Rolls-Royce says 'worst behind us' as it posts £4bn loss
11/03/2021 | news | business | 189
The plane-engine maker says 2020 was "unprecedented", but that air travel should bounce back this year.
1
11/03/2021 10:30:08 12 10
bbc
U.K. Economy , is there anything left ?
9
11/03/2021 10:39:54 12 30
bbc
Hardly. Party of the Rich have sold most of it since the disaster that was Thatcher....
25
11/03/2021 10:44:24 7 6
bbc
The UK economy is going to be fairly resilient. There is an awful lot of money sloshing about here, from all over the world. It is the southern EU countries that are going to get hammered, that EU bailout fund is worth about tuppence compared to the huge financial hole that the Mediterranean are in.
2
11/03/2021 10:30:59 14 1
bbc
Given that RR gets most of it's money on pay as you fly contracts it's hardly surprising.
3
11/03/2021 10:32:51 54 2
bbc
I think it was inevitable the company is in the red.

One upside that isn't talked about here is that the energy business is rapidly expanding, with the reactor hubs idea having advanced a lot this past year. Hopefully this historic company can make a strong recovery.
4
11/03/2021 10:33:56 5 2
bbc
To be expected.
35
11/03/2021 10:56:23 5 4
bbc
You were expecting a figure of £4 billion then?

??

??????????????????
42
11/03/2021 11:17:10 0 4
bbc
Still, if destroying Rolls Royce and throwing 7,000 people on the dole (so far) saves just one life, it will all have been worth it, eh?
5
11/03/2021 10:36:33 10 3
bbc
2020 has evidenced the need for businesses to keep cash reserves, however in doing so a business can often be penalised by our tax/financial system.

At some point our govts (present & future) will need to take note of many pandemics in the last century & start to make plans on how to help people & businesses survive them better.
40
11/03/2021 11:16:15 10 11
bbc
Not panicking and completely destroying the economy in an attempt to 'save' 0.2% of the population dying a few months earlier (aged 82.3 on average) would be a good way of doing it.
6
11/03/2021 10:37:26 3 4
bbc
I didn't think we were allowed to talk about the Rolls..
28
11/03/2021 10:47:40 4 8
bbc
You can on the Guardian today. And I don't think it is going the way the student rag hoped!
7
11/03/2021 10:37:47 3 9
bbc
What is stopping the Development of Hydrogen Aero Engines.
Surely that is the future.
Its probably that Market Companies cannot cost in the Investments. The model as BT has shown with fibre is seriously flawed when greed is at play. Unless markets can pass ALL investment costs onto customers they fail-but that is not 'build it and they will come'. BT price rise CPI+3.9% and they get away with it.
14
11/03/2021 10:45:22 11 3
bbc
Two things are hindering that, but not stopping it.
- aviation fuel is heavily subsidised all round the world;
- producing hydrogen is difficult and expensive and transporting and using it safely is even more difficult and expensive.
8
11/03/2021 10:39:42 3 12
bbc
Tory magic money forest will come to its rescue.
11
11/03/2021 10:42:55 7 7
bbc
Apparently, Party of the Rich have said we could not possibly afford any additional spend on 2019 levels...

Is Sunak going to leave "There is no money left" note, I wonder? And, more importantly, are right-wing rags going to pick that up?
27
11/03/2021 10:46:48 3 4
bbc
The difference is that the Labour magic money trees don't have any roots!
1
11/03/2021 10:30:08 12 10
bbc
U.K. Economy , is there anything left ?
9
11/03/2021 10:39:54 12 30
bbc
Hardly. Party of the Rich have sold most of it since the disaster that was Thatcher....
26
11/03/2021 10:45:29 11 7
bbc
Mrs Thatcher was one of our great Prime Ministers. She dragged Britain into the 20th century, hammered the unions who were trying to keep it firmly in the doldrums for their own selfish benefit.
29
11/03/2021 10:54:16 9 1
bbc
How many of the union ravaged industries that Thatcher closed down did Labour reopen?
63
11/03/2021 11:59:35 3 2
bbc
What happened with the 13 years of Labour though? Didn't they save it?
83
11/03/2021 12:34:53 4 2
bbc
What, like Gordon Brown sold our gold reserves at record lows and raided private pensions ...
10
ken
11/03/2021 10:42:16 42 6
bbc
The government needs to support this world leading business, we are free of EU so now act. Rolls also needs to develop hydrogen it is the way forward no pollution and easily accessible and loads of it.
12
11/03/2021 10:44:23 12 37
bbc
What, Party of the Rich and industrial strategy? An oxymoron, surely?....
17
11/03/2021 10:47:47 6 1
bbc
No pollution when it's used as fuel. But very power intensive and polluting to create, with present technologies.
43
11/03/2021 11:21:28 1 1
bbc
The UK-EU trade deal still requires either side to ensure that any subsidy over £340,000 does not distort the others market, with courts able to review decisions. Brexit means we can be more agile and flexible for small subsidies, but for RR size support, we are still not totally free, it works both ways of course. French mfr Safran (part of CFM) could object, but no more or less than before.
175
11/03/2021 16:09:41 1 7
bbc
Sound's like it's only world leading in losses! We should support profitable businesses, not prop up failing ones from the old economy.
8
11/03/2021 10:39:42 3 12
bbc
Tory magic money forest will come to its rescue.
11
11/03/2021 10:42:55 7 7
bbc
Apparently, Party of the Rich have said we could not possibly afford any additional spend on 2019 levels...

