The Restaurant Group: Wagamama owner to raise millions as lockdown bites
10/03/2021 | news | business | 166
The Restaurant Group says its sales dived by 57% last year after its sites were forced to close.
1
MVS
10/03/2021 10:49:45 65 4
bbc
There were far too many restaurant chains taking up space on the High Streets of UK towns and cities.
A complete shake-up of the sector can only be a good thing if it allows some local, independent restaurants to emerge and provide real diversity and choice to customers.
4
10/03/2021 10:52:10 13 2
bbc
Thats a big if unfortunately but I hope you are right.
33
10/03/2021 11:12:04 5 0
bbc
We need independent shops not merely restaurants. Chains set out to do exactly what the word says: Destroy your freedom of choice.
36
10/03/2021 11:14:13 1 0
bbc
Who in their right mind would start up a retail or cafe unit when the government can shut them down for months, while rents and rates are still to be paid?
The high streets will be half empty after this with betting shops and pawn shops proliferating.
79
10/03/2021 11:45:59 2 0
bbc
Many of the really really good independent restaurants open new branches because of demand - and then you get a chain.

There are a dozen bars/eateries in my city which on the face of it look unique and independent. It was only when the local paper ran a story recently that I realised they were all under the umbrella of the same company.
90
10/03/2021 11:58:12 0 0
bbc
Aside from banks and betting shops that is all my high street consists of. Even the last pound store has permanently closed!
103
WM
10/03/2021 12:21:21 0 0
bbc
More empty sites in the High Street will just add to the miserable experience. Do you really think there are many waiting to take their spaces?
114
Pip
10/03/2021 13:04:56 0 0
bbc
This has to be a must, giving some much needed diversity to High Streets that have long been stifled by big name stores and brands of low quality goods...............?
144
10/03/2021 17:51:47 0 1
bbc
allows some local, independent restaurants ?

err dont think so the multi nationals chains win out
158
11/03/2021 03:01:02 0 0
bbc
There is always space for an establishment serving good wholesome food at a reasonable price.
Local independent restaurants tend to try to be exclusive (mediocre food at high prices) or deteriorate rapidly into the 'Greasy Spoon' category where you are nervous to sit down, much less eat.
The few exceptions I know used to do well - but have been hard hit by Covid.
2
JH
10/03/2021 10:50:44 11 6
bbc
Personally I can't wait to be able to tuck into a chicken katsu curry again!
3
10/03/2021 10:51:40 23 3
bbc
Lot's about the effect that lockdown has had on the business, not a lot about the fact that they were making a loss before. Like a lot of businesses, COVID and the reaction to it may have hastened decline, but decline had already set in before the pandemic hit. I just feel sorry for those who do the real work in the business yet are the lowest paid - the customer facing staff!
10
10/03/2021 10:58:49 6 5
bbc
I feel sorry for those many people who setup businesses and risked their capital.
20
10/03/2021 11:07:09 1 2
bbc
"they were making a loss before"

Sweeping statement full of ill-informed pejorative.
Have YOU ever built a business?
32
10/03/2021 11:11:53 0 0
bbc
They could always risk their houses to start their own businesses if they are that unhappy.
1
MVS
10/03/2021 10:49:45 65 4
bbc
There were far too many restaurant chains taking up space on the High Streets of UK towns and cities.
A complete shake-up of the sector can only be a good thing if it allows some local, independent restaurants to emerge and provide real diversity and choice to customers.
4
10/03/2021 10:52:10 13 2
bbc
Thats a big if unfortunately but I hope you are right.
5
10/03/2021 10:54:07 51 5
bbc
Small quality restaurants is the way forward not the fast food american model. Cheap food is generally poor food. Let's see more fish restaurants and less burger bars.
11
10/03/2021 10:59:36 19 26
bbc
Wagamma isn't American fast food. It's Japanese fusion and really very good
19
10/03/2021 11:06:20 2 2
bbc
Fewer burger bars. Less meat.
28
10/03/2021 11:10:40 0 3
bbc
There will be very few outlets of any kind left after the lockdowns. You will need to be happy with the few survivers and get used to the gaps and spaces left in towns and cities everywhere.
82
10/03/2021 11:48:17 5 0
bbc
Generally fish are wild animals and a lot of them are threatened, cows aren't.

Have you seen the damage clam dredging does to the sea bed ?

Don't think you are being eco friendly by adopting a piscine diet to impress people.
96
10/03/2021 12:09:57 0 0
bbc
Fewer burger bars...
6
10/03/2021 10:54:34 7 9
bbc
The demand for hospitality if the lockdown ends is going to be at a much lower level. I think many people have seen that they can do without pubs and restaurants and with strong residual fear of covid will mean that many will never reopen and this is something the industry will have to accept.
14
10/03/2021 11:03:22 16 3
bbc
I love how wrong you are... You may be loving sitting at home doing nothing, but thats not the general feeling of the population
18
10/03/2021 11:05:50 3 1
bbc
Oh, how wrong you are.
I intend to eat out every other day for a month and spend the rest of the time in the pub, chatting and socialising.
35
10/03/2021 11:13:34 1 0
bbc
I'm not sure I agree. I think it will be the opposite - for a while at least. I think people will just want to be out and about doing things again and hospitality is going to be very busy.
38
Gab
10/03/2021 11:15:25 1 0
bbc
No. People are going to rush to the pub, for sure! But the lower end of food hospitality in the UK is horrendous. Hopefully, demand drives quality up. What is UK street food? Fish and chips and McDonald's!
7
10/03/2021 10:54:59 33 2
bbc
If I had a stake in Just Eat I'd be concerned that even in an environment so favourable to them they can't turn a profit.
30
10/03/2021 11:11:05 22 0
bbc
A lot of these startups are over hyped, over advertised on TV then floated on the stock exchange and the founding members get very rich and then abandon ship.
111
10/03/2021 12:42:58 0 0
bbc
Just eat is not a religion we should follow, but seems to be in many people’s lives these days! The world is full of other things to do you know!! ??
135
10/03/2021 15:59:25 0 0
bbc
Ocado lost millions! Directors should be shot!!
8
10/03/2021 10:55:08 112 16
bbc
I've managed to replicate the Wagamama experience at home during lockdown simply by emptying a pot noodle into a bowl of stagnant water and then burning £20 notes
17
10/03/2021 11:05:46 31 4
bbc
This is very funny and, in my submission, not too far off the truth!

