Tesco to start recycling bread bags and crisp packets
10/03/2021 | news | business | 770
The supermarket is rolling out new recycling points for soft plastics that often end up in landfill.
1
10/03/2021 11:39:31 24 11
bbc
about time too. and why not in Scotland, we eat plenty of crisps as well!
18
WM
10/03/2021 11:45:35 9 17
bbc
More than you're fair share
2
10/03/2021 11:39:37 20 26
bbc
Only about 50 years too late! I dread to think how much wildlife has been murdered as a result of this plastic waste, disgracefull
17
WM
10/03/2021 11:45:10 19 4
bbc
Got to start somewhere, sometime, or would you rather nothing was done?
54
10/03/2021 11:43:53 6 10
bbc
How much wildlife wouldve been murdered by other wildlife had they been unchecked? Environment hippies dont think things through lol
3
10/03/2021 11:40:40 14 22
bbc
"Where there is good PR, there is money!"
4
10/03/2021 11:41:02 78 8
bbc
It would be helpful if this could also be available on the delivery service.
468
10/03/2021 14:05:58 3 1
bbc
It used to be and probably will be again.....,,,eventually!
560
10/03/2021 14:55:08 0 0
bbc
I see no reason why the council recycling service can't collect these soft plastics.
5
10/03/2021 11:41:31 17 27
bbc
If stuff is recyclable it should go in the recycling bin and get recycled. That's the process for recycling in this country. If that process isn't working then fix it, don't complicate things. Recycling is already complicated enough.
21
10/03/2021 11:46:08 20 5
bbc
But thats the whole point - mixed plastic is a nightmare for recycling centres and there isnt a huge market for soft stuff - you are wrong - this isnt a case of making things more complicated, just applying a solution to a problem
35
10/03/2021 11:49:22 4 2
bbc
This stuff is rejected by the roadside recyclers so this is very welcome
79
10/03/2021 11:59:38 4 2
bbc
If you downvote please reply and say why. Most downvoted post is basically the same thing as 2nd most upvoted post. Wondering why.
303
10/03/2021 13:01:32 4 0
bbc
Manufacturers should certainly design simpler packaging containing fewer mixed materials - some goods come wrapped in two or three types of plastic which can't easily be separated, even if the end user if willing to put in the effort. Cardboard boxes with plastic windows glued to them are another example.
But even Pringles are looking at recycling their notorious tubes now - change is possible!
You want to know why I down voted your post? A grown man complaining "recycling is already complicated enough"...really? Given that children in Primary schools manage I see no reason why you struggle sorting paper, plastic etc Removed
499
10/03/2021 14:23:37 1 0
bbc
If the world produces 10 (for example) types of plastic, but your council only accepts 2 types for recycling, where is the rest going? Or are you suggesting that people should only buy stuff that is packaged in plastics that their council accepts for recycling?
Oh bless, you find recycling complicated?
Amazing you are able to work the internet really!
Removed
6
10/03/2021 11:42:18 72 10
bbc
Hooray. Long time coming but at least it is finally here. I think this will have a tremendous impact. Thank you Tesco for being proactive in this.
119
10/03/2021 12:07:35 18 92
bbc
More fool you for believing the stunt
7
10/03/2021 11:42:21 51 6
bbc
Well Done, Tesco! Morrisons provides carrier bag return (from any shop) but this goes much further. Excellent!
404
10/03/2021 13:43:16 10 3
bbc
Morrisons carrier bag return box says you can also put bread wrappers and produce bags/wrappers into the same box. I've been using it for 18months, (except during first lockdown when it was taken away). Just waiting for them to get a crisp bag, snack wrapper box, as both can be recycled together, I presently pay for a crisp bag recycling box from zero waste, but it's expensive.
8
10/03/2021 11:42:40 8 18
bbc
I like Tesco, but these changes are used for PR, nothing else. We waste huge amounts of paper and products each year. We ship our rubbish off around the world to be incinerated. Then we tell the world we are leading the push for climate change and have emissions down. Everything is just hijacked now, talk about climate change in December & before Christmas. Only then will I listen.
42
10/03/2021 11:51:21 6 8
bbc
Keep your tin foil hat on and keep using that metal coat hanger to get a signal.
9
10/03/2021 11:43:05 418 35
bbc
First 4 comments all negative. Typical of current climate. This is a positive step - well done Tesco.
52
10/03/2021 11:53:44 119 104
bbc
A positive step would be talking about climate change in December and before Christmas. We don't because we are more interested in consumerism and then playing hero when it suits us. We have become such hypocrites in climate it's frankly laughable. Because come Easter & December, millions of tons of waste will be created. As well as cheap throw away fashion in weeks to come.
152
01
10/03/2021 12:14:28 22 9
bbc
I agree, the UK is a nation of moaners.
190
10/03/2021 12:32:18 13 5
bbc
Maybe they have a chip on their shoulder, like poor old Mr PotatoHead.
261
10/03/2021 12:48:08 23 10
bbc
Sadly for these neo-puritans virtue-signalling is the most important factor in their quest for 'self-actualisation'. For many of the hard-core on HYS, Twitter, etc, the easiest way of determining 'who they are' in an increasingly fragmented word is by castigating the rest of us for overconsumption, for not using the right pronouns, or for whatever else the social justice crime de jour may be.
325
10/03/2021 13:06:03 8 24
bbc
SCREW TESCO....the horse has already bolted when it comes to recycling.Tesco are just pandering to public opinion which will enable them to sell more groceries and thereby create more waste.The Government should create laws to protect this planet from commercial parasites like Tesco et al.
356
10/03/2021 13:18:30 10 4
bbc
Except, as I've just pointed out in a post, you have been able to recycle bread bags for some time now, it's written on the bag.

Also, when I buy a 6 bag of crisps, the bag that they come in is also recycleable, and has been for a while.

People don't look and read.
They also don't listen, but that is an aside.
381
10/03/2021 13:30:50 3 9
bbc
This smells like greenwashing because it is greenwashing.
Taking REAL action would involve eliminating all plastics - perfectly possible for foods. Though heavier, glass bottles with a biodegradable plastic nozzle would be perfectly suitable for most liquids, including chemicals such as cleaning products.
410
10/03/2021 13:47:47 3 2
bbc
Hmm, this seems like a passive negative comment to suggest the negativity is "typical". The upvoting on your comments shows that the majority (rightly) agree it is a positive step.
431
10/03/2021 13:54:16 3 6
bbc
Just like Boris, Tesco aiming to grab as much publicity as they can. The trouble is that they have been a large part of the problem for many years and up to now have done little or nothing about it.
539
10/03/2021 14:50:38 1 2
bbc
Yeah, well done for doing something you should have been doing anyway, and didn't start doing until the optics started looking too bad to ignore...
766
11/03/2021 16:38:01 0 0
bbc
Those wishing recycle sooner than now are deemed 'negative'??

