How Covid has changed where we want to live
19/03/2021 | news | business | 1,185
Cornwall has overtaken London as the most searched for location among property buyers, data suggests.
1
19/03/2021 10:25:21 8 10
bbc
Very frustrating for some and great for others - nothing new there in housing. Let's debate why house prices haven't tanked yet following: 1. Voting for Brexit in 2016 2. Leaving the EU in 2020 and 3. Having a sub optimal trade deal with the EU
4
19/03/2021 10:28:35 10 11
bbc
Not just housing tanking, but the crops wilting in the fields and the UK's inability to get live-preserving medicines.
10
19/03/2021 10:33:04 2 1
bbc
Weaker GBP and Government subsidies will play no small part in the current bubble
12
19/03/2021 10:33:27 2 1
bbc
House prices are thriving as people putting their money where their mouths are see Britain thriving too.
The market was buoyant before the stamp duty holiday and then went into overload when it was announced.
Buyers and sellers know now they will not complete until the window closes but are ploughing on regardless.
21
19/03/2021 10:40:56 2 0
bbc
One track mind Peter darling.
2
Bob
19/03/2021 10:27:38 12 6
bbc
Media doing it's part to fuel hype again.

Another pandemic house selling bonanza article with another estate agent who says they've 'never been busier', yet one quick glance at Land Registry data shows sales are still below normal levels.

So yeah, maybe some individual agents are very busy, but that's not indicative of the whole market.
7
19/03/2021 10:30:50 11 0
bbc
I've been in the residential property industry for forty years, never known it as busy so thus is not hype.
265
19/03/2021 12:48:51 0 0
bbc
I can assure you the report is not all hype, certainly as far as Cornwall is concerned.

We've been trying to buy the sort of house the EA was quoting as saying is 'short in supply' and that has been our experience. Offers are being accepted on property the day it appears on national web sites, sometimes before, and 'guide prices' are being treated as auction starting prices. It's the Wild West!
846
19/03/2021 18:18:54 0 0
bbc
The article and estate agents mentioned Cornwall specifically/ do keep up
3
19/03/2021 10:27:46 8 2
bbc
It's worrying that people are not seeking to rent or buy flats.

It begs the question what is going to happen to office blocks around the country that are going to be vacated due to the trend of working from home.

Converting to flats and renting out my not be fruitful.

Might not seem like a worry to most until you realise that your pension fund is most likely tied to commercial property.
9
19/03/2021 10:32:24 7 0
bbc
Actually flats are in strong demand in my area - but of course it depends on the facilities come with - for example parking, good communal garden etc.
55
19/03/2021 11:02:54 2 1
bbc
Yes, I keep reading comments from people saying wfh means that offices could be converted to housing, but who would want to live in a converted office block? They were not designed / built with housing in mind, with no balconies or outdoor space.
61
19/03/2021 11:08:25 0 0
bbc
If these office blocks are converted to flats and the 'change of use' is altered, then more than likely they would not be permitted in a commercial property fund.
1
19/03/2021 10:25:21 8 10
bbc
Very frustrating for some and great for others - nothing new there in housing. Let's debate why house prices haven't tanked yet following: 1. Voting for Brexit in 2016 2. Leaving the EU in 2020 and 3. Having a sub optimal trade deal with the EU
4
19/03/2021 10:28:35 10 11
bbc
Not just housing tanking, but the crops wilting in the fields and the UK's inability to get live-preserving medicines.
5
19/03/2021 10:29:50 804 22
bbc
Anyone who's moving from the city to a rural areas needs to understand that the countryside is a working environment. Our village has been taken over by people who think the countryside is some idyll, and when they find out it is isn't just complain and try to change it. We actually had someone ask us at harvest time to stop the combine as it was gone 10pm.
33
19/03/2021 10:48:46 700 11
bbc
Couldn't agree more-
We had similar in my village - new residents complaining that the muck spreading stank, and that the cows made too much noise during milking!!!!

The country side is full of noise and smells- less latte - more fartte
48
19/03/2021 10:57:54 115 5
bbc
You are so RIGHT. Townies moved in around our village and asked for the cockerel to be "shut up" as it made too much noise in the morning.
75
19/03/2021 11:21:41 56 3
bbc
I'm surprised they didn't also ask you to add fabric conditioner to cow feed to make the slurry smell sweeter.
99
19/03/2021 11:08:09 85 13
bbc
Yep, the daft townies think they are so clever. But they are not. They don;t realise that when there is a harvesting chance it may be brief, so the combines are out 24/7. Then they moan about smells. And cockerels crowing. And mud on the road. Wish they'd stay in the cities.
Removed
122
19/03/2021 11:59:53 56 37
bbc
here we go - it's all US and THEM again.....
165
19/03/2021 12:24:29 27 3
bbc
Good grief. They should be made to get out there and help, with comments like that! It would do them good.
176
19/03/2021 12:28:21 32 5
bbc
And I hope your response was, "OK, we'll stop, when you stop needing food"
198
19/03/2021 12:37:38 35 1
bbc
2 days ago had a lady complain to me about all the muck on a farmers field and could the parish council have it cleared
199
19/03/2021 12:37:38 43 2
bbc
Absolutely, I'm up in Cumbria, some tourists asked do you really need to be spreading muck... it smells! However I fear the increase in house prices vs local wages outside of the cities. My children will struggle to live in their community and buy a property.
211
19/03/2021 12:42:36 77 1
bbc
I live in a idyllic small village and a couple from the city purchased a house in the centre opposite the church (stunning location).

First weekend they complained to the council about the church bells ringing on Sunday/Thursday practice wanting it banned. Basically they brought a house next to a 500 year old church and then complained there's a 500 year old church there.
231
19/03/2021 12:48:29 17 1
bbc
100% agree!
233
19/03/2021 12:52:51 15 2
bbc
always lived in the city/suburbs but i feel for you on this one! talk about gentrification
254
19/03/2021 13:00:29 7 1
bbc
Townies Hey Unbelievable Jeff as a certain football commentator says.
302
19/03/2021 13:18:41 34 0
bbc
Yes they also have tacky suburban habits like high panel fencing or hedging themselves into their 'yard'. Hiding away. Complaining of cockerels waking them etc. Walking anywhere they fancy,, saw a couple this week walking over a barley crop, with their dog running free of course.

Too late now life has become all about self & short lived 'fun'. Take for yourself, fly about, holiday, litter, etc.
336
19/03/2021 13:29:34 7 29
bbc
Who on earth do you think you are?
347
19/03/2021 13:33:42 20 1
bbc
Agreed. We have a plague of urban dwellers who have come in and are suggesting all sorts of improvements to the village but when asked to join in they “ can’t commit”. Complaints include smell of muck spreading, crow scarers and harvest. The thing which worries me is the building that may come in their wake ??
367
19/03/2021 13:40:22 12 1
bbc
Is this the village equivalent of when city folk say that city visitors don't stand on the right side of the escalator and slow daily commutors down?
378
19/03/2021 13:39:42 12 2
bbc
Our lovely village is near the city and lots of people commute, but they are still committed to village life and very involved.
The big problem for the past year is that we are inundated with visitors at the weekend, who drive down and go walking around the village, its so busy we don't go out. I would say "its like Piccadilly Circus", except Piccadilly Circus is deserted!
394
19/03/2021 13:52:00 8 1
bbc
Well said, Suffolk Boy. I think it is also a little bit about respect ...
401
19/03/2021 13:55:14 9 1
bbc
Dont worry as soon as this is all over, they will remember why they lived in towns and cities - and all dash back again!
406
19/03/2021 14:00:17 9 1
bbc
In fairness, you get this everywhere - people who buy flats in city centre locations (above a pub or a music venue) and complain about the noise is a recent problem too. I suppose if you're paying the thick end of a million for a place to live, sense of entitlement is a bolt-on.
421
19/03/2021 14:09:00 16 1
bbc
People here were complaining that sheep in a field adjacent to their homes were 'ruining their quality of life'. You could not make that up.
439
19/03/2021 14:19:51 7 4
bbc
Surely you have your own "Running A Stranger Out Of Bounds" ceremony? Here in Coldcomfortonboggy we regularly "sees them off" up the London Road - 'tis good sport with Meade and Tatters. Phil & Kirsty don't mention that on "Escape To The Country" though!
449
19/03/2021 14:22:09 7 6
bbc
I can understand how that would grate, but I wonder how many of the examples here are one-offs or even made up/apocryphal. Let’s not add rural vs urban to the long list of polarisation problems in our society please and have a bit more understanding. We’re all entitled to choose where to live within the UK (for now at least).
477
mm
19/03/2021 14:47:23 10 4
bbc
Absolutely agree. The 'incomers' want street lighting, tar pavements and new houses at high density and completely out of character for a village. If we do not put a block on this the countryside will cease to exist. Send a few tractors down their estates and they will soon get the message.
486
19/03/2021 14:50:50 6 0
bbc
Yes, feel for the local people.
489
19/03/2021 14:53:05 7 0
bbc
Was that before or after you fed them throught the baler?
514
19/03/2021 15:05:55 6 11
bbc
I think some of you simple country folk are exaggerating the reactions of city dwellers who have migrated to your little villages. We city dwellers put up with foul smells, noise and animals every day. It's called the London Underground.
626
19/03/2021 16:06:42 3 1
bbc
You usually stop a combine because of the moisture content of the grain, unless you want to flash up the Penny +Porter. Mind you combines have moved on from model 21's and matador standards. Just be a bit kinder to the DFL's and less curmudgeonly, about their funny little ways.
640
19/03/2021 16:11:59 2 3
bbc
Ah, the real world! Where is that exactly?
It looks to me like rural nimbys complaining about DFL's. The enemy is not the DFL, it is the developer of poor housing, and those locally, who are quite happy to pocket the cash when someone buys a second home, but decry the DFL's after the fact.
6
19/03/2021 10:29:55 76 2
bbc
A few years ago we bought our forever home. It turns out we accidentally bought a pandemic house - a huge place that needs doing up, that no one else wanted because of size/effort needed.

I wouldn't swap it for the world.

Being stuck at home isn't fun, but it's more bearable if you have space and a nice environment to be in.
260
19/03/2021 13:02:36 44 2
bbc
Exactly, we brought a forever home 5 years ago and have been fixing it up ever since. No locals wanted to due to the fact it was almost derelict and requires years of work and a lot of money to fix. we have employed dozens of local people in the renovations and now work locally ourselves. I grew up in Devon and had to go away for work, does that mean i am not allowed back after working in London?
503
mm
19/03/2021 14:59:53 1 7
bbc
Oh dear a forever home, what an idyll. Reality will soon set in dear.
709
19/03/2021 16:55:43 3 0
bbc
True I have a patio garden and a 10 minute walk to the seafront. 5 minute walk to the train station which are all electrified (this means quiet) however I like and am used to train noise. Lucky.
2
Bob
19/03/2021 10:27:38 12 6
bbc
Media doing it's part to fuel hype again.

Another pandemic house selling bonanza article with another estate agent who says they've 'never been busier', yet one quick glance at Land Registry data shows sales are still below normal levels.

So yeah, maybe some individual agents are very busy, but that's not indicative of the whole market.
7
19/03/2021 10:30:50 11 0
bbc
I've been in the residential property industry for forty years, never known it as busy so thus is not hype.
8
19/03/2021 10:31:55 108 4
bbc
In the ten years I've lived in it, the price of my house has doubled, and some areas have increased far more than that. Over the same period, average wages have not doubled, far from it. How does someone get their foot on the property ladder these days? Who can afford a property like mine? Asking prices are ridiculous and the market is due for a major re-adjustment.
13
19/03/2021 10:34:46 44 19
bbc
That re-adjustment has been coming for over twenty years, the crash didn't affect it, neither will this.
Demand will continue to outstrip supply until we build more houses.
19
19/03/2021 10:39:01 8 1
bbc
The problem goes back to the introduction of the term ‘property ladder’, rather than needing somewhere to live and deciding at a certain point to settle in a certain area. Used to be associated with getting married and having children - ‘settling down’. Huge migration into London, for example, combined with the buy-to-let put pressure on the market.
628
19/03/2021 16:07:49 2 0
bbc
Skilled working class salaries have fallen since 1970 only really noticeable now. I earned 25k p.a. in 1997 but could afford to buy a house by myself. That same 25k in 2021 only buys a garage where a live. Wages have not increased but for the super middle class mainly in IT, Financial Services, Legal, Medicine. There is a housing shortage hence high prices.
655
19/03/2021 16:16:20 2 0
bbc
Dream on.
Supply and demand.

