotland the SNP announces today that its fibre roll out will be FOUR a years late - where the coverage of that BBC Glen Cambell?!
87
18/03/2021 11:28:16 9 1
bbc
What does BT have on the Tory govt? The fact that the ongoing failure of BT to deliver a front line infrastructure service in third decade of the 21st C despite the bizarre decision to being granted a monopoly seems to go endlessly unchallenged. Meanwhile digital UK Plc slips ever backwards.
857
18/03/2021 21:41:03 0 1
bbc
They all went the same sort of school in his case a private school in Surrey
88
18/03/2021 11:28:18 33 3
bbc
"My page may now load a nanosecond faster"
Faster Internet is not about 'pages', it's about technologies that depend on less latency (changes are visible sooner) and higher bandwidth (bigger changes). Gaming and telly drives a lot of this, but so does 'big science' (scientists working from home on large collaborative projects: big datasets, telesurgery etc).
327
18/03/2021 12:26:16 8 11
bbc
Is "gaming" a productive industry? (No). And telly already costs £3pw to another monopoly. The key point here is that BT (who own Openreach) can now undertake further profiteering (or is it racketeering?). Just observe the "fury" on this HYS - all against BT (and a weak Ofcom)
89
18/03/2021 11:28:18 4 3
bbc
If the Post Office Telephones had not been privatised and everything centralised, we would have all had our local offices and consequentially IMHO a far better service.
Local knowledge goes a long way and centralization destroyed that.
Telecoms infrastructure ,ducts/poles cables all have to be managed and much of it's difficult to share with other suppliers.
44
Bob
18/03/2021 11:17:53 242 120
bbc
'I want the better product, I want the faster speeds, I want the more reliable technology, but I don't want to pay for it' - Joe Public.
90
18/03/2021 11:28:24 58 8
bbc
Joe public is happy to pay for it, he just doesn't want to pay through the nose for it.
15
18/03/2021 11:12:32 16 7
bbc
The ducts and poles along which the majority of copper or fibre connections are routed were built by the GPO - then a branch of government - at great public expense in the 20th century.
They are a public asset, like the regular streets and roads of the country. They should not be monopolised by Openreach.
Competition would be great - so open up the ducts and poles for competitors to lay cables.
91
MT
18/03/2021 11:29:22 0 1
bbc
Too late for that as Cable & Wireless had to lay complete network of fibre, even when BT and others were trying to convince local authorities they had fast proper return path, when that was complete rubbish for years, as the only return path was via a phone line and where it would never have the bandwidth that could be provided by an integrated return path within fibre.
92
18/03/2021 11:29:32 6 4
bbc
So, to sum up the story, OFCOM has decided to allow the near-monopoly of BT Openreach to charge whatever they like for a decent internet connection. Corporate greed is placed first, customers are placed last. What else would we expect under the Tories?
110
18/03/2021 11:33:38 1 1
bbc
For any given cahllenge, the Tory approach seems to be:

"Let the market* decide, let the public underwrite | pay the bill, and let the private business keep the proceeds. Let us use any logical fallacy and disinformation | bluster to prevent scrutiny"

* "Market" means "monopoly or cartel"
892
19/03/2021 01:30:23 0 0
bbc
So tell me, are you willing to take a pay cut because your employer thinks your rate per hour is too high. Nobody will sell at a price below cost for anything other than a limited time and probably only then if they don't have upfront costs to recover.
93
18/03/2021 11:29:42 2 2
bbc
I have FTTC 50mbps and it's fine for gaming, streaming etc. I bet half the people with FTTP don't even know what to do with it beyond Facebook for five.
45
18/03/2021 11:18:11 110 15
bbc
How many times is this that BT has been paid by Gov to install fibre?
94
18/03/2021 11:29:56 55 15
bbc
As often as their donations are still needed to party coffers and to prop up their share price - that’s all it’s about - cannot accept thatchers dream was a nightmare so we keep pouring cash into it.
62
MT
18/03/2021 11:22:05 25 8
bbc
Why is BT given such a special privilege when others are pushing faster internet without any grant or subsidy?
95
18/03/2021 11:30:01 10 0
bbc
Is there a grant or subsidy here?
119
18/03/2021 11:35:46 5 0
bbc
The privilege is the certainty that they can increase their fees by any % they like, for ten whole years, and the near-certainty there is no effective market, competition, nor regulation.
931
19/03/2021 11:21:31 0 0
bbc
No what you have is worse. At least with a grant or subsidy you would know the amount of money given to BT. Now with a 10 year period of charging operators of the new network what they like it is a licence to print money for BT especially in areas of the UK with no cable alternative.
Do you think BT install this network in Hull to compete with the existing super faster option available there?
96
18/03/2021 11:22:02 1 0
bbc
I would just like them to provide any services my line is old copper cable that is constantly not working keep hearing for the last 7 years they can't work out how to get fibre to me as I am last on the line and the cabinet is to far to get it too me.
Complaints go nowhere as open reach are untouchable and my provider can do nothing to help
I live in Scotland openreach is a joke
97
18/03/2021 11:22:50 2 0
bbc
Open reach can only guarantee me 1mb speed it is a joke
136
18/03/2021 11:38:51 2 0
bbc
According to https://www.speedtest.net/global-index you have a third of the average speed in Turkmenistan and all the list 175 countries in the world have faster speeds than you.
98
18/03/2021 11:24:08 4 1
bbc
You could not make this up, what an absolute joke! The incompetence of Ofcom and the complete greed of BT is astonishing! I don't use BT, but we should all refuse to pay any ISP until the prices are in line with equivalent countries/speeds.
62
MT
18/03/2021 11:22:05 25 8
bbc
Why is BT given such a special privilege when others are pushing faster internet without any grant or subsidy?
99
18/03/2021 11:30:32 3 2
bbc
Probably regulator and BT in cahoots. UK regulators have never worked in interest of customers in any field
100
18/03/2021 11:30:57 2 1
bbc
It has taken far too long for BT to get here. They have made millions from poor service and then charged county councils to improve rural rollout. Leaving BT as a monopoly was a mistake and inhibited competition. OpenReach should have split out years ago, like the model for elec supply. OpenReach fast rollout prioritises urban areas where BT has to compete with cable/Virgin