Bravo.
61
10/03/2021 11:28:19 9 0
bbc
Spot on, but don't forget sitting on a wooden bench
76
10/03/2021 11:43:29 7 0
bbc
Bravo, hilarious.

Wins comment of the week.
87
10/03/2021 11:52:00 12 0
bbc
You forgot to add whilst sitting on a bench and eating off a sticky table.
105
10/03/2021 12:22:09 5 0
bbc
That's one of the funniest comments I have ever seen on any forum, brilliant
124
10/03/2021 14:36:01 4 0
bbc
I fail to understand the down votes, This is observational comedy at it`s finest.
I do hope you will tour the clubs upon reopening,
138
10/03/2021 16:10:23 1 1
bbc
You've clearly never eaten in Wagamamas, as the food is very good, and reasonably priced to be fair, drinks are way too expensive, but that's par for the course.
157
11/03/2021 02:51:29 0 0
bbc
Funny but a bit unkind.
I rather like(d) Wagamama.
Hope this isn't smokescreen for approaching administration.
9
10/03/2021 10:56:09 6 6
bbc
Never been to Wagamama. Is it any good?
13
10/03/2021 11:02:07 10 5
bbc
Not really.
15
10/03/2021 11:04:13 5 3
bbc
If you like being crammed on a bench with strangers in order to eat a pot noodle, probably yes.
21
Gab
10/03/2021 11:07:34 5 1
bbc
If you know Asian food, then no!
24
10/03/2021 11:08:42 6 2
bbc
If you like nice food then it's probably not for you. If you have COVID and as a result lost your sense of taste then give it a go.
29
10/03/2021 11:10:56 2 2
bbc
When you go have the Katsu Chicken, its great. You do share a bench and the food can arrive at different times - its part of the Far East experience.
48
10/03/2021 11:21:38 2 0
bbc
Not that great (although I remember going to their first restaurant in London in the 90s, and that was actually pretty good). Basically, it's overpriced fake-Japanese for "British tastes".

If you can find a real Japanese noodle bar in your area just go there. It'll almost certainly be better and cheaper.
54
10/03/2021 11:23:43 3 0
bbc
Not any more. Went there when it new and was decent and fairly priced (from what I remember. But like with a lot of chains, they start scrimping. At first no one notices but the scrimping increases and the quality and value goes down; then people do notice.
3
10/03/2021 10:51:40 23 3
bbc
Lot's about the effect that lockdown has had on the business, not a lot about the fact that they were making a loss before. Like a lot of businesses, COVID and the reaction to it may have hastened decline, but decline had already set in before the pandemic hit. I just feel sorry for those who do the real work in the business yet are the lowest paid - the customer facing staff!
10
10/03/2021 10:58:49 6 5
bbc
I feel sorry for those many people who setup businesses and risked their capital.
5
10/03/2021 10:54:07 51 5
bbc
Small quality restaurants is the way forward not the fast food american model. Cheap food is generally poor food. Let's see more fish restaurants and less burger bars.
11
10/03/2021 10:59:36 19 26
bbc
Wagamma isn't American fast food. It's Japanese fusion and really very good
27
10/03/2021 11:10:10 4 1
bbc
That explains it - the first and last time I ate 'Japanese Fusion' in Wagathingy I suffered a bout of 'Japanese Fission'.
49
10/03/2021 11:22:25 2 0
bbc
The article is about various eating establishments and I didn't say it was american, I said American model. However, it is still overpriced rubbish.
56
10/03/2021 11:24:50 2 0
bbc
It's very poor and wildly overpriced Japanese fusion. If you want soup noodle you're better off finding an actual Japanese noodle bar (if you can find one).
12
10/03/2021 10:59:38 2 1
bbc
Well they're not going to be the only ones are they
58
10/03/2021 11:25:27 3 0
bbc
Debt. The final throw of the neo liberal dice.
9
10/03/2021 10:56:09 6 6
bbc
Never been to Wagamama. Is it any good?
13
10/03/2021 11:02:07 10 5
bbc
Not really.
6
10/03/2021 10:54:34 7 9
bbc
The demand for hospitality if the lockdown ends is going to be at a much lower level. I think many people have seen that they can do without pubs and restaurants and with strong residual fear of covid will mean that many will never reopen and this is something the industry will have to accept.
14
10/03/2021 11:03:22 16 3
bbc
I love how wrong you are... You may be loving sitting at home doing nothing, but thats not the general feeling of the population
22
10/03/2021 11:08:01 2 1
bbc
Completely agree. If being locked in your own house for a year doesn't make you want to go out into world, nothing will. Furthermore, I can't imagine the rest of us are going to miss your company.
9
10/03/2021 10:56:09 6 6
bbc
Never been to Wagamama. Is it any good?
15
10/03/2021 11:04:13 5 3
bbc
If you like being crammed on a bench with strangers in order to eat a pot noodle, probably yes.
16
ML
10/03/2021 11:04:28 17 2
bbc
So many hospitality venues that seem to be overpriced and fleecing customers. In fairness, some chains have picked up on this and tried to refocus but there are still a number that serve glorified ready meals which I could easily get for a reasonable price from a well-known pub chain already.
8
10/03/2021 10:55:08 112 16
bbc
I've managed to replicate the Wagamama experience at home during lockdown simply by emptying a pot noodle into a bowl of stagnant water and then burning £20 notes
17
10/03/2021 11:05:46 31 4
bbc
This is very funny and, in my submission, not too far off the truth!

