'Pointy-elbow' parents emailing teachers to boost exam grades
11/03/2021 | news | education | 1,096
Head teachers warn of pushy parents lobbying for higher GCSE and A-level grades in cancelled exams.
1
Hex
11/03/2021 19:03:18 205 3
bbc
If your child isn't clever enough stamp your feet until they get the grade you want!
178
11/03/2021 19:58:23 126 14
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It worked last year
219
11/03/2021 20:07:09 16 5
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True, also parent to lazy to help their kids
382
FH
11/03/2021 20:48:41 10 1
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Or just accept your child for who they are. Stop pressurising them. Help them find their strengths and a path that suits them
596
11/03/2021 21:47:49 2 5
bbc
That is the Tory pushyboots way.

Tarquin can't POSSIBLY have a lower grade in English than that ghastly oik Mark from the council estate.......

And so many weaklings in place to enable it.
2
11/03/2021 19:03:31 17 7
bbc
I wouldn’t bother pestering the school, this year and last year results mean nothing and employers will look at it that way. Students need to develop their interview and people skills to gain jobs not what some numbers or letters on paper say
3
Tim
11/03/2021 19:04:25 14 1
bbc
Just cross-mark externally. Get error checks from external teachers.
8
11/03/2021 19:06:37 20 1
bbc
That would be too sensible, parents would not be able to blame anyone else then and we can’t have that
14
11/03/2021 19:09:25 4 1
bbc
Oh, you mean like.... Regular exams?
59
11/03/2021 19:23:49 1 1
bbc
They already have the exam markers in place it would be easy to get a random sample of evidence and moderate it. Most teachers I know would welcome it.
12/03/2021 09:55:21 0 0
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It's called Internal Moderation when carried out by a colleague and External Moderation when checked by an academic from another institution. I'm a University Professor and can confirm its a requirement for all assessments, whether exams or coursework to go through both processes.
4
11/03/2021 19:04:50 205 6
bbc
"Pointy-elbow" is that the on-trend politically correct way of calling them entitled pushy parents?
58
11/03/2021 19:23:40 11 11
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Would my pointy nose be ok to be pushy ?
185
11/03/2021 20:00:54 1 2
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A rather old-fashioned term, I believe.
271
TJ
11/03/2021 20:17:36 1 23
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Or caring parents who want the best for their kids?
303
11/03/2021 20:27:07 2 5
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No, it's just the phrase used by the person in the article.

Still, look anywhere long enough and you'll start to see a conspiracy, as the saying goes.
327
11/03/2021 20:33:40 2 5
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I had to guess what it meant, too - maybe it is a common saying somewhere on the country ?
998
12/03/2021 03:37:09 0 0
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I'm an ex-teacher and basically say - 'be pushy' because I know what it is like from the inside and believe me, be pushy.
5
01
11/03/2021 19:04:43 65 27
bbc
If a parent threatened me with a pointed elbow, I'll be marking down the student!
12
11/03/2021 19:09:00 66 20
bbc
Why punish the student for the parent's behaviour?

The correct answer is to *disregard* the parent's unfair demands.
634
11/03/2021 21:57:43 0 0
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Probably why I am not a teacher.

You are way too kind.
868
11/03/2021 23:06:42 1 2
bbc
then you are just as pathetic as the parent for punishing the child for the adults behavoir.
you would also not be trusted to judge any childs grades due to obvious willingness to be influenced 1 way or the other by somebody elses influences,so therefore all students grades by you would have to come with a warning note
6
11/03/2021 19:05:42 600 20
bbc
Society started having real trouble when parents stopped backing up teachers, now kids think nothing is their fault and parents are afraid to parent as it might reflect badly on them
32
11/03/2021 19:16:13 154 11
bbc
Well Said
65
11/03/2021 19:26:29 38 40
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Not helped by the fact that this Government treats state education with contempt. Some parents tend to follow the Government line .
214
11/03/2021 20:06:29 33 42
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The blame is shared over years over growing pressure from society, a bleating teacher union that does a disservice to us teachers. Teaching the only job where poor performance has little come back
231
11/03/2021 20:10:35 3 50
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Teachers have off days and it only takes 1 adult to explain to a child he's stupid to damage them.
339
11/03/2021 20:37:17 7 26
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Possibly because there was a distinct lack of civic duty amongst the faculty when the country needed them the most
374
11/03/2021 20:46:56 15 11
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parents are afraid to parent as it might reflect badly on them.

Not allowed to strike a child even in self defence?

Modern Britain - only too right the parents feel unsafe.
381
11/03/2021 20:48:39 19 3
bbc
Well you know what people are like. They'll moan at people doing this sort of thing and then go and do it themselves. The sort of who who dislike the royal family and then moan at Corbyn for not singing the national Anthem - The Sun, Mail and Express readers of this world - The Percy Sugdens and Victor Meldrews
395
11/03/2021 20:51:13 3 15
bbc
Probably because education was dreadful 30 years ago, so we're having to deal with the results now
Maybe if teacher weren't such arrogant idiots they wouldn't get so much grief. Just a thought Removed
562
11/03/2021 21:38:50 0 0
bbc
Off topic really.

Nothing to do with pushy parents expecting A*s all round .. otherwise its Carter-Ruck.
566
11/03/2021 21:39:36 11 0
bbc
Yes indeed. Too many who won't hold their little angel to account but will accuse the teacher who is giving them a D (justifiably because they've done no work this term) of harming their child's prospects.
757
11/03/2021 22:29:26 3 1
bbc
Adults run society, not children. Adults vote for MPs who decide on education policies. Children can't choose parents & can't parent themselves. Lack of discipline tends to be due to parenting styles-which tend to be handed down the generations. If society is in real trouble then that's on the adults & those who lead society. Children learn by example but they can't pick the people they learn from
997
12/03/2021 03:30:43 0 0
bbc
Really? I used to teach and know how poor some teachers at estimating grades and while schools should moderate their grades, many don't dot it very well. I also know that some children do a lot better in the exams that the estimates because they were bored in school due to work that was just too simple for them - I have every sympathy for teacher but a lot more for parents than I used to have.
12/03/2021 07:48:56 0 1
bbc
It is why we have ended up as a nation of thicko's.