Oh dear oh dear oh dear OP.
10
10/03/2021 11:43:31 30 7
bbc
Well done Tesco. Every little helps!
11
10/03/2021 11:43:42 113 9
bbc
Good for Tesco - our council has hard plastic recycling and food waste collection - when I look in the general waste bin now about the only thing I see is this sort of soft plastic - this should be made compulsory for all supermarkets. Lets not demonise plastic as some do.... but anything that makes it more than one use is a good move
235
10/03/2021 12:44:14 39 5
bbc
It's about the only thing that goes into my black bin as well, mostly the plastic wraps around 6-packs of cat food tins & the soft tops from hard plastic trays. If it could be recycled I'd only have to put the bin out about every 6 - 8 weeks.
482
Dew
10/03/2021 14:12:51 1 0
bbc
Yes Waitrose need to do this
12
10/03/2021 11:43:48 206 7
bbc
Well done Tesco. This shows that these things can be recycled.

We need local councils to start recycling these things too so that we can do it without a trip to Tesco.
20
10/03/2021 11:45:52 59 3
bbc
Its quite recent and currently expensive to run the tech that can do this. though i do agree
368
DrR
10/03/2021 13:23:34 2 0
bbc
We already recycle bread bags, we make some of our own bread and the shop bought bags are great.

You can have the crisp packets though.
386
10/03/2021 13:32:26 1 2
bbc
Why can I not recycle poly bags?
Councils should be told by government green policy people to do this, I am fed up with the hot air and very little action on the ground from those in Westminster.
424
10/03/2021 13:52:44 6 1
bbc
It should be noted that when it comes to plastic recycling. They very rarely do it themselves.

More likely, they contract a specialised company to collect it and leave it in their hands to recycle on the promise it'll be recycled.

Then these contractors have been known to subcontract to Malaysia based 'recycling' firms who 'pinky promise' to recycle it.

Landfill. Original company unaware.
600
10/03/2021 15:20:50 1 0
bbc
Our local council is going to charge to collect garden and food waste. Councils are a real problem here because they charge so much for services that people can’t afford to use them.
640
10/03/2021 15:45:31 1 1
bbc
They're to busy wasting our Council Tax..
13
10/03/2021 11:43:55 29 5
bbc
Good !
14
10/03/2021 11:44:10 52 8
bbc
Although it may be for marketing, it will hopefully make the rest follow suit.
Well done Tesco!
15
10/03/2021 11:44:40 187 22
bbc
It is time supermarkets caught up with public opinion. Un recyclable or non bio degradeable packinging is no longer acceptable.
130
Bob
10/03/2021 12:12:52 64 6
bbc
The public also want the freshest possible produce.

Unfortunately the public doesn't, and nor would it, understand the reasons why materials are used in many cases.

Stuff like plastic wrap on a multipack of something is of course immediately exchangeable for cardboard, but the material protecting the product isn't.
149
10/03/2021 12:09:08 16 18
bbc
You are out of touch. That is not public opinion at all. Public opinion is that it should be dumped Willy nilly or strewn out the car window.
175
10/03/2021 12:25:42 12 0
bbc
The vast majority of current polythene packaging is recyclable, but it costs money to collect and separate into its constituent categories and that's the problem - who pays?
227
10/03/2021 12:42:25 10 1
bbc
one problem is we don't know what we want. is it better to have a product pack which is bio degradable but takes 5-10 time the energy to make than one which is lower cost but only recyclable? I genuinely don't know the answer and am not sure how you can decide.

"No plastic" is a great headline but is it ecologically sound if it causes more product waste and uses significantly more energy?
231
10/03/2021 12:43:27 2 14
bbc
You do realise that preventing waste going to landfil is robbing the future generations of this planet of fossil fuels. It all gets recycled, eventually.
253
10/03/2021 12:45:18 17 3
bbc
And we want British produce. Not stuff that has been half way round the world.
But we can do our bit too - do you realise there are idiots buying bottles of french water?
256
10/03/2021 12:46:12 3 5
bbc
Higher prices on daily goods are also not acceptable to public opinion. Ah, to inhabit the lofty realms of pseudo-consensus, free of the the complexities and needs of those below
273
10/03/2021 12:52:41 4 1
bbc
They'll only catch up with public opinion when environmental concerns overtake price as being the main factor for where people shop.
328
10/03/2021 13:09:51 5 1
bbc
Biodegradable waste should NOT be mixed in with other waste!
- It generally cannot be recycled and would therefor contaminate a recycling stream. Also, depending upon the mechanism of degradation.
- If it ends up in landfill it could generate CO2 and methane (which has a much worse GWP than CO2).
331
10/03/2021 13:10:12 1 0
bbc
People don't HAVE to but goods that are in non-reyclable packaging. Also Bio-degradeable can still be a major issue and overall polluter.

A good step no doubt but there is a risk that people will see this as an excuse not to buy really environmentally friendly products
419
AJ
10/03/2021 13:50:12 0 1
bbc
If people didn’t buy the products that are non bio degradable then overnight the manufacture would change the packaging
475
10/03/2021 14:08:59 2 0
bbc
It is improving, very slowly. Standing in the queue to pay in my supermarket, I get a nice view of the beer & cider aisle - hardly any plastic there now. Mostly cardboard packaging around bottles and cans. Still not as good as a freshly pulled pint from a keg, however - ultimate recycled packaging!!
664
10/03/2021 15:59:44 1 0
bbc
Unfortunately I think the majority 'public opinion' view is 'I don't care'. As a result there's little consumer pressure on suppliers to change things. On the face of it this is a good move but not using that plastic in the first place (where possible) would be a good move. And we shouldn't demonise plastic which, used sensibly, is of massive benefit to product life and safety.
16
10/03/2021 11:44:46 82 10
bbc
This is brilliant, as someone who actually studied recycling at Uni, both 2 years and 7 years ago. I know the soft plastics (which couldn't be recycled easily) can now be.
392
10/03/2021 13:35:29 39 9
bbc
"studied recycling at Uni, both 2 years and 7 years ago"

Did you recycle your education?
639
xlr
10/03/2021 15:45:26 5 0
bbc
Out of interest how did they solve the problem of polyolefins reverting to crystalline form or shortened or branching polymer chains after remelting?