Bravo.
6
10/03/2021 10:54:34 7 9
bbc
The demand for hospitality if the lockdown ends is going to be at a much lower level. I think many people have seen that they can do without pubs and restaurants and with strong residual fear of covid will mean that many will never reopen and this is something the industry will have to accept.
18
10/03/2021 11:05:50 3 1
bbc
Oh, how wrong you are.
I intend to eat out every other day for a month and spend the rest of the time in the pub, chatting and socialising.
5
10/03/2021 10:54:07 51 5
bbc
Small quality restaurants is the way forward not the fast food american model. Cheap food is generally poor food. Let's see more fish restaurants and less burger bars.
19
10/03/2021 11:06:20 2 2
bbc
Fewer burger bars. Less meat.
46
10/03/2021 11:21:21 1 0
bbc
the problem with burgers is not the meat but the ship that accompanies it.
3
10/03/2021 10:51:40 23 3
bbc
Lot's about the effect that lockdown has had on the business, not a lot about the fact that they were making a loss before. Like a lot of businesses, COVID and the reaction to it may have hastened decline, but decline had already set in before the pandemic hit. I just feel sorry for those who do the real work in the business yet are the lowest paid - the customer facing staff!
20
10/03/2021 11:07:09 1 2
bbc
"they were making a loss before"

Sweeping statement full of ill-informed pejorative.
Have YOU ever built a business?
39
10/03/2021 11:15:39 3 0
bbc
The statement may be "sweeping" but is it factually wrong? If it is, then I apologise. Otherwise, my point stands.
9
10/03/2021 10:56:09 6 6
bbc
Never been to Wagamama. Is it any good?
21
Gab
10/03/2021 11:07:34 5 1
bbc
If you know Asian food, then no!
14
10/03/2021 11:03:22 16 3
bbc
I love how wrong you are... You may be loving sitting at home doing nothing, but thats not the general feeling of the population
22
10/03/2021 11:08:01 2 1
bbc
Completely agree. If being locked in your own house for a year doesn't make you want to go out into world, nothing will. Furthermore, I can't imagine the rest of us are going to miss your company.
23
10/03/2021 11:08:13 12 9
bbc
The £37 billion wasted on the failed Track and Trace system could have been used to half business rates for 18 months and reduce Employers Nics from 13% to 9%.
45
10/03/2021 11:13:25 19 3
bbc
to 'halve' dear boy
59
10/03/2021 11:25:40 0 0
bbc
Employee nic !
9
10/03/2021 10:56:09 6 6
bbc
Never been to Wagamama. Is it any good?
24
10/03/2021 11:08:42 6 2
bbc
If you like nice food then it's probably not for you. If you have COVID and as a result lost your sense of taste then give it a go.
25
Gab
10/03/2021 11:08:53 27 5
bbc
Greggs and McDonald's deliveries. And we wonder why the UK has one of the worst COVID death rates in the world!
41
10/03/2021 11:17:05 12 0
bbc
and all of it more expensive because gross profit is shipped out of the country.
26
10/03/2021 11:08:54 26 5
bbc
Went to Wagamama just once. My ribs starter was ice cold and had never even seen a microwave. My main dish was OK but I had eaten it all before my partner got her meal 20 minutes later. Had to ask for drinks 3 times before we got them. Complained to the manager and he said "cold food and slow delivery is part of the Wagamama's way".