There is only so much land available. It's not the cost of the bricks and mortar - It's mainly down to the land it sits on.
779
19/03/2021 17:35:22 0 0
bbc
it's becoming a huge problem for rural Scotland as no body can afford to live in there if they work there. the whole economy depends on a temp workforce living in caravans. the youngsters have to move to the cities to get work as they can't afford the rents for half the year
932
19/03/2021 20:22:11 1 0
bbc
Thank you for your question the reason why house prices have doubled is because of INFLATION when the Bank of England prints money and reduces interest rates the value assets the value of assets like houses, stocks, and bonds goes up.
20/03/2021 07:58:00 0 0
bbc
it's called financial "crisis"
20/03/2021 14:47:32 0 0
bbc
And much of the cause has been the way mortgages are calculated, help to buy and shared ownership. If mortgages had not gone to stupid LTV and multiples of salaries then prices could not have risen. Likewise shared ownership and HTB, all fuelled house prices. There have been 2 big opportunities to reset this and both time nothing has been learnt.
ww
20/03/2021 15:39:35 0 0
bbc
You buy where you can afford to live. Simple. And working from home mans you can live in all sorts of areas - and I am not talking Cornwall but try Wales or the midlands.
3
19/03/2021 10:27:46 8 2
bbc
It's worrying that people are not seeking to rent or buy flats.

It begs the question what is going to happen to office blocks around the country that are going to be vacated due to the trend of working from home.

Converting to flats and renting out my not be fruitful.

Might not seem like a worry to most until you realise that your pension fund is most likely tied to commercial property.
9
19/03/2021 10:32:24 7 0
bbc
Actually flats are in strong demand in my area - but of course it depends on the facilities come with - for example parking, good communal garden etc.
1
19/03/2021 10:25:21 8 10
bbc
Very frustrating for some and great for others - nothing new there in housing. Let's debate why house prices haven't tanked yet following: 1. Voting for Brexit in 2016 2. Leaving the EU in 2020 and 3. Having a sub optimal trade deal with the EU
10
19/03/2021 10:33:04 2 1
bbc
Weaker GBP and Government subsidies will play no small part in the current bubble
18
19/03/2021 10:37:47 2 0
bbc
It's a very big bubble, about thirty years old too!!
11
19/03/2021 10:25:28 182 41
bbc
The horrible price inflation in London is exporting Londoners and wrecking the rest of the country. Stay in London.
44
19/03/2021 10:56:03 133 107
bbc
It's hardly the Londoners fault - it was driven by importing foreigners into London that is pushing Londoners out - mostly down to FOM.
200
Dee
19/03/2021 12:37:51 7 1
bbc
Companies are also moving out of London as land is too expensive & people can work from home.
206
19/03/2021 12:40:32 19 1
bbc
And are you happy for all the wealth London generates to stay there too? Or do you still want a share of that?
864
19/03/2021 18:48:56 0 0
bbc
Ladies used to retire to the countryside once they’d married off their daughters. People come from elsewhere to London, tend to move out when they want children, then some of them move back, exchanging the family home for a flat.
875
19/03/2021 19:04:37 0 0
bbc
I watch locals here walking away counting London money and complaining all the way to the bank.

Perhaps a hefty second home council tax levy? Just wait until I’ve sold my place first, though.
20/03/2021 18:45:54 0 0
bbc
So would you stay where you are, even if you don't get on with your immediate next-door neighbour? No, nor would I. Can't wait to leave the outskirts of London. BTW I once heard a year ago (on a boat trip up the Thames) that some rich-kid from Saudi gave the developer £50m and said I'll have the penthouse suite. Not one brick had been laid at the time. Obviously money talks, no matter where...
1
19/03/2021 10:25:21 8 10
bbc
Very frustrating for some and great for others - nothing new there in housing. Let's debate why house prices haven't tanked yet following: 1. Voting for Brexit in 2016 2. Leaving the EU in 2020 and 3. Having a sub optimal trade deal with the EU
12
19/03/2021 10:33:27 2 1
bbc
House prices are thriving as people putting their money where their mouths are see Britain thriving too.
The market was buoyant before the stamp duty holiday and then went into overload when it was announced.
Buyers and sellers know now they will not complete until the window closes but are ploughing on regardless.
30
19/03/2021 10:47:22 4 0
bbc
It's nothing to do with Britain thriving. When governments create inflation or load up the economy with increasing debt, the prices of assets - shares and especially houses - rise to compensate.
8
19/03/2021 10:31:55 108 4
bbc
In the ten years I've lived in it, the price of my house has doubled, and some areas have increased far more than that. Over the same period, average wages have not doubled, far from it. How does someone get their foot on the property ladder these days? Who can afford a property like mine? Asking prices are ridiculous and the market is due for a major re-adjustment.
13
19/03/2021 10:34:46 44 19
bbc
That re-adjustment has been coming for over twenty years, the crash didn't affect it, neither will this.
Demand will continue to outstrip supply until we build more houses.
43
19/03/2021 10:54:52 12 13
bbc
Or until we target a net-zero immigration policy for a decade or so.
68
19/03/2021 11:15:58 6 0
bbc
'The last 20 years' neatly excludes the last major re-adjustment in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when prices dropped by around 20%, and I got into the property market. That wasn't the result of a major recession (although a minor, quite prolonged one) but I remember it putting a lot of people into negative equity.
362
19/03/2021 13:38:34 6 2
bbc
Or heaven forbid control immigration.
497
19/03/2021 14:58:47 3 5
bbc
This country does not have a housing crisis - unless you call too many houses a crisis. What this country does have is an immigration crisis. This country does not have the responsibility to house the whole world
730
19/03/2021 17:06:46 0 0
bbc
Even if it did come it wouldn't last long, too many will be fighting each other over the limited supply and force prices back up again.
958
19/03/2021 22:04:45 1 0
bbc
There are new homes being thrown up all over the place but mainly in the countryside. Villages are fast becoming townages.
20/03/2021 12:48:29 0 0
bbc
Indeed over time they will rise..mainly because of TWO FACTORS cost of labour..land materials..prof fees etc etc all do. Secondly existing homes are ADDED to by their owners..not denuded from..extensions..garages..extra dorma bedrooms..glitzy kitchens/bathrooms etc etc..that stuff massively distorts the "apparent" inflation but no one seems to get it !
14
19/03/2021 10:34:58 77 8
bbc
Journalists: please stop writing ‘we’ when the story is about a percentage of the population, or many people. ‘We’ refers to you and your friends, or a group decision, and irritates many of us mightily.
663
19/03/2021 16:22:53 6 3
bbc
We is a collective pronoun. It can refer to the inhabitants of the country or group thereof. Nothing wrong with using it in this context.
15
19/03/2021 10:35:04 176 53
bbc
How are all these people going to cope when they find out none of there neighbours read the Guardian Newspaper and voted to leave the EU ?
20
19/03/2021 10:39:09 110 44
bbc
They might open their eyes to the real world
53
19/03/2021 11:02:09 22 6
bbc
They don't talk to the locals. They just socialise with their other London escapees in the same village.
333
19/03/2021 13:28:20 1 8
bbc
Another Grauniad reader who can't spell
Oh we still buy the Guardian, talk to everyone we meet (like we used to), argue with tossers (they exist everywhere) and I sympathise with my crew mates who voted brexit and now have their caught fish stuck rotting in lorries at Dover because coming out of a market reintroduced bureaucracy. Boris once a hero, is now local called a Kipper (two faced)...the irony is lost though! Removed
877
19/03/2021 19:07:18 1 0
bbc
Read the Guardian AND voted Leave?

Isn’t that like voting Tory and having a social conscience?

939
19/03/2021 20:46:14 1 0
bbc
They might come round and explain the difference between ‘their’ and ‘there’.
16
19/03/2021 10:36:34 307 4
bbc
Everyone wants to live in a small pretty town, that’s why all the small pretty towns are now being surrounded by overpriced poor quality new build housing.

Here in Harrogate we have literally 1000’s of new builds and the roads are permanently gridlocked.
22
19/03/2021 10:42:26 165 2
bbc
Rather like the secluded beach, it soon won’t be if too many people go in search of it. Idylls are fixed in time.
24
19/03/2021 10:43:50 12 0
bbc
Same for Cornwall.
38
19/03/2021 10:51:47 8 10
bbc
Harrogate is a sensible size. Invest in a bicycle.
Removed
170
19/03/2021 12:26:32 9 1
bbc
Same in Chichester , West Sussex. So much overdevelopment
209
19/03/2021 12:41:57 14 3
bbc
'Everyone wants to live in a small pretty town'
No they don't. I live in London and love it here, I would hate to live in a small pretty town.
428
19/03/2021 14:15:13 4 0
bbc
Same in Devon - new housing everywhere but no new infrastructure (schools, parks, hospitals, shops etc). I think the council have been encouraging the developments to plug holes in budgets since 2008.
511
19/03/2021 15:04:44 0 0
bbc
It is similar in York. I cycle and avoid most traffic jams but you still have to cycle alongside stalled cars near the curbs.

And house prices here have shot up. The prices they are going on to rightmove are easily 10% more than prior to first lockdown but many sell fast. I moved two weeks before the first lockdown, and still get rightmove alerts. I missed the stamp duty cut but got lower price.
582
19/03/2021 15:49:04 0 0
bbc
Too many cars on the road. As someone who does not drive we need some to take the bus or cycle. I agree with the poor new housing and that is the fault of the government and the large builders companies who do not quality check the work.
637
19/03/2021 16:10:35 0 1
bbc
I live in Harrogate, its not small nor pretty. The centre is dire. Those new builds are over priced boxes, but the roads were bad before they were built. A bypass is required, but as it runs through Nidd Gorge NIMBYs don't want that. Can't have it both ways.
957
19/03/2021 21:59:45 0 0
bbc
Same here in North Essex. The field opposite my cottage has just been earmarked for.... more new houses.
977
19/03/2021 23:17:15 1 0
bbc
No not everyone wants to live in a pretty small town, just the terminally unimaginative.
SJ
20/03/2021 10:28:55 0 0
bbc
Tory law = presumption in favour of development.
If you voted Tory, you voted for sprawl. Accept your decision.
20/03/2021 12:37:35 0 0
bbc
Total exaggeration...the roads are not permanently gridlocked.. utter nonsense.
20/03/2021 14:54:02 0 0
bbc
lucky you in bucks here in aylesbury we have over 28K of housing going up no new roads and the 5th worst record for congestion in the uk and it above many cities but AVDC only care about council tax and getting more cash to pay themselves and their cronies
17
19/03/2021 10:34:04 64 9
bbc
When I needed really good test for Glaucoma it was great to have Moorfields less than an hour's public transport away. When I wanted a quick Hernia operation by a really good specialist having the British Hernia Centre close by was a godsend.