Is Sunak going to leave "There is no money left" note, I wonder? And, more importantly, are right-wing rags going to pick that up?
10
ken
11/03/2021 10:42:16 42 6
bbc
The government needs to support this world leading business, we are free of EU so now act. Rolls also needs to develop hydrogen it is the way forward no pollution and easily accessible and loads of it.
12
11/03/2021 10:44:23 12 37
bbc
What, Party of the Rich and industrial strategy? An oxymoron, surely?....
13
11/03/2021 10:45:04 2 6
bbc
Sadly, no doubt China will set-up an aero-engine plant in the UK to replace Rolls Royce.
16
11/03/2021 10:46:38 1 6
bbc
Yep, otherwise known as "freedom" to some...
18
11/03/2021 10:48:22 6 1
bbc
Probably already hacked all it needs and will do it in China.
30
11/03/2021 11:00:55 4 3
bbc
And it will be touted as a post-brexit benefit demonstrating how great the UK is at securing overseas investment...
74
11/03/2021 12:17:32 0 2
bbc
That would at least keep the very highly skilled RR staff employed in the UK.
95
11/03/2021 12:49:45 2 1
bbc
Actually, RR has set-up a plant in China, LOL
124
11/03/2021 13:17:27 0 2
bbc
China will buy it with loose change and close it down.
Currently China launch naval fleet each year bigger than the French navy so scoff at China at your peril. The wolf is not far away its already in the house ran sacking the house
7
11/03/2021 10:37:47 3 9
bbc
What is stopping the Development of Hydrogen Aero Engines.
Surely that is the future.
Its probably that Market Companies cannot cost in the Investments. The model as BT has shown with fibre is seriously flawed when greed is at play. Unless markets can pass ALL investment costs onto customers they fail-but that is not 'build it and they will come'. BT price rise CPI+3.9% and they get away with it.
14
11/03/2021 10:45:22 11 3
bbc
Two things are hindering that, but not stopping it.
- aviation fuel is heavily subsidised all round the world;
- producing hydrogen is difficult and expensive and transporting and using it safely is even more difficult and expensive.
32
11/03/2021 10:52:34 1 3
bbc
I wouldn't get on a hydrogen plane.; It would be like that Peter Sellars film when he is sitting on a bomb!
15
11/03/2021 10:46:34 11 4
bbc
This would have been the time to invest in research and development (R&D) focusing on electric or hydrogen powered aero engines. Does the government really support and encourage this? Is our economy really geared to support enough R&D? If we are going to dig ourselves out of this hole, rebuilding with new products and reformed services is needed, not sitting and waiting for the old like to resume.
20
11/03/2021 10:49:48 1 1
bbc
The last sentence should have read "... sitting and waiting for the old life to resume." Damned typos!
97
11/03/2021 12:51:36 2 1
bbc
Read other news articles and RR is at the front looking at electric power and sustainable aviation fuels including hydrogen.
If not for pandemic, RR/Airbus might have had a prototype hybrid flying this year
112
11/03/2021 13:09:11 1 1
bbc
They have and they do.
119
11/03/2021 13:14:55 0 1
bbc
its been along time since Rolls Royce had any vision or even senior engineers capable creating something new(?) Their more into being modifiers of old has been technology
13
11/03/2021 10:45:04 2 6
bbc
Sadly, no doubt China will set-up an aero-engine plant in the UK to replace Rolls Royce.
16
11/03/2021 10:46:38 1 6
bbc
Yep, otherwise known as "freedom" to some...
125
11/03/2021 13:17:57 0 1
bbc
Free dumb to others
10
ken
11/03/2021 10:42:16 42 6
bbc
The government needs to support this world leading business, we are free of EU so now act. Rolls also needs to develop hydrogen it is the way forward no pollution and easily accessible and loads of it.
17
11/03/2021 10:47:47 6 1
bbc
No pollution when it's used as fuel. But very power intensive and polluting to create, with present technologies.
104
11/03/2021 13:01:20 1 1
bbc
Not quite right.
It is energy intensive to produce, but only polluting if Methane is used instead of green electricity (solar/wind).

The argument against still regularly appears but when reading the articles the author more often than not has an axe to grind for a particular alternative or against something e.g. flying.
Basic point is electric storage hasn't the power density of other fuels
13
11/03/2021 10:45:04 2 6
bbc
Sadly, no doubt China will set-up an aero-engine plant in the UK to replace Rolls Royce.
18
11/03/2021 10:48:22 6 1
bbc
Probably already hacked all it needs and will do it in China.
19
PS
11/03/2021 10:49:13 2 9
bbc
Another non story. Any decent articles out there?
23
11/03/2021 10:51:21 6 1
bbc
Yeah, plenty.

But then, you wouldn't be able to moan on them....
34
11/03/2021 10:54:44 3 1
bbc
Try the Express Online.
38
11/03/2021 11:11:39 4 1
bbc
Why is it a non-story ? This is a business article in the business section so if you're not interested in business go read something else.

Rolls-Royce would be putting out results now pandemic or no pandemic. They just happen to be awful at the moment due to the collapse in air travel.
117
11/03/2021 13:13:08 0 1
bbc
With the obvious cul de sac Rolls Royce find themselves in you would think they would be smart enough to realise now was the time to relocate to Europe, possibly Poland, or Belgium
15
11/03/2021 10:46:34 11 4
bbc
This would have been the time to invest in research and development (R&D) focusing on electric or hydrogen powered aero engines. Does the government really support and encourage this? Is our economy really geared to support enough R&D? If we are going to dig ourselves out of this hole, rebuilding with new products and reformed services is needed, not sitting and waiting for the old like to resume.
20
11/03/2021 10:49:48 1 1
bbc
The last sentence should have read "... sitting and waiting for the old life to resume." Damned typos!
21
11/03/2021 10:51:06 3 10
bbc
Like most global companies the real cost savings can be found at the top of the organisation. But rarely do they rationalise themselves and rewrite contracts.
22
11/03/2021 10:51:07 3 5
bbc
Rolls-Royce's problems, whilst exasperated by the downturn in air travel, are more fundamental and predate the pandemic. Rolls-Royce acquired a significant presence in the marine sector to mitigate cycles in the aviation sector; they seen to have overseen a downturn in those businesses and sold them off. RR seems to operate businesses on a basis that doesn't ensure reliable profitability.
57
11/03/2021 11:54:35 2 2
bbc
Yes .. when I started investing in shares .. RR was an obvious candidate to look at.

But as it does not (did not) pay a cash dividend .. I moved on. It indicates a lack of confidence or arrogance towards investors.

Its a funny company. On the face of it .. should be a good money spinner, but it isn't.

Compare and contrast to Renishaw or Spectris .. good engineering companies that are well run.
19
PS
11/03/2021 10:49:13 2 9
bbc
Another non story. Any decent articles out there?
23
11/03/2021 10:51:21 6 1
bbc
Yeah, plenty.

But then, you wouldn't be able to moan on them....
24
11/03/2021 10:52:49 1 15
bbc
2020...with the company making a loss of almost £4bn, after a £583m profit the year before.

=Oh dear oh dear oh dear

since the market won't improve much by the end of this year, this could also mean R& R could go bankrupt ???

Meantime

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7krmx_cX28&t=20s

Maybe it is about time to sell R& R to them at a good price before nobody is willing to have it
1
11/03/2021 10:30:08 12 10
bbc
U.K. Economy , is there anything left ?
25
11/03/2021 10:44:24 7 6
bbc
The UK economy is going to be fairly resilient. There is an awful lot of money sloshing about here, from all over the world. It is the southern EU countries that are going to get hammered, that EU bailout fund is worth about tuppence compared to the huge financial hole that the Mediterranean are in.
36
11/03/2021 11:09:30 4 4
bbc
What exactly is your comment based on other than your perceptions of the EU, which i'm guessing are biased?
118
11/03/2021 13:14:46 2 3
bbc
Ah, the triumph of hope versus the reality!....