Where knowing something without searching online for it is classed as outstanding.
7
11/03/2021 19:06:33 17 1
bbc
I can see a slew of law-suits coming from wealthier parents who are not happy with the grades awarded to their offspring.
15
11/03/2021 19:09:46 13 5
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It's the wealthier parents who give teachers the most expensive presents. What do you think they're for, they're seldom returned!
3
Tim
11/03/2021 19:04:25 14 1
bbc
Just cross-mark externally. Get error checks from external teachers.
8
11/03/2021 19:06:37 20 1
bbc
That would be too sensible, parents would not be able to blame anyone else then and we can’t have that
9
11/03/2021 19:07:06 294 4
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the same kids that will act entitled when they go to uni.
Stand your ground teachers
126
11/03/2021 19:46:45 103 85
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Public school boys have always done it.
267
11/03/2021 20:17:06 11 6
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In my experience all the undergrads complain unless they get top marks and the lecturers typically comply. For those that don't comply then management will step in and demand that the mark is increased. This is why I stopped working at UK universities.
355
11/03/2021 20:41:28 17 5
bbc
They won't, I used to work for an examination board, and interference from parents who "knew" the local Labour MP was quite common. What was particularly worrying was their preparedness to have low paid office staff sacked just to get their way. In the end the board would always cave into money and political power.
701
11/03/2021 22:15:07 1 0
bbc
even worse, some kids will think they're capable of impossibly high grades. they'll be the ones dropping out a few years down the line
10
11/03/2021 19:08:20 7 13
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Teachers have got what they always wanted. Now they want protection!
52
11/03/2021 19:21:15 3 3
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I know of no teacher who wanted total say in grades students are given.
11
11/03/2021 19:08:53 4 5
bbc
What job allows you to self assess how good you think you are?
If you give a fair assessment 'spoilt' parents will berate you because they think there offspring are far better that they really are... and in few cases this may be true???

There are many great teachers but here also very many who think they are and the latter will give away the world to make themselves look better than they are!
20
11/03/2021 19:12:13 5 6
bbc
"...they think there offspring are.."

I take it that you failed in English.
5
01
11/03/2021 19:04:43 65 27
bbc
If a parent threatened me with a pointed elbow, I'll be marking down the student!
12
11/03/2021 19:09:00 66 20
bbc
Why punish the student for the parent's behaviour?

The correct answer is to *disregard* the parent's unfair demands.
48
11/03/2021 19:19:17 2 2
bbc
True - should disregard.

But please tell the subconscious mind to also forget....
50
11/03/2021 19:20:29 11 1
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And report the communication to the JCQ.
13
11/03/2021 19:09:17 47 2
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Alas in years to come these grades will be ignored anyway, and the pupils will have to take proper external exams when in the real world in competition against proper exam results
160
11/03/2021 19:55:39 9 2
bbc
Can't see that happening tbh What will happen is kids do A level courses that they fail or degree courses that they fail
3
Tim
11/03/2021 19:04:25 14 1
bbc
Just cross-mark externally. Get error checks from external teachers.
14
11/03/2021 19:09:25 4 1
bbc
Oh, you mean like.... Regular exams?
41
Tim
11/03/2021 19:18:17 1 1
bbc
Yes, a bit, except the work is what they're marking, not an examination, and it's being done by teachers, not an exam board.
7
11/03/2021 19:06:33 17 1
bbc
I can see a slew of law-suits coming from wealthier parents who are not happy with the grades awarded to their offspring.
15
11/03/2021 19:09:46 13 5
bbc
It's the wealthier parents who give teachers the most expensive presents. What do you think they're for, they're seldom returned!
54
11/03/2021 19:21:59 5 2
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As a teacher I wasn’t allowed to accept expensive presents - any thing more than a box of Thornton’s had to be returned with a polite “ thanks but no thanks”
962
12/03/2021 00:43:51 0 0
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As a teacher, we have to declare everything received as a 'present' - the end of term can present difficulties for colleagues on a diet when all those presents of chocolates and biscuits (and wine ...!) are laid out for consumption by all in the staff room.
16
11/03/2021 19:09:52 375 13
bbc
Although I have every sympathy for students, I am of the opinion that schools should inform parents that if they email in such a way, it will be marked on the students record that the parent has attempted to influence the grades and as such they don't represent the said students academic achievements.
125
11/03/2021 19:46:13 60 22
bbc
Hmm. Toby Young and every single public school alumnus come to find with parents trying to buy influence.
155
11/03/2021 19:54:17 25 5
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Good idea. Pushy parents were always a problem and got worse when Maggie made them think they had a right to get the head to do what they wanted.
623
11/03/2021 21:54:21 10 0
bbc
Good idea. They should include the parents’ emails with the papers submitted to the exam boards.
769
11/03/2021 22:31:36 0 2
bbc
Schools have pupils, further education has students.......
17
11/03/2021 19:10:04 159 4
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Marking up grades either by teachers, or teachers being pressured, will just lead to disappointment later. They won't be able to cut it at university if they are out of their depth.
63
11/03/2021 19:25:55 91 1
bbc
Exactly, parents will not be helping their little princes/princesses in the longer term - Can’t hold their hands forever.
90
11/03/2021 19:34:34 15 1
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Agreed. My sympathies lie with the brighter kids who would have achieved top marks in an exam situation
152
11/03/2021 19:53:33 4 1
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Or in the wider World later in life
207
11/03/2021 20:05:28 9 4
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Still probably get some kind of degree. Unis don't care as long as they get their money.
233
11/03/2021 20:11:09 0 3
bbc
It's not always the case though, some kids can do it, they were just too lazy at school. Once they get into uni or even into a job, they can change. So not doing enough for the grades doesn't mean you can't cut it, it might do, it just doesn't prove it.
272
BBB
11/03/2021 20:17:40 3 1
bbc
Unless they become polticians
348
11/03/2021 20:39:13 2 1
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...but it's already happened, years ago. Who among us has never complained about colleagues propping up inept workmates. Sadly, that's always been the case - are the numbers increasing? I feel so, but that could be bitter experience talking - at least I'm fair enough to admit that.
404
11/03/2021 20:53:35 5 4
bbc
Have you seen how dumbed down many university courses are now?
616
11/03/2021 21:52:18 0 0
bbc
Err no .. they are just the Uni students who copy other peoples work and cheat in exams.