There are lots of very important advantages that living in London affords. Giving it up for fear of covid-19 is highly irrational.
284
19/03/2021 13:11:29 30 1
bbc
We planned to move to either Cornwall or W Scotland when my husband retired, as I work at home anyway, but I got a serious illness 18 months ago and may not still be here were it not for a large local hospital, specialist facilities & a top class consultant.
The nearest large hospital in W Scotland would be 3 hours by road/rail.
Much as we love Cornwall and W Scotland, we're glad we stayed here.
354
19/03/2021 13:35:22 2 0
bbc
£500,000 for a two bedroom terraced home in London though, must look tempting for a couple starting out to be able to buy something for half that in Cornwall (that's if you can find a job) you can see why so many people sell up in London if they have retired that's a cool £250,000 extra capital to live on.
519
19/03/2021 15:09:49 7 0
bbc
Everyone I know who retired to the countryside moved back to town sooner or later. Some enjoyed rural living for years until illness, the loss of a partner or financial problems became too much to bear; one or two realised they'd made a terrible mistake within weeks of moving. Moving to the countryside is never a decision to be made lightly, especially if you have health problems.
714
19/03/2021 16:58:10 2 0
bbc
Agree Cornwall has crap infrastructure due to a low population over a vast area of land.
848
19/03/2021 18:20:52 0 0
bbc
There is an excellent eye infirmary in Plymouth (Derriford REI) and there are also excellent ophthalmological facilities in Truro, at Treliske Hospital (Royal Cornwall). There are also excellent general surgeons working and operating in Devon and Cornwall.
20/03/2021 18:04:02 0 0
bbc
Yes, I think a lot of people will really miss the great facilities of London. Cornwall only has one real hospital and worries when too many people go there at the moment. However, for all those living in expensive rooms or flats with no balconies in London or other large cities, I can understand why they might want to move away.
10
19/03/2021 10:33:04 2 1
bbc
Weaker GBP and Government subsidies will play no small part in the current bubble
18
19/03/2021 10:37:47 2 0
bbc
It's a very big bubble, about thirty years old too!!
8
19/03/2021 10:31:55 108 4
bbc
In the ten years I've lived in it, the price of my house has doubled, and some areas have increased far more than that. Over the same period, average wages have not doubled, far from it. How does someone get their foot on the property ladder these days? Who can afford a property like mine? Asking prices are ridiculous and the market is due for a major re-adjustment.
19
19/03/2021 10:39:01 8 1
bbc
The problem goes back to the introduction of the term ‘property ladder’, rather than needing somewhere to live and deciding at a certain point to settle in a certain area. Used to be associated with getting married and having children - ‘settling down’. Huge migration into London, for example, combined with the buy-to-let put pressure on the market.
20/03/2021 07:59:20 0 0
bbc
pathetic reasoning
15
19/03/2021 10:35:04 176 53
bbc
How are all these people going to cope when they find out none of there neighbours read the Guardian Newspaper and voted to leave the EU ?
20
19/03/2021 10:39:09 110 44
bbc
They might open their eyes to the real world
Maybe the incomers will help the Cornish locals. By buying their fish, seafood and dairy that they seem to have lost their main market for.
252
19/03/2021 12:59:53 4 1
bbc
Honestly because having a conscience is unrealistic and not in the real world. Get a grip
1
19/03/2021 10:25:21 8 10
bbc
Very frustrating for some and great for others - nothing new there in housing. Let's debate why house prices haven't tanked yet following: 1. Voting for Brexit in 2016 2. Leaving the EU in 2020 and 3. Having a sub optimal trade deal with the EU
21
19/03/2021 10:40:56 2 0
bbc
One track mind Peter darling.
37
19/03/2021 10:51:17 2 0
bbc
The market will keep going up whilst there are more people here and with capability to buy - which is obviously still the case. It is interesting from a Brexit perspective not just because of the predictions but the fact that there has been retention of people and good jobs - so far
16
19/03/2021 10:36:34 307 4
bbc
Everyone wants to live in a small pretty town, that’s why all the small pretty towns are now being surrounded by overpriced poor quality new build housing.

Here in Harrogate we have literally 1000’s of new builds and the roads are permanently gridlocked.
22
19/03/2021 10:42:26 165 2
bbc
Rather like the secluded beach, it soon won’t be if too many people go in search of it. Idylls are fixed in time.
104
19/03/2021 11:10:37 20 6
bbc
Yep. Those 10 best walks, 10 best secret beaches. Ten best campsite etc articles. mind you, keeps them away from my quiet spots, concentrates them together. I like Glasonbury Festival, because for one week of the year you know where all the idiots are going to be!
567
19/03/2021 15:39:38 2 0
bbc
Don't always seem to go....pay paradise put up a parking lot.
23
19/03/2021 10:42:46 260 41
bbc
Things will settle done in a few years as things get back to normal and people regret their decision.

Frankly anyone who owns 2, or more, homes can sod off.
74
19/03/2021 11:21:07 173 314
bbc
"Frankly anyone who owns 2, or more, homes can sod off."

Ah, the politics of envy, the politics of the Left. Writ large for all to see.

You'd be buying a lovely little bolthole in the country if you could, too, and you wouldn't be taking any lectures from anyone telling you how selfish you are in so doing. Being successful isn't a bad thing or something to be ashamed of.
350
19/03/2021 13:34:34 11 10
bbc
Nobody needs two homes its immoral.
You can rent if you have to commute and go home weekends.
We choose our job.
If you live in the country, farm, have livestock not even a holiday is possible
16
19/03/2021 10:36:34 307 4
bbc
Everyone wants to live in a small pretty town, that’s why all the small pretty towns are now being surrounded by overpriced poor quality new build housing.

Here in Harrogate we have literally 1000’s of new builds and the roads are permanently gridlocked.
24
19/03/2021 10:43:50 12 0
bbc
Same for Cornwall.
203
19/03/2021 12:38:51 10 0
bbc
Lost count of how many lockdown TV programmes there has been on Cornwall. I can see the county being swamped post-lockdown.
25
19/03/2021 10:42:43 5 5
bbc
Left the London stinkhole 8 years ago for village life,my kids go to fantastic top of the tree regular schools,there's load of things to do in your spare time even if its just a walk across the fields with a picnic,fishing clubs,village football teams 6yrs and up,cricket clubs,swimming,country houses etc and i only paid 190k for a 3 bed semi,huge back garden front garden,parking.Recommended to all
129
19/03/2021 11:54:34 2 1
bbc
Why did you move to London?
26
19/03/2021 10:46:02 95 3
bbc
So the indigenous population of rural areas that have historically been on very low wages, are now going to be priced out of the market even further.

I hope this is a temporary blip and things will return to normal. There are many 2nd home owners in my area and during the winter the local towns and villages are dead. Summer time and you cant move.
47
19/03/2021 10:57:45 66 66
bbc
The indigenous people of London were similarly impacted via mass EU migration.
137
19/03/2021 12:07:38 2 0
bbc
I'd agree with that. There's a place near me which has been historically 'poor' and no-one wanted to live there - now they're selling for 50% more than what they were and every page I've looked at recently of EA's has 'sold' all the way down the listings. The last EA I spoke with said they couldn't keep up!
917
19/03/2021 19:56:13 2 0
bbc
The British have been driving up prices in Spain, Portugal etc for years. Payback
20/03/2021 12:52:28 0 0
bbc
I doubt more than 10% will actually in reality be second homes..as usual anything around housing is constantly exaggerated and blown up in this country. As for indigenous ..are we doing genetic testing or what ? the english are a myriad of various mixed races...and the vast majority of us are at best only fractionally genetically linked to the areas we were born in.
27
19/03/2021 10:46:10 16 0
bbc
It is going to be interesting to see how far and quickly the information of the Census might be out of date.
744
19/03/2021 17:12:41 0 0
bbc
Good point.
28
MVP
19/03/2021 10:46:32 28 2
bbc
It is unsurprising that people no longer want to live in London.

It is noisy, crowded and expensive.
49
19/03/2021 10:58:11 5 2
bbc
Tired of living in London eh?
50
19/03/2021 10:58:19 10 1
bbc
Its also now largely unaffordable to many people born and raised there. A lot of the complaints that people in the west country have about outsiders coming into "their" area and pricing people out has been happening in London for decades.
29
19/03/2021 10:46:51 151 7
bbc
If the people that move too Devon, Cornwall etc integrate into the community and do not put up cameras & high walls around the property they buy, if they contribute to local events & use local shops (not order it from supermarkets for delivery), if they learn that driving the lanes means you have to know how wide your car is and you do not mind if you scratch the paint, then welcome all!
39
19/03/2021 10:52:13 57 72
bbc
Devon and Cornwall are picturesque and the climate is lovely, but the locals aren't exactly the friendliest people you'll meet (especially by northerner standards).

We bought our holiday home in Anglesey. Just as beautiful, a lot less crowded, and the Welsh people are as welcoming and lovely as you could ever want. For us, no contest.
62
19/03/2021 11:08:41 15 3
bbc
Some of us oldies are buying from supermarkets for delivery to reduce Covid risks.
616
19/03/2021 16:03:51 0 0
bbc
I am all for competing in the flower and produce show. I would order s supermarket delivery but also use the corner shop.
671
19/03/2021 16:29:34 0 0
bbc
Right on
808
19/03/2021 17:52:48 1 0
bbc
The climate is not "lovely" in Cornwall ??. It's wet and windy most of the year.
12
19/03/2021 10:33:27 2 1
bbc
House prices are thriving as people putting their money where their mouths are see Britain thriving too.
The market was buoyant before the stamp duty holiday and then went into overload when it was announced.
Buyers and sellers know now they will not complete until the window closes but are ploughing on regardless.
30
19/03/2021 10:47:22 4 0
bbc
It's nothing to do with Britain thriving. When governments create inflation or load up the economy with increasing debt, the prices of assets - shares and especially houses - rise to compensate.
31
19/03/2021 10:45:24 176 4
bbc
Yes I am one of those to of taken the opportunity and moved to 350 miles to Cornwall.
Why?
- My partner is now able to look after her aging father, who is now only 1/2 mile away.
- I can now work from home and in a productive manner.
- One less "second home" in the village brings more life to the existing community.
242
19/03/2021 12:41:47 155 2
bbc
I’m from Cornwall and am struggling to get on the housing market. Buyers like you are far better for Cornwall than second home owners, for the reason you have given. We need our rural communities brought back to life with permanent live-in residents.
346
19/03/2021 13:33:35 3 29
bbc
But still haven't bothered to learn grammar
416
19/03/2021 14:07:17 6 0
bbc
Thats the way to do it!
490
mm
19/03/2021 14:53:23 8 22
bbc
If you can work from home, presumably on a computer, then you do not have a real constructive job. We need people in Cornwall who work locally and contribute practically.
662
19/03/2021 16:22:50 0 5
bbc
Hope you don’t write for a living!
717
19/03/2021 16:58:32 12 0
bbc
Good for you, Dave. We need some 2nd home owners here in Cornwall to keep our cleaners, gardeners, handyfolk, etc. employed, but we still need living towns and villages. Poor Mousehole is so full of 2nd homes that it spoils the life of the village. In our village, we face a woman from London who buys up any available property for holiday lets - no-one local could afford to live here now.
907
19/03/2021 19:40:49 2 0
bbc
Hi Dave a very good reply,
Like you we moved into the countryside but it was not my birth place, No I was born in a house that was in a field, But the council decided to build another 700 houses in the same field and they called it a council estate, So i understand what your saying and agree with you 100%
20/03/2021 04:08:38 0 1
bbc
English - those to have taken, not "those to of taken"
32
19/03/2021 10:47:46 85 7
bbc
Feel sorry for locals........inflated prices..........holiday homes no longer family homes...........can't compete with the rich and well-off.
263
19/03/2021 12:47:02 28 2
bbc
Almost all my friends I grew up with have moved away from Cornwall because they can’t afford it here or can find better jobs elsewhere. It does make me sad that the communities don’t remain the same as they do up in the North.
ww
20/03/2021 15:41:25 0 0
bbc
Holiday homes are also good for the local economy - such families do spend a lot of money in the area. There is also no moral right to be able to live in an area which you are born. Move to where you can get a job and live there.
5
19/03/2021 10:29:50 804 22
bbc
Anyone who's moving from the city to a rural areas needs to understand that the countryside is a working environment. Our village has been taken over by people who think the countryside is some idyll, and when they find out it is isn't just complain and try to change it. We actually had someone ask us at harvest time to stop the combine as it was gone 10pm.
33
19/03/2021 10:48:46 700 11
bbc
Couldn't agree more-
We had similar in my village - new residents complaining that the muck spreading stank, and that the cows made too much noise during milking!!!!