Voted Brexit, then? If you ever come across that Unicorn, let us know....
9
11/03/2021 10:39:54 12 30
bbc
Hardly. Party of the Rich have sold most of it since the disaster that was Thatcher....
26
11/03/2021 10:45:29 11 7
bbc
Mrs Thatcher was one of our great Prime Ministers. She dragged Britain into the 20th century, hammered the unions who were trying to keep it firmly in the doldrums for their own selfish benefit.
The nice man in the white coat will be along soon with your pills. Removed
51
11/03/2021 11:41:18 1 2
bbc
Have to disagree with you there fella. She looked after the rich and left he poor behind. Fortunately those types are gone and we now have Tory-lite instead.
127
11/03/2021 13:20:53 0 2
bbc
As the Blessed Margret said. There no such thing as society.
8
11/03/2021 10:39:42 3 12
bbc
Tory magic money forest will come to its rescue.
27
11/03/2021 10:46:48 3 4
bbc
The difference is that the Labour magic money trees don't have any roots!
6
11/03/2021 10:37:26 3 4
bbc
I didn't think we were allowed to talk about the Rolls..
28
11/03/2021 10:47:40 4 8
bbc
You can on the Guardian today. And I don't think it is going the way the student rag hoped!
39
11/03/2021 11:12:08 3 2
bbc
Ah so any view other than yours has to be dismissed then? Bet you'd complain if the situation was reversed.
9
11/03/2021 10:39:54 12 30
bbc
Hardly. Party of the Rich have sold most of it since the disaster that was Thatcher....
29
11/03/2021 10:54:16 9 1
bbc
How many of the union ravaged industries that Thatcher closed down did Labour reopen?
116
11/03/2021 13:13:04 1 2
bbc
Try to re-open closed factories and mines and see how easy that is. Especially as Thatcher, by creating the culture of dependency (15 years + of it), destroyed skills as well.
13
11/03/2021 10:45:04 2 6
bbc
Sadly, no doubt China will set-up an aero-engine plant in the UK to replace Rolls Royce.
30
11/03/2021 11:00:55 4 3
bbc
And it will be touted as a post-brexit benefit demonstrating how great the UK is at securing overseas investment...
31
11/03/2021 11:04:14 38 17
bbc
Sounds like it is time for the unions to step in and make sure that no jobs are lost and in so doing ensure RR will remain uncompetitve and go under, waiting for the stat to step in.
Opps sorry I was stuck in a timewarp, that was the car,steel and coal indutsries.
53
11/03/2021 11:42:04 25 22
bbc
Funny how Germany has far stronger unions and still has those industries.
Perhaps the Sun, Mail, Express, Telegraph, Times etc. had an agenda?
All of it anti British.
108
11/03/2021 13:06:49 5 3
bbc
Unions are strong in Germany and Japan, perhaps more tellingly government involvement and mentoring is very much the norm. The British way(?) is lack of investment in tooling, mediocre design more geared to modifiers than true design, Standards have not dropped among shop floor trades but across British industry graduates and company directors are extremely poor quality.
130
11/03/2021 13:24:04 1 1
bbc
Its your outdated Victorian mentality that is holding things back me thinks.
14
11/03/2021 10:45:22 11 3
bbc
Two things are hindering that, but not stopping it.
- aviation fuel is heavily subsidised all round the world;
- producing hydrogen is difficult and expensive and transporting and using it safely is even more difficult and expensive.
32
11/03/2021 10:52:34 1 3
bbc
I wouldn't get on a hydrogen plane.; It would be like that Peter Sellars film when he is sitting on a bomb!
44
11/03/2021 11:25:10 1 1
bbc
I stopped flying ten years ago.
45
11/03/2021 11:31:56 2 2
bbc
Yet you will happily sit in a plane stuffed full of highly volatile aviation fuel.
46
11/03/2021 11:32:03 4 1
bbc
Dr Strangelove? It's actually Slim Pickens riding the bomb down - Sellers is still in the US, playing two characters in the War Room and another at the USAF base.
Unforgettable scene.
33
11/03/2021 10:54:14 14 15
bbc
Well at least they can rely on the Services Agreement Boris got in the Brexit Deal......

Ooops!

It's getting crowded under the bus!
19
PS
11/03/2021 10:49:13 2 9
bbc
Another non story. Any decent articles out there?
34
11/03/2021 10:54:44 3 1
bbc
Try the Express Online.
4
11/03/2021 10:33:56 5 2
bbc
To be expected.
35
11/03/2021 10:56:23 5 4
bbc
You were expecting a figure of £4 billion then?

??

??????????????????
25
11/03/2021 10:44:24 7 6
bbc
The UK economy is going to be fairly resilient. There is an awful lot of money sloshing about here, from all over the world. It is the southern EU countries that are going to get hammered, that EU bailout fund is worth about tuppence compared to the huge financial hole that the Mediterranean are in.
36
11/03/2021 11:09:30 4 4
bbc
What exactly is your comment based on other than your perceptions of the EU, which i'm guessing are biased?
68
11/03/2021 12:00:26 3 1
bbc
I was talking to an EU business partner this morning. Interestingly, he would also vote to leave the EU. But, unlike you, I read a variety of publications to get a broad view. That E750 billion EU bailout, it is a tiny sticking patch compared to the real problems.
37
11/03/2021 11:11:33 19 9
bbc
Travelling to low infection areas onboard aircraft with state of the art ventilation systems is safer than a bus trip in the UK.
Despite virtually zero impact on the UK's appalling figures the industry has been used as a scapegoat to distract from real issues.
We need to get flying again safely and for the government to provide robust support for all sections of the aviation and travel industry.
47
11/03/2021 11:28:45 6 6
bbc
True for ventilation but ...The study, which was released without peer review, did not take into account other ways that people could catch the virus on aircraft -- including from others coughing or breathing directly on them, from surfaces or from confined spaces such as restrooms.
79
11/03/2021 12:10:02 3 1
bbc
"Said Mr O'Leary in a press release"
19
PS
11/03/2021 10:49:13 2 9
bbc
Another non story. Any decent articles out there?
38
11/03/2021 11:11:39 4 1
bbc
Why is it a non-story ? This is a business article in the business section so if you're not interested in business go read something else.