The problem is not confined to secondary schools.
629
Wet
11/03/2021 21:56:18 0 0
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They won't be able to cut it in the job market either. Employers will be well aware of the problems with the pupils leaving school in 2020 and 2021.
835
11/03/2021 22:45:58 0 0
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You’d think. A decade ago one of my son’s peers at university had her 2:2 raised to a 2:1 after lobbying from parents, who claimed as a dyslexic she’d not had enough extra time/ support . She was quite rightly entitled to support but as he said that was not the reason she’d done badly - she’d basically just partied and not done the work.
940
12/03/2021 00:08:40 0 0
bbc
They will find university exams much more difficult too. No preparation.
949
12/03/2021 00:17:31 0 0
bbc
This year it has to be evidence-based and schools WILL be sampled on their grading process in all subjects to weed out those duff grades. Each school has to produce a policy on how grades will be determined and that has to be sent in advance to the exam boards before any grade is put forward.
12/03/2021 03:43:18 0 0
bbc
Don't think that teachers' grades are based on science, they aren't, and when I was a teacher I was shocked that the same work could be an A for one teacher and a C for another - there is an absolute lack of consistency in teachers' grades but no-one wants to say it but I used to teach and I know that it is a major problem.
12/03/2021 11:24:59 0 0
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"Later" does not feature in their way of thinking. It is sad, but not surprising.
18
11/03/2021 19:10:43 1 10
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Won’t matter when Brazilian variant takes hold and we are all in lockdown again.
Two years of no GCSE and A level exams, leading to a third this autumn
45
11/03/2021 19:19:10 1 1
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looking on the bright side?
19
11/03/2021 19:11:29 8 11
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Any emails sent to teachers regarding the grading of children should be passed to the police. This is bullying in its simplest form. Forget the fines or community service rubbish. Public hangings of the perpetrators. Thankfully my kids are all grown up & passed proper exams & got good grades so I feel rather smug.
11
11/03/2021 19:08:53 4 5
bbc
What job allows you to self assess how good you think you are?
If you give a fair assessment 'spoilt' parents will berate you because they think there offspring are far better that they really are... and in few cases this may be true???

There are many great teachers but here also very many who think they are and the latter will give away the world to make themselves look better than they are!
20
11/03/2021 19:12:13 5 6
bbc
"...they think there offspring are.."

I take it that you failed in English.
56
11/03/2021 19:22:13 1 2
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And you've -never- mistyped anything ever, of course?

You've certainly -not- failed Smugness!
21
11/03/2021 19:12:36 37 10
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I wouldn't trust any teachers' assessment system to replace exams. Some teachers like some pupils; some pupils like some teachers. That's no way to assess a pupils actual ability
43
11/03/2021 19:19:06 9 15
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The flaw in that argument is that the exam results will be moderated so no teacher would risk their job over a grade . The students have and will sit mock exams which will be used to grade. Don’t worry , your children will get the grades they deserve.
133
11/03/2021 19:48:47 6 6
bbc
You obviously don't know how the system operates. There is cross moderation among all teachers at least once a year in most places. So there checks to ensure teachers are marking to a an exam board standard. The school will also have to send reps to exam boards to ensure compliance standards. Teaching is a profession with professional standards!
12/03/2021 13:05:30 1 0
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Teachers are professional and not shallow like you. So we can trust them.
22
11/03/2021 19:12:53 12 8
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It hardly matters since every child will get an A grade anyway, so there's no need for parents to worry and put pressure on teachers.
23
11/03/2021 19:09:22 179 3
bbc
I have already had bullying emails and calls from parents. It's quite worrying the lengths some people will go to in order to get what they want. Parents need to leave us to get on with trying to do the very best we can for students in these last crucial few weeks.
156
11/03/2021 19:54:30 98 4
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Name and shame them
560
11/03/2021 21:37:58 8 0
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If your head teacher is worth their salt you forward these to them to deal with and put the parents firmly in their place.
999
12/03/2021 03:41:44 0 0
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Been a teacher, seen that, now have 15 year and wish I'd been more like the pushy parents - my 'most able and talented' son (school's words by the way) is bored in many of his lessons - there is no MAT provision. Thank God for Cardiff University which is actually investing time and money in a high level extra curricular activity for him - with post graduates teaching him another subject area.
24
11/03/2021 19:13:27 14 3
bbc
This was inevitable.
Schools should be encouraged to report such pressure to the police.
If schools do not resist this kind of pressure it will mean already doubtful grades will be worthless.
Teachers naturally want the best for their candidates and Examination Boards have had to moderate teacher assessed marks to ensure standardisation. Without this this years grades are already unreliable.
686
11/03/2021 22:12:05 0 2
bbc
"Teachers naturally want the best for their candidates"

Not convinced that is always the case.

Although not much to do with the pointy elbow brigade.
788
11/03/2021 22:36:13 0 0
bbc
No, the Police have way too much to do to get involved in this mess.

If this happens, a panel of independent adjudicators should be called in to Fully scrutinise the child's work and/or set them an appropriate exam.
25
11/03/2021 19:13:33 12 2
bbc
They should have allowed the students to sit the exams, it would have helped motivate them to continue studying.

In this sub-optimal situation they should get all the students to sit mocks as if they were real exams and give the mark from the mocks, then anyone appealing or checking can simply look at the mock papers.
588
11/03/2021 21:45:57 0 3
bbc
Except since I've lost my job marking exams this year, I've had to take on a second job that takes up so much time I will have to rush through the mocks at break neck pace, I haven't got the time to be accurate. Should have just sat the exams as normal.
26
11/03/2021 19:13:37 3 4
bbc
I've heard of sharp elbows, but not pointy elbows.
46
11/03/2021 19:19:10 0 1
bbc
Never been at a jumble sale where old women breenge in?
173
11/03/2021 19:58:01 0 1
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If you can't see the metaphors have the same meaning then you need to look in the pencil box for a sharpener.
27
11/03/2021 19:14:58 75 8
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And this is why you have exams. CSE's were phased out as they relied too much on unsupervised course work.
278
11/03/2021 20:18:39 46 6
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Right argument wrong exam CSE was a straight exam with no course work reflecting a percentage. the CSE was phased out c1980s for the GCSE with a percentage for course work and grades which took up half the alphabet basically meaning which became the standing joke that a pupil only needed to write their name on exam paper to get a passing grade if it was spelt correctly a higher grade was awarded.
282
11/03/2021 20:19:14 2 1
bbc
Ironic that some universities have modules that are 100% coursework
328
11/03/2021 20:33:47 4 1
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Not in my experience, however there was little moderation. Main reason for phasing out was that they were seen as second rate qualifications.
624
11/03/2021 21:54:36 0 0
bbc
My goodness .. you have said something sensible.

I'm going for a cup of tea and a lie down.
28
11/03/2021 19:15:14 2 1
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So...Bullying?
29
11/03/2021 19:15:43 31 3
bbc
Well it is the people who move to post codes, join churches, the PTA, and other social scumbags who do this. Because the little darlings are too thick to get there on their own.
109
11/03/2021 19:42:20 13 10
bbc
That was the whole point of the comprehensive system, to ensure those who could afford to move house could get their kids into the best schools.

Can't have oiks from the council estate taking a place which should go to Tarquin or Henrietta, just because they happen to be brighter.
30
11/03/2021 19:15:44 23 8
bbc
Easy solution - any contact by a parent results in the loss of one grade point regardless
74
11/03/2021 19:30:47 11 6
bbc
It's not fair to punish the student for having a daft interfering parent.