The country side is full of noise and smells- less latte - more fartte
116
19/03/2021 11:58:12 75 2
bbc
and they are glorious. Lived in big cities all my life. Moved to the countryside 4 years ago. I, and the mrs, love the smells, the sound of harvesting, cows being milked, morning song is far louder ( or easir to hear) thsn in the city. Stables everywhere instead of costa coffee. But it does take people time to adjust, just as it would if you moved from the countryside to the centre of London.
251
19/03/2021 12:58:53 20 1
bbc
The modern generation eh! Nothing wrong with the smell from farms it is like if people can't stand the heat get out of the kitchen aka if you don't like the smell of the countryside don't move there.
280
19/03/2021 13:10:24 21 3
bbc
And the sheep in distress at lambing time, the dog barking, shut that cockeral up, what do they expect, hay in the lane, horse poo no. When the farmer moves his cows across a lane at milking time how about cow sized doggie bags?
They should stay in the city.
348
19/03/2021 13:34:11 3 1
bbc
Brilliant comment!!!!!!!!
488
19/03/2021 14:52:06 6 1
bbc
Don’t forget the ones who complain about roosters too.
509
19/03/2021 15:02:39 4 0
bbc
all the stuff I miss, used to love listening to the sheep of a morning just before market day - would give my right arm to be back in that environment just chillin out and those around all looking out for each other. Still each to their own
715
19/03/2021 16:58:19 2 0
bbc
Absolutely brilliant!
720
19/03/2021 17:01:32 3 0
bbc
As someone who has lived in the county all my life, including long stints working on farms, I would say there is a pretty significant distinction between the smells originating from a few trailer loads of muck from the byre, and that from the growing number of corporate industrialised complexes that generate lakes of the stuff that eventually gets washed into our rivers. That is not a county smell
34
19/03/2021 10:49:15 508 105
bbc
As I Devonian, I hope Londoners will stay in London. They not only cause huge price inflation in rural areas, but also over-develop and gentrify their houses with the sole purpose of making money when they sell. All of this means the locals and their children cannot afford to live where they were born and brought up. Londoners made their city the disgrace it is - they should stay there
45
19/03/2021 10:56:12 161 40
bbc
On one hand, I agree. Property development is an absolute scurge (everywhere) and causes ridiculous price inflation.
I have to disagree with the 'right' to buy where you were brought up, though.
It is, and always has been, that you buy where you can afford.
If my parents owned a £2m house somewhere, it wouldn't be a 'right' that house prices allow me to live there as well.
70
19/03/2021 11:16:19 61 27
bbc
"Londoners made their city the disgrace it is - they should stay there"

I have no intention of leaving London. I do usually like to visit Devon though, I assume that its still OK with you? Or shall we all stay away completely and give you something else to bellyache about?
110
19/03/2021 11:53:05 15 27
bbc
With Britain's soaring population, a house being your safest pension pot, and speculative builders donating to the Tory party, the time will come when the price of homes in the U.K. will have to be regulated by the State. Taking away a citizen's right to live where they desire is taking away their personal freedom.
118
19/03/2021 11:50:23 12 17
bbc
Jamie i agree with you
Let Devon be for Devonians,
Liverpool just for scousers,
And London,just for indigenous londoners,
What a perfect world,
136
19/03/2021 12:05:41 53 7
bbc
Londoners can decide to live in Devon or Cornwall just as Devonians and Cornish can live in London. Restrictions on where you can live is totalitarian. Why can't other Brits enjoy parts of their own country you think is your own? It isn't.
169
19/03/2021 12:26:25 28 3
bbc
Slightly harsh. London is pretty vital to us all, and has some truly beautiful and well preserved architecture. It is just a matter or people showing a bit of respect.
188
Dee
19/03/2021 12:33:48 30 2
bbc
Born & bred Londoners (if you can still find one) have had to put up with decades of people living & working in London from over the UK (including Devon) & all over the world. Now you know how we feel being priced out of the housing market.
261
19/03/2021 13:02:50 16 3
bbc
A naïve & misguided comment.

I appreciate house prices have been pushed up, & accept that's a downside of people buying second homes. However the price of living in a free country is the ability to go where you wish & do what you wish, providing it's within the law.

I'm sure many have moved from Devon & Cornwall into London & the SE, I don't see the "natives" there telling them to go home.
287
19/03/2021 13:13:13 7 6
bbc
Pompous git. It’s exactly this entitled crap which will be your downfall
293
19/03/2021 13:16:13 13 0
bbc
I would have loved to have lived in the Devonian period.
358
19/03/2021 13:37:45 4 1
bbc
It happened in Oxford locals priced out of the market
413
19/03/2021 14:03:18 9 0
bbc
Why do you think all Londoners are the same? You're just showing a bit of small mindedness there. Should i therefore assume that all Devonians are rude and unwelcoming, based on your post?
418
19/03/2021 14:07:29 4 1
bbc
Haha, wow - some vinegar with those chips dude? What an absolutely ridiculous statement.

Without people from around the country and abroad coming to places like Devon during holiday season, I think a lot of places would struggle.

Perhaps we should just ghetthoise Devon, wall you all in and throw away the keys.
423
19/03/2021 14:10:29 2 1
bbc
So join the rest of the country. Devon votes solidly for Tories. And the Tories push up house prices to win votes.
427
19/03/2021 14:13:26 3 0
bbc
I agree about the second home issue but a lot of that is to do with not enough affordable housing being built over the years and not enough done to encourage business other than tourism. I live in a Devon coastal town and I would welcome some gentrification - sick of looking at charity shops!
435
19/03/2021 14:18:10 2 0
bbc
Actually the same happened to Londoners born and bred, many had to move out as others had moved it......it's how it rolls.
436
19/03/2021 14:18:19 1 0
bbc
If people from all over the UK and the world didn't move to London, then Londoners (you know, people born there) might be abel to afford to buy their own houses.

Seems that it's only London that suffers from a free-for-all of migration from anywhere...
440
19/03/2021 14:20:11 1 0
bbc
While I largely agree with you, children born in London cannot afford to live in the areas where their parents were able to buy, each generation having to move further out as more people come in.
454
Nep
19/03/2021 14:27:35 1 1
bbc
What an obnoxious comment. Londoners have had problems with being pushed or priced out of their neighbourhood for years by newcomers and generally have a high cost of living. Perhaps they should think twice about holidaying in Devon though.
494
19/03/2021 14:56:57 1 0
bbc
To be honest, and at risk of being deleted by the Beeb's woke review system, part of the problem is London is echoing the 'white flight' well recorded in US cities.....

When you look at the 3 East London boroughs where Covid incidence has been the highest in the UK then look at demographics ...

Note they are not only heading for rural areas but cities like Manchester, Nottingham and Glasgow.
495
19/03/2021 14:57:50 1 0
bbc
As a Londoner my nieces are in exactly the same position.
Their mum and dad’s house where they grew up has soared in value beyond anything they can afford.
3 bedroom terrace house now valued at £1.2m.

There was a time young girls got married and wanted to live their mums. Not anymore in London.

Property value is insane in London.

I saw a new build 1 bed flat on sale for £750k this week.
517
19/03/2021 15:08:09 1 0
bbc
Hi Jamie. I am also a Devonian and like nothing better than playing the find a job in Devon where the salary allows you to be able to afford a home. Playing for years and like the lottery no win yet
518
19/03/2021 15:08:25 3 0
bbc
I, as a life long Devonian, hope they come and increase the intelligence, the openness to other cultures and money to areas long run down and full of non workers.
524
19/03/2021 15:12:21 0 0
bbc
A small point of detail, it wasn't Londoners who made their city what it is, it was imports form places like Devon, and everywhere else. Some did it to make money from better job prospects, and others have done it simply by making property investments whilst still sitting in their homes in places like Devon.

It works both ways.
530
19/03/2021 15:15:03 0 0
bbc
Not a Londoner (anymore) but important to remember that it is the only part of the UK that 'pays in' financially rather than taking out. It helps fund the benefits the rest of the country enjoy. Wish it's decline at your own peril.
539
19/03/2021 15:20:05 2 0
bbc
‘Londoners’ are made up of all those ‘locals’ who left to become gainfully employed, rather than sit on a bench smoking weed & drinking Stella. They improved themselves, paid taxes that were dispersed around the country & allowed for improvement, rather than being a burden on society & draining resources from all communities, rural or urban. There are very, very few genuine ‘Londoners’.
560
19/03/2021 15:26:41 1 0
bbc
Not so sure that there are that many Londoners left these days. Many settled in `new towns` like Basildon or latterly Costa Brava!!
573
19/03/2021 15:42:03 0 0
bbc
Then those selling houses should sell to the locals in that way you won't get the London incomers surely? How can over develop a house? What do you mean gentrify do you mean make it nice? What's wrong with that not everyone wants to live on a hovel with an outside toilet.
35
19/03/2021 10:49:18 203 7
bbc
Cornwall to live is lovely in principle. Grey depressing winters hit even harder down there and summers are often a wash out. Rude locals, packed roads at peak holiday time. The dream often doesn't mirror the reality!
81
19/03/2021 11:27:18 169 6
bbc
I live in Cornwall for 17 years. Lovely when the sun shines, wet damp hole for the 300 days of the year. Remember folks, there is nothing in between Cornwall and the USA. Just a big damp ocean....
121
19/03/2021 11:59:44 10 7
bbc
How dark it is in winter! The councils don't believe in public lighting. It puts up the Council Tax, you see.
391
19/03/2021 13:50:54 26 0
bbc
And the same goes for most areas that people dream of moving to - Wales, the Scottish Highlands & Islands, the Lake District. No-one should ever relocate anywhere on the basis of enjoying a week's summer holiday there once. I'd recommend renting somewhere for at least a year to experience the place in all seasons before committing yourself.
429
19/03/2021 14:16:32 12 3
bbc
Aha! Clever tactics, tictacs. Slag the place off, so that nobody wants to go there, thus protecting it for yourself. I see through you!
462
19/03/2021 14:36:21 15 2
bbc
here here, i've been here 25 years now & it is not all it is cracked up to be, emmit season is horrendous......i'd stay where you are if i was you, i made a huge mistake & now can't afford to move back......
683
19/03/2021 16:38:40 10 2
bbc
the rude locals are probably those who have recently moved to the area not the indigenous locals
696
19/03/2021 16:45:11 3 0
bbc
Too true. Beautiful weather between April and July, then it goes downhill from there.
969
19/03/2021 22:55:19 0 2
bbc
Cornwall natives are renowned for being rude to anyone not born in the area. They even have an offensive Cornish word for tourists. "Grockles". That said, you can go from Cornwall all the way east to west Somerset if you want rude natives. On a side note, the gene pool down here is so small, it beggars belief. Most of the natives are thick as mince, and the number of illiterates is scary.
36
19/03/2021 10:49:29 8 2
bbc
Surely this article demands the BBC's celebrated Affordability Calculator? I thought it was compulsory.
21
19/03/2021 10:40:56 2 0
bbc
One track mind Peter darling.
37
19/03/2021 10:51:17 2 0
bbc
The market will keep going up whilst there are more people here and with capability to buy - which is obviously still the case. It is interesting from a Brexit perspective not just because of the predictions but the fact that there has been retention of people and good jobs - so far
16
19/03/2021 10:36:34 307 4
bbc
Everyone wants to live in a small pretty town, that’s why all the small pretty towns are now being surrounded by overpriced poor quality new build housing.

Here in Harrogate we have literally 1000’s of new builds and the roads are permanently gridlocked.
38
19/03/2021 10:51:47 8 10
bbc
Harrogate is a sensible size. Invest in a bicycle.
649
19/03/2021 16:14:03 0 0
bbc
Cycling routes are rubbish in Harrogate. Try the A61 and get tailed by idiots in 4x4s driving too close. No infrastructure for bikes.
29
19/03/2021 10:46:51 151 7
bbc
If the people that move too Devon, Cornwall etc integrate into the community and do not put up cameras & high walls around the property they buy, if they contribute to local events & use local shops (not order it from supermarkets for delivery), if they learn that driving the lanes means you have to know how wide your car is and you do not mind if you scratch the paint, then welcome all!
39
19/03/2021 10:52:13 57 72
bbc
Devon and Cornwall are picturesque and the climate is lovely, but the locals aren't exactly the friendliest people you'll meet (especially by northerner standards).