Rolls-Royce would be putting out results now pandemic or no pandemic. They just happen to be awful at the moment due to the collapse in air travel.
28
11/03/2021 10:47:40 4 8
bbc
You can on the Guardian today. And I don't think it is going the way the student rag hoped!
39
11/03/2021 11:12:08 3 2
bbc
Ah so any view other than yours has to be dismissed then? Bet you'd complain if the situation was reversed.
73
11/03/2021 12:04:38 1 5
bbc
I am not bothered about your opinion. 80 seat majority remember, we don't have to listen to the left any more. Expect an even larger conservative majority next election, as the current government steers us quickly to recovery. Business and the people back Conservatives.
5
11/03/2021 10:36:33 10 3
bbc
2020 has evidenced the need for businesses to keep cash reserves, however in doing so a business can often be penalised by our tax/financial system.

At some point our govts (present & future) will need to take note of many pandemics in the last century & start to make plans on how to help people & businesses survive them better.
40
11/03/2021 11:16:15 10 11
bbc
Not panicking and completely destroying the economy in an attempt to 'save' 0.2% of the population dying a few months earlier (aged 82.3 on average) would be a good way of doing it.
69
11/03/2021 12:13:02 6 3
bbc
You really hated your grandparents, didn't you? Didn't they spoil you enough, sweetie?
128
11/03/2021 13:21:18 3 1
bbc
Ah, the usual "only a few extra months" BS, spouted by someone who obviously doesn't understand statistics...
188
12/03/2021 08:59:28 0 0
bbc
Strangely for almost all of the last year deaths have been above the 5 year average.

If you were correct then we will soon see the rates drop massively as everyone 'due' to die in 2021 will already be gone.

You also fail to take account of the thousands hospitalised.
Removed
4
11/03/2021 10:33:56 5 2
bbc
To be expected.
42
11/03/2021 11:17:10 0 4
bbc
Still, if destroying Rolls Royce and throwing 7,000 people on the dole (so far) saves just one life, it will all have been worth it, eh?
10
ken
11/03/2021 10:42:16 42 6
bbc
The government needs to support this world leading business, we are free of EU so now act. Rolls also needs to develop hydrogen it is the way forward no pollution and easily accessible and loads of it.
43
11/03/2021 11:21:28 1 1
bbc
The UK-EU trade deal still requires either side to ensure that any subsidy over £340,000 does not distort the others market, with courts able to review decisions. Brexit means we can be more agile and flexible for small subsidies, but for RR size support, we are still not totally free, it works both ways of course. French mfr Safran (part of CFM) could object, but no more or less than before.
56
11/03/2021 11:53:29 6 1
bbc
Remember that RR has a significant presence in EU countries, so investment could be permissible.
32
11/03/2021 10:52:34 1 3
bbc
I wouldn't get on a hydrogen plane.; It would be like that Peter Sellars film when he is sitting on a bomb!
44
11/03/2021 11:25:10 1 1
bbc
I stopped flying ten years ago.
32
11/03/2021 10:52:34 1 3
bbc
I wouldn't get on a hydrogen plane.; It would be like that Peter Sellars film when he is sitting on a bomb!
45
11/03/2021 11:31:56 2 2
bbc
Yet you will happily sit in a plane stuffed full of highly volatile aviation fuel.
32
11/03/2021 10:52:34 1 3
bbc
I wouldn't get on a hydrogen plane.; It would be like that Peter Sellars film when he is sitting on a bomb!
46
11/03/2021 11:32:03 4 1
bbc
Dr Strangelove? It's actually Slim Pickens riding the bomb down - Sellers is still in the US, playing two characters in the War Room and another at the USAF base.
Unforgettable scene.
76
11/03/2021 12:07:29 0 1
bbc
Thanks for filling in the details on that Yorkshireman.
37
11/03/2021 11:11:33 19 9
bbc
Travelling to low infection areas onboard aircraft with state of the art ventilation systems is safer than a bus trip in the UK.
Despite virtually zero impact on the UK's appalling figures the industry has been used as a scapegoat to distract from real issues.
We need to get flying again safely and for the government to provide robust support for all sections of the aviation and travel industry.
47
11/03/2021 11:28:45 6 6
bbc
True for ventilation but ...The study, which was released without peer review, did not take into account other ways that people could catch the virus on aircraft -- including from others coughing or breathing directly on them, from surfaces or from confined spaces such as restrooms.
61
11/03/2021 11:57:27 3 2
bbc
Yes but couldn't that happen anywhere and not just on an aircraft ?
A few people suffer heart attacks on board planes and die each year but we can't stop flying because of heart attacks unless it is proven that being on board statistically increases the likelihood of it happening significantly.
48
11/03/2021 11:29:40 0 1
bbc
26
11/03/2021 10:45:29 11 7
bbc
Mrs Thatcher was one of our great Prime Ministers. She dragged Britain into the 20th century, hammered the unions who were trying to keep it firmly in the doldrums for their own selfish benefit.
49
bbc
The nice man in the white coat will be along soon with your pills. Removed
50
11/03/2021 11:38:08 3 5
bbc
the buck stops with you mr east,after your sacked try a politicians job then you will escape any repercussions and always have the new boris slogan of pass the buck,but dont worry the tories do state aid now because of brexit and it will be a world beating fantastic programme that will put labour to shame,they are trying to be the nice party instead of the nasty party,nurses 1% is really nasty/
54
11/03/2021 11:42:23 5 12
bbc
Labour are the real nasty party.
60
11/03/2021 11:56:51 2 1
bbc
Full stops may help to understand your "comments"
26
11/03/2021 10:45:29 11 7
bbc
Mrs Thatcher was one of our great Prime Ministers. She dragged Britain into the 20th century, hammered the unions who were trying to keep it firmly in the doldrums for their own selfish benefit.
51
11/03/2021 11:41:18 1 2
bbc
Have to disagree with you there fella. She looked after the rich and left he poor behind. Fortunately those types are gone and we now have Tory-lite instead.
65
11/03/2021 12:00:34 1 4
bbc
Not the poor, but the feckless and lazy
72
11/03/2021 12:02:31 2 3
bbc
I know many families who made good under Mrs thatcher, including my own. She backed SMEs, helped us to prosper. The industries that failed under her were zombie industries anyway.
52
11/03/2021 11:41:36 9 11
bbc
Its all OK because Emma Thompson does not want the little people flying.

And what Emma Thompson wants, the Impartial BBC will always agree with, and keep ramming down the throats of the little people.