A name-and-shame of the parents might be a fairer and more effective deterrent.
890
11/03/2021 23:24:02 1 0
bbc
yes lets teach children that life is about making innocent people suffer for the actions of others against you.

this is exactly the type of thinking that made this country a tit for tat country of bullies
31
11/03/2021 19:16:05 32 3
bbc
Which was the whole point of using an algorithm, but the pointy elbowed objected.
Its well know that some teachers and schools give higher marks than deserved.
6
11/03/2021 19:05:42 600 20
bbc
Society started having real trouble when parents stopped backing up teachers, now kids think nothing is their fault and parents are afraid to parent as it might reflect badly on them
32
11/03/2021 19:16:13 154 11
bbc
Well Said
783
LH
11/03/2021 22:34:49 0 2
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That's "written", not "said"!!!
33
11/03/2021 19:16:22 8 1
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Sad but not surprising
34
11/03/2021 19:16:30 73 13
bbc
Well of course they are, the system was always going to be abused once you took away the objectivity of exams and replaced it with the subjectivity of a teachers opinion.

Every bad grade predicted given by a teacher is an admission of failure on their part and every parent not pushing for a better grade is an admission of failure on the part of their children.

The whole thing is farcical.
208
11/03/2021 20:05:38 41 12
bbc
What is subjective about biology, physics, language, geography, etc? Teachers are expensively trained professionals and a large part of their remit is to eliminate and counteract subjectivity. Because most people are recipients of education, they think they know it all. There's little point in training for a profession if anybody can do the job without the education and training.
223
11/03/2021 20:07:59 4 1
bbc
The current cohort of GCSE students will be interesting, to see how many achieve top grades only to crash and burn at ‘A’ level
384
11/03/2021 20:48:59 1 4
bbc
The ‘objectivity’ of exams is also up for discussion. And they are a very poor way to prepare most people for the adult world. When did you last have to sit down for 2 hours at work and write everything you knew about something without being able to research or discuss it with other people?
630
11/03/2021 21:56:29 1 0
bbc
"The whole thing is farcical."

Absolutely. But find a media pundit or politician who will say so and wants exams to be scheduled this summer.
35
11/03/2021 19:16:40 13 9
bbc
Many feel teachers will not do this properly.
How about we just let parents pick the grades for their children?
Would save a lot of energy!
69
11/03/2021 19:29:08 3 3
bbc
Please tell me your joking
36
11/03/2021 19:16:52 330 3
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My mother, a school secretary has already seen instances of parents physically threatening teachers because their child got a detention. How much worse will it be for exam grades!
111
11/03/2021 19:42:46 280 3
bbc
This really says it all, and exactly why those kids got a detention! Learned behaviour from awful parents
253
11/03/2021 20:14:24 52 1
bbc
When I was at school (in the 1960s) if I got a detention, I got a bollocking from my dad because I must have deserved the detention.
408
11/03/2021 20:54:42 25 1
bbc
Like many others here I got a thick ear when I got detention. And I deserved it
441
11/03/2021 21:01:32 17 2
bbc
Contact the police and they will be arrested for breach of the peace. Pushy parents need to work harder themselves and stop the booze culture.
461
11/03/2021 21:07:03 12 15
bbc
The worst thing the bleeding hearts and liberals did was to get their way in abolishing the cane and strap
Half of today's young thugs would have had it knocked out of them at an early age instead of thinking that they can do just as they please
Back in the70's if you'd been punished at school you wouldn't have gone home whining on to your parents about it as you'd have got it again for disrespect
558
11/03/2021 21:37:30 15 0
bbc
That's says a lot about todays society. Back when I was a getting a detention at school it wouldn't have been the teachers getting threatened by parents for getting a detention but rather me or pupils like me and threatened might not be all we got. Back then we were taught to behave, but how can we expect kids to if their parents example is to threaten teachers instead of supporting them.
811
11/03/2021 22:42:01 7 1
bbc
Any threats to teachers of physical violence must result in arrest and prosecution of the parents and expulsion of the pupils from the school.

Two or three examples of this and it should stop.

BUT police and courts must be willing to enforce ruthlessly and without exception.
12/03/2021 10:08:54 0 0
bbc
If the school secretary witnessed this then the teacher should go straight to the police, because this is a criminal offence for which the parent can be prosecuted.
12/03/2021 14:38:23 0 0
bbc
There are good and bad parents. As it ever was.

The idea that parents in the 1960s were somehow universally respectful of society and considerate of their children is pretty obviously not true. If people compare their upbringing then, with one bad anecdote today, it may seem that way, but I'm sure their were terrible parents doing their own reprehensible things back then too.
37
11/03/2021 19:16:57 44 1
bbc
Are we meant to be surprised? Next it won’t just be cajoling but bribing. The parents need to be called out by the schools as likely won’t just be one subject per parent. Kids have to start standing on their own, it’s their future.
603
11/03/2021 21:49:27 8 0
bbc
Well said mate. If kids get the grades that there parents want they’ll go to the uni that their parents want then fail as they aren’t fit to be there and will have wasted £30k. Then who will the parents blame, Boris?
970
12/03/2021 01:01:09 0 0
bbc
Teachers will have all the apples they can eat and more this year. They might even have their car washed for free too!