If they go into administration I won't lose any sleep.
140
10/03/2021 17:26:19 0 0
bbc
It used to be good, but before Covid had gone downhill. Poor customer care as well.
11
10/03/2021 10:59:36 19 26
bbc
Wagamma isn't American fast food. It's Japanese fusion and really very good
27
10/03/2021 11:10:10 4 1
bbc
That explains it - the first and last time I ate 'Japanese Fusion' in Wagathingy I suffered a bout of 'Japanese Fission'.
44
10/03/2021 11:19:20 1 0
bbc
Fukushima tsunami time.
107
10/03/2021 12:36:37 0 0
bbc
Oh the flatulents! ??
5
10/03/2021 10:54:07 51 5
bbc
Small quality restaurants is the way forward not the fast food american model. Cheap food is generally poor food. Let's see more fish restaurants and less burger bars.
28
10/03/2021 11:10:40 0 3
bbc
There will be very few outlets of any kind left after the lockdowns. You will need to be happy with the few survivers and get used to the gaps and spaces left in towns and cities everywhere.
9
10/03/2021 10:56:09 6 6
bbc
Never been to Wagamama. Is it any good?
29
10/03/2021 11:10:56 2 2
bbc
When you go have the Katsu Chicken, its great. You do share a bench and the food can arrive at different times - its part of the Far East experience.
43
10/03/2021 11:18:47 1 0
bbc
not the far east I know!
52
10/03/2021 11:22:56 1 0
bbc
Never thought of Chatteris as the Far East myself.
7
10/03/2021 10:54:59 33 2
bbc
If I had a stake in Just Eat I'd be concerned that even in an environment so favourable to them they can't turn a profit.
30
10/03/2021 11:11:05 22 0
bbc
A lot of these startups are over hyped, over advertised on TV then floated on the stock exchange and the founding members get very rich and then abandon ship.
42
10/03/2021 11:17:40 0 0
bbc
Like pallid George Osborne's ladyfriend Thea Rogers.
Loadsamoney.
81
10/03/2021 11:48:03 0 0
bbc
It interesting that it seems Amazon are not in this market...if they thought they could turn a profit they'd be on it...if they do they would probably crush the opposition.
93
10/03/2021 11:51:50 0 0
bbc
Spot on Sir.
31
10/03/2021 11:11:53 46 7
bbc
Wagamamma. Pot noodle for 12 quid!
3
10/03/2021 10:51:40 23 3
bbc
Lot's about the effect that lockdown has had on the business, not a lot about the fact that they were making a loss before. Like a lot of businesses, COVID and the reaction to it may have hastened decline, but decline had already set in before the pandemic hit. I just feel sorry for those who do the real work in the business yet are the lowest paid - the customer facing staff!
32
10/03/2021 11:11:53 0 0
bbc
They could always risk their houses to start their own businesses if they are that unhappy.
40
10/03/2021 11:16:18 0 0
bbc
Indeed they could, and quite possibly some have - who knows.
1
MVS
10/03/2021 10:49:45 65 4
bbc
There were far too many restaurant chains taking up space on the High Streets of UK towns and cities.
A complete shake-up of the sector can only be a good thing if it allows some local, independent restaurants to emerge and provide real diversity and choice to customers.
33
10/03/2021 11:12:04 5 0
bbc
We need independent shops not merely restaurants. Chains set out to do exactly what the word says: Destroy your freedom of choice.
34
10/03/2021 11:12:26 7 1
bbc
What is quite amusing is translated, Wagamama means selfish disobedient child.
6
10/03/2021 10:54:34 7 9
bbc
The demand for hospitality if the lockdown ends is going to be at a much lower level. I think many people have seen that they can do without pubs and restaurants and with strong residual fear of covid will mean that many will never reopen and this is something the industry will have to accept.
35
10/03/2021 11:13:34 1 0
bbc
I'm not sure I agree. I think it will be the opposite - for a while at least. I think people will just want to be out and about doing things again and hospitality is going to be very busy.
1
MVS
10/03/2021 10:49:45 65 4
bbc
There were far too many restaurant chains taking up space on the High Streets of UK towns and cities.
A complete shake-up of the sector can only be a good thing if it allows some local, independent restaurants to emerge and provide real diversity and choice to customers.
36
10/03/2021 11:14:13 1 0
bbc
Who in their right mind would start up a retail or cafe unit when the government can shut them down for months, while rents and rates are still to be paid?
The high streets will be half empty after this with betting shops and pawn shops proliferating.
37
10/03/2021 11:15:12 44 7
bbc
Saw his interview on Sky earlier. It now seems to be the vogue for CEO's and the like to refer to their lowly paid employees as "colleagues".
It sounds about as sincere as when Johnson and his Brexit government refer to the EU as "our friends in Europe".
67
10/03/2021 11:33:09 14 1
bbc
I know, it makes me feel queasy it’s so disingenuous.
6
10/03/2021 10:54:34 7 9
bbc
The demand for hospitality if the lockdown ends is going to be at a much lower level. I think many people have seen that they can do without pubs and restaurants and with strong residual fear of covid will mean that many will never reopen and this is something the industry will have to accept.
38
Gab
10/03/2021 11:15:25 1 0
bbc
No. People are going to rush to the pub, for sure! But the lower end of food hospitality in the UK is horrendous. Hopefully, demand drives quality up. What is UK street food? Fish and chips and McDonald's!
60
10/03/2021 11:25:41 0 0
bbc
Personally I hope I'm wrong. The problem is that rhe Government has scared people into complying with lockdown. The problem is that is takes 5 mins to scare someone but a lot longer to remove that fear. Hopefully peoe can use this opportunity to support good quality hospitality.
20
10/03/2021 11:07:09 1 2
bbc
"they were making a loss before"

Sweeping statement full of ill-informed pejorative.
Have YOU ever built a business?
39
10/03/2021 11:15:39 3 0
bbc
The statement may be "sweeping" but is it factually wrong? If it is, then I apologise. Otherwise, my point stands.
32
10/03/2021 11:11:53 0 0
bbc
They could always risk their houses to start their own businesses if they are that unhappy.
40
10/03/2021 11:16:18 0 0
bbc
Indeed they could, and quite possibly some have - who knows.
25
Gab
10/03/2021 11:08:53 27 5
bbc
Greggs and McDonald's deliveries. And we wonder why the UK has one of the worst COVID death rates in the world!
41
10/03/2021 11:17:05 12 0
bbc
and all of it more expensive because gross profit is shipped out of the country.
117
10/03/2021 13:24:38 2 0
bbc
Greggs is a UK company, headquartered in Newcastle....?
139
10/03/2021 17:07:13 0 0
bbc
Greggs is a UK company listed on the FTSE. Around 82% of McDonald's in the UK are franchises therefore run by UK business people.