Not a snide question, a genuine one, as it was still a major problem when I was getting polymer chemistry at uni.
Get a life Removed
2
10/03/2021 11:39:37 20 26
bbc
Only about 50 years too late! I dread to think how much wildlife has been murdered as a result of this plastic waste, disgracefull
17
WM
10/03/2021 11:45:10 19 4
bbc
Got to start somewhere, sometime, or would you rather nothing was done?
1
10/03/2021 11:39:31 24 11
bbc
about time too. and why not in Scotland, we eat plenty of crisps as well!
18
WM
10/03/2021 11:45:35 9 17
bbc
More than you're fair share
19
10/03/2021 11:45:49 7 11
bbc
A few will bother. But really how many will save them all up & take them back? Let alone the fact most are moving to home delivery, will the vans take these bags back? Then there will be the 'wrong' sort of bag in the mixes. Foil crisp bags and clear plastic food bags, are they really compatible?

Good stunt. But we all know there is no plastic problem only a littering problem. No change likely.
12
10/03/2021 11:43:48 206 7
bbc
Well done Tesco. This shows that these things can be recycled.

We need local councils to start recycling these things too so that we can do it without a trip to Tesco.
20
10/03/2021 11:45:52 59 3
bbc
Its quite recent and currently expensive to run the tech that can do this. though i do agree
5
10/03/2021 11:41:31 17 27
bbc
If stuff is recyclable it should go in the recycling bin and get recycled. That's the process for recycling in this country. If that process isn't working then fix it, don't complicate things. Recycling is already complicated enough.
21
10/03/2021 11:46:08 20 5
bbc
But thats the whole point - mixed plastic is a nightmare for recycling centres and there isnt a huge market for soft stuff - you are wrong - this isnt a case of making things more complicated, just applying a solution to a problem
568
10/03/2021 14:57:45 4 1
bbc
Apply the tens of thousands of fit, long term unemployed to hand sorting plastic waste four days a week, with a £40 payment each week & the other day a compulsory 8 hours on supervised job search.
22
bbc
Is this news? What about an HYS on Piers Morgan or the Meghan/ Harry accusation. Too volatile? BBC won't like the comments? And they will no doubt take down this post! Removed
Nobody cares about Piers he is a jumped up twerp Removed
45
10/03/2021 11:51:46 5 1
bbc
Yes this is news! Wide scale availability of LDPE recycling would be huge benefit. Even bigger than Piers Morgan not being on TV - which in itself is massive.
23
10/03/2021 11:46:33 4 4
bbc
Tesco need to offer recycling facilities for Tetra-Paks, as local council collections no longer accept these containers in the regular recycled item collection, they have to be taken to a local recycling centre, which is a pain unless one amasses a sizeable bag of them.
101
sci
10/03/2021 12:04:15 1 0
bbc
depends upon the council, and the companies to whom they send their collected recycling. Our local council do accept Tetra-paks, as per printed on their doorstep-collecting bags issued to households, so I assume they are actually recycling them. As for taking anything to local recycling centres, that's a stupid waste of energy if using individual vehicles to drive it there.
24
10/03/2021 11:47:30 2 16
bbc
WOW FFS is that all they can offer?
25
10/03/2021 11:47:43 12 3
bbc
For a council / local authority - recycling is just a cost.
Yes - they try to recoup some of that where waste has a saleable value, but that value is very, very low.
They end up burning or burying some of it.

For Tesco - it's different - they've got you into their store.
And Tesco have made a cost/benefit that they gain from attracting you in store, and from improving their image.

But still GOOD
38
10/03/2021 11:50:18 4 1
bbc
New tech can turn this plastic back into oil, which has value.

This is the key to making waste valuable, not just a cost, so it is not discarded anymore.
26
10/03/2021 11:47:44 336 10
bbc
To those being negative, recycling thin plastic such as bread bags and crisp packets is very hard, hence why its not been possible until now.

There is a British company, Recycling Technologies that has done great work, backed by UK government grants.

Lets hope it can be widely rolled out.
102
10/03/2021 12:04:23 95 7
bbc
Thank you for this information LovelyTim.
It would be nice if this was in the article but you've saved the day.
203
10/03/2021 12:36:00 3 3
bbc
Progress as you say and good news too, but how much energy is required to achieve this difficult recycling process? Is the real green solution removal of such materials from the consumer product, packaging, waste, recycle loop. Surely we are using more resources just to avoid the challenge of behavior change that would make the real difference...Oh for Recycling Technolgies to make a profit too!
210
10/03/2021 12:37:34 4 3
bbc
Its not hard, its expensive and economically unviable. Completely different thing.
219
10/03/2021 12:39:07 7 9
bbc
Germany has been doing this for years. Why is the rest of the world always "behind"?
409
10/03/2021 13:46:11 0 4
bbc
This is a multi-million pound company jumping on the green bandwagon with little or no thought to how they will actually deliver this! In the same way they introduced paper bags for loose fruit and veg not so long ago, which have proven to be totally unsuited for the purpose they were intended for. As a result we now have single use paper bags, which I don't think was quite the idea, was it!
540
10/03/2021 14:50:59 0 0
bbc
If it's hard then maybe use an alternative...
610
10/03/2021 15:25:29 2 1
bbc
Then better don't buy it, UK produce less than 1% of world waste and 90% of all we paintakingly put in our guilt free brown recycle bins end up in the ocean because it's cheaper to export via a middleman, on the excuse that if 1 person puts the wrong thing in a bin it is contaminated, well half the UK can't even read English instructions, let alone organise a military precision home waste system??
630
xlr
10/03/2021 15:39:10 1 1
bbc
It's not so much that recycling these plastics is difficult per se, more that the resulting recycled plastic is altered and lacks the characteristics of the original. It is common to end up with recycled plastic nobody wants to buy.

But science is moving on all the time.
27
10/03/2021 11:48:04 7 2
bbc
in principle great, but balance this with the fact that so much 'recycled' waste ends up being incinerated or exported for poor countries to deal with
28
10/03/2021 11:48:08 8 5
bbc
Very good news as it seems they have a use for the material - unlike the clowns on our local councils who want us to separate in order to reach some recycling target figure and then burn it or have it dumped in another country.!
29
10/03/2021 11:48:09 14 3
bbc
If the supermarkets were responsible for recycling all the plastic packaging they use surely its usage would diminish as they try to save costs. A win for the planet?
293
10/03/2021 12:59:07 5 1
bbc
Packaging is used to increase profit but the cost of recycling it is borne by the public purse. This has to change.
30
PLS
10/03/2021 11:48:18 26 5
bbc
Our Local Sainsbury’s has been doing this for a couple of years now, and we make full use of this facility. Their delivery drivers will also take soft plastic packaging away from our home. It's a good move hopefully more retailers will take up this approach.
599
amb
10/03/2021 15:20:14 1 8
bbc
This is so unhygienic, taking away your old rubbish whilst delivering people's shopping. This supermarket used to fill people's filthy containers at the deli.
I stopped shopping there.
You wonder why we get nasty little viruses.
31
10/03/2021 11:48:47 40 6
bbc
I thought it wasn't recycleable at all, hence why we're told not to put it in our recycling bin?