We bought our holiday home in Anglesey. Just as beautiful, a lot less crowded, and the Welsh people are as welcoming and lovely as you could ever want. For us, no contest.
72
19/03/2021 11:18:01 39 3
bbc
Maybe that’s because our children can’t afford to buy homes where they were born, as they’re being bought as 2nd home owners, who then make demands about what happens ’in my back yard’ rather than what’s best for locals who need to live and work there. Some villages are dying because there are more holiday homes than those lived in by locals. You’d be unwelcoming if your way of life was dying out.
120
19/03/2021 11:58:58 20 7
bbc
Wait till they set fire to your holiday home and see if you find them as welcoming.
267
19/03/2021 13:05:18 18 3
bbc
So pleased for you...and so bored you have spent your morning on this thread showing off at how privileged you are ??
291
JJ
19/03/2021 13:15:26 17 2
bbc
You are extremely lucky then - I lived in North Wales for three years and the locals were the most unfriendly, dour bunch of b....ds I have ever met - and I have lived in 6 different countries in my life so I can compare.
331
19/03/2021 13:27:17 10 3
bbc
They are very friendly people, just not to tourists, who invade year after year. They add to the local economy, granted, but tourists generally are rude themselves, demanding, leave litter and add chaos to the roads.
366
19/03/2021 13:39:44 8 2
bbc
They used to set fire to homes like yours not that long ago.
617
19/03/2021 16:04:02 1 1
bbc
spreading unsubstantiated nonsense down in the weeds of the thread here too? Blimey. People are usually as friendly as you behave towards them. And to quote you from a later post - "I couldn't afford to buy a house in the rural Essex village where I grew up either." Glad to find out Essex is in the North!?!
618
19/03/2021 16:04:14 1 0
bbc
Too much rain in Wales.
924
19/03/2021 20:05:49 1 2
bbc
St Ives was recently voted the happiest place in the uK, so that's your theory gone. I had a horrendous experience in North Wales once, I'm sure Meibion Glyndwr used the local pub as a base.
935
19/03/2021 20:39:36 0 2
bbc
Good. Hope you stay there. A more self satisfied prig I have rarely seen on these pages.
960
19/03/2021 22:23:04 1 1
bbc
........ but need to bear in mind that holiday homes in Wales present a real contest to the Welsh population who therefore face higher and unaffordable house prices - there is also devastation to communities and weakening of the Welsh language - those welcome in Wales are those who respect its nationhood, language and culture - and there needs to be a rebalancing in that direction.
20/03/2021 13:32:08 0 0
bbc
How times have changed. In the 1970’s “come home to a real fire” was a joke about Meibion Glyndwr setting fire to holiday homes in Wales.
20/03/2021 18:48:20 0 0
bbc
???????? Welsh ppl welcoming...ur having a laugh. Anglesey is full of English!
20/03/2021 22:50:44 0 0
bbc
We are very blooming friendly.
How dare you!!!
??
40
19/03/2021 10:52:45 132 41
bbc
There was no need for Sunak to create a stamp duty holiday. At all.

And now the Tories are re-floating further help-to-buy schemes in an effort to keep prices artificially high. This flies in the face of their laissez-faire dogma, demanding that market forces determine valuations!!

Why?

Because developers throw donations at the Tories and all their chums own multiple houses.

Scandalous stuff.
108
19/03/2021 11:45:01 52 106
bbc
Another tedious left wing conspiracy theory.
195
19/03/2021 12:37:12 4 19
bbc
We can hear your copy of the Socialist Worker rustling with anger from here.
359
19/03/2021 13:37:47 5 1
bbc
True...UK house prices need to fall considereably to be affordable...London prices coming down for last 2 years..
361
19/03/2021 13:37:53 2 9
bbc
You sound a bit envious to me.
680
19/03/2021 16:36:11 3 1
bbc
Wrong! Social housing tenants vote labour; property owners vote Tory. Margaret Thatcher started this with Right to Buy in the 80s and I am old enough to remember working class people actually saying now I own my own property I will vote Tory. This is a bribe for future votes. I agree prices artificially high due to what you said and QE that has inflated assets.
41
Ed
19/03/2021 10:54:38 34 7
bbc
Local Authorities need to sort out second homes. A significant stamp duty and council tax bill might do the job.
46
19/03/2021 10:56:53 13 5
bbc
Both of these already apply.
65
19/03/2021 11:12:42 10 0
bbc
A serious problem in this part ( St.Ives and district). Young locals are priced out while serving meals to visitors who have a quaint little holiday hideaway cottage...endless Carbis Bay development with the quasi Med paradigm....pastel blue boarding, glass and chrome Juliet balcony.
Then winter, ghost town..empty beaches, empty houses, youth emigration, more plans to build. And Cornwall changes.
950
19/03/2021 21:37:36 1 0
bbc
Problem is due to immigration and people having too many children.
42
19/03/2021 10:54:48 167 9
bbc
Nature in the UK is under extreme stress ,due to the needs of 68 million people. It is important that we do NOT cut down any more trees (only 9%), grub up shrubs and hedges, cover peat land, marsh or flood plains or otherwise destroy any more animals, birds & insects' habitats, because some of us suddenly wish to be 'in Nature'.

Green our own environments, before destroying theirs.
246
19/03/2021 12:56:19 113 85
bbc
Totally agree, and the UK's sprialling population is largely due to immigration. Our countryside is being bulldozed in order to house an immigrant population
967
19/03/2021 22:43:22 1 0
bbc
ah, but green doesn't always mean green does it, I have the pleasure of living in Norfolk, a lot of which is about to be ripped apart to land offshore 'clean' wind power.
a lot of habitat will be destroyed to lay cables and build substations, and we will have cables carrying huge amounts of electrical energy 1.5 metres below our feet.
check this out before you buy a house here!
13
19/03/2021 10:34:46 44 19
bbc
That re-adjustment has been coming for over twenty years, the crash didn't affect it, neither will this.
Demand will continue to outstrip supply until we build more houses.
43
19/03/2021 10:54:52 12 13
bbc
Or until we target a net-zero immigration policy for a decade or so.
499
19/03/2021 14:59:20 2 1
bbc
Better still a re-migration policy
20/03/2021 08:00:53 0 1
bbc
You seem to be deeply affected by your inabilities.
11
19/03/2021 10:25:28 182 41
bbc
The horrible price inflation in London is exporting Londoners and wrecking the rest of the country. Stay in London.
44
19/03/2021 10:56:03 133 107
bbc
It's hardly the Londoners fault - it was driven by importing foreigners into London that is pushing Londoners out - mostly down to FOM.
105
19/03/2021 11:12:50 20 43
bbc
A remainer friend of mine in Kent was complaining about all the building last week. I told her that she might now see the evidence of why we voted Leave.
125
19/03/2021 12:00:38 75 5
bbc
Most Europeans who were allowed FOM couldn't afford to live in London. The problem was (and is) the Russian, Chinese and Arabian billionaires buying up huge swathes of property. Leaving or remaining in the EU makes not a jot of difference to them!
166
19/03/2021 12:25:12 53 9
bbc
No. Mostly down to the Tory policy to attract Millionaire Russian Gangsters and Middle Eastern Sheiks with preferential tax rates.
373
19/03/2021 13:44:17 2 3
bbc
There are nearly 3 million Hong Kong citizens entitled to come to the UK (~350,000 UK passport holders, and 2.6 million others entitled); many of them are likely to use that right over the next few years. If you dislike immigration and want to blame someone, try blaming China.
595
19/03/2021 15:53:06 2 0
bbc
All those Russian crims and Saudi princes, all those Chines, Indian and Malaysian billionaires. All benefitting from that pesky EU Freedom of Movement. Oh, hang on a mo'......
610
19/03/2021 16:00:08 1 1
bbc
Hilarious really hilarious. Firstly the rich Russians, Arabs, Greek, Italians, Chinese buy in London because of the rule of law, our property contract law etc. Financial Service has created wealth for Londoners so they can buy another home. Some of these foreigners work in Financial Services well paid jobs because we have too many Brits who do not study hard subjects likes maths!
Nazis had this slogan engraved on their belt "God with us". Your nickname seem to be inspired by it. Your cape must be covering obscuring you the meaning of "good" and "hope". Removed
34
19/03/2021 10:49:15 508 105
bbc
As I Devonian, I hope Londoners will stay in London. They not only cause huge price inflation in rural areas, but also over-develop and gentrify their houses with the sole purpose of making money when they sell. All of this means the locals and their children cannot afford to live where they were born and brought up. Londoners made their city the disgrace it is - they should stay there
45
19/03/2021 10:56:12 161 40
bbc
On one hand, I agree. Property development is an absolute scurge (everywhere) and causes ridiculous price inflation.
I have to disagree with the 'right' to buy where you were brought up, though.
It is, and always has been, that you buy where you can afford.
If my parents owned a £2m house somewhere, it wouldn't be a 'right' that house prices allow me to live there as well.
73
19/03/2021 11:21:00 50 11
bbc
There are a lot of people who will never be able to buy (and never were able to buy) wherever they were born. The real problem is not enough decent rented housing caused by Thatcher selling off council houses. We need a sizeable council house building programme: not great slabs of social housing as before, not on the cheaper edges of existing cities and towns but integrated into mixed communities.
114
19/03/2021 11:57:47 24 10
bbc
"You buy where you can afford". By that reasoning there will soon come a time when nine-tenths of the U.K. population will be living in overcrowded hovels. Welcome back the 19th Century!
469
Rob
19/03/2021 14:37:40 2 0
bbc
How does property development cause house price inflation? Surely a lack of housing development is the problem? The main reason UK house prices are high is due to not enough housing being built to meet demand.
523
19/03/2021 15:11:59 0 0
bbc
Agreed. I grew up in Hampstead but that doesn't mean I have a right to live there. In fact I'd probably pay to not have to live there!
576
19/03/2021 15:45:12 0 0
bbc
Property development? We have a growing population and not enough houses it is as simple as that and people want to live in a nice house. It is only a scourge if it is bad design internally and externally. I live in Hove, Hove Town hall is hideous brutalism which I would demolish.
41
Ed
19/03/2021 10:54:38 34 7
bbc
Local Authorities need to sort out second homes. A significant stamp duty and council tax bill might do the job.
46
19/03/2021 10:56:53 13 5
bbc
Both of these already apply.
26
19/03/2021 10:46:02 95 3
bbc
So the indigenous population of rural areas that have historically been on very low wages, are now going to be priced out of the market even further.

I hope this is a temporary blip and things will return to normal. There are many 2nd home owners in my area and during the winter the local towns and villages are dead. Summer time and you cant move.
47
19/03/2021 10:57:45 66 66
bbc
The indigenous people of London were similarly impacted via mass EU migration.
54
19/03/2021 11:02:30 14 2
bbc
Yes - the old town of Londinium was overrun by turnip eaters from the shires after the Romans had introduced modern life.

(From the life of Brian) What have the Europeans/Romans ever done for us!!
102
19/03/2021 11:38:13 5 0
bbc
Yes, but the replacement or augmentation by Chinese and Japanese had already started well before Brexit. Let's see if that continues after Brexit. If not we will all have to expect even higher tax rises to replace that national income. Some may not like immigrants but some of those bring significant wealth into the country.
106
19/03/2021 11:43:45 5 0
bbc
Russian gangsters in reality.
342
19/03/2021 13:32:01 4 4
bbc
Most immigration into UK is NOT from EU, but from REst of the World (USA, India, Asia, Oz etc..)
706
19/03/2021 16:53:10 3 1
bbc
So were the indigenous people of Africa Asia they were affected by mass white European colonisation.
5
19/03/2021 10:29:50 804 22
bbc
Anyone who's moving from the city to a rural areas needs to understand that the countryside is a working environment. Our village has been taken over by people who think the countryside is some idyll, and when they find out it is isn't just complain and try to change it. We actually had someone ask us at harvest time to stop the combine as it was gone 10pm.
48
19/03/2021 10:57:54 115 5
bbc
You are so RIGHT. Townies moved in around our village and asked for the cockerel to be "shut up" as it made too much noise in the morning.
28
MVP
19/03/2021 10:46:32 28 2
bbc
It is unsurprising that people no longer want to live in London.

It is noisy, crowded and expensive.
49
19/03/2021 10:58:11 5 2
bbc
Tired of living in London eh?
28
MVP
19/03/2021 10:46:32 28 2
bbc
It is unsurprising that people no longer want to live in London.