So neither profits going abroad ...
30
10/03/2021 11:11:05 22 0
bbc
A lot of these startups are over hyped, over advertised on TV then floated on the stock exchange and the founding members get very rich and then abandon ship.
42
10/03/2021 11:17:40 0 0
bbc
Like pallid George Osborne's ladyfriend Thea Rogers.
Loadsamoney.
29
10/03/2021 11:10:56 2 2
bbc
When you go have the Katsu Chicken, its great. You do share a bench and the food can arrive at different times - its part of the Far East experience.
43
10/03/2021 11:18:47 1 0
bbc
not the far east I know!
55
10/03/2021 11:24:33 1 1
bbc
Aah, the Naga Hills.
Maybe the closure of Wagamama explains the huge increase in dogs during Covid.
27
10/03/2021 11:10:10 4 1
bbc
That explains it - the first and last time I ate 'Japanese Fusion' in Wagathingy I suffered a bout of 'Japanese Fission'.
44
10/03/2021 11:19:20 1 0
bbc
Fukushima tsunami time.
23
10/03/2021 11:08:13 12 9
bbc
The £37 billion wasted on the failed Track and Trace system could have been used to half business rates for 18 months and reduce Employers Nics from 13% to 9%.
45
10/03/2021 11:13:25 19 3
bbc
to 'halve' dear boy
50
10/03/2021 11:22:33 4 0
bbc
Indeed, my bad. Ooops.
Thank you.
19
10/03/2021 11:06:20 2 2
bbc
Fewer burger bars. Less meat.
46
10/03/2021 11:21:21 1 0
bbc
the problem with burgers is not the meat but the ship that accompanies it.
47
Joe
bbc
I think most people are waiting for the Premier League clubs to go out of business tbh Removed
9
10/03/2021 10:56:09 6 6
bbc
Never been to Wagamama. Is it any good?
48
10/03/2021 11:21:38 2 0
bbc
Not that great (although I remember going to their first restaurant in London in the 90s, and that was actually pretty good). Basically, it's overpriced fake-Japanese for "British tastes".

If you can find a real Japanese noodle bar in your area just go there. It'll almost certainly be better and cheaper.
11
10/03/2021 10:59:36 19 26
bbc
Wagamma isn't American fast food. It's Japanese fusion and really very good
49
10/03/2021 11:22:25 2 0
bbc
The article is about various eating establishments and I didn't say it was american, I said American model. However, it is still overpriced rubbish.
45
10/03/2021 11:13:25 19 3
bbc
to 'halve' dear boy
50
10/03/2021 11:22:33 4 0
bbc
Indeed, my bad. Ooops.
Thank you.
51
10/03/2021 11:22:34 2 9
bbc
The stocks and shares market is funsamentally flawed.
Shares do not bring their rewards they should because they are tapped at source by owners of supercomputers doing micro transactions at millions of deals per second on the leading edge of the sale.

A co-operative society share structure would probably benefit the business and shareholder more without paying the casino leeches unearned income.
85
10/03/2021 11:49:42 1 2
bbc
The Stock market may not be a perfect solution to the World's trade, but there are flaws in every system.
Having spent some years working for The Co-Operative Group in the UK, (and used the Co-Operative Bank), I left sadly disillusioned with the almost endemic scale of corruption within the business
91
10/03/2021 12:00:08 2 2
bbc
You have no idea what you are talking about? Supercomputers and micro transactions at millions per second............what utter rubbish!
29
10/03/2021 11:10:56 2 2
bbc
When you go have the Katsu Chicken, its great. You do share a bench and the food can arrive at different times - its part of the Far East experience.
52
10/03/2021 11:22:56 1 0
bbc
Never thought of Chatteris as the Far East myself.
53
10/03/2021 11:23:43 12 5
bbc
I would of thought deliveroo/ just eat would have kept them going alright?

I don’t get Wagamama- I think it’s both overpriced and nowhere near as good as an Indian/Thai/Chinese etc
62
10/03/2021 11:29:40 9 0
bbc
In SE London wr have a small chain called Miso. Better quality and better priced that Wagamama.
64
10/03/2021 11:31:39 1 1
bbc
"nowhere near as good as an Indian/Thai/Chinese etc"

Quite subjective. There are just as many bad places, as there are good. I doubt very much that every "Indian/Thai/Chinese etc" is better than Waga.

You might just prefer it to Japanese cuisine
9
10/03/2021 10:56:09 6 6
bbc
Never been to Wagamama. Is it any good?
54
10/03/2021 11:23:43 3 0
bbc
Not any more. Went there when it new and was decent and fairly priced (from what I remember. But like with a lot of chains, they start scrimping. At first no one notices but the scrimping increases and the quality and value goes down; then people do notice.
130
10/03/2021 15:29:42 0 0
bbc
Bit like Yo Sushi. Was great about ten years ago. Dumbed down and bland now.
43
10/03/2021 11:18:47 1 0
bbc
not the far east I know!
55
10/03/2021 11:24:33 1 1
bbc
Aah, the Naga Hills.
Maybe the closure of Wagamama explains the huge increase in dogs during Covid.
11
10/03/2021 10:59:36 19 26
bbc
Wagamma isn't American fast food. It's Japanese fusion and really very good
56
10/03/2021 11:24:50 2 0
bbc
It's very poor and wildly overpriced Japanese fusion. If you want soup noodle you're better off finding an actual Japanese noodle bar (if you can find one).
57
10/03/2021 11:25:25 2 1
bbc
The biggest mistake these companies can make are insidious price rises to recover their losses. They will have to rebuild slowly and share the pain like everyone else.
73
10/03/2021 11:35:11 0 1
bbc
That is the levers of price service delivery.