A canny teacher will accept these gifts openly, praise the parent/pupil concerned for their consideration equally publicly and mark the child appropriately and without bias.
38
11/03/2021 19:17:18 2 3
bbc
A friend of mine apparently was level with another boy who's father was a bank manager both wanting to a grammar school so my friend joined me at the Secondary Modern we both got enough O levels to go to the grammar school we aspired to join The other lad left school at 16 with 1-O level Bit of a contrast as my friend then trained to be a quantity sureyor. This was over 50 years ago so what's new?
39
11/03/2021 19:17:39 5 1
bbc
. I remember in the mid 60s my parents lobbying the headteacher of the local primary to allow a neighbours daughter to go to the senior rather than the junior sec. he told them - if you care , we care. Now, however, parents are blind to their children’s failings and so teachers will be put under enormous pressure. Btw the girl had passed her 11+ but had a twin sister at the junior sec.
40
11/03/2021 19:17:51 5 7
bbc
Best way to deal with the pushy parents is to give everyone the highest grade possible ??
14
11/03/2021 19:09:25 4 1
bbc
Oh, you mean like.... Regular exams?
41
Tim
11/03/2021 19:18:17 1 1
bbc
Yes, a bit, except the work is what they're marking, not an examination, and it's being done by teachers, not an exam board.
42
11/03/2021 19:18:53 101 7
bbc
Why do pushy parents realise pushing children beyond their capabilities will result in more mental health problems. I had a friend at school who we all thought was very clever. I met him at university and he said he worked every minute he could in order to succeed. In the second year where he found it getting too much for him, he committed suicide.
Please thank of you child’s life.
84
11/03/2021 19:31:10 38 1
bbc
Bloody hell, that's awful, poor kid.
850
11/03/2021 22:54:26 0 0
bbc
Very true. I have a family member who was pushed by his parents to go to university, a quiet young man, kept very much to himself. The police found him sat on the M27 motorway verge, near his motorbike whilst on his way to university. Complete gone, had a mental breakdown and has spent the years since unemployed on medication.
12/03/2021 03:45:56 0 1
bbc
It isn't pushing beyond abilities, it's asking for transparency in grading - I used to be a teacher, you would be shocked at how bad some teachers are at estimating grades (and they can be very good teachers) - without transparency in the moderating system how can you trust that the teacher in this school is using the same criteria in that school? You can't, and don't trust the boards either.
21
11/03/2021 19:12:36 37 10
bbc
I wouldn't trust any teachers' assessment system to replace exams. Some teachers like some pupils; some pupils like some teachers. That's no way to assess a pupils actual ability
43
11/03/2021 19:19:06 9 15
bbc
The flaw in that argument is that the exam results will be moderated so no teacher would risk their job over a grade . The students have and will sit mock exams which will be used to grade. Don’t worry , your children will get the grades they deserve.
180
11/03/2021 19:58:30 3 3
bbc
Mock exams will not be used as they are not standardised. Don't worry you'll be up to speed soon
181
11/03/2021 19:58:48 2 1
bbc
Moderated then over-ruled, like last year.
649
11/03/2021 22:02:51 1 0
bbc
Unsurprising comment from someone using the moniker "Teachers Pet".
44
ken
11/03/2021 19:12:58 52 3
bbc
I thought the phrase was "sharp-elbowed parents". But, I'm not the pointiest tool in the box.
644
11/03/2021 22:00:45 17 1
bbc
It is .. but you have to make allowances .. some of these journos may have had "sharp elbowed parents" themselves, so might not have as much command of the English language as their qualifications would lead you to expect.

:-)
18
11/03/2021 19:10:43 1 10
bbc
Won’t matter when Brazilian variant takes hold and we are all in lockdown again.
Two years of no GCSE and A level exams, leading to a third this autumn
45
11/03/2021 19:19:10 1 1
bbc
looking on the bright side?
26
11/03/2021 19:13:37 3 4
bbc
I've heard of sharp elbows, but not pointy elbows.
46
11/03/2021 19:19:10 0 1
bbc
Never been at a jumble sale where old women breenge in?
47
11/03/2021 19:19:15 124 3
bbc
The moment these were called 'teacher assessed grades' teachers were going to be exposed to all sorts of harassment from parents.
98
11/03/2021 19:38:48 56 3
bbc
Indeed.
And also a very big ask for teachers to second guess how a student would fare in an exam situation, particularly when they’ve had so little contact
719
11/03/2021 22:19:28 1 0
bbc
the DfE and Ofqual are making our teachers assume the role of examiners. i smell another fiasco in the making
12
11/03/2021 19:09:00 66 20
bbc
Why punish the student for the parent's behaviour?

The correct answer is to *disregard* the parent's unfair demands.
48
11/03/2021 19:19:17 2 2
bbc
True - should disregard.

But please tell the subconscious mind to also forget....
49
11/03/2021 19:18:37 265 3
bbc
If teachers get such emails they should be able to report said parents to the exam boards for trying to influence the fair and balanced grading. This could then be taken into account when said parents put in challenges to grades. This happens too often and these people must be stopped.
220
11/03/2021 20:07:21 34 89
bbc
Your kids must go to very easy going schools,l never met a teacher who didn't favour one student or another
274
TJ
11/03/2021 20:18:19 1 8
bbc
This is what happens in places like China and the old Soviet Union. Not sure I fancy that.
280
11/03/2021 20:18:59 9 11
bbc
Fair and balanced as in post codes literally being factored into the (expected) results? My niece, a bright and hard working sixth form pupil, got worse mock results than classmates who were doing less well academically, purely because of the part of town she lives in.

Fair and balanced my "Ricky Tomlinson"!
332
11/03/2021 20:35:48 4 1
bbc
Unfortunately that would require a level of organisation and joined-up-thinking that would leave most official bodies flummoxed.
532
11/03/2021 21:28:59 2 0
bbc
You know the novel thing is that they could sit the damm exams poor dears......
12
11/03/2021 19:09:00 66 20
bbc
Why punish the student for the parent's behaviour?

The correct answer is to *disregard* the parent's unfair demands.
50
11/03/2021 19:20:29 11 1
bbc
And report the communication to the JCQ.
51
11/03/2021 19:21:12 212 3
bbc
I first came across this behaviour 22 years ago when I was a driving instructor with the AA. Parents demanding their offspring be put up for their driving tests despite the fact they were not good enough at that point.
It really is incredible to witness. I was shocked that they could find £5k for a car for offspring, but giving them the lessons to stay alive was an issue.
Weird thinking really.
10
11/03/2021 19:08:20 7 13
bbc
Teachers have got what they always wanted. Now they want protection!
52
11/03/2021 19:21:15 3 3
bbc
I know of no teacher who wanted total say in grades students are given.
53
11/03/2021 19:21:16 4 5
bbc
Exams are the only true criterium. Extend schools over the Summer vacs to complete the syllabus and hold the exams in september. It's a tough route but a fair one. In years to come it will be a mild blip in kids lives.
118
11/03/2021 19:43:52 0 1
bbc
Criterium?
If you must use big words, at least spell them correctly!
15
11/03/2021 19:09:46 13 5
bbc
It's the wealthier parents who give teachers the most expensive presents. What do you think they're for, they're seldom returned!
54
11/03/2021 19:21:59 5 2
bbc
As a teacher I wasn’t allowed to accept expensive presents - any thing more than a box of Thornton’s had to be returned with a polite “ thanks but no thanks”
55
11/03/2021 19:21:51 13 3
bbc
External examiners are independent of schools. So, why do classroom teachers have to mark their pupils' work? If parts of the curriculum haven't been completed, examination boards can send multiple questions to the schools&teachers can decide which questions to select to reflect what has been covered in class. Exam papers can then be sent to Exam boards & marked by external examiners. Simple&fair.
20
11/03/2021 19:12:13 5 6
bbc
"...they think there offspring are.."

I take it that you failed in English.
56
11/03/2021 19:22:13 1 2
bbc
And you've -never- mistyped anything ever, of course?