I'm all for eco-friendliness and recycle as much as possible, but why is it being made so complicated?

What really makes me laugh is separating glass into its own tub, then the binmen come, empty the main recycling bin, then throw the glass in the same truck after it anyway. What's the point?
86
10/03/2021 12:01:03 29 2
bbc
It's 'cos different councils have different recycling contracts & some recycle materials others won't touch
It is about reducing waste, but it's also about making money
Where I live the recyclers will take any hard plastic packaging but where my partner lives, they stopped taking anything plastic except bottles
So I assume that Tesco have a recycler for whom it's cost effective to take wrappers
93
10/03/2021 11:51:00 1 0
bbc
They are difficult to recycle, but can be recycled in some areas. Problem is, if you put it in the recycling and your area can't recycle them, the whole bag of recycling has to go to landfill because of that one unrecyclable plastic bag.

Agreed - the binmen are somewhat thoughtless in their approach
116
10/03/2021 12:08:13 8 0
bbc
There are lots of things that are recyclable that you can't put in a recycling bin. It's made complicated because it's an inherently complex subject. The most expensive part of the recycling process is separating the materials from one another, that's why they are asking us to put in the bare minimum of effort to help out.
140
10/03/2021 12:14:58 12 0
bbc
You may find the back of the lorry has a divider. I thought the same until I noticed the lorry was actually split into two halves. So although it looks from your house as though they're throwing it all into the same compartment. Glass might go in the left hand compartment and the rest in the right.
283
10/03/2021 12:55:40 0 0
bbc
So have you made your views known to the local council? Why have a moan on here when you can be sure your local council don't read this page? Do something rather positive.
521
10/03/2021 14:37:24 0 0
bbc
I can happily say that the biggest problem I found when it came to recycling was it is so complex that alot of people don't actually know what to do. Some places can recycle, the issue is the tech and chemicals required are expensive. So kinda hard for all councils to do.
32
10/03/2021 11:48:56 9 4
bbc
Tesco need to rethink their own packaging first. I have seen more plastic the past year in the fresh fruit and vegetable department then before, they make the price cheaper to buy in bulk wrapped in plastic, why?
33
10/03/2021 11:49:00 7 4
bbc
This is good news but because my council do not collect food waste (Rotherham) I use these bags for my food waste to keep my bin clean.
What I would really like to see is the companies who collect waste for councils do it in vehicles that don’t allow all the rubbish to blow out of the wagon when they drive off!
KEEP BRITAIN TIDY!
Is this news? What about an HYS on Piers Morgan or the Meghan/ Harry accusation. Too volatile? BBC won't like the comments? And they will no doubt take down this post! Removed
Nobody cares about Piers he is a jumped up twerp Removed
5
10/03/2021 11:41:31 17 27
bbc
If stuff is recyclable it should go in the recycling bin and get recycled. That's the process for recycling in this country. If that process isn't working then fix it, don't complicate things. Recycling is already complicated enough.
35
10/03/2021 11:49:22 4 2
bbc
This stuff is rejected by the roadside recyclers so this is very welcome
36
10/03/2021 11:49:28 31 6
bbc
Every little helps
188
10/03/2021 12:31:20 32 2
bbc
Now all we need to do is get China and India to reduce their coal burning by 90%.
37
10/03/2021 11:49:42 13 4
bbc
Well done Tesco. I've been a regular user of one of the trial Tesco stores, and it has reduced the amount of waste going into our black landfill bin, to just a small carrier bag of waste a week. I don't need to have it emptied so often. The scheme seems to be well used.
357
10/03/2021 13:15:02 0 7
bbc
How naive
25
10/03/2021 11:47:43 12 3
bbc
For a council / local authority - recycling is just a cost.
Yes - they try to recoup some of that where waste has a saleable value, but that value is very, very low.
They end up burning or burying some of it.

For Tesco - it's different - they've got you into their store.
And Tesco have made a cost/benefit that they gain from attracting you in store, and from improving their image.

But still GOOD
38
10/03/2021 11:50:18 4 1
bbc
New tech can turn this plastic back into oil, which has value.

This is the key to making waste valuable, not just a cost, so it is not discarded anymore.
39
10/03/2021 11:50:25 28 6
bbc
As usual we will get the anti Tesco Brigade on here moaning that they are not doing enough when at least they are trying to do something. Perhaps they should be asking the likes of Morrisons why they are still using carrier bags for deliveries instead of the returnable, reusable and recyclable tray liners used by Tesco.
114
10/03/2021 12:06:11 3 2
bbc
Or the useless non paper carrier bags
574
10/03/2021 15:06:40 0 0
bbc
I didn’t know that the Tesco tray liners were returnable as no one had told me. I was throwing them away as I couldn’t find any other use for them. I will check this out on our next delivery.
745
10/03/2021 22:53:46 0 0
bbc
My Morrisons started to use paper bags but these were quickly replaced by plastic. This is fine by me as the plastic bags can be reused and recycled again later. However, the one problem is that when dairy products are put into plastic bags; items like cream/yoghurt/eggs are easily broken.
40
10/03/2021 11:50:27 88 16
bbc
If supermarkets didn't overpackage in the first place it might help. Why have four tomatoes in a plastic tray covered with plastic? Why does every sodding apple, pear, banana, kiwifruit have to have a sticky label on it? How many visually impaired people have inadvertently eaten them. As for deli products such as cold meat in difficult (for us with arthritic fingers) to open hard plastic .....
81
10/03/2021 12:00:16 61 35
bbc
Yes, it would be better if the barcode could be grown into the fruit.
144
10/03/2021 12:15:34 7 2
bbc
A very good comment, so good that i dont need to make my own comment now.
Thats what i would have put..
Nice one
255
10/03/2021 12:46:08 6 4
bbc
You under estimate the stupidity of the English public
274
10/03/2021 12:52:54 5 0
bbc
The supermarkets produce huge quantities of soft plastic wrapping waste of their own & the landfill tax has incentivised them to find a way not to dump it.This is simply good PR in the meantime & hopefully incentivises the supermarkets to work with the manufacturer to minimise the amount produced in the first place.
296
10/03/2021 13:00:14 14 6
bbc
@" Why does every sodding apple, pear, banana, kiwifruit have to have a sticky label on it?"