"Too high" a price in some places, the elite will still buy.
12
10/03/2021 10:59:38 2 1
bbc
Well they're not going to be the only ones are they
58
10/03/2021 11:25:27 3 0
bbc
Debt. The final throw of the neo liberal dice.
23
10/03/2021 11:08:13 12 9
bbc
The £37 billion wasted on the failed Track and Trace system could have been used to half business rates for 18 months and reduce Employers Nics from 13% to 9%.
59
10/03/2021 11:25:40 0 0
bbc
Employee nic !
128
10/03/2021 15:27:45 0 0
bbc
That too. Nics should be 8% across the board. So a reduction from 12% for ordinary folk and a rise from 2% for the rich.
38
Gab
10/03/2021 11:15:25 1 0
bbc
No. People are going to rush to the pub, for sure! But the lower end of food hospitality in the UK is horrendous. Hopefully, demand drives quality up. What is UK street food? Fish and chips and McDonald's!
60
10/03/2021 11:25:41 0 0
bbc
Personally I hope I'm wrong. The problem is that rhe Government has scared people into complying with lockdown. The problem is that is takes 5 mins to scare someone but a lot longer to remove that fear. Hopefully peoe can use this opportunity to support good quality hospitality.
88
10/03/2021 11:56:57 1 0
bbc
If you look at the massive queues for coffee and a Macdonalds last time lockdown eased I think you are wrong about that.
8
10/03/2021 10:55:08 112 16
bbc
I've managed to replicate the Wagamama experience at home during lockdown simply by emptying a pot noodle into a bowl of stagnant water and then burning £20 notes
61
10/03/2021 11:28:19 9 0
bbc
Spot on, but don't forget sitting on a wooden bench
53
10/03/2021 11:23:43 12 5
bbc
I would of thought deliveroo/ just eat would have kept them going alright?

I don’t get Wagamama- I think it’s both overpriced and nowhere near as good as an Indian/Thai/Chinese etc
62
10/03/2021 11:29:40 9 0
bbc
In SE London wr have a small chain called Miso. Better quality and better priced that Wagamama.
155
11/03/2021 00:35:06 0 0
bbc
There's a place in Ipswich named Mizu which is also excellent. I used to go there a LOT when I lived in the area, free sides on a Monday and warp-speed service of frankly wonderful food.
63
10/03/2021 11:29:47 29 2
bbc
Not a fan of Wagamama personally; the food's nowhere near as good as the price suggests it should be.

That said, I can only praise the fact that they're raising the funding from shareholders, rather than going cap in hand to the government to demand taxpayer funded bailouts, as many other big businesses have tried to do.
53
10/03/2021 11:23:43 12 5
bbc
I would of thought deliveroo/ just eat would have kept them going alright?

I don’t get Wagamama- I think it’s both overpriced and nowhere near as good as an Indian/Thai/Chinese etc
64
10/03/2021 11:31:39 1 1
bbc
"nowhere near as good as an Indian/Thai/Chinese etc"

Quite subjective. There are just as many bad places, as there are good. I doubt very much that every "Indian/Thai/Chinese etc" is better than Waga.

You might just prefer it to Japanese cuisine
65
10/03/2021 11:32:21 2 4
bbc
Sadly, this is what happens when companies try to diversify too much and dilute their offerings.
Mexican and Japanese food have little in common.
72
10/03/2021 11:35:10 2 0
bbc
They have in common that which all food does - it all ends up in the same.
133
10/03/2021 15:46:51 0 0
bbc
Really?
Beans, fish, flour , rice etc..
66
10/03/2021 11:32:34 11 4
bbc
Just made for the vain youngsters of today. Better go to your local Indian or Chinese any day instead of the plastic mama. As someone said earlier, wagamama means selfish in Japanese , very apt
70
10/03/2021 11:34:12 12 0
bbc
Quite right, we should try to support local independent restaurants.
95
10/03/2021 12:06:16 0 0
bbc
yeah. why on earth would anyone want to eat something other than chinese and indian food?
37
10/03/2021 11:15:12 44 7
bbc
Saw his interview on Sky earlier. It now seems to be the vogue for CEO's and the like to refer to their lowly paid employees as "colleagues".
It sounds about as sincere as when Johnson and his Brexit government refer to the EU as "our friends in Europe".
67
10/03/2021 11:33:09 14 1
bbc
I know, it makes me feel queasy it’s so disingenuous.
68
10/03/2021 11:33:27 0 5
bbc
Wagamama £459.8 M revenue in 2020.