It is noisy, crowded and expensive.
50
19/03/2021 10:58:19 10 1
bbc
Its also now largely unaffordable to many people born and raised there. A lot of the complaints that people in the west country have about outsiders coming into "their" area and pricing people out has been happening in London for decades.
117
19/03/2021 11:58:14 2 3
bbc
Indeed - although Londoners were "racist" if they said so (as they moved out to cheaper places in Essex).
20
19/03/2021 10:39:09 110 44
bbc
They might open their eyes to the real world
Maybe the incomers will help the Cornish locals. By buying their fish, seafood and dairy that they seem to have lost their main market for.
63
Tim
19/03/2021 11:09:21 8 20
bbc
Access to that market having been in the hands of the EU all along, of course. I'm sure that the French and Spanish simply love paying more than they necessarily have to in order to obtain seafoods that they were accustomed to having, whilst we were yoked to that bureaucratic pseudo-socialist empire that squats over the people of Europe, but if they want to engage in free trade, look to the EU.
52
19/03/2021 11:00:56 15 2
bbc
Property owners in London may not have to move nearer to the sea.

The house prices there are already on the edge of a cliff.
364
Dee
19/03/2021 13:39:27 1 0
bbc
Come September, they’ll be over the cliff.
755
19/03/2021 17:23:50 0 0
bbc
Yep Brighton and Hove is suffering from the London invasion because it is a nice place to live.
15
19/03/2021 10:35:04 176 53
bbc
How are all these people going to cope when they find out none of there neighbours read the Guardian Newspaper and voted to leave the EU ?
53
19/03/2021 11:02:09 22 6
bbc
They don't talk to the locals. They just socialise with their other London escapees in the same village.
182
19/03/2021 12:31:23 7 2
bbc
And of course there is no inkling that the same actions are reciprocated by the 'locals'!!
Simply using words like "They" and "London escapees" says it all.

I guess you don't live in a nice village - I did, and after moving from London, and that was NOT the way I was treated at all.
47
19/03/2021 10:57:45 66 66
bbc
The indigenous people of London were similarly impacted via mass EU migration.
54
19/03/2021 11:02:30 14 2
bbc
Yes - the old town of Londinium was overrun by turnip eaters from the shires after the Romans had introduced modern life.

(From the life of Brian) What have the Europeans/Romans ever done for us!!
3
19/03/2021 10:27:46 8 2
bbc
It's worrying that people are not seeking to rent or buy flats.

It begs the question what is going to happen to office blocks around the country that are going to be vacated due to the trend of working from home.

Converting to flats and renting out my not be fruitful.

Might not seem like a worry to most until you realise that your pension fund is most likely tied to commercial property.
55
19/03/2021 11:02:54 2 1
bbc
Yes, I keep reading comments from people saying wfh means that offices could be converted to housing, but who would want to live in a converted office block? They were not designed / built with housing in mind, with no balconies or outdoor space.
56
19/03/2021 11:03:44 26 10
bbc
It basically means that this overcrowded country is going to start feeling more overcrowded in many of the regional areas - which were protected to some extent by the huge numbers of people piling into London.

The people of Britain need to take a stand and demand a long term strategy for population stability - and, indeed, even reduction.

More people makes us poor people.
66
19/03/2021 11:13:09 7 2
bbc
This long-term strategy will need us to alter our economy to a highly profitable model that allows people to retire at a reasonable age. This then ensures all school/university leavers have good prospects going forward. Until that happens, nothing will change.
79
19/03/2021 11:24:59 0 1
bbc
well, there's been a degree of population reduction this year...
95
19/03/2021 11:35:32 2 0
bbc
We are sovereign -- bring it up with mop-head. BTW, why does he do that? He can wear a suit but doesn't understand how a comb works? Surely he doesn't think the populous will think he's a cool guy because of messy hair?

Do they?
773
19/03/2021 17:31:36 1 0
bbc
Well lots of middle class women have 4 children. Also with the number of divorces there are 2 sets of kids born to the same man or woman. I am against this because automation and climate change mean we do not need as many humans. We consume too much because we are greedy. If you have one child you can help them buy help with education fees. Why don't we do this?
20/03/2021 08:23:36 0 0
bbc
your comment sound like a speach of some of sort of cleansing. Scary!
57
19/03/2021 11:04:09 62 1
bbc
I’m from Cornwall. Looks like I’ll have to add a few more years onto my predicted date to purchase my first home. Buzzing. ??
259
19/03/2021 13:02:04 24 53
bbc
But they'll be more jobs cleaning my holiday home and looking after the garden, so there's some silver lining for you.
722
19/03/2021 17:02:14 1 3
bbc
Get a second job. That's what I did.
ww
20/03/2021 15:42:12 0 0
bbc
Move.
58
VF
19/03/2021 11:04:20 34 8
bbc
Great.

So after ruining their own cities the descend on the countryside like a plague of locusts.
88
19/03/2021 11:31:49 18 5
bbc
I've just moved out of London.

The pandemic has allowed me to move back to near my parents home (in the countryside) while still maintaining my London job & wage.

A wage that I will now be spending locally so surly its a good thing........
Removed
59
19/03/2021 11:06:45 391 30
bbc
Second homes are the scourge of our most beautiful areas. Charge them double council tax and make it a legal requirement that they should be occupied more than half the year.
78
19/03/2021 11:24:04 162 27
bbc
Unless they are let out then I would want 5 x council tax rate.
87
19/03/2021 11:29:53 12 41
bbc
so houses that use no council services should pay double? they are arguably already paying 1000% more than they should be........
89
19/03/2021 11:31:59 14 30
bbc
Council tax is to pay for services used in the area - if you aren't living in the house then surely you should pay less. Perhaps the key is to increase stamp duty significantly for second homes.
216
19/03/2021 12:43:27 10 0
bbc
They would still find a loophole to get out of paying it, where I live probably 1 in 10 properties are mostly unused second homes.
226
19/03/2021 12:47:32 13 19
bbc
It seems that if you have become successful through work, as in most cases of 2nd home owners which I'm not one, then you should be penalized by paying more for something I think you will find that most 2nd homes will become retirement homes. Where does it stop, should you pay extra for more then one car, a boat 3 or more bedrooms or more then 2 children?
230
GEH
19/03/2021 12:48:17 16 6
bbc
There may be a problem with insisting that people with two homes occupy them both for over half the year!
255
19/03/2021 13:00:38 28 3
bbc
Absolutely agree.

When we are repeatedly told that there is a housing shortage in the UK; the ownership of second homes should be discouraged and taxation is the best way to do that.

And the extra tax income raised would take a little pressure off the rest of us.

Problem is - many MPs have second homes, so let's not hold our breath on that one.....
270
19/03/2021 13:06:33 12 3
bbc
No second homes until the housing demand is met and then strict rules to restrict second home ownership to brand new properties on new sites thereby protecting existing communities from rampant price inflation.
295
19/03/2021 13:16:36 13 0
bbc
Gwynedd has just gone from 150% to 200% council tax on second homes unless it is a commercial holiday let.

However, most people in these communities understand the money and employment benefits tourism brings.
433
19/03/2021 14:17:42 3 5
bbc
Who are you (or anyone) to say what people can or cannot spend their money on.
As a side point, I'm not sure if you're being ironic or can't add up, but if it were a legal requirement to live in a property for more than 50% of the year, it would be impossible ever to have a second home
520
19/03/2021 15:09:56 3 1
bbc
Let them to the immigrants who actually do a lot of the hard work in the fields.
531
19/03/2021 15:16:17 1 0
bbc
Never gonna happen simply as it’s those who make the rules who are the types who to have the second homes.
547
19/03/2021 15:23:16 1 2
bbc
How do you define a second home?

Should a married couple not be allowed 2 homes, as much as an unmarried couple in a steady relationship?

Should someone with a property interest connected to their business be penalised from owning a home?

Should someone with a small part ownership with a parent or child not be allowed a home of their own?

It's too difficult to define, it should never happen.
578
19/03/2021 15:46:47 1 2
bbc
Half a year occupation more likely now city folk are able to work from home. Double council tax for what? They are only there half a year.
692
19/03/2021 16:42:54 4 1
bbc
Most likely they are making use of a loophole where they register it as a holiday let, never rent it out, but still pay barely any council tax.
741
19/03/2021 17:10:51 0 0
bbc
Stamp duty is horrifically expensive on a second home because it costs more; I had to pay an extra £12k when I moved last year because I hadn't sold my other house. However, it's refunded if the original house is sold within three years. I also had to pay full council tax on my old house whilst waiting to sell it, which took 12 months (thanks Covid!).
817
19/03/2021 18:00:00 1 0
bbc
I've never understood why you get a council tax discount on an empty second property when the council is paying to look after the homeless. So silly and easily changed.
975
19/03/2021 23:16:07 0 0
bbc
No one needs two homes, should just ban it.
20/03/2021 13:39:31 0 0
bbc
The sun will set on the whole second home culture soon. It won't be allowed. In fact ownership of anything will be frowned up. Being rich and hoarding wealth will be frowned upon in the future.
60
Dea
19/03/2021 11:08:13 20 0
bbc
Its not changed were I want to live. It has however made it even less affordable as people pile out of London and inflate local prices even more than before.

Especially with the extensions to the government's schemes to prop up houses prices giving the buyers incentive to compete with each other for the same houses.
3
19/03/2021 10:27:46 8 2
bbc
It's worrying that people are not seeking to rent or buy flats.

It begs the question what is going to happen to office blocks around the country that are going to be vacated due to the trend of working from home.

Converting to flats and renting out my not be fruitful.

Might not seem like a worry to most until you realise that your pension fund is most likely tied to commercial property.
61
19/03/2021 11:08:25 0 0
bbc
If these office blocks are converted to flats and the 'change of use' is altered, then more than likely they would not be permitted in a commercial property fund.
29
19/03/2021 10:46:51 151 7
bbc
If the people that move too Devon, Cornwall etc integrate into the community and do not put up cameras & high walls around the property they buy, if they contribute to local events & use local shops (not order it from supermarkets for delivery), if they learn that driving the lanes means you have to know how wide your car is and you do not mind if you scratch the paint, then welcome all!
62
19/03/2021 11:08:41 15 3
bbc
Some of us oldies are buying from supermarkets for delivery to reduce Covid risks.
710
19/03/2021 16:55:59 0 0
bbc
and supermarkets do employ local people
Maybe the incomers will help the Cornish locals. By buying their fish, seafood and dairy that they seem to have lost their main market for.
63
Tim
19/03/2021 11:09:21 8 20
bbc
Access to that market having been in the hands of the EU all along, of course. I'm sure that the French and Spanish simply love paying more than they necessarily have to in order to obtain seafoods that they were accustomed to having, whilst we were yoked to that bureaucratic pseudo-socialist empire that squats over the people of Europe, but if they want to engage in free trade, look to the EU.
164
19/03/2021 12:23:48 25 12
bbc
So, the lack of a million affordable homes is the fault of the EU?

Standard Leaver's 'Blame the EU for everything' mindset.
994
20/03/2021 02:24:17 1 0
bbc
British fishermen actually sold their rights freely to the highest French/Spanish bidder.
64
Dea
19/03/2021 11:10:57 214 3
bbc
They've built loads of new houses near us and the people moving in are complaining about the amount of traffic. Well there is bound to be a lot of traffic, they've doubled the size of the village with hundreds of new houses....
112
19/03/2021 11:56:21 125 1
bbc
They've built 900 new homes near me. Thankfully it's a few 100m from a motorway junction so access is good, and it was the former colliery site, so the developers have cleaned up a contaminated site and made good use of it.

If only all new developments could be so well located.

(They didn't build any schools though, so that's caused a problems.)
240
19/03/2021 12:54:25 19 0
bbc
Thats the issue developers are being allowed to make big bucks on the housing without ever contributing to the local infratsure leaving it over whelmed, roads sewage drainage transport
41
Ed
19/03/2021 10:54:38 34 7
bbc
Local Authorities need to sort out second homes. A significant stamp duty and council tax bill might do the job.
65
19/03/2021 11:12:42 10 0
bbc
A serious problem in this part ( St.Ives and district). Young locals are priced out while serving meals to visitors who have a quaint little holiday hideaway cottage...endless Carbis Bay development with the quasi Med paradigm....pastel blue boarding, glass and chrome Juliet balcony.
Then winter, ghost town..empty beaches, empty houses, youth emigration, more plans to build. And Cornwall changes.
56
19/03/2021 11:03:44 26 10
bbc
It basically means that this overcrowded country is going to start feeling more overcrowded in many of the regional areas - which were protected to some extent by the huge numbers of people piling into London.

The people of Britain need to take a stand and demand a long term strategy for population stability - and, indeed, even reduction.