Because it requires less packaging than sticking the same information on an outer package. The principle is to let the fruit skin be the package and apply just a small, minimal label that.
526
10/03/2021 14:39:19 0 0
bbc
Oh yes, yes, yes. Pointless sticky labels. What are they actually for? Not blind people because they’re not in Braille, and if you’re sighted, surely you’d know that an apple is ... duh, an apple. Well said.
668
10/03/2021 16:02:52 0 0
bbc
To prevent people spreading germs/viruses when they touch everything on the shelf.
701
10/03/2021 16:34:08 0 0
bbc
Are you suggesting that visually impaired people eat bananas with the skin on?
41
10/03/2021 11:51:20 9 2
bbc
This is superb news. A shame local councils don't take away plastic bags, pet food pouches and crisp bags for recycling too though.
697
10/03/2021 16:28:01 0 0
bbc
And it’s an even greater shame that so many of the public don’t even take them home to dispose of.
8
10/03/2021 11:42:40 8 18
bbc
I like Tesco, but these changes are used for PR, nothing else. We waste huge amounts of paper and products each year. We ship our rubbish off around the world to be incinerated. Then we tell the world we are leading the push for climate change and have emissions down. Everything is just hijacked now, talk about climate change in December & before Christmas. Only then will I listen.
42
10/03/2021 11:51:21 6 8
bbc
Keep your tin foil hat on and keep using that metal coat hanger to get a signal.
61
10/03/2021 11:55:46 0 7
bbc
That is just playground nonsense, it's true. Easter and then at Christmas we will waste millions of tons of waste. On top of that all the throw away cheap fashion. But now, lets play hero because it makes us feel better about ourselves. Maybe take your blinkers off and get real.
43
10/03/2021 11:51:26 6 5
bbc
Well done to Tesco. That said they produce so much of the plastic packaging that has blotted the landscape they should take the lead.
103
10/03/2021 12:04:30 1 0
bbc
I think you find it is Tesco customers who dump the plastic
44
10/03/2021 11:51:43 4 4
bbc
Local authorities should have the power to prevent stores from selling goods in packaging that they cannot recycle.
99
10/03/2021 12:03:37 1 0
bbc
Tesco have a policy to drive to use only the plastic that can be recycled. Google it.
Is this news? What about an HYS on Piers Morgan or the Meghan/ Harry accusation. Too volatile? BBC won't like the comments? And they will no doubt take down this post! Removed
45
10/03/2021 11:51:46 5 1
bbc
Yes this is news! Wide scale availability of LDPE recycling would be huge benefit. Even bigger than Piers Morgan not being on TV - which in itself is massive.
46
10/03/2021 11:52:10 3 6
bbc
Hold on. How much is it costing (in £ terms and in environmental terms) to collect, sort, recycle and reuse these items. The notion of recycling seems to be considered an end in itself. More important is to address the litter problem.
47
10/03/2021 11:52:40 4 3
bbc
They were taking bags back from home deliveries until the pandemic stopped it.

Personally can't see people taking the time to clean them before disposing of them.
75
10/03/2021 11:59:27 5 0
bbc
Some people are lazy and other's not
48
10/03/2021 11:53:06 2 7
bbc
Nice idea...BUT

Can the recycling containers be situated outside in the car park, rather than carrying bags with rotting food into the shop?

In this virus conscious age we mustn't forget bacteria and moulds.
64
10/03/2021 11:56:45 5 1
bbc
Rotting food? I think you're supposed to dispose of that separately.
92
10/03/2021 12:02:07 0 0
bbc
Rotting food is not plastic. The recycle containers are already in most supermarket car parks
122
10/03/2021 12:09:57 1 0
bbc
Someone else who couldn't be bothered to read the article before posting

"however they will need to clean items"
49
10/03/2021 11:53:33 3 2
bbc
It’s a good step. But it’s an easy step.

Will they go further and “significantly” cut the plastic used on food packaging in their stores? They are a big player, so have the power to make changes in supply
chain to use a lot less plastic. Doing so would change a big % of the populations buying habits, as we often just buy what’s conveniently on offer.
83
10/03/2021 12:00:29 0 0
bbc
Why it use the internet to check before you post. You will find they have reduced the packaging. Remember this is one of their costs, so will be minimised.
50
10/03/2021 11:53:37 0 7
bbc
Can imagine Tesco going round the streets picking up litter and rummaging around on tips looking for bags to recycle
51
10/03/2021 11:53:40 3 4
bbc
We should be making recycling easier. In London boroughs you get a recycling wheelie bin, for everything to go in and it gets sorted at a centre designed for it.

In other places, such as Swindon, you're expected to sort your rubbish out into 5 different bins and package your plastic in more plastic!

Talk about backwards. We're paying the tax AND doing the work for them too! Needs modernisation.
71
10/03/2021 11:58:28 2 0
bbc
Rotherham is good at this too - just one bin for all plastic, metal and glass.

