Parents urged not to pressure teachers over exam grades
09/03/2021 | news | education | 282
Teachers should not be put under pressure by parents over deciding exam grades, says watchdog.
1
09/03/2021 16:08:21 10 46
bbc
Teachers do a good job and are to be respected but they are not overworked. They have had most of the last year off. For my son, work set the night before online and that’s is it. Most teachers have been at home.
2
09/03/2021 16:15:19 23 3
bbc
You need to get in touch with your local MP then because that's pretty much unhreard of outside of the internet and in the real world. Highly unusual and the school should be investigated if there were no online classes and proper work was not set.
4
09/03/2021 16:21:49 18 4
bbc
That is an absolutely horrid and wholly inaccurate statement that does not help anyone, particularly yourself. You should just be ashamed, that's all.
7
09/03/2021 16:44:59 22 5
bbc
Like any profession how good a job is done and how hard people work varies, but in general teachers do a fantastic job and deserve a huge amount of respect and thanks. Some teachers in some schools are not overworked - but they are the minority doing a poor job. The majority work ridiculously long hours to get a good job done for the their kids. That applies whether working at home or in school.
17
09/03/2021 17:51:02 6 6
bbc
As if you've actually had someone sleep with you to produce a child.
25
09/03/2021 19:25:04 13 3
bbc
Teachers were at home. Schools were closed except for key worker children and teachers were on rotas to supervise them. My child's experience and most of my friends very different from yours. Five hours of lessons a day via Teams with work assessed via Assignments. Making crass generalisations doesn't help. What did the HT say when you contacted them to complain?
29
09/03/2021 20:07:15 6 5
bbc
I know 14 Teachers.
The only ones at home are the two who work for private schools.
34
09/03/2021 20:31:20 4 4
bbc
You are an ingnoranus.
41
09/03/2021 22:50:58 2 4
bbc
I completely agree. My school has done lots of work, whereas others that I have heard of have done virtually no work at all in the 2020 lockdown... not handing in any work...
48
09/03/2021 22:52:16 3 1
bbc
in the first lockdown, we were given independent work to complete on our own for the whole week, from March to July, but from January 2021, the school changed the policy and we did full online lessons according to the school timetable - the latter far more productive if you ask me...
149
10/03/2021 02:06:45 0 1
bbc
It depends on the subject taught. Maths GCSE/O Level curriculum hasn't changed in 50 years. Not too much stress updating course notes year on year :))
1
09/03/2021 16:08:21 10 46
bbc
Teachers do a good job and are to be respected but they are not overworked. They have had most of the last year off. For my son, work set the night before online and that’s is it. Most teachers have been at home.
2
09/03/2021 16:15:19 23 3
bbc
You need to get in touch with your local MP then because that's pretty much unhreard of outside of the internet and in the real world. Highly unusual and the school should be investigated if there were no online classes and proper work was not set.
3
09/03/2021 16:21:12 3 3
bbc
FTAO BBC person, may want to pixelate the first image...
52
09/03/2021 23:00:39 1 4
bbc
You assume the press agency credited hasn't got appropriate privacy consent. Its dangerous to assume.
1
09/03/2021 16:08:21 10 46
bbc
Teachers do a good job and are to be respected but they are not overworked. They have had most of the last year off. For my son, work set the night before online and that’s is it. Most teachers have been at home.
4
09/03/2021 16:21:49 18 4
bbc
That is an absolutely horrid and wholly inaccurate statement that does not help anyone, particularly yourself. You should just be ashamed, that's all.
5
09/03/2021 16:28:12 9 5
bbc
I'm not angry, I'm just disappointed
4
09/03/2021 16:21:49 18 4
bbc
That is an absolutely horrid and wholly inaccurate statement that does not help anyone, particularly yourself. You should just be ashamed, that's all.
5
09/03/2021 16:28:12 9 5
bbc
I'm not angry, I'm just disappointed
6
09/03/2021 16:30:13 12 6
bbc
Be careful of pressurising teachers. HYS opinion from a minority who know all the facts will have you believe they have no integrity, and so likely to mark down of pressurised.

Obviously not worth the risk.
1
09/03/2021 16:08:21 10 46
bbc
Teachers do a good job and are to be respected but they are not overworked. They have had most of the last year off. For my son, work set the night before online and that’s is it. Most teachers have been at home.
7
09/03/2021 16:44:59 22 5
bbc
Like any profession how good a job is done and how hard people work varies, but in general teachers do a fantastic job and deserve a huge amount of respect and thanks. Some teachers in some schools are not overworked - but they are the minority doing a poor job. The majority work ridiculously long hours to get a good job done for the their kids. That applies whether working at home or in school.
8
09/03/2021 16:49:36 55 7
bbc
"Parents urged not to pressure teachers over exam grades"

What exams ?