Who incidentally are forced to pay for the Impartial BBC, whether they want it - let alone even use it - or not.
58
11/03/2021 11:43:17 6 8
bbc
You aren't forced to pay for it.
31
11/03/2021 11:04:14 38 17
bbc
Sounds like it is time for the unions to step in and make sure that no jobs are lost and in so doing ensure RR will remain uncompetitve and go under, waiting for the stat to step in.
Opps sorry I was stuck in a timewarp, that was the car,steel and coal indutsries.
53
11/03/2021 11:42:04 25 22
bbc
Funny how Germany has far stronger unions and still has those industries.
Perhaps the Sun, Mail, Express, Telegraph, Times etc. had an agenda?
All of it anti British.
62
11/03/2021 11:57:38 21 4
bbc
German unions work with management and owners for the benefit of all. Unlike the workshy dinosaurs that we ended up with in the UK.
166
11/03/2021 15:24:55 3 1
bbc
Their unions seem to be able to understand if they damage the company they also lose; now UK unions might now be able to do this some of the time but previously they could'nt. A recent example is Unite at Grangemouth; whole plant could have closed losing all jobs.
187
11/03/2021 21:36:02 0 0
bbc
Well said but unfortunately wasted on the great ignorant British public.
50
11/03/2021 11:38:08 3 5
bbc
the buck stops with you mr east,after your sacked try a politicians job then you will escape any repercussions and always have the new boris slogan of pass the buck,but dont worry the tories do state aid now because of brexit and it will be a world beating fantastic programme that will put labour to shame,they are trying to be the nice party instead of the nasty party,nurses 1% is really nasty/
54
11/03/2021 11:42:23 5 12
bbc
Labour are the real nasty party.
59
11/03/2021 11:47:17 3 4
bbc
Only if you're rich and uncaring.
75
11/03/2021 12:06:09 3 6
bbc
Listened to Angela Raynor in R4 this morning She just gabbled a load of sound bites. How on earth do Labour think they can mount a creditable challenge with their front bench? Conservatives are the party of business, and most people understand that is what we need right now.
55
11/03/2021 11:47:28 19 1
bbc
Rolls Royce was always likely to survive because of their diversity of trade.

Good news to hear that they are through the worst, time to buy some shares??
89
11/03/2021 12:46:29 1 5
bbc
I would advise caution. There are (my opinion) serious underlying problems with RR's business model; I personally have still to be convinced that the technical problems with the Trent 1000 Engine have been resolved and that the Trent XWB won't suffer similar technical problems.
43
11/03/2021 11:21:28 1 1
bbc
The UK-EU trade deal still requires either side to ensure that any subsidy over £340,000 does not distort the others market, with courts able to review decisions. Brexit means we can be more agile and flexible for small subsidies, but for RR size support, we are still not totally free, it works both ways of course. French mfr Safran (part of CFM) could object, but no more or less than before.
56
11/03/2021 11:53:29 6 1
bbc
Remember that RR has a significant presence in EU countries, so investment could be permissible.
22
11/03/2021 10:51:07 3 5
bbc
Rolls-Royce's problems, whilst exasperated by the downturn in air travel, are more fundamental and predate the pandemic. Rolls-Royce acquired a significant presence in the marine sector to mitigate cycles in the aviation sector; they seen to have overseen a downturn in those businesses and sold them off. RR seems to operate businesses on a basis that doesn't ensure reliable profitability.
57
11/03/2021 11:54:35 2 2
bbc
Yes .. when I started investing in shares .. RR was an obvious candidate to look at.

But as it does not (did not) pay a cash dividend .. I moved on. It indicates a lack of confidence or arrogance towards investors.

Its a funny company. On the face of it .. should be a good money spinner, but it isn't.

Compare and contrast to Renishaw or Spectris .. good engineering companies that are well run.
93
11/03/2021 12:48:33 2 1
bbc
You're part of RR's problem
Aviation is high tech, safety critical long term investment as other countries e.g. Germany know. The quick buck UK investors force asset stripping for short term returns or push firms to sell up
Previous Chair Rishton panick sold profitable assets cos city agitators pressed for cash 'now'. So RR no longer has presence in shorthaul market that will be first to restart
52
11/03/2021 11:41:36 9 11
bbc
Its all OK because Emma Thompson does not want the little people flying.

And what Emma Thompson wants, the Impartial BBC will always agree with, and keep ramming down the throats of the little people.

Who incidentally are forced to pay for the Impartial BBC, whether they want it - let alone even use it - or not.
58
11/03/2021 11:43:17 6 8
bbc
You aren't forced to pay for it.
178
11/03/2021 16:39:33 0 1
bbc
Absolute utter tosh.

By law you have to pay even if you don't consume any content from the Impartial BBC.

As reported on here, the Impartial BBC even cite themselves that over 90% of people who claim that they do not need a TV license; do in fact need one.

Try doing some cursory research before commenting.
54
11/03/2021 11:42:23 5 12
bbc
Labour are the real nasty party.
59
11/03/2021 11:47:17 3 4
bbc
Only if you're rich and uncaring.
177
11/03/2021 16:35:16 1 1
bbc
What with the super generous Furlough scheme?

Or pre Covid, taking more low earners out of paying tax altogether?