Just hope they will also start recycling soft plastics now that Tesco have shown it can be done.
636
10/03/2021 15:42:26 0 0
bbc
Depends on the borough in which you live.
9
10/03/2021 11:43:05 418 35
bbc
First 4 comments all negative. Typical of current climate. This is a positive step - well done Tesco.
52
10/03/2021 11:53:44 119 104
bbc
A positive step would be talking about climate change in December and before Christmas. We don't because we are more interested in consumerism and then playing hero when it suits us. We have become such hypocrites in climate it's frankly laughable. Because come Easter & December, millions of tons of waste will be created. As well as cheap throw away fashion in weeks to come.
242
10/03/2021 12:45:13 1 19
bbc
Problem is the populist government will accuse yiy of cancelling out history
247
10/03/2021 12:41:21 13 3
bbc
Good idea. They have been doing this in Australian supermarkets for years. Glad UK is catching up!!!
53
10/03/2021 11:43:02 3 13
bbc
bring back plastic straws, there was a reason they were invented..
2
10/03/2021 11:39:37 20 26
bbc
Only about 50 years too late! I dread to think how much wildlife has been murdered as a result of this plastic waste, disgracefull
54
10/03/2021 11:43:53 6 10
bbc
How much wildlife wouldve been murdered by other wildlife had they been unchecked? Environment hippies dont think things through lol
228
10/03/2021 12:42:49 9 0
bbc
How foolish you are. Nature sorts it's self out, death happens. Animals suffocated by plastic, trees and shrubs with rubbish hanging in them all down to humans. I'm a scuba diver and walker not an environmental hippie and I've picked up litter on land and underwater. Animals didn't make that litter, natural litter from death and decay decomposes and takes it's part in the circle of life.
295
10/03/2021 12:59:59 6 1
bbc
Nature has its checks and balances, so that populations generally remain stable (within boundaries). Humans are an exception as we have few (if any) natural predators apart from microbes!. Natural systems don't need our rubbish adding to the problems they face.
611
10/03/2021 15:14:13 0 0
bbc
What a pathetic & blind attitude you have towards nature.
55
10/03/2021 11:44:52 3 6
bbc
Instead of collection points could Tesco not follow up their £4.50 minimum delivery service charge with a visit to collect all the plastic that they sent the customer in the first place.
70
10/03/2021 11:58:16 1 0
bbc
Plastic pollution is due to lazy people
56
10/03/2021 11:54:10 58 4
bbc
A positive step, but if you want households to really recycle waste plastic all councils should be taking this stuff, and other recyclable materials, via kerbside collection.
744
10/03/2021 22:43:51 0 0
bbc
The problem with kerbside collection of plastics is that the containers provided are only useful for hard plastics such as bottles and boxes. I have got round this by putting all my plastic waste into a plastic carrier bag and it is then taken in bulk by the kerbside team.
57
10/03/2021 11:54:12 46 10
bbc
If these products are harder to recycle, why make them?
65
10/03/2021 11:56:57 30 3
bbc
They keep your food fresh for longer. For example metal in the pouches excludes light. Alternative is a metal can.
67
10/03/2021 11:57:16 8 1
bbc
So that the contents of the packaging can get to the user intact.
68
10/03/2021 11:57:24 9 7
bbc
Exactly, I can never understand why suppliers are allowed to put items in non recyclable materials!
198
10/03/2021 12:35:22 6 0
bbc
Because the manufacturers aren't responsible for recycling the packaging.
516
10/03/2021 14:35:08 3 0
bbc
Tins (which is the alternate) can leach metals into the food. Also some foods are corrosive to metals. Fruit juices are a great example. That and these "non recyclable" products are becoming recyclable due to demand. in a 5yr gap from no tech and it being "Impossible" it became "We can actually do this"
58
10/03/2021 11:55:13 3 7
bbc
Sorry Tesco but you've been a bit late there, Morrisons has been doing this for months.
66
PLS
10/03/2021 11:57:11 5 1
bbc
The more the merrier surely?
730
10/03/2021 19:19:34 0 0
bbc
For quite a while, before the pandemic, Tesco customers were able to return soft plastics - such as bread wrappers, frozen vegetable bags - to larger stores or, if an online customer, via the delivery driver.
59
10/03/2021 11:55:29 0 8
bbc
Yep,. That'll do it. Tesco the massive carbon polluters.. but.. no.. that'll sort the environment. Conscience.... EASED....
60
10/03/2021 11:55:38 4 14
bbc
Tesco uses more soya for animal feed than any supermarket in the UK. Fires are used as a tool by the industrial meat industry to clear vast areas of forest in the Amazon and elsewhere to use for cattle farms and soya plantations. When is Tesco going to stop destroying the Amazon?
105
10/03/2021 11:56:53 0 0
bbc
Plagiarism. But I approve.
42
10/03/2021 11:51:21 6 8
bbc
Keep your tin foil hat on and keep using that metal coat hanger to get a signal.
61
10/03/2021 11:55:46 0 7
bbc
That is just playground nonsense, it's true. Easter and then at Christmas we will waste millions of tons of waste. On top of that all the throw away cheap fashion. But now, lets play hero because it makes us feel better about ourselves. Maybe take your blinkers off and get real.
598
10/03/2021 15:05:59 1 0
bbc
Maybe just stop producing excess waste.
My clothes are worn until the holes & tears get too big even for at home or gardening.
100% cotton & wool such as old jeans & pullovers go in the compost bays.

Maybe stop denigrating the efforts of others & make some effort yourself.
62
10/03/2021 11:56:28 9 6
bbc
Will it actually get recycled or will it be shipped half way around the world so someone can dump it in the sea?
141
10/03/2021 12:15:06 1 0
bbc
Being processed and reused in UK
63
10/03/2021 11:56:39 10 2
bbc
Good. I hope they also reinstate the recycling service for printer cartridges, batteries and light bulbs. That facility has been missing recently.
156
10/03/2021 12:18:07 3 0
bbc
My local council accepts old batteries for recycling. They don't publicise it much, but I just put old batteries in a plastic bag on top of my old cardboard and they take them. It's worth asking your council if they do it too.
48
10/03/2021 11:53:06 2 7
bbc
Nice idea...BUT

Can the recycling containers be situated outside in the car park, rather than carrying bags with rotting food into the shop?

In this virus conscious age we mustn't forget bacteria and moulds.
64
10/03/2021 11:56:45 5 1
bbc
Rotting food? I think you're supposed to dispose of that separately.
57
10/03/2021 11:54:12 46 10
bbc
If these products are harder to recycle, why make them?
65
10/03/2021 11:56:57 30 3
bbc
They keep your food fresh for longer. For example metal in the pouches excludes light. Alternative is a metal can.
218
10/03/2021 12:38:58 7 0
bbc
A metal can is fully recycleable, including the paper label.
336
10/03/2021 13:12:14 6 0
bbc
Alternative is a metal can,

Which can easily and cheaply be recycled time after time and uses far less energy throughout a long life.
643
10/03/2021 15:48:01 2 0
bbc
A steel can is easier to recycle, they are easily identified at recycling centres using a magnet, back to a smelter and then reused.
Pet food pouches need to be segregated from other recycling and sent to a very small number of specialised recycling facilities, so more likely off to landfill.
58
10/03/2021 11:55:13 3 7
bbc
Sorry Tesco but you've been a bit late there, Morrisons has been doing this for months.
66
PLS
10/03/2021 11:57:11 5 1
bbc
The more the merrier surely?
100
10/03/2021 12:03:54 0 0
bbc
Every little helps.
57
10/03/2021 11:54:12 46 10
bbc
If these products are harder to recycle, why make them?
67
10/03/2021 11:57:16 8 1
bbc
So that the contents of the packaging can get to the user intact.
57
10/03/2021 11:54:12 46 10
bbc
If these products are harder to recycle, why make them?
68
10/03/2021 11:57:24 9 7
bbc
Exactly, I can never understand why suppliers are allowed to put items in non recyclable materials!
69
10/03/2021 11:57:46 26 7
bbc
Been doing so at my local tesco for maybe 2 years now

Drastically reduces our household waste!
80
10/03/2021 12:00:13 15 4
bbc
Why down vote - Tesco Extra, Yate
406
10/03/2021 13:44:15 0 2
bbc
"Been doing so at my local tesco for maybe 2 years now"

So why the announcement today? Couldn't be that Tesco wants some free positive publicity could it?
55
10/03/2021 11:44:52 3 6
bbc
Instead of collection points could Tesco not follow up their £4.50 minimum delivery service charge with a visit to collect all the plastic that they sent the customer in the first place.
70
10/03/2021 11:58:16 1 0
bbc
Plastic pollution is due to lazy people
193
10/03/2021 12:28:56 0 0
bbc
Why should anyone spend their day sorting out another persons litter and rubbish. Fine supermarkets for using all these wrappers.
51
10/03/2021 11:53:40 3 4
bbc
We should be making recycling easier. In London boroughs you get a recycling wheelie bin, for everything to go in and it gets sorted at a centre designed for it.