The corrected sentence is :

Parents urged not to pressure teachers over grades
92
09/03/2021 23:35:37 31 15
bbc
Correct, but you are dealing with the BBC who are little more than taboid journalists these days.
119
10/03/2021 00:16:21 1 10
bbc
Is that all you can come up with?
155
10/03/2021 08:36:10 3 0
bbc
They're doing exams at my kid's school and they count towards grades
213
10/03/2021 11:33:13 3 0
bbc
The usual sloppy BBC journalism.
9
09/03/2021 16:57:41 47 16
bbc
maybe ministers should be asked not to pressure the teachers.... as soon as the results are out they will be first to comment they are to high and they will stoke the tabloids into more teacher hating.
77
09/03/2021 23:22:26 17 10
bbc
Too high.
10
09/03/2021 17:00:01 11 6
bbc
No pressure just wondering what present to get you this term! ??
32
09/03/2021 20:29:32 7 2
bbc
Do you have a large brown envelope?
11
09/03/2021 16:58:39 14 26
bbc
After seeing the massive grade inflation last year why would anyone trust teacher assessed grades? And while most will be graded too generously, those who teachers dislike will pay dearly. I've seen it happen!

There's still time to reinstate fair and impartial external exams. Marking to the curve allows for the fact there kids have had less teaching. This is the ONLY decent, honest thing to do.
Well done on displaying your stupidity so openly. Removed
38
09/03/2021 22:14:23 1 3
bbc
1: No time
2: let's put 250 students in one room with poor ventilation for up to 4 hours a day. Cant see that on our risk assessment
12
09/03/2021 17:04:03 35 7
bbc
Why would parents start to trust teachers when Governments have made a show of not doing so for decades? However, a professional teacher will be objective when awarding exam results. Children might learn however that getting results as adults means appearing to being nice to the right people works as well as doing their job.
13
09/03/2021 17:11:46 32 15
bbc
Can we assess Gavin Williamson's performance please?
14
09/03/2021 17:16:16 20 13
bbc
Unfortunately we don't have a marking scheme that can deal with results that are worse than doing nothing!
83
09/03/2021 23:28:36 2 3
bbc
Slapdash and incomplete. Looks like he does his homework on the school bus.
13
09/03/2021 17:11:46 32 15
bbc
Can we assess Gavin Williamson's performance please?
14
09/03/2021 17:16:16 20 13
bbc
Unfortunately we don't have a marking scheme that can deal with results that are worse than doing nothing!
97
09/03/2021 23:40:55 0 5
bbc
He's not done nothing, he has already been found to have acted unlawfully . . . . . so he's probably in line for a gold star or something . . . . .

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/nov/24/gavin-williamson-unlawfully-removed-child-safeguards-in-pandemic-court-rules
15
09/03/2021 17:42:50 14 28
bbc
If history tells us anything it is that you can't trust teachers to mark their own work.

Inflated grades are guaranteed,
I doubt your room temperature IQ can grasp how it's being actually done.

It's not what your limited intellect is telling you.
Removed
31
09/03/2021 20:27:49 7 6
bbc
I’m sure your grades weren’t inflated. Did you pass anything except your GCSE in being a loser?
11
09/03/2021 16:58:39 14 26
bbc
After seeing the massive grade inflation last year why would anyone trust teacher assessed grades? And while most will be graded too generously, those who teachers dislike will pay dearly. I've seen it happen!

There's still time to reinstate fair and impartial external exams. Marking to the curve allows for the fact there kids have had less teaching. This is the ONLY decent, honest thing to do.
16
bbc
Well done on displaying your stupidity so openly. Removed
1
09/03/2021 16:08:21 10 46
bbc
Teachers do a good job and are to be respected but they are not overworked. They have had most of the last year off. For my son, work set the night before online and that’s is it. Most teachers have been at home.
17
09/03/2021 17:51:02 6 6
bbc
As if you've actually had someone sleep with you to produce a child.
26
09/03/2021 19:25:38 3 3
bbc
Brilliant. You win the internet
18
09/03/2021 17:56:26 36 7
bbc
My lot have 2 assessments done and will do 2 more, 1 of which will be from the selection published by the exam boards later this month.