More people makes us poor people.
66
19/03/2021 11:13:09 7 2
bbc
This long-term strategy will need us to alter our economy to a highly profitable model that allows people to retire at a reasonable age. This then ensures all school/university leavers have good prospects going forward. Until that happens, nothing will change.
71
19/03/2021 11:17:41 3 4
bbc
We need to re-learn the lesson of the industrial revolution: that productivity and wealth come from efficient automation and mass production.

Meanwhile, during the EU era we got used to relying on cheap labour instead - and productivity stalled for years.

Meanwhile the pinko influenced youth are pro-envionment and want cheap housing, but think letting in lots more people is a good idea.
67
19/03/2021 11:15:47 16 7
bbc
Anyone who leaves a big city and expects they will keep their job remotely, as we have had during Covid-19, is delusional. I suspect a lot of people will find themselves with monster commutes, or financially in trouble as they will not have the same income as when they lived in the city.
84
19/03/2021 11:28:31 9 4
bbc
Speak for yourself. My employer has already confirmed I only need to be back in the office once or twice per week after the pandemic & I don't mind a longer commute if its only a few times a week.

They have already ditched a number of offices & would not be able to get everyone into the ones left if they did want us all in all the time.
158
19/03/2021 12:19:36 3 0
bbc
Open your eyes, it's happening all around you!
349
Dee
19/03/2021 13:34:31 5 0
bbc
Many companies are already moving out of London to other UK cities in their droves because commercial property prices are way too high. On the BBC news today, the faster new forthcoming broadband speeds will be had in areas outside London.
13
19/03/2021 10:34:46 44 19
bbc
That re-adjustment has been coming for over twenty years, the crash didn't affect it, neither will this.
Demand will continue to outstrip supply until we build more houses.
68
19/03/2021 11:15:58 6 0
bbc
'The last 20 years' neatly excludes the last major re-adjustment in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when prices dropped by around 20%, and I got into the property market. That wasn't the result of a major recession (although a minor, quite prolonged one) but I remember it putting a lot of people into negative equity.
160
19/03/2021 12:21:56 0 0
bbc
The government at the time screwed with the housing market whilst removing MIRAS, boom and bust. Lessons were learnt thank goodness as worse financial hurdles have failed to halt the rise in prices.
69
19/03/2021 11:16:07 24 3
bbc
........and where do we expect the near 300,000 nett new immigrants per annum to live?
86
19/03/2021 11:29:01 14 10
bbc
Brexit worked, then!!
743
19/03/2021 17:12:02 1 2
bbc
What the hell are you talking about what net new immigrants of 300,000 all that has stopped. There is this thing called Brexit have you heard of it?
34
19/03/2021 10:49:15 508 105
bbc
As I Devonian, I hope Londoners will stay in London. They not only cause huge price inflation in rural areas, but also over-develop and gentrify their houses with the sole purpose of making money when they sell. All of this means the locals and their children cannot afford to live where they were born and brought up. Londoners made their city the disgrace it is - they should stay there
70
19/03/2021 11:16:19 61 27
bbc
"Londoners made their city the disgrace it is - they should stay there"

I have no intention of leaving London. I do usually like to visit Devon though, I assume that its still OK with you? Or shall we all stay away completely and give you something else to bellyache about?
315
19/03/2021 13:22:31 9 0
bbc
It is fine to visit of course it is. Unfortunately when people buy and only complain, we get fed up with it. The post re buying next to a church and then complaining about the bells says it all! There is no way a cockeral can be shut up, unless you keep him in the dark and that would be animal cruelty.
328
19/03/2021 13:26:43 5 1
bbc
Yes, if you could stay away that would be lovely thank you.
66
19/03/2021 11:13:09 7 2
bbc
This long-term strategy will need us to alter our economy to a highly profitable model that allows people to retire at a reasonable age. This then ensures all school/university leavers have good prospects going forward. Until that happens, nothing will change.
71
19/03/2021 11:17:41 3 4
bbc
We need to re-learn the lesson of the industrial revolution: that productivity and wealth come from efficient automation and mass production.

Meanwhile, during the EU era we got used to relying on cheap labour instead - and productivity stalled for years.

Meanwhile the pinko influenced youth are pro-envionment and want cheap housing, but think letting in lots more people is a good idea.
257
19/03/2021 13:01:10 2 0
bbc
You have 100% nailed it there - mass migration of low-skilled, low-paid workers ramps rents and house prices, suppresses wages and suppresses productivity.
369
Tim
19/03/2021 13:41:44 2 1
bbc
Our productivity stalled because we don't 'produce' anything any longer. We rely on the ethereal financial services sector which, lets be honest, can float around the world at the drop of a hat. We have a pathetically small manufacturing base as is witnessed by our complete inability to mass produce PPE and vaccines (main production in India). We need to get a grip.
39
19/03/2021 10:52:13 57 72
bbc
Devon and Cornwall are picturesque and the climate is lovely, but the locals aren't exactly the friendliest people you'll meet (especially by northerner standards).

We bought our holiday home in Anglesey. Just as beautiful, a lot less crowded, and the Welsh people are as welcoming and lovely as you could ever want. For us, no contest.
72
19/03/2021 11:18:01 39 3
bbc
Maybe that’s because our children can’t afford to buy homes where they were born, as they’re being bought as 2nd home owners, who then make demands about what happens ’in my back yard’ rather than what’s best for locals who need to live and work there. Some villages are dying because there are more holiday homes than those lived in by locals. You’d be unwelcoming if your way of life was dying out.
80
19/03/2021 11:25:17 25 14
bbc
I couldn't afford to buy a house in the rural Essex village where I grew up either.

The difference between us, I suspect, is a question of temperament? Rather than being bitter and blaming those people who could afford to move in, I "got on my bike" and moved somewhere that I could afford to live, rolled my sleeves up and got cracking, working and studying hard. Now, years later, I can afford it.
45
19/03/2021 10:56:12 161 40
bbc
On one hand, I agree. Property development is an absolute scurge (everywhere) and causes ridiculous price inflation.
I have to disagree with the 'right' to buy where you were brought up, though.
It is, and always has been, that you buy where you can afford.
If my parents owned a £2m house somewhere, it wouldn't be a 'right' that house prices allow me to live there as well.
73
19/03/2021 11:21:00 50 11
bbc
There are a lot of people who will never be able to buy (and never were able to buy) wherever they were born. The real problem is not enough decent rented housing caused by Thatcher selling off council houses. We need a sizeable council house building programme: not great slabs of social housing as before, not on the cheaper edges of existing cities and towns but integrated into mixed communities.
111
19/03/2021 11:47:33 24 18
bbc
Council houses were getting old and were expensive to maintain. There were often problems with tenants. They are a financial millstone, even Labour councils don't want council housing.
147
19/03/2021 12:02:59 28 5
bbc
When Thatcher sold off council houses the population was static, as very few people moved here from abroad and in some years more people left Britain than arrived, so we net lost people.

High immigration from the late 1990s caused higher house demand, more houses should have been built by Labour and Cameron.
23
19/03/2021 10:42:46 260 41
bbc
Things will settle done in a few years as things get back to normal and people regret their decision.

Frankly anyone who owns 2, or more, homes can sod off.
74
19/03/2021 11:21:07 173 314
bbc
"Frankly anyone who owns 2, or more, homes can sod off."

Ah, the politics of envy, the politics of the Left. Writ large for all to see.

You'd be buying a lovely little bolthole in the country if you could, too, and you wouldn't be taking any lectures from anyone telling you how selfish you are in so doing. Being successful isn't a bad thing or something to be ashamed of.
113
19/03/2021 11:57:00 87 12
bbc
My lovely little "bolthole" in the country is where I've lived, grew up and went to school and work from all my life. There's a national shortage of housing so people looking for a home should have priority over those who already have one and are just looking for a part-time retreat. That is a waste of available housing stock, that's common sense, not envy.
115
19/03/2021 11:58:00 50 8
bbc
Depends what you do with that success, I wouldn't become $77bn richer during this pandemic and deny any of my employees paid sick leave like Jeff Bezos or spread dangerous misinformation about COVID-19 like Donald Trump or Elon Musk.
133
19/03/2021 12:04:33 78 11
bbc
Successful... or Selfish?

No one NEEDS 3 Homes, me me me culture in a nut shell
148
19/03/2021 12:12:58 72 10
bbc
Unfortunately there is a strong correlation between "being successful" with pure selfishness and tax avoiding criminality.
217
19/03/2021 12:43:30 44 4
bbc
Its not the being the successful thats the problem, its the harm the flows from it and the impact it has on the daily lives of those who already live in the under pressure areas
409
19/03/2021 14:00:40 12 7
bbc
"Ah, the politics of envy, the politics of the Left. Writ large for all to see."

BORING, the envy card has been played too many times. I could easily respond to that dumb comment by saying "me me me I'll do what I want stuff the externalised consequences, typical politics of the right whingers", anyone with half a brain cell can resort to primitive in-group out-group tribalism.
458
19/03/2021 14:31:39 8 4
bbc
I'm happy to be successful in life - and I own NO houses - I rent, thereby, occupying what would otherwise be a holiday home in a beautiful part of the world AND I don't feel the need to demonstrate my "success" by owning homes that are unoccupied. There are words for you and they have four letters....
481
mm
19/03/2021 14:48:59 6 4
bbc
Jeez, success has nothing to do with it - greed has though!
535
19/03/2021 15:18:05 4 1
bbc
Not envy or left wing to want to stay near your family and your community. It is however selfish to deny others that.
Why do you bring ‘left’ into it. The West Country, where I live, only ever votes Tories in.
Locals are denied a chance to buy because of money earned elsewhere. You don’t understand the average wage in the places you want a bolthole, the same one which you seem to speak out of.
546
19/03/2021 15:22:40 2 3
bbc
But there is shame in being a selfish aunt, which is what you are.
623
19/03/2021 16:05:30 3 2
bbc
"Being successful isn't a bad thing or something to be ashamed of."

Great attempt at misrepresenting your opponent's argument!!

No, being successful isn't a bad thing per se. Making it impossible for people to own a home in their preferred localities because property has been hoovered up by the wealthy as an 'investment asset' IS!
630
19/03/2021 16:09:17 3 2
bbc
That's a heck a lot of assumptions you stuck-up twit!
5
19/03/2021 10:29:50 804 22
bbc
Anyone who's moving from the city to a rural areas needs to understand that the countryside is a working environment. Our village has been taken over by people who think the countryside is some idyll, and when they find out it is isn't just complain and try to change it. We actually had someone ask us at harvest time to stop the combine as it was gone 10pm.
75
19/03/2021 11:21:41 56 3
bbc
I'm surprised they didn't also ask you to add fabric conditioner to cow feed to make the slurry smell sweeter.
76
19/03/2021 11:22:49 16 1
bbc
After ten years of hard saving, we were ready for our Devon smallholding move last March All our viewings cancelled as covid hit, then in june when we were able to go again to view we were priced out. Prices increased by £60k compared to £15k in essex...we are stuck. Estate agents said 80% are 2nd home or people from London and some already saying how hard winter is and isolating...
77
19/03/2021 11:23:08 35 10
bbc
In rural Lincolnshire where I live, in the small village where we live several Southerners have come and gone over the last few years.

They added nothing to village life, drove their Chelsea tractors at stupid speed, complained about the tractors driving like tractors, made few friends and were not missed when they left.
127
19/03/2021 12:01:24 10 25
bbc
So at least there's still work for you in the fields. Off you go.
156
19/03/2021 12:18:51 7 0
bbc
Lol. Country drivers drive much faster than city dwellers.
279
19/03/2021 13:10:05 8 0
bbc
I imagine they were met with lots of friendly faces by the sounds of it. Not.
292
19/03/2021 13:15:46 0 1
bbc
I'm a Southerner who lives in Lincolnshire. As soon as people realised that my Party (I think you can guess which from my nickname) was actually there to help people with their Poll Tax if they were house owners and the Council Benefits if they have council houses, they couldn't have become more welcoming. If I, as their neighbour, don't have the answer, I can ask my Cllr on their behalf.
Sorry you had the misfortune of having the tosser Londoners! I hear you though. Removed
59
19/03/2021 11:06:45 391 30
bbc
Second homes are the scourge of our most beautiful areas. Charge them double council tax and make it a legal requirement that they should be occupied more than half the year.
78
19/03/2021 11:24:04 162 27
bbc
Unless they are let out then I would want 5 x council tax rate.
311
19/03/2021 13:20:43 1 2
bbc
Is that what you would like is it ?
dioti.
404
19/03/2021 13:56:50 1 0
bbc
Why?
872
19/03/2021 19:02:01 0 0
bbc
Council tax is paid by the tenant. Seems a little harsh to charge them so much - how will they ever save for their own home?
56
19/03/2021 11:03:44 26 10
bbc
It basically means that this overcrowded country is going to start feeling more overcrowded in many of the regional areas - which were protected to some extent by the huge numbers of people piling into London.