In other places, such as Swindon, you're expected to sort your rubbish out into 5 different bins and package your plastic in more plastic!

Talk about backwards. We're paying the tax AND doing the work for them too! Needs modernisation.
71
10/03/2021 11:58:28 2 0
bbc
Rotherham is good at this too - just one bin for all plastic, metal and glass.

Just hope they will also start recycling soft plastics now that Tesco have shown it can be done.
72
10/03/2021 11:58:50 7 2
bbc
What happened to the much touted can and bottle deposit scheme? Loads of chat, nothing happened. I've seen it in very effective use across Europe and it's fantastic.
73
10/03/2021 11:59:16 0 6
bbc
General public helping Tesco meet its own legislative recycling targets. Will I get minimum wage for my donation?
74
10/03/2021 11:59:16 5 3
bbc
Just checked a packet of Tesco's own brand crisps I bought recently.

"Soft plastic" it isnt. Metallised foil & I would think quite hard to recycle.

Forget recycling plastic, just stop using it for food packaging.
98
10/03/2021 12:03:33 1 0
bbc
136
10/03/2021 12:13:48 0 0
bbc
It is hard to recycle, but someone found out how, so Tesco is collecting them
47
10/03/2021 11:52:40 4 3
bbc
They were taking bags back from home deliveries until the pandemic stopped it.

Personally can't see people taking the time to clean them before disposing of them.
75
10/03/2021 11:59:27 5 0
bbc
Some people are lazy and other's not
76
CJ
10/03/2021 11:59:29 13 1
bbc
Many plastic bags around fruit / veg & bread bags can already be recycled with old carrier bags at many large Asda/Waitrose/Sainsbury already.
Plus Walkers to have a crisp packet recycle network.
Bigger problem is Tetrapak uht milk type cartons. Only a few places will take them.
449
10/03/2021 13:59:15 2 0
bbc
My old council used to take Tetrapack as part of its mixed recycling, so I therefore assumed all did (and have been putting it out in my current borough without questioning it). Seems like I might need to double check if it's not your experience!
77
10/03/2021 11:59:29 5 5
bbc
Add 10p tax to any product with non-recyclable packaging.

Worked for plastic bags.
78
10/03/2021 11:59:36 0 8
bbc
Well done by TESCO helping us with our collective public shame over all things eco. Even better you got free advertising from this and didn’t have to cover all your uk shops in one go. A win win, we feel so much better , all the woke support you and the re cycling done every week by many people through rubbish collections , and the refuse industry can be ignored.
5
10/03/2021 11:41:31 17 27
bbc
If stuff is recyclable it should go in the recycling bin and get recycled. That's the process for recycling in this country. If that process isn't working then fix it, don't complicate things. Recycling is already complicated enough.
79
10/03/2021 11:59:38 4 2
bbc
If you downvote please reply and say why. Most downvoted post is basically the same thing as 2nd most upvoted post. Wondering why.
69
10/03/2021 11:57:46 26 7
bbc
Been doing so at my local tesco for maybe 2 years now

Drastically reduces our household waste!
80
10/03/2021 12:00:13 15 4
bbc
Why down vote - Tesco Extra, Yate
40
10/03/2021 11:50:27 88 16
bbc
If supermarkets didn't overpackage in the first place it might help. Why have four tomatoes in a plastic tray covered with plastic? Why does every sodding apple, pear, banana, kiwifruit have to have a sticky label on it? How many visually impaired people have inadvertently eaten them. As for deli products such as cold meat in difficult (for us with arthritic fingers) to open hard plastic .....
81
10/03/2021 12:00:16 61 35
bbc
Yes, it would be better if the barcode could be grown into the fruit.
95
10/03/2021 12:02:27 10 2
bbc
And how does that work with items you CAN put into a paper bag and weigh?
166
10/03/2021 12:22:26 2 0
bbc
may give me indigestion
426
10/03/2021 13:53:11 5 2
bbc
"Yes, it would be better if the barcode could be grown into the fruit."

To avoid this, retailers have an incredibly sophisticated bit of equipment at the checkouts called a laminated sheet with the barcodes on. Or you press "apples" on the screen of a weighing scale. Just because you can't think of another way, doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
513
10/03/2021 14:33:08 0 0
bbc
"Yes, it would be better if the barcode could be grown into the fruit."

Har Har, there are rarely barecodes on the sticky labels on fruits anyway. It's always the brand label. You have to go to the scales and weigh them and then print out the barcode.
649
10/03/2021 15:52:17 0 0
bbc
Now there's a challenge for genetic engineers.
758
em6
11/03/2021 10:28:07 0 0
bbc
It can be printed onto the skin of the fruit. It's just a curved surface, same as the date on bottle shoulders and lids. All you have to do is use non-toxic ink.
82
10/03/2021 12:00:28 3 2
bbc
Good this is happening but ultimately we need to look at ways of stopping some of these packaging approaches at source, rather than addressing through recycling. Terracycle recycle pet food pouches and other items, so Tesco are not first, but the Terracycle schemes are smaller scale and not available everywhere.
49
10/03/2021 11:53:33 3 2
bbc
It’s a good step. But it’s an easy step.

Will they go further and “significantly” cut the plastic used on food packaging in their stores? They are a big player, so have the power to make changes in supply
chain to use a lot less plastic. Doing so would change a big % of the populations buying habits, as we often just buy what’s conveniently on offer.
83
10/03/2021 12:00:29 0 0
bbc
Why it use the internet to check before you post. You will find they have reduced the packaging. Remember this is one of their costs, so will be minimised.
84
10/03/2021 12:00:34 0 1
bbc
About 14 years ago I used to deliver cigarettes to Morrisons Supermarkets, and was always impressed as the had bags for recycling and one was for plastic wrapping.
Do not know if they still do.
85
10/03/2021 12:00:47 0 5
bbc
until the incredible number of mixed material yoghurts are banned this is insignificant.
31
10/03/2021 11:48:47 40 6
bbc
I thought it wasn't recycleable at all, hence why we're told not to put it in our recycling bin?