You've certainly -not- failed Smugness!
57
11/03/2021 19:22:27 386 19
bbc
Memo from Head Teacher to parents: First contact will result in a reminder to leave things to us. Second contact and we will file for harassment.
123
11/03/2021 19:45:54 106 166
bbc
This isn't America - it is 'report' in this country not 'file'.
184
11/03/2021 20:00:16 5 2
bbc
Third contact state bribe on offer
199
11/03/2021 20:03:52 15 1
bbc
Second time minus a grade!!!
204
11/03/2021 20:00:12 23 37
bbc
It is already too late as the qualifications have been watered down so much that they are worthless - get your name right and it is A*
224
11/03/2021 20:08:19 53 36
bbc
It's this stupid pandemic of entitlement.
Consumerism has turned us into nasty selfish units of one.
It started with Thatcher. Nasty old witch.
428
11/03/2021 20:59:03 0 3
bbc
liberal
4
11/03/2021 19:04:50 205 6
bbc
"Pointy-elbow" is that the on-trend politically correct way of calling them entitled pushy parents?
58
11/03/2021 19:23:40 11 11
bbc
Would my pointy nose be ok to be pushy ?
162
11/03/2021 19:55:48 8 7
bbc
Is it bigger than Pinocchio ??Johnson’s.
3
Tim
11/03/2021 19:04:25 14 1
bbc
Just cross-mark externally. Get error checks from external teachers.
59
11/03/2021 19:23:49 1 1
bbc
They already have the exam markers in place it would be easy to get a random sample of evidence and moderate it. Most teachers I know would welcome it.
964
12/03/2021 00:46:35 0 0
bbc
That is the plan. Schools will be randomly sampled and their grades checked against the basket of evidence they have gathered to justify those grades.
60
Kat
11/03/2021 19:24:15 9 9
bbc
What's the problem with this? Isn't it that those who have friends in high places or who know how to pressure others that tend to end up with the best jobs? Given that our society is broken, this is just another example.

Until the most important jobs are rewarded ahead of social influencers and consultants, we will remain broken.
61
11/03/2021 19:24:16 13 2
bbc
This is the way it works nowadays. Parents are doing nothing to help their kids in the long term by bullying/ bribing teachers - We all know they will crumble when mummy and daddy (and their cheque book) are not right behind them !
86
11/03/2021 19:33:56 11 3
bbc
Crumble even more when Mummy and Daddy’s money doesn’t cover the cost of drink and drugs that they get into because they can’t cope.
699
11/03/2021 22:14:58 1 0
bbc
"cheque book" ?

What is that ?

If I was a teacher I would want the money sent by bank transfer or to my Paypal account.... otherwise I would have to actually find a bank to deposit the cheque in ....
62
11/03/2021 19:24:19 14 5
bbc
Says a lot about the education system when people are still confused by the Covid rules for students outside school - they are exactly the same as for everyone else so stop meeting in groups of friends and going to other students houses. SIMPLE
17
11/03/2021 19:10:04 159 4
bbc
Marking up grades either by teachers, or teachers being pressured, will just lead to disappointment later. They won't be able to cut it at university if they are out of their depth.
63
11/03/2021 19:25:55 91 1
bbc
Exactly, parents will not be helping their little princes/princesses in the longer term - Can’t hold their hands forever.
548
11/03/2021 21:35:46 5 0
bbc
I respectfully disagree. I think many middle-class parents hold their children's hands forever, e.g. doing their A-level course work, arranging work experience in top-flight companies, paying allowances in adulthood (all examples I personally know of). The upshot is that bright children from ordinary backgrounds don’t get a look-in. I guess it was ever thus, but we as a society lose out.
64
11/03/2021 19:26:10 9 3
bbc
So one example given and the rest is about “the spectre” of this happening. What a non-story.
6
11/03/2021 19:05:42 600 20
bbc
Society started having real trouble when parents stopped backing up teachers, now kids think nothing is their fault and parents are afraid to parent as it might reflect badly on them
65
11/03/2021 19:26:29 38 40
bbc
Not helped by the fact that this Government treats state education with contempt. Some parents tend to follow the Government line .
908
11/03/2021 23:37:12 0 0
bbc
How very true. Sadly those who are far too up the Tories nether regions don't seem to care about the countries or our children's future unless they are in private education being subsidised by the tax payer.
66
11/03/2021 19:27:10 28 10
bbc
Personally I can see no reason why exams should not take place this year. All that is required is for exam boards to set papers that allow students to choose which questions to answer, rather than forcing them to answer questions on topics they may not have had opportunity to study in depth.
81
11/03/2021 19:33:25 19 3
bbc
This is quite normal in exams I have taken (admittedly some years ago) where the paper may present 8 questions, and you should attempt to answer 5, for example.
99
11/03/2021 19:38:59 6 2
bbc
Not sure that is viable for GCSEs, but for A-levels, if students are not capable of self studying with remote guidance from their teachers, they ought to rethink whether higher education is for them.

So I don't think there is any reason why A-level exams couldn't go ahead. Just a shame that the UK ditched percentile based grading back in the 80s.
114
11/03/2021 19:43:29 4 2
bbc
Yep, I'm having to sit university exams online after a year of non-existent teaching - why is schooling different
159
11/03/2021 19:55:36 3 9
bbc
Do you have any idea what the mental health of our children is like right now? Obviously not

My own daughter far from not sitting exams, has been told she is doing exam week in exam halls, having missed best part 50% of the course, and is already under CAMHS for suicidal thoughts. Teachers just say you sit the exam or fail.

How’s does that fit with no child Will be detrimentally affected?
209
11/03/2021 20:05:44 2 5
bbc
Will that show they understand the topic fully? No of course not. Therefore pointless idea, please go to detention you thick dweeb lol
782
11/03/2021 22:34:27 0 0
bbc
Don't be silly! That is way too sensible.