The people of Britain need to take a stand and demand a long term strategy for population stability - and, indeed, even reduction.

More people makes us poor people.
79
19/03/2021 11:24:59 0 1
bbc
well, there's been a degree of population reduction this year...
72
19/03/2021 11:18:01 39 3
bbc
Maybe that’s because our children can’t afford to buy homes where they were born, as they’re being bought as 2nd home owners, who then make demands about what happens ’in my back yard’ rather than what’s best for locals who need to live and work there. Some villages are dying because there are more holiday homes than those lived in by locals. You’d be unwelcoming if your way of life was dying out.
80
19/03/2021 11:25:17 25 14
bbc
I couldn't afford to buy a house in the rural Essex village where I grew up either.

The difference between us, I suspect, is a question of temperament? Rather than being bitter and blaming those people who could afford to move in, I "got on my bike" and moved somewhere that I could afford to live, rolled my sleeves up and got cracking, working and studying hard. Now, years later, I can afford it.
20/03/2021 22:52:11 0 0
bbc
Well done Lord Norman “on yer bike” Raiden.
We can all learn a lot from you
35
19/03/2021 10:49:18 203 7
bbc
Cornwall to live is lovely in principle. Grey depressing winters hit even harder down there and summers are often a wash out. Rude locals, packed roads at peak holiday time. The dream often doesn't mirror the reality!
81
19/03/2021 11:27:18 169 6
bbc
I live in Cornwall for 17 years. Lovely when the sun shines, wet damp hole for the 300 days of the year. Remember folks, there is nothing in between Cornwall and the USA. Just a big damp ocean....
484
19/03/2021 14:50:04 7 1
bbc
Great waves, though. You must concede that!
601
19/03/2021 15:55:24 11 5
bbc
Spain on the other hand is 300 days of sun and 60 days of rain and they are friendlier than the Cornish.
82
19/03/2021 11:27:31 1 6
bbc
Death rate up 7% in 2020.
What's 7% of 604,000?
ONS said a 20% increase - but they ignore 2015.
83
19/03/2021 11:28:15 21 1
bbc
I could never move to Cornwall as I'd end up 25 stones visiting Philps of Hayle every day to munch on their pasties.
67
19/03/2021 11:15:47 16 7
bbc
Anyone who leaves a big city and expects they will keep their job remotely, as we have had during Covid-19, is delusional. I suspect a lot of people will find themselves with monster commutes, or financially in trouble as they will not have the same income as when they lived in the city.
84
19/03/2021 11:28:31 9 4
bbc
Speak for yourself. My employer has already confirmed I only need to be back in the office once or twice per week after the pandemic & I don't mind a longer commute if its only a few times a week.

They have already ditched a number of offices & would not be able to get everyone into the ones left if they did want us all in all the time.
Next they'll be employing Sanjay to do the job from even further away...... Removed
408
19/03/2021 14:00:24 1 3
bbc
Lots of people thinking that working from home is the new utopia. Haven't people realised that now that employers know that the work can be done easily remotely, what's to stop them employing non British employees from around the world? Careful what you wish for is what I say.
843
19/03/2021 18:15:50 0 2
bbc
My moderated comment was to show that once your employer realises they don't need you in the office they may find they don't need you in the country and someone from a far lower cost country (i.e. India, who speak English) can do the job instead at a far lower cost.
85
19/03/2021 11:28:54 1 1
bbc
Jeez !! Marshall 's optician must be in demand, that is some pair of specs. I would move to Cornwall for a pair of those cool babies alone.
69
19/03/2021 11:16:07 24 3
bbc
........and where do we expect the near 300,000 nett new immigrants per annum to live?
86
19/03/2021 11:29:01 14 10
bbc
Brexit worked, then!!
59
19/03/2021 11:06:45 391 30
bbc
Second homes are the scourge of our most beautiful areas. Charge them double council tax and make it a legal requirement that they should be occupied more than half the year.
87
19/03/2021 11:29:53 12 41
bbc
so houses that use no council services should pay double? they are arguably already paying 1000% more than they should be........
533
19/03/2021 15:17:25 4 1
bbc
No houses to be homes not getaways for the pompous rich please
58
VF
19/03/2021 11:04:20 34 8
bbc
Great.

So after ruining their own cities the descend on the countryside like a plague of locusts.
88
19/03/2021 11:31:49 18 5
bbc
I've just moved out of London.

The pandemic has allowed me to move back to near my parents home (in the countryside) while still maintaining my London job & wage.

A wage that I will now be spending locally so surly its a good thing........
740
19/03/2021 17:10:46 0 1
bbc
Good for you. If you employ someone try and pay them well it means they can spend money. For me capitalism is about creating and spreading wealth. In the UK we are doing the former but failing on the latter for many people.
59
19/03/2021 11:06:45 391 30
bbc
Second homes are the scourge of our most beautiful areas. Charge them double council tax and make it a legal requirement that they should be occupied more than half the year.
89
19/03/2021 11:31:59 14 30
bbc
Council tax is to pay for services used in the area - if you aren't living in the house then surely you should pay less. Perhaps the key is to increase stamp duty significantly for second homes.
239
19/03/2021 12:38:54 38 3
bbc
Council also pay to house people who can’t afford overinflated rent, driven up by price rises caused by second home ownership. Cornwall is incredibly deprived of decent jobs because communities have been ruined by second home owners not living in their holiday homes full time. Ghost villages in the winter. So yes, their council tax should be incredibly high unless they are a full time resident.
383
19/03/2021 13:47:08 5 2
bbc
In Birmingham 30% of my council tax goes towards council pensions. Like many I had nobody except me contributing to my pension fund. It’s an absolute scandal and you can’t opt out!
824
19/03/2021 18:03:10 2 1
bbc
Are you for real? Just because your not there , the council still supplies services. Or do you want a rebate on your main house if your on holiday?
It's called privilege. If you can afford more than one house and deny the local authority of a regular contributor. I hope you won't be calling the police or fire services , as you havnt contributed towards them.
Removed
16
19/03/2021 10:36:34 307 4
bbc
Everyone wants to live in a small pretty town, that’s why all the small pretty towns are now being surrounded by overpriced poor quality new build housing.

Here in Harrogate we have literally 1000’s of new builds and the roads are permanently gridlocked.
Removed
92
19/03/2021 11:32:56 34 0
bbc
In the 80's we had an influx from London into my area, which was positive for me as derelict and poorly maintained properties were snapped up, there was disposable income to support businesses and economic growth in the town. We do not live in a 'League of Gentlemen' society for "locals only". However, I do agree if they move in they should accept aspects of local country living.
130
19/03/2021 11:57:48 5 0
bbc
Londoners getting a bashing here
But indigenous londoner, would not move to the country side through choice, maybe a home counties yuppie sort
146
19/03/2021 12:01:45 7 3
bbc
Its ok for everyone and his dog to move to London
But not the other way round
Stinks of hypocrisy
322
19/03/2021 13:23:48 1 0
bbc
No room for reflective balanced statements like that on HYS - reported ??????
93
19/03/2021 11:33:35 27 0
bbc
I used to live in Suffolk and was 80 miles from the nearest motorway. To visit anywhere outside East Anglia in a day was an expensive ordeal, with little time at the destination.

It's all very well wanting to live on a remote peninsula when the law doesn't allow you to go anywhere, but when that changes and the newbies find it takes all day to go anywhere, the gloss may wear off somewhat...
731
19/03/2021 17:06:53 2 0
bbc
I'm still annoyed that they sold the land on Aldeburgh train station so the nearest one is Saxmundham 12 bloody miles away. The best solution is living walking distance to a market town or a large village which must have 1 gastro pub, 1 artisan coffee shop, 1 butcher, 1 fishmonger, post office general store, village hall for exercise classes and flower and produce. Do you know of such a village?
94
19/03/2021 11:34:16 19 0
bbc
Cities and large towns continue to expand into green belt and farm land around their edges. If we want to keep some rural areas in the UK (other than the National Parks), the planning process needs to favour development on brownfield sites.
103
19/03/2021 11:38:32 4 4
bbc
It already does. You'll get through planning far quicker for Brownfield and despite government efforts the local authority will still give you hell for a new Greenfield application.
565
19/03/2021 15:36:31 1 0
bbc
There's masses of redundant office and retail space in city centres that can be repurposed for residential use. People will be able to move back to town to avoid commuting and be close to their work.
Oh, wait...
754
19/03/2021 17:22:34 0 0
bbc
Agree. Also change hideous office buildings in nice flats.
56
19/03/2021 11:03:44 26 10
bbc
It basically means that this overcrowded country is going to start feeling more overcrowded in many of the regional areas - which were protected to some extent by the huge numbers of people piling into London.

The people of Britain need to take a stand and demand a long term strategy for population stability - and, indeed, even reduction.

More people makes us poor people.
95
19/03/2021 11:35:32 2 0
bbc
We are sovereign -- bring it up with mop-head. BTW, why does he do that? He can wear a suit but doesn't understand how a comb works? Surely he doesn't think the populous will think he's a cool guy because of messy hair?

Do they?
96
19/03/2021 11:36:35 10 1
bbc
Feel sorry for the working-class Londoners - who don't have the cash for 'la-de-da' dreams of life in the country - and are stuck in lovely slummy London
131
19/03/2021 12:03:16 9 1
bbc
its why inequality in London is so evident. Its a city of those that can afford to live there (the really really rich) & those that are paid to live there (those on benefits)

Any middle earners who would have to pay for it themselves don't live in London (they commute in)
97
19/03/2021 11:06:30 10 8
bbc
Cornwall is awful. But then so is London. No wonder that Londoners like to go there and pretend to be surfers and eat in overpriced restaurants.
142
19/03/2021 12:10:53 5 0
bbc
Cornwal is beautiful (but I think I know what you mean), the rest of what you say is accurate.
98
19/03/2021 11:06:44 7 5
bbc
BAN foreign ownership of residential property.
Increase the time to get a UK passport to 12 years and zero criminal conviction.
Give the foreigners one year to sell up.

Result prices of property becomes affordable.
128
19/03/2021 12:01:32 1 0
bbc
In London maybe but not the rest of the UK......
143
19/03/2021 12:11:31 0 0
bbc
for some - and huge loss and misery for others.
323
Dee
19/03/2021 13:24:07 0 1
bbc
Why? If they have had all the rigorous, relevant checks & can afford the property it’s not a problem. Instead, there should be extra council tax charges for all those who leave properties empty. In that way, properties must be occupied all year round.
5
19/03/2021 10:29:50 804 22
bbc
Anyone who's moving from the city to a rural areas needs to understand that the countryside is a working environment. Our village has been taken over by people who think the countryside is some idyll, and when they find out it is isn't just complain and try to change it. We actually had someone ask us at harvest time to stop the combine as it was gone 10pm.
99
19/03/2021 11:08:09 85 13
bbc
Yep, the daft townies think they are so clever. But they are not. They don;t realise that when there is a harvesting chance it may be brief, so the combines are out 24/7. Then they moan about smells. And cockerels crowing. And mud on the road. Wish they'd stay in the cities.
153
19/03/2021 12:17:13 40 74
bbc
But you don't mind the money they bring?
625
19/03/2021 16:05:58 2 0
bbc
emmetts
5
19/03/2021 10:29:50 804 22
bbc
Anyone who's moving from the city to a rural areas needs to understand that the countryside is a working environment. Our village has been taken over by people who think the countryside is some idyll, and when they find out it is isn't just complain and try to change it. We actually had someone ask us at harvest time to stop the combine as it was gone 10pm.
Removed