According to Lamy, and KYS until he quietly U turned (while the Impartial BBC turned a blind eye) Labour would have let frontline health workers die to ensure that all of the proper paperwork regarding PPE procurement - during a global shortage - was submitted on time.
50
11/03/2021 11:38:08 3 5
bbc
the buck stops with you mr east,after your sacked try a politicians job then you will escape any repercussions and always have the new boris slogan of pass the buck,but dont worry the tories do state aid now because of brexit and it will be a world beating fantastic programme that will put labour to shame,they are trying to be the nice party instead of the nasty party,nurses 1% is really nasty/
60
11/03/2021 11:56:51 2 1
bbc
Full stops may help to understand your "comments"
47
11/03/2021 11:28:45 6 6
bbc
True for ventilation but ...The study, which was released without peer review, did not take into account other ways that people could catch the virus on aircraft -- including from others coughing or breathing directly on them, from surfaces or from confined spaces such as restrooms.
61
11/03/2021 11:57:27 3 2
bbc
Yes but couldn't that happen anywhere and not just on an aircraft ?
A few people suffer heart attacks on board planes and die each year but we can't stop flying because of heart attacks unless it is proven that being on board statistically increases the likelihood of it happening significantly.
53
11/03/2021 11:42:04 25 22
bbc
Funny how Germany has far stronger unions and still has those industries.
Perhaps the Sun, Mail, Express, Telegraph, Times etc. had an agenda?
All of it anti British.
62
11/03/2021 11:57:38 21 4
bbc
German unions work with management and owners for the benefit of all. Unlike the workshy dinosaurs that we ended up with in the UK.
107
11/03/2021 13:06:19 4 3
bbc
Would that be unions or management or both
111
11/03/2021 13:07:15 1 2
bbc
Of course, British owners and management have always welcomed union participation with open arms.
113
11/03/2021 13:09:34 5 4
bbc
The work shy and naive work in middle management and senior management, its impossible to be work shy on the shop floor as each job activity is timed and failure to hit targets always ends up in being sacked
9
11/03/2021 10:39:54 12 30
bbc
Hardly. Party of the Rich have sold most of it since the disaster that was Thatcher....
63
11/03/2021 11:59:35 3 2
bbc
What happened with the 13 years of Labour though? Didn't they save it?
80
11/03/2021 12:11:19 2 1
bbc
It wasn't Labour, it was Blairism. Possibly more dangerous than Labour, most things he interfered with ended up as disasters.
120
11/03/2021 13:15:20 1 1
bbc
How exactly you propose they should have saved it? It was already gone....
64
11/03/2021 12:00:16 5 1
bbc
There have been several reports on RR business, but what about General Electric and Pratt & Whitney. They are both part of large companies, but their aero-engine businesses must be suffering as well.
185
11/03/2021 19:31:17 0 1
bbc
Particularly with the problems the Americans are having with their new technology involving hollow turbine blades which the FAA have now grounded.
51
11/03/2021 11:41:18 1 2
bbc
Have to disagree with you there fella. She looked after the rich and left he poor behind. Fortunately those types are gone and we now have Tory-lite instead.
65
11/03/2021 12:00:34 1 4
bbc
Not the poor, but the feckless and lazy
66
11/03/2021 12:06:13 2 7
bbc
Vacuum transport must be the way to go! In theory no motors are required other than a vacuum pump to create a vacuum in the tube; similar to the vacuum system that used to be used in shops to transport capsules. Journey time from UK to USA could be down to an hour or so with almost zero pollution!
67
11/03/2021 12:08:02 4 2
bbc
Brunel tried it in the 1800's ... he gave up and went with steam.
77
11/03/2021 12:08:07 2 2
bbc
Apart from billions of tons of CO2 building the tube which wouldn't work anyway.
78
11/03/2021 12:08:16 3 2
bbc
Meanwhile, back in the real world!
82
11/03/2021 12:28:14 4 1
bbc
Let me guess... you are going to power this vacuum pump with 3 AAA batteries..
90
11/03/2021 12:47:20 3 4
bbc
Transport of people has been solved already. You stay where you are and communications are live video to upcoming virtual reality. Travel over distances is primitive now.
101
11/03/2021 12:59:55 2 1
bbc
And in the real world?
66
11/03/2021 12:06:13 2 7
bbc
Vacuum transport must be the way to go! In theory no motors are required other than a vacuum pump to create a vacuum in the tube; similar to the vacuum system that used to be used in shops to transport capsules. Journey time from UK to USA could be down to an hour or so with almost zero pollution!
67
11/03/2021 12:08:02 4 2
bbc
Brunel tried it in the 1800's ... he gave up and went with steam.
70
11/03/2021 12:13:58 1 3
bbc
Yep, but that was 2021 years ago. Technology and engineering have moved on since then.
81
11/03/2021 12:12:34 2 2
bbc
I have only ever heard of it being used by evil scientists in a Gerry Anderson plot!
36
11/03/2021 11:09:30 4 4
bbc
What exactly is your comment based on other than your perceptions of the EU, which i'm guessing are biased?
68
11/03/2021 12:00:26 3 1
bbc
I was talking to an EU business partner this morning. Interestingly, he would also vote to leave the EU. But, unlike you, I read a variety of publications to get a broad view. That E750 billion EU bailout, it is a tiny sticking patch compared to the real problems.
40
11/03/2021 11:16:15 10 11
bbc
Not panicking and completely destroying the economy in an attempt to 'save' 0.2% of the population dying a few months earlier (aged 82.3 on average) would be a good way of doing it.
69
11/03/2021 12:13:02 6 3
bbc
You really hated your grandparents, didn't you? Didn't they spoil you enough, sweetie?
121
11/03/2021 13:16:25 3 1
bbc
Or was impatient for the share of the inheritance?
67
11/03/2021 12:08:02 4 2
bbc
Brunel tried it in the 1800's ... he gave up and went with steam.
70
11/03/2021 12:13:58 1 3
bbc
Yep, but that was 2021 years ago. Technology and engineering have moved on since then.
71
11/03/2021 12:14:23 14 6
bbc
Cadbury's, Westland Helicopters the list goes on ... The Tory fetishism with the open market economy and privatisation is great if everyone plays by the same rules but most nations and companies don't and support debt/soveriegn wealth funded by-outs of great british brands with board members and politicians trousering money from lobby firms. We need aid, legislation and production in the UK.
87
11/03/2021 12:44:50 9 1
bbc
Bid for Astra-Zeneca was (thankfully) blocked. To be fair, some buy-outs also happened under Blair. Also, the buy-outs by British companies seldom make the news. e.g. BAe Systems bought a string of USA cyber-security operations. Rentokil has bought up pest control operations in USA and Brazil. Whitbread has bought up hotels in Germany. It's not just one-way, although sometimes it seems like it.
170
11/03/2021 15:37:06 0 2
bbc
The UK's 100 largest companies earn three quarters of their profits from selling or owning things abroad. We are a hugely successful trading nation.
The last thing we need is to prop up failing or irrelevant domestic businesses by letting politicians spaff taxpayers' money on protecting them from reality.
51
11/03/2021 11:41:18 1 2
bbc
Have to disagree with you there fella. She looked after the rich and left he poor behind. Fortunately those types are gone and we now have Tory-lite instead.
72
11/03/2021 12:02:31 2 3
bbc
I know many families who made good under Mrs thatcher, including my own. She backed SMEs, helped us to prosper. The industries that failed under her were zombie industries anyway.
39
11/03/2021 11:12:08 3 2
bbc
Ah so any view other than yours has to be dismissed then? Bet you'd complain if the situation was reversed.
73
11/03/2021 12:04:38 1 5
bbc
I am not bothered about your opinion. 80 seat majority remember, we don't have to listen to the left any more. Expect an even larger conservative majority next election, as the current government steers us quickly to recovery. Business and the people back Conservatives.
122
11/03/2021 13:16:29 0 2
bbc
With 43% of the vote. No doubt you still bang on about Democracy.
13
11/03/2021 10:45:04 2 6
bbc
Sadly, no doubt China will set-up an aero-engine plant in the UK to replace Rolls Royce.
74
11/03/2021 12:17:32 0 2
bbc
That would at least keep the very highly skilled RR staff employed in the UK.
126
11/03/2021 13:19:31 0 2
bbc
Rolls Royce is more a working museum it will be crushed underfoot between Europe, America and China
54
11/03/2021 11:42:23 5 12
bbc
Labour are the real nasty party.
75
11/03/2021 12:06:09 3 6
bbc
Listened to Angela Raynor in R4 this morning She just gabbled a load of sound bites. How on earth do Labour think they can mount a creditable challenge with their front bench? Conservatives are the party of business, and most people understand that is what we need right now.
103
11/03/2021 13:00:06 0 3
bbc
Can you expand or your opinion? Leaving Europe has reduced economic trade, Europe will not allow the City to continue to trade in Europe, They do not appear to be the party of fiscal responsibility more the economic terrorists.
46
11/03/2021 11:32:03 4 1
bbc
Dr Strangelove? It's actually Slim Pickens riding the bomb down - Sellers is still in the US, playing two characters in the War Room and another at the USAF base.
Unforgettable scene.
76
11/03/2021 12:07:29 0 1
bbc
Thanks for filling in the details on that Yorkshireman.
66
11/03/2021 12:06:13 2 7
bbc
Vacuum transport must be the way to go! In theory no motors are required other than a vacuum pump to create a vacuum in the tube; similar to the vacuum system that used to be used in shops to transport capsules. Journey time from UK to USA could be down to an hour or so with almost zero pollution!
77
11/03/2021 12:08:07 2 2
bbc
Apart from billions of tons of CO2 building the tube which wouldn't work anyway.
162
Ray
11/03/2021 15:02:21 0 1
bbc
Well you have to 'speculate to accumulate' or in this case 'a bit of bad to make it better'
66
11/03/2021 12:06:13 2 7
bbc
Vacuum transport must be the way to go! In theory no motors are required other than a vacuum pump to create a vacuum in the tube; similar to the vacuum system that used to be used in shops to transport capsules. Journey time from UK to USA could be down to an hour or so with almost zero pollution!
78
11/03/2021 12:08:16 3 2
bbc
Meanwhile, back in the real world!
37
11/03/2021 11:11:33 19 9
bbc
Travelling to low infection areas onboard aircraft with state of the art ventilation systems is safer than a bus trip in the UK.
Despite virtually zero impact on the UK's appalling figures the industry has been used as a scapegoat to distract from real issues.
We need to get flying again safely and for the government to provide robust support for all sections of the aviation and travel industry.
79
11/03/2021 12:10:02 3 1
bbc
"Said Mr O'Leary in a press release"
63
11/03/2021 11:59:35 3 2
bbc
What happened with the 13 years of Labour though? Didn't they save it?
80
11/03/2021 12:11:19 2 1
bbc
It wasn't Labour, it was Blairism. Possibly more dangerous than Labour, most things he interfered with ended up as disasters.
67
11/03/2021 12:08:02 4 2
bbc
Brunel tried it in the 1800's ... he gave up and went with steam.
81
11/03/2021 12:12:34 2 2
bbc
I have only ever heard of it being used by evil scientists in a Gerry Anderson plot!
66
11/03/2021 12:06:13 2 7
bbc
Vacuum transport must be the way to go! In theory no motors are required other than a vacuum pump to create a vacuum in the tube; similar to the vacuum system that used to be used in shops to transport capsules. Journey time from UK to USA could be down to an hour or so with almost zero pollution!
82
11/03/2021 12:28:14 4 1
bbc
Let me guess... you are going to power this vacuum pump with 3 AAA batteries..
84
11/03/2021 12:35:38 3 2
bbc
Children's laughter.