I had that in the 1970s and actually chose some questions on topics we hadn't covered but I had an interest in. Worked mainly, but not all occasions.
Just say no and bugger off. Removed
68
11/03/2021 19:27:51 3 3
bbc
Meanwhile tutors will rake it in for years to come. And the disparity between the haves and have nots will become a chasm. In central Scotland the school with consistently high grades is Tutor City. The parents are well known as agitators and have used their power to oust at least one headteacher.
35
11/03/2021 19:16:40 13 9
bbc
Many feel teachers will not do this properly.
How about we just let parents pick the grades for their children?
Would save a lot of energy!
69
11/03/2021 19:29:08 3 3
bbc
Please tell me your joking
77
11/03/2021 19:32:45 2 1
bbc
We all know life is about having friends/family in the right places!
122
11/03/2021 19:45:42 1 1
bbc
Seems obvious to me...
70
11/03/2021 19:29:09 10 1
bbc
This brings to mind 'Tim Nice But Dim'.
or Saville loved a sp.. Removed
71
11/03/2021 19:29:29 10 14
bbc
Putrid class ridden UK. Selfish Tory culture.
75
11/03/2021 19:31:40 9 6
bbc
You could always leave.
121
M D
11/03/2021 19:45:27 3 1
bbc
Class-ridden definitely. But the worst sneering class bigotry comes from the middle-class against white working class people and their culture.
72
11/03/2021 19:30:17 25 5
bbc
Now there is a shocker.
Imagine how much more pressure there is at the private schools, where, shall we politely put it, the piper may wish to call the tune.
680
11/03/2021 22:11:06 4 3
bbc
No pressure .... everyone gets 9's or A** and then have a jolly good time at oxford or cambridge
957
12/03/2021 00:32:03 0 0
bbc
Absolutely! I taught in one independent school where if the parents said 'Jump!', the Head replied 'How high?'
73
CJR
11/03/2021 19:30:37 12 2
bbc
This just is going to show these exam passes are not going to be worth the paper they are written on.
30
11/03/2021 19:15:44 23 8
bbc
Easy solution - any contact by a parent results in the loss of one grade point regardless
74
11/03/2021 19:30:47 11 6
bbc
It's not fair to punish the student for having a daft interfering parent.

A name-and-shame of the parents might be a fairer and more effective deterrent.
71
11/03/2021 19:29:29 10 14
bbc
Putrid class ridden UK. Selfish Tory culture.
75
11/03/2021 19:31:40 9 6
bbc
You could always leave.
88
11/03/2021 19:33:44 6 2
bbc
But even if he wanted to he can't go to Europe easily now, because of the:

Putrid class ridden UK. Selfish Tory culture
76
MAC
11/03/2021 19:31:44 6 2
bbc
This is so sad for all students who took exams last year or taking exams this year. Grade inflation will make employers disregard the grades given. This is likely to affect future years too, corrections will make 2022 students look like failures.
Parents who pressure teachers or teachers who succumb to pressure will actually be damaging the child’s prospects.
103
11/03/2021 19:40:44 2 2
bbc
But it will be universally known that 2020 and 2021 grades were not accurate or earned, and that will probably be taken into account when comparing to 2022... the kids who also missed a lot of school but had to sit their exams. I think that will be acknowledged.
127
11/03/2021 19:47:00 0 1
bbc
No, they will be damaging the whole cohort but benefiting their offspring relatively.
69
11/03/2021 19:29:08 3 3
bbc
Please tell me your joking
77
11/03/2021 19:32:45 2 1
bbc
We all know life is about having friends/family in the right places!
78
11/03/2021 19:33:12 12 2
bbc
I predict in August we will see record high exam scores and Tory press going on about how exams were much harder in the 1960s.
108
11/03/2021 19:38:13 5 5
bbc
Or during the war
124
11/03/2021 19:45:55 1 4
bbc
Not quite; the inflated teacher scores will be moderated fairly by the boards, then Tarquin and Lucinda will complain and the Tories will bend over like last year.
660
11/03/2021 22:06:55 1 0
bbc
Nah...they'll be much lower, and the Tory press will bang on about how its the teachers' fault.
79
11/03/2021 19:26:42 11 6
bbc
Pushy middle class parents, "oh my children are so precious, I cannot believe they may not become lawyers or doctors, whatever shall we do with young Lucinda and Jeremy!"
And the lower class scum with their Chelseas and Chardonnays, pitbull at hand Removed
80
11/03/2021 19:28:01 4 7
bbc
What does pointy elbows mean please, beeb?

Rather than trying to copy buzzfeed and metro-type luvvie slang, please can you publish real words?
95
11/03/2021 19:38:32 1 3
bbc
"Pointy" and "elbows" are both words.
117
11/03/2021 19:43:42 0 2
bbc
It's called a metaphor. We had them before buzzfeed , whatever that is.
Unlike slang, which makes no sense until explained, a metaphor can be understood with a little thought and looking at the context. They are part of the joy of language.
A story about people using dubious means pushing to the front...pointy elbows...no?
66
11/03/2021 19:27:10 28 10
bbc
Personally I can see no reason why exams should not take place this year. All that is required is for exam boards to set papers that allow students to choose which questions to answer, rather than forcing them to answer questions on topics they may not have had opportunity to study in depth.
81
11/03/2021 19:33:25 19 3
bbc
This is quite normal in exams I have taken (admittedly some years ago) where the paper may present 8 questions, and you should attempt to answer 5, for example.
960
12/03/2021 00:39:47 0 0
bbc
That's fine in a normal year where there could be 4 easy questions and 4 hard questions - answering well in the 4 hard question + 1 easy question gets a top grade, but answering well in 4 easy questions and 1 hard question would only deserve a middle grade. It won't work like that this year.
82
11/03/2021 19:33:39 6 2
bbc
"a teacher who had been emailed by parents over the high grades needed for their daughter's ambition to become a doctor"

Let's hope the parents are not that stupid (and, if they are, the daughter doesn't take after them).

The grades without the study, effort, aptitude, intelligence & application will just end up with a daughter failing the next exams and having nowhere left to turn to.
83
11/03/2021 19:29:05 7 12
bbc
Exams are dated and pointless ways of testing knowledge, I may have known the subject well, but like a lot of people anxiety and nerves got in the way and my mind was blank, it happens. Exams just test memory and perhaps nerves, nothing else.
92
11/03/2021 19:36:09 7 2
bbc
I'll make a note - if you were ever a doctor - my doctor - and I was bleeding out; it would be OK if you can take you time and not be under any pressure!
97
11/03/2021 19:38:41 1 1
bbc
Yes, stress doesn't happen in real life. Better learn a little bit at a time and let the teacher give the best grades to their favorites. And if you can't write well, get extra time, because that's what employers do.
106
11/03/2021 19:41:20 0 1
bbc
And real life doesn't?
848
11/03/2021 22:53:32 0 0
bbc
Explains why there is jealousy in every post you've made
42
11/03/2021 19:18:53 101 7
bbc
Why do pushy parents realise pushing children beyond their capabilities will result in more mental health problems. I had a friend at school who we all thought was very clever. I met him at university and he said he worked every minute he could in order to succeed. In the second year where he found it getting too much for him, he committed suicide.
Please thank of you child’s life.
84
11/03/2021 19:31:10 38 1
bbc
Bloody hell, that's awful, poor kid.
85
11/03/2021 19:31:11 3 9
bbc
What a joke. Teachers have always had an incentive to ‘predict’ high grades often detached from the reality of actual results and they have a dig at parents who dare to influence this cabal of corruption!
61
11/03/2021 19:24:16 13 2
bbc
This is the way it works nowadays. Parents are doing nothing to help their kids in the long term by bullying/ bribing teachers - We all know they will crumble when mummy and daddy (and their cheque book) are not right behind them !
86
11/03/2021 19:33:56 11 3
bbc
Crumble even more when Mummy and Daddy’s money doesn’t cover the cost of drink and drugs that they get into because they can’t cope.
897
11/03/2021 23:27:42 0 0
bbc
i take it you had a bad experiance yourself did you?
87
M D
11/03/2021 19:34:00 7 3
bbc
I can see where people are trying to deflect this behaviour on to; no, this is the behaviour of many pushy middle-class parents too.
110
11/03/2021 19:39:50 2 4
bbc
They are the worse, no doubt about it, self entitled lot!
75
11/03/2021 19:31:40 9 6
bbc
You could always leave.
88
11/03/2021 19:33:44 6 2
bbc
But even if he wanted to he can't go to Europe easily now, because of the:

Putrid class ridden UK. Selfish Tory culture
129
11/03/2021 19:47:23 1 2
bbc
You could try Venezuela.
89
11/03/2021 19:34:10 148 3
bbc
Just fix all emails to the school gate for everyone to read...
101
11/03/2021 19:40:18 57 1
bbc
Not a bad idea
119
11/03/2021 19:44:08 18 1
bbc
Brilliant idea, but someone will cry human rights and demand a payout for hurt feelings
632
Wet
11/03/2021 21:57:08 2 0
bbc
great idea. But they will just resort to threats in person then.
806
11/03/2021 22:40:14 2 0
bbc
I’d love to see the meltdown between parents at the school gates. “You think your Johnny should get a higher grade than my Tom, do you…?”
12/03/2021 10:17:37 0 0
bbc
You made me really laugh with that, because I've done very similar.

When a school broke its contract with me everything went on my website, for all to see. They were then stupid enough to get their lawyers to threaten me, so that went on the website too. They then tried to force the ISP to remove the material, at which point the ISP's lawyers told them where to go.
17
11/03/2021 19:10:04 159 4
bbc
Marking up grades either by teachers, or teachers being pressured, will just lead to disappointment later. They won't be able to cut it at university if they are out of their depth.
90
11/03/2021 19:34:34 15 1
bbc
Agreed. My sympathies lie with the brighter kids who would have achieved top marks in an exam situation
91
11/03/2021 19:35:12 14 3
bbc
Teacher assessment is a misnomer - it's not their opinion that's sought but a body of evidence of progress & achievement

In any case any evaluation will, or should be subject to both peer review & moderation in schools, & external review when needed

The answer to counter attempts to influence outcomes is to make the criteria, processes & results as transparent as possible

and report offenders!
154
11/03/2021 19:53:44 2 1
bbc
That's more or less what is going on TBF.
980
12/03/2021 01:25:20 0 0
bbc
That's a lot of work, if done extensively enough to be sure it make a difference. How will teachers find the time to fit that in, they're already in catchup mode with tuition.
83
11/03/2021 19:29:05 7 12
bbc
Exams are dated and pointless ways of testing knowledge, I may have known the subject well, but like a lot of people anxiety and nerves got in the way and my mind was blank, it happens. Exams just test memory and perhaps nerves, nothing else.
92
11/03/2021 19:36:09 7 2
bbc
I'll make a note - if you were ever a doctor - my doctor - and I was bleeding out; it would be OK if you can take you time and not be under any pressure!
93
11/03/2021 19:37:11 2 3
bbc
It could result in a teacher actually under marking. They've got to be left to get on with it. A tough responsibility to have. Exams have a purpose in life and should return at the earliest opportunity.
94
11/03/2021 19:38:05 2 1
bbc
Not only parents, head teachers too.
"give him/her/they a chance - They'll blossom at Uni - don't be the one to break their dream and stop their potential" there's so much pressure. Exams are anonymous for a reason.

Let's use the first year as a prep year to sort out the wheat from the chaff and give one. They have one year to prove themselves in the subject of their choice.
80
11/03/2021 19:28:01 4 7
bbc
What does pointy elbows mean please, beeb?

Rather than trying to copy buzzfeed and metro-type luvvie slang, please can you publish real words?
95
11/03/2021 19:38:32 1 3
bbc
"Pointy" and "elbows" are both words.
96
11/03/2021 19:38:41 2 5
bbc
There is NO PEER review. Teachers are difficult to remove when they are not up to grade. BIAS is very strong and every school wants to lie to BOOST its own score. Follylist lives in a dream world!
107
11/03/2021 19:41:50 1 1
bbc
bull......
136
11/03/2021 19:50:07 1 1
bbc
Cynicism is not a valid rebuttal & smacks of prejudiced belief rather than evidence

I had a 5 page document from my son's school last year detailing how the grading for his A levels was arrived at, with personalised & moderated data from his coursework
147
11/03/2021 19:52:38 1 1
bbc
Oh I do love your fairytales.
83
11/03/2021 19:29:05 7 12
bbc
Exams are dated and pointless ways of testing knowledge, I may have known the subject well, but like a lot of people anxiety and nerves got in the way and my mind was blank, it happens. Exams just test memory and perhaps nerves, nothing else.
97
11/03/2021 19:38:41 1 1
bbc
Yes, stress doesn't happen in real life. Better learn a little bit at a time and let the teacher give the best grades to their favorites. And if you can't write well, get extra time, because that's what employers do.
47
11/03/2021 19:19:15 124 3
bbc
The moment these were called 'teacher assessed grades' teachers were going to be exposed to all sorts of harassment from parents.
98
11/03/2021 19:38:48 56 3
bbc
Indeed.
And also a very big ask for teachers to second guess how a student would fare in an exam situation, particularly when they’ve had so little contact
817
11/03/2021 22:44:47 2 1
bbc
When I did my GCSEs and A-levels not one of the teachers I saw everyday predicted the grades I actually got correctly.
886
11/03/2021 23:20:32 0 0
bbc
That was the system last year. This year it is supposed to be an assessment of what the students have done, rather than a prediction of what they might have done.
66
11/03/2021 19:27:10 28 10
bbc
Personally I can see no reason why exams should not take place this year. All that is required is for exam boards to set papers that allow students to choose which questions to answer, rather than forcing them to answer questions on topics they may not have had opportunity to study in depth.
99
11/03/2021 19:38:59 6 2
bbc
Not sure that is viable for GCSEs, but for A-levels, if students are not capable of self studying with remote guidance from their teachers, they ought to rethink whether higher education is for them.

So I don't think there is any reason why A-level exams couldn't go ahead. Just a shame that the UK ditched percentile based grading back in the 80s.
100
11/03/2021 19:39:41 2 3
bbc
It’s always been the way and will always be the way. Take an interest in your child’s education or don’t, it’s your choice