I'm all for eco-friendliness and recycle as much as possible, but why is it being made so complicated?

What really makes me laugh is separating glass into its own tub, then the binmen come, empty the main recycling bin, then throw the glass in the same truck after it anyway. What's the point?
86
10/03/2021 12:01:03 29 2
bbc
It's 'cos different councils have different recycling contracts & some recycle materials others won't touch
It is about reducing waste, but it's also about making money
Where I live the recyclers will take any hard plastic packaging but where my partner lives, they stopped taking anything plastic except bottles
So I assume that Tesco have a recycler for whom it's cost effective to take wrappers
402
10/03/2021 13:41:53 0 0
bbc
"then throw the glass in the same truck after it anyway. What's the point?"
--
If they can't/won't recycle glassware why have they (as I presume they have) told you to present your glassware separately? Or are you separating them on your own initiative? If the latter, it's your responsibility to take them to a bottle bank IF you want them recycled.
87
10/03/2021 12:01:03 7 1
bbc
Don't they already recycle the bags from bread? I have understood that any polythene that stretches (like bread bags, bags for carrot, potatoes etc) can be recycled via the plastic bag collection bins instore. Or is this a different type?
88
10/03/2021 12:01:12 2 2
bbc
For once BBC I agree with your obligatory daily environment story.

Recycling is a very simple way of creating efficiency and reducing the consumption of resources than encouraging the whipped up braying masses to pump money and taxes into inefficient schemes for government and capital investors profit.
89
10/03/2021 12:01:36 0 3
bbc
FINALLY!!! Too much plastic is used for packaging by supermarkets.
90
10/03/2021 12:01:39 15 3
bbc
Perhaps they could have a good shout at cadbury et al for changing from paper and foil to plastic covering.
Even bags of sugar are now in plastic - what was wrong with those paper bags they used for over a hundred years?
111
10/03/2021 12:05:33 14 7
bbc
brown colour deemed racist no doubt.
346
10/03/2021 13:15:19 0 0
bbc
Our sugar still comes in paper bags and we recycle them. It's "Silver Spoon" from Morrisons (and probably from other suppliers, too).
91
10/03/2021 12:01:46 2 4
bbc
Isn't "plastic recycling" greenwash for the oil industry? "Recycling" is too vague. If the returned plastic is being expensively (where the real benefit is marketing) made into a lower quality even less recyclable product, it should have a different name to differentiate it from - say - metals or glass recycling which can almost totally recover the original material.

Just stop using plastic.
113
10/03/2021 12:06:09 0 0
bbc
Not really no. Recyling is better than landfill or escape to the environment. Avoiding and reusing is better but recycling has a place as plastic is so ubiquitous and useful. Avoiding it is much easier said than done. Besides only about 15% of oil is used to make things.
123
10/03/2021 12:10:11 0 0
bbc
Being recycled back to original, check out Magnum ice cream tubs as an example
48
10/03/2021 11:53:06 2 7
bbc
Nice idea...BUT

Can the recycling containers be situated outside in the car park, rather than carrying bags with rotting food into the shop?

In this virus conscious age we mustn't forget bacteria and moulds.
92
10/03/2021 12:02:07 0 0
bbc
Rotting food is not plastic. The recycle containers are already in most supermarket car parks
31
10/03/2021 11:48:47 40 6
bbc
I thought it wasn't recycleable at all, hence why we're told not to put it in our recycling bin?

I'm all for eco-friendliness and recycle as much as possible, but why is it being made so complicated?

What really makes me laugh is separating glass into its own tub, then the binmen come, empty the main recycling bin, then throw the glass in the same truck after it anyway. What's the point?
93
10/03/2021 11:51:00 1 0
bbc
They are difficult to recycle, but can be recycled in some areas. Problem is, if you put it in the recycling and your area can't recycle them, the whole bag of recycling has to go to landfill because of that one unrecyclable plastic bag.

Agreed - the binmen are somewhat thoughtless in their approach
94
10/03/2021 11:52:53 0 11
bbc
Tesco to start recycling bread bags and crisp packets

Yuck!

Think it through - do you really want all those smelly bags in your stores and then stuffed in boxes as packaging?
109
10/03/2021 12:05:50 0 0
bbc
Did you read the article before commenting?

"however they will need to clean items"
81
10/03/2021 12:00:16 61 35
bbc
Yes, it would be better if the barcode could be grown into the fruit.
95
10/03/2021 12:02:27 10 2
bbc
And how does that work with items you CAN put into a paper bag and weigh?
159
10/03/2021 12:19:43 2 3
bbc
It’s easy, you put the banana’s with a ‘grown on’ barcode, in to a CLEAR plastic bag. I don’t want all the glory, it’s the same logic as when you buy pre-peeled fruit, in plastic pots.
436
10/03/2021 13:55:41 1 0
bbc
I don't even use the paper bags. For most fruit and veg, there's no point - just put it 'naked' into your basket or trolley and then your bag.
96
10/03/2021 12:02:43 4 4
bbc
I'd sooner that this was done by our Council waste collection services.
117
10/03/2021 12:08:23 0 0
bbc
Wouldn't we all but would you sooner like the higher tax bill?

Then in actual fact don't eat the crisps.....give them straight to one of the families who the extra tax pushes into poverty to feed their kids...

All a balance and being green costs...
97
10/03/2021 12:02:54 3 7
bbc
Won't work as most people won't be bothered for worthless collection points...

Let me tell you the best way is to use degradable bags

China has banned on non-degradable bags in an attempt to curve its plastic waste production.
115
10/03/2021 12:07:55 1 0
bbc
Works very well with the store having to empty the collection cages regularly
120
10/03/2021 12:08:44 0 0
bbc
Tesco have banned degradable plastic from packaging
126
10/03/2021 12:11:57 1 0
bbc
But still allow wet markets
74
10/03/2021 11:59:16 5 3
bbc
Just checked a packet of Tesco's own brand crisps I bought recently.

"Soft plastic" it isnt. Metallised foil & I would think quite hard to recycle.

Forget recycling plastic, just stop using it for food packaging.
98
10/03/2021 12:03:33 1 0
bbc
44
10/03/2021 11:51:43 4 4
bbc
Local authorities should have the power to prevent stores from selling goods in packaging that they cannot recycle.
99
10/03/2021 12:03:37 1 0
bbc
Tesco have a policy to drive to use only the plastic that can be recycled. Google it.
66
PLS
10/03/2021 11:57:11 5 1
bbc
The more the merrier surely?
100
10/03/2021 12:03:54 0 0
bbc
Every little helps.