Like the rest of the UK by 2030.

It's terrifying living in a world where these Green nutters think they have only to write something on a piece of paper and those lazy scientists who obviously completely lack imagination and have been siting there twiddling their thumbs, will just go away and build it for them.

And all they need is a deadline!
9
11/03/2021 10:39:54 12 30
bbc
Hardly. Party of the Rich have sold most of it since the disaster that was Thatcher....
83
11/03/2021 12:34:53 4 2
bbc
What, like Gordon Brown sold our gold reserves at record lows and raided private pensions ...
114
11/03/2021 13:10:41 1 3
bbc
Ah, the sore point about clamping down on pensions privileges to the well-off. A bit of sore point, I see. What, you work(ed) in the industry or something?

Gold? Peanuts. You conveniently forgot the £20bn pure profit from the pioneering auction of 3G.

In any case, how relevant is that to Thatcher destroying British industry?....
82
11/03/2021 12:28:14 4 1
bbc
Let me guess... you are going to power this vacuum pump with 3 AAA batteries..
84
11/03/2021 12:35:38 3 2
bbc
Children's laughter.

Like the rest of the UK by 2030.

It's terrifying living in a world where these Green nutters think they have only to write something on a piece of paper and those lazy scientists who obviously completely lack imagination and have been siting there twiddling their thumbs, will just go away and build it for them.

And all they need is a deadline!
85
11/03/2021 12:42:24 0 7
bbc
Good news for this German company
98
11/03/2021 12:52:44 8 1
bbc
Rolls Royce is a British Company, listed on the UK Stock Exchange and manufactures plane engines amongst other things. However, Rolls Royce cars which is a totally different brand is owned by BMW and thus is German.
106
11/03/2021 12:48:11 4 2
bbc
Most obtuse comment of the day. Rolls Royce aerospace has zero to do with Rolls Royce cars. But I never expect lefties and EU fanboys to know many facts.
86
11/03/2021 12:44:35 1 6
bbc
No the worst is ahead of the flying industry. These event will be more common the more you keep moving virus hosts about the world fast for fat profits. This was a mild warning not a one off. Next one might well be serious!

No cross border travel should be permitted without full locked up quarantine every time. Less trips but probably for longer visits. A better world flying safely & less often.
71
11/03/2021 12:14:23 14 6
bbc
Cadbury's, Westland Helicopters the list goes on ... The Tory fetishism with the open market economy and privatisation is great if everyone plays by the same rules but most nations and companies don't and support debt/soveriegn wealth funded by-outs of great british brands with board members and politicians trousering money from lobby firms. We need aid, legislation and production in the UK.
87
11/03/2021 12:44:50 9 1
bbc
Bid for Astra-Zeneca was (thankfully) blocked. To be fair, some buy-outs also happened under Blair. Also, the buy-outs by British companies seldom make the news. e.g. BAe Systems bought a string of USA cyber-security operations. Rentokil has bought up pest control operations in USA and Brazil. Whitbread has bought up hotels in Germany. It's not just one-way, although sometimes it seems like it.
159
11/03/2021 14:53:19 2 2
bbc
blair was more tory blair than tony
88
11/03/2021 12:44:53 6 2
bbc
rolls Royce manufacturing , engines, military, will be nationalised again due to confidential programmes with the new aircraft carriers and new aircraft f 35 Joint Strike Fighter.
90% of airlines have RR jet powered engines.
94
11/03/2021 12:49:17 2 13
bbc
I expect the orders will be quietly cancelled and forgotten UK is not the super power it once was and those who lead and are grounded in reality no longer exist in GB
174
11/03/2021 15:42:07 0 4
bbc
Tax payers' money should NOT be used to finance a failing company. RR went into liquidation in 1971 due to problems with an engine (RB211) programme; much of the problems they are suffering are again related to technical problems with an engine programme which left the in a poor financial position prior to the pandemic. RR is either a viable business or it isn't.
55
11/03/2021 11:47:28 19 1
bbc
Rolls Royce was always likely to survive because of their diversity of trade.