Those assessments done, and 1 to do, have been constructed using AQA previous exam questions and grade boundaries from Exampro

Outcomes are based only on those so no bias can come into play.

Vast majority of state schools and colleges will be doing similar.
111
10/03/2021 00:02:16 12 25
bbc
Bratty kids will just ignore all the Covid rules anyway and continue to infect their parents while throwing their litter all over our streets. It’s time for some actual discipline in schools instead of just letting the kids run rings around the teachers.
148
10/03/2021 02:02:03 0 2
bbc
Your lot? Very respectful
190
10/03/2021 10:31:57 2 2
bbc
Of course there's LOTS OF BIAS. The difficulty of topics and exam questions various enormously. So most teachers will omit harder topics and questions.

But you keep telling yourself I'm making this up, and that all the inflated grades we are going to get are fully deserved.
15
09/03/2021 17:42:50 14 28
bbc
If history tells us anything it is that you can't trust teachers to mark their own work.

Inflated grades are guaranteed,
19
bbc
I doubt your room temperature IQ can grasp how it's being actually done.

It's not what your limited intellect is telling you.
Removed
20
DG
09/03/2021 18:12:21 8 19
bbc
Assessments must be made anonymously to prevent 'some' parents bribing the teacher.
Some may say this won't happen, sorry, but if the child's teacher is the only assessor then this will happen.
22
09/03/2021 18:30:41 13 5
bbc
That's not how it works.
21
09/03/2021 18:18:48 5 9
bbc
It is how the grades will be perceived in 5 to 10 years time, when compared with the next generation coming up that issue. The reality over the next few years the academic asement system will be worthless to future job prospects. A switch to skills and setting up small business will be more effective. Brexit means a change in what skills we needed for the sort term we need to change what we do
36
09/03/2021 21:30:07 11 2
bbc
I don't think O-levels and A-levels have much relevance in the job market 10 years down the line!
37
09/03/2021 22:13:45 5 3
bbc
When looking at CVs at work, if someone has five years post school, we might consider their grades relevant. After 10 years, there's no point.
46
09/03/2021 22:57:50 1 2
bbc
Do you know how old the cohort is who first sat the harder GCSE's? Of course you dont... unless you happen to be 23??... no one will remember in a few years if you sat exams or not - they will only look at result.
20
DG
09/03/2021 18:12:21 8 19
bbc
Assessments must be made anonymously to prevent 'some' parents bribing the teacher.
Some may say this won't happen, sorry, but if the child's teacher is the only assessor then this will happen.
22
09/03/2021 18:30:41 13 5
bbc
That's not how it works.
23
09/03/2021 18:37:31 6 8
bbc
Laughable

But the World has clearly gone mad.
11
09/03/2021 16:58:39 14 26
bbc
After seeing the massive grade inflation last year why would anyone trust teacher assessed grades? And while most will be graded too generously, those who teachers dislike will pay dearly. I've seen it happen!

There's still time to reinstate fair and impartial external exams. Marking to the curve allows for the fact there kids have had less teaching. This is the ONLY decent, honest thing to do.
1
09/03/2021 16:08:21 10 46
bbc
Teachers do a good job and are to be respected but they are not overworked. They have had most of the last year off. For my son, work set the night before online and that’s is it. Most teachers have been at home.
25
09/03/2021 19:25:04 13 3
bbc
Teachers were at home. Schools were closed except for key worker children and teachers were on rotas to supervise them. My child's experience and most of my friends very different from yours. Five hours of lessons a day via Teams with work assessed via Assignments. Making crass generalisations doesn't help. What did the HT say when you contacted them to complain?
17
09/03/2021 17:51:02 6 6
bbc
As if you've actually had someone sleep with you to produce a child.
26
09/03/2021 19:25:38 3 3
bbc
Brilliant. You win the internet
27
09/03/2021 19:29:51 11 10
bbc
Ofqual themselves published a document two years ago that said that an A or a B could be an equally valid grade for the same paper due subjective application of marking criteria. Each year grade boundaries just move around in the ranking exercise. One might argue that teacher assessment is fairer...
28
09/03/2021 20:04:24 13 21
bbc
Don't make me laugh. Trust?
The neo liberals have spent 43 years undermining trust in every institution and aspect of modern Britain.
Why would anyone trust a Teacher?
30
09/03/2021 20:24:56 18 15
bbc
You clearly didn’t do well at school and now you blame every teacher for being a loser. Poor you.
49
09/03/2021 22:59:26 4 5
bbc
Education does suit everybody and clearly it failed you, but don't blame the teachers.