No sense in stocks and shares to raise revenue except to grab a bundle of cash.
86
10/03/2021 11:49:55 1 1
bbc
Are you confused about operating cost, revenue and profit?
97
10/03/2021 12:10:56 1 0
bbc
#460MM revenue, not profit. you need to consider the other side of the equation, ie their cost base
69
10/03/2021 11:33:44 9 2
bbc
I'd suggest shareholders think very carefully before entrusting any more of their money to Andy Hornby - a man with a pretty shocking record in destroying value and for whom, when it comes to colleagues' interests, actions speak much more loudly than words
66
10/03/2021 11:32:34 11 4
bbc
Just made for the vain youngsters of today. Better go to your local Indian or Chinese any day instead of the plastic mama. As someone said earlier, wagamama means selfish in Japanese , very apt
70
10/03/2021 11:34:12 12 0
bbc
Quite right, we should try to support local independent restaurants.
71
10/03/2021 11:34:19 56 3
bbc
Now that the local McDonald’s is serving takeaways again, the amount of litter has increased massively.
Why are fast food fans such slobs?
77
10/03/2021 11:45:42 45 2
bbc
They don't respect themselves so why would they respect the enviroment or others?
They toss the rubbish out of their car windows.
They're not slobs, they're TOSSERS!
Removed
110
10/03/2021 12:41:16 5 1
bbc
Why do McDonalds use so much packaging?
65
10/03/2021 11:32:21 2 4
bbc
Sadly, this is what happens when companies try to diversify too much and dilute their offerings.
Mexican and Japanese food have little in common.
72
10/03/2021 11:35:10 2 0
bbc
They have in common that which all food does - it all ends up in the same.
57
10/03/2021 11:25:25 2 1
bbc
The biggest mistake these companies can make are insidious price rises to recover their losses. They will have to rebuild slowly and share the pain like everyone else.
73
10/03/2021 11:35:11 0 1
bbc
That is the levers of price service delivery.

"Too high" a price in some places, the elite will still buy.
74
10/03/2021 11:35:35 8 13
bbc
The economy is a roundabout

And we have stopped it

It will take a lot to get it going again

With 500 billion on everyone's back

That's 10 years of deficits

That'll be 50 years of payback and pain

For 100,000 sick over 70's - let's hope our sentimentality is worth it or at least our grandchildren think so if they are ever born
75
10/03/2021 11:42:48 3 10
bbc
Never ever heard of it.
8
10/03/2021 10:55:08 112 16
bbc
I've managed to replicate the Wagamama experience at home during lockdown simply by emptying a pot noodle into a bowl of stagnant water and then burning £20 notes
76
10/03/2021 11:43:29 7 0
bbc
Bravo, hilarious.

Wins comment of the week.
71
10/03/2021 11:34:19 56 3
bbc
Now that the local McDonald’s is serving takeaways again, the amount of litter has increased massively.
Why are fast food fans such slobs?
77
10/03/2021 11:45:42 45 2
bbc
They don't respect themselves so why would they respect the enviroment or others?
78
10/03/2021 11:45:52 12 3
bbc
Wagamama and Frankie & Benny's delivered the 2 worst "dining" experiences of 2020. As previously stated here, a barely warm pot noodle followed by a rubbery squid starter ( the "food" does not arrive in any sort of sequence ) in Wagamama one evening, plus a partially frozen burger on a stale bun with a few scattered oven chips in F&B's on another occasion was quite enough thanks.
1
MVS
10/03/2021 10:49:45 65 4
bbc
There were far too many restaurant chains taking up space on the High Streets of UK towns and cities.
A complete shake-up of the sector can only be a good thing if it allows some local, independent restaurants to emerge and provide real diversity and choice to customers.
79
10/03/2021 11:45:59 2 0
bbc
Many of the really really good independent restaurants open new branches because of demand - and then you get a chain.

There are a dozen bars/eateries in my city which on the face of it look unique and independent. It was only when the local paper ran a story recently that I realised they were all under the umbrella of the same company.
80
10/03/2021 11:46:32 14 8
bbc
We are an SME and our sales are down by over 60% due to Covid but NOBODY helps us nor are they even interested. We have downsized by 50% giving up one of our units but not sure if this will be enough to survive. We need British manufacturing support not free ports to import from abroad more cheaply. As for Megan Markle feeling suicidal she needs to experience the real world!
30
10/03/2021 11:11:05 22 0
bbc
A lot of these startups are over hyped, over advertised on TV then floated on the stock exchange and the founding members get very rich and then abandon ship.
81
10/03/2021 11:48:03 0 0
bbc
It interesting that it seems Amazon are not in this market...if they thought they could turn a profit they'd be on it...if they do they would probably crush the opposition.
5
10/03/2021 10:54:07 51 5
bbc
Small quality restaurants is the way forward not the fast food american model. Cheap food is generally poor food. Let's see more fish restaurants and less burger bars.
82
10/03/2021 11:48:17 5 0
bbc
Generally fish are wild animals and a lot of them are threatened, cows aren't.

Have you seen the damage clam dredging does to the sea bed ?

Don't think you are being eco friendly by adopting a piscine diet to impress people.
123
10/03/2021 14:23:28 0 0
bbc
I'm not .......fish is better for you than red meat, and since when has a clam been a fish?
83
10/03/2021 11:48:33 11 3
bbc
Where most places like Wagamama fail is popping up in every town and city across the country! Greed and desire to be bigger and better has sadly impacted them financially and their reputation is going to suffer with price increases.
Rare sight to find family run restaurants in our towns and cities these days. Why do we need/want these big companies with their frozen food offerings?
152
10/03/2021 23:53:28 0 0
bbc
Costa set up a 'coffee shop' in our town right next to an Italian coffee/pizza/pasta shop. Why? Costa is closed at the moment (lockdown?) but the Italian place is thriving and does far better coffee.