Good news to hear that they are through the worst, time to buy some shares??
89
11/03/2021 12:46:29 1 5
bbc
I would advise caution. There are (my opinion) serious underlying problems with RR's business model; I personally have still to be convinced that the technical problems with the Trent 1000 Engine have been resolved and that the Trent XWB won't suffer similar technical problems.
184
11/03/2021 19:26:54 1 1
bbc
RR are confident they have Trent problem identified and, it is hoped they can supply engines to America who, as you know, now have serious problems with their hollow turbine blade strategy in their new engines.
66
11/03/2021 12:06:13 2 7
bbc
Vacuum transport must be the way to go! In theory no motors are required other than a vacuum pump to create a vacuum in the tube; similar to the vacuum system that used to be used in shops to transport capsules. Journey time from UK to USA could be down to an hour or so with almost zero pollution!
90
11/03/2021 12:47:20 3 4
bbc
Transport of people has been solved already. You stay where you are and communications are live video to upcoming virtual reality. Travel over distances is primitive now.
91
11/03/2021 12:47:23 2 4
bbc
Having followed Rolls Royce and invested in them I have noticed when they say the worst is over they mean far far worse is about to come shortly, when they say their going to have a wonderful year it means it will be an average year and they will under perform compared to their competition. Its sad but the company is on steady slide of poor quality and mediocre senior management
110
11/03/2021 12:53:01 2 2
bbc
Says the Chinese posters, anything UK is negative, Rolls-Royce and let’s say how bad the company is, strange how these types of posters are attracted to BBC
92
11/03/2021 12:47:31 2 1
bbc
They need to start developing more and more hybrid engines.
138
11/03/2021 13:42:11 3 1
bbc
Hybrid is half a step forward. Why not go the full step?
149
Ben
11/03/2021 14:16:22 0 1
bbc
Hybrid should have become a mainstream thing 25 years ago. The tech was there. Then the transition to electric or bio-fuel now would be much easier and less costly.
57
11/03/2021 11:54:35 2 2
bbc
Yes .. when I started investing in shares .. RR was an obvious candidate to look at.

But as it does not (did not) pay a cash dividend .. I moved on. It indicates a lack of confidence or arrogance towards investors.

Its a funny company. On the face of it .. should be a good money spinner, but it isn't.

Compare and contrast to Renishaw or Spectris .. good engineering companies that are well run.
93
11/03/2021 12:48:33 2 1
bbc
You're part of RR's problem
Aviation is high tech, safety critical long term investment as other countries e.g. Germany know. The quick buck UK investors force asset stripping for short term returns or push firms to sell up
Previous Chair Rishton panick sold profitable assets cos city agitators pressed for cash 'now'. So RR no longer has presence in shorthaul market that will be first to restart
88
11/03/2021 12:44:53 6 2
bbc
rolls Royce manufacturing , engines, military, will be nationalised again due to confidential programmes with the new aircraft carriers and new aircraft f 35 Joint Strike Fighter.
90% of airlines have RR jet powered engines.
94
11/03/2021 12:49:17 2 13
bbc
I expect the orders will be quietly cancelled and forgotten UK is not the super power it once was and those who lead and are grounded in reality no longer exist in GB
105
11/03/2021 13:05:13 4 2
bbc
Its not about super powers, these orders cant be cancelled due to a joint NATO strike force and RR jet engines will power the next USA air fleet and BA.
RR DERBY must be retained due to military and civil projects, if it does go the next engines will be Chinese!
13
11/03/2021 10:45:04 2 6
bbc
Sadly, no doubt China will set-up an aero-engine plant in the UK to replace Rolls Royce.
95
11/03/2021 12:49:45 2 1
bbc
Actually, RR has set-up a plant in China, LOL
96
11/03/2021 12:50:44 2 2
bbc
I don't know where the BBC are getting their figures of a '£583m profit the year before'

According to Rolls Royces own annual reports they made a loss of 2.3bn in 2018 and 1.3bn in 2019.

https://www.rolls-royce.com/~/media/Files/R/Rolls-Royce/documents/annual-report/2019/ar2019-financial-statements.pdf
15
11/03/2021 10:46:34 11 4
bbc
This would have been the time to invest in research and development (R&D) focusing on electric or hydrogen powered aero engines. Does the government really support and encourage this? Is our economy really geared to support enough R&D? If we are going to dig ourselves out of this hole, rebuilding with new products and reformed services is needed, not sitting and waiting for the old like to resume.
97
11/03/2021 12:51:36 2 1
bbc
Read other news articles and RR is at the front looking at electric power and sustainable aviation fuels including hydrogen.
If not for pandemic, RR/Airbus might have had a prototype hybrid flying this year
Good news for this German company
98
11/03/2021 12:52:44 8 1
bbc
Rolls Royce is a British Company, listed on the UK Stock Exchange and manufactures plane engines amongst other things. However, Rolls Royce cars which is a totally different brand is owned by BMW and thus is German.
99
11/03/2021 12:53:28 4 12
bbc
Rolls Royce have gone bust before now UK is no longer part of the Grand EU experiment before an American company or European company get thrown to the wolves who do you think will get thrown first? Any Company with British postal address is on borrowed time. I suggest Rolls Royce relocate to Europe before its crushed under foot
141
11/03/2021 13:47:05 1 4
bbc
Our government is not good at keeping British companies British.

Look what happened to the car industry.

They couldn’t even hold onto the Rover and MG names (let alone the companies behind the names) for future British use.
100
11/03/2021 12:57:09 3 4
bbc
I wouldn't trust an electric aeroplane. If there isn't a reassuring roaring of engines how do you know when to panic as they cut out?

Don't like propellers much either; hate sitting next to them. I always think one's going to snap off and come in through the window.
131
11/03/2021 13:26:39 4 2
bbc
OK. Next time you're on a jet powered aircraft, think about this.
The operating temperature inside the engine is hotter than the melting point of the metals used to make the engine.
136
11/03/2021 13:40:37 3 1
bbc
I don’t think you like flying, however it is done.

You certainly wouldn’t like jet engines.
156
Ray
11/03/2021 14:49:57 0 1
bbc
if the propeller snaps off it can go anywhere, but if it comes through the window where you are sat then there are positives as yours was a quick exit, while everyone else screams at it plunges to the ground in the inevitable fireball. Just telling it like it is .....