As for local/family run restaurants (and other businesses)? Still running and thriving here.
84
10/03/2021 11:49:04 10 7
bbc
I feel very sorry for the staff but Wagamama is complete junk and it won't be missed when it goes legs up.
51
10/03/2021 11:22:34 2 9
bbc
The stocks and shares market is funsamentally flawed.
Shares do not bring their rewards they should because they are tapped at source by owners of supercomputers doing micro transactions at millions of deals per second on the leading edge of the sale.

A co-operative society share structure would probably benefit the business and shareholder more without paying the casino leeches unearned income.
85
10/03/2021 11:49:42 1 2
bbc
The Stock market may not be a perfect solution to the World's trade, but there are flaws in every system.
Having spent some years working for The Co-Operative Group in the UK, (and used the Co-Operative Bank), I left sadly disillusioned with the almost endemic scale of corruption within the business
68
10/03/2021 11:33:27 0 5
bbc
Wagamama £459.8 M revenue in 2020.

No sense in stocks and shares to raise revenue except to grab a bundle of cash.
86
10/03/2021 11:49:55 1 1
bbc
Are you confused about operating cost, revenue and profit?
8
10/03/2021 10:55:08 112 16
bbc
I've managed to replicate the Wagamama experience at home during lockdown simply by emptying a pot noodle into a bowl of stagnant water and then burning £20 notes
87
10/03/2021 11:52:00 12 0
bbc
You forgot to add whilst sitting on a bench and eating off a sticky table.
60
10/03/2021 11:25:41 0 0
bbc
Personally I hope I'm wrong. The problem is that rhe Government has scared people into complying with lockdown. The problem is that is takes 5 mins to scare someone but a lot longer to remove that fear. Hopefully peoe can use this opportunity to support good quality hospitality.
88
10/03/2021 11:56:57 1 0
bbc
If you look at the massive queues for coffee and a Macdonalds last time lockdown eased I think you are wrong about that.
89
10/03/2021 11:57:01 9 3
bbc
Why does Andy Hornby manage to get CEO positions all the time after his track record of being in charge of HBOS when it was run into the ground? Just how does this work?
129
10/03/2021 15:28:23 3 0
bbc
Like football managers, company top bods can make the biggest dogs dinner of any company, yet will receive a huge golden goodbye, and will be guaranteed to pop up in a similar role elsewhere to do it all over again. Jobs for the boys in all it's glory!
156
11/03/2021 00:37:27 0 0
bbc
The CEO circuit is a revolving door. You can't be a CEO unless you are already a CEO.
1
MVS
10/03/2021 10:49:45 65 4
bbc
There were far too many restaurant chains taking up space on the High Streets of UK towns and cities.
A complete shake-up of the sector can only be a good thing if it allows some local, independent restaurants to emerge and provide real diversity and choice to customers.
90
10/03/2021 11:58:12 0 0
bbc
Aside from banks and betting shops that is all my high street consists of. Even the last pound store has permanently closed!
51
10/03/2021 11:22:34 2 9
bbc
The stocks and shares market is funsamentally flawed.
Shares do not bring their rewards they should because they are tapped at source by owners of supercomputers doing micro transactions at millions of deals per second on the leading edge of the sale.

A co-operative society share structure would probably benefit the business and shareholder more without paying the casino leeches unearned income.
91
10/03/2021 12:00:08 2 2
bbc
You have no idea what you are talking about? Supercomputers and micro transactions at millions per second............what utter rubbish!
92
10/03/2021 11:48:13 5 4
bbc
These businesses are happy to stash the profits away in good times. They must expect to shell out when times are bad.
30
10/03/2021 11:11:05 22 0
bbc
A lot of these startups are over hyped, over advertised on TV then floated on the stock exchange and the founding members get very rich and then abandon ship.
93
10/03/2021 11:51:50 0 0
bbc
Spot on Sir.
94
10/03/2021 11:52:01 1 4
bbc
"To" raise £Millions?

Their overpriced generic food has already done that!
66
10/03/2021 11:32:34 11 4
bbc
Just made for the vain youngsters of today. Better go to your local Indian or Chinese any day instead of the plastic mama. As someone said earlier, wagamama means selfish in Japanese , very apt
95
10/03/2021 12:06:16 0 0
bbc
yeah. why on earth would anyone want to eat something other than chinese and indian food?
5
10/03/2021 10:54:07 51 5
bbc
Small quality restaurants is the way forward not the fast food american model. Cheap food is generally poor food. Let's see more fish restaurants and less burger bars.
96
10/03/2021 12:09:57 0 0
bbc
Fewer burger bars...
68
10/03/2021 11:33:27 0 5
bbc
Wagamama £459.8 M revenue in 2020.

No sense in stocks and shares to raise revenue except to grab a bundle of cash.
97
10/03/2021 12:10:56 1 0
bbc
#460MM revenue, not profit. you need to consider the other side of the equation, ie their cost base
98
10/03/2021 12:11:29 2 3
bbc
I know many who not be helping this or other companies recovery.
99
MC
10/03/2021 12:13:52 6 1
bbc
The industry has a skill problem. There's a massive shift to volume catering. A 5-8% net profit margin is to blame but greed is the main culprit. The old chef de parties no longer exist when a chef can be responsible for EVERYTHING on their station cooking from scratch. Now, it's assembly line culture of line and prep cooks churning out dishes for the sake of a few quid. Hospitality is soulless
100
10/03/2021 12:15:40 9 3
bbc
is Wagamama the latest Pink Floyd album?
118
10/03/2021 13:25:42 2 2
bbc
More like Genesis