Instead, try looking in a mirror.
1
09/03/2021 16:08:21 10 46
bbc
Teachers do a good job and are to be respected but they are not overworked. They have had most of the last year off. For my son, work set the night before online and that’s is it. Most teachers have been at home.
29
09/03/2021 20:07:15 6 5
bbc
I know 14 Teachers.
The only ones at home are the two who work for private schools.
28
09/03/2021 20:04:24 13 21
bbc
Don't make me laugh. Trust?
The neo liberals have spent 43 years undermining trust in every institution and aspect of modern Britain.
Why would anyone trust a Teacher?
30
09/03/2021 20:24:56 18 15
bbc
You clearly didn’t do well at school and now you blame every teacher for being a loser. Poor you.
61
gog
09/03/2021 23:11:38 5 5
bbc
I am with Windy Shepard and before you hark on I am a professional with a six figure salary. My teachers predicted an E an N and a U at A level mocks, I aced the exams. Clearly my teachers knew stack all.
116
10/03/2021 00:13:35 2 2
bbc
I think you misunderstood the point...
216
10/03/2021 11:28:16 0 1
bbc
And you clearly don't know your history. Back in the 60s the loony lefty lecturers at LSE urged their students to become teachers so that they could go into schools and indoctrinate pupils.

Look it up comrade.
15
09/03/2021 17:42:50 14 28
bbc
If history tells us anything it is that you can't trust teachers to mark their own work.

Inflated grades are guaranteed,
31
09/03/2021 20:27:49 7 6
bbc
I’m sure your grades weren’t inflated. Did you pass anything except your GCSE in being a loser?
10
09/03/2021 17:00:01 11 6
bbc
No pressure just wondering what present to get you this term! ??
32
09/03/2021 20:29:32 7 2
bbc
Do you have a large brown envelope?
33
bbc
Wishful thinking, government. Some parents (most likely pushy middle-class types who tend to overestimate their children’s brilliance) will undoubtedly try to put pressure on schools/teachers. In their minds they will only be trying to make sure their little darlings are treated fairly, but it will still be pressure. I wish the teachers the best of luck; tough times ahead... Removed
171
10/03/2021 09:43:46 3 0
bbc
I was a teacher, working in deprived areas, and whilst there are some parents who over-estimate the ability of their son or daughter, a much worse problem is that group of parents who take no interest in education and will not cooperate with the school. I came across many of these.
1
09/03/2021 16:08:21 10 46
bbc
Teachers do a good job and are to be respected but they are not overworked. They have had most of the last year off. For my son, work set the night before online and that’s is it. Most teachers have been at home.
34
09/03/2021 20:31:20 4 4
bbc
You are an ingnoranus.
35
09/03/2021 20:49:14 7 13
bbc
No issue everyone gets grade a of course
21
09/03/2021 18:18:48 5 9
bbc
It is how the grades will be perceived in 5 to 10 years time, when compared with the next generation coming up that issue. The reality over the next few years the academic asement system will be worthless to future job prospects. A switch to skills and setting up small business will be more effective. Brexit means a change in what skills we needed for the sort term we need to change what we do
36
09/03/2021 21:30:07 11 2
bbc
I don't think O-levels and A-levels have much relevance in the job market 10 years down the line!
45
09/03/2021 22:57:05 3 5
bbc
O-levels? These were replaced by GCSEs over 30 years ago as the main exam qualification at 16/Year 11.
Nice to see contributors are up to date with education qualifications!!
212
10/03/2021 11:20:06 1 1
bbc
You're just plain wrong. For those who don't go to university, employers, faced with many applicants, will often use the highest exam level taken as an initial filter.

But tell yourself I'm wrong, if it makes you feel better.
21
09/03/2021 18:18:48 5 9
bbc
It is how the grades will be perceived in 5 to 10 years time, when compared with the next generation coming up that issue. The reality over the next few years the academic asement system will be worthless to future job prospects. A switch to skills and setting up small business will be more effective. Brexit means a change in what skills we needed for the sort term we need to change what we do
37
09/03/2021 22:13:45 5 3
bbc
When looking at CVs at work, if someone has five years post school, we might consider their grades relevant. After 10 years, there's no point.
11
09/03/2021 16:58:39 14 26
bbc
After seeing the massive grade inflation last year why would anyone trust teacher assessed grades? And while most will be graded too generously, those who teachers dislike will pay dearly. I've seen it happen!

There's still time to reinstate fair and impartial external exams. Marking to the curve allows for the fact there kids have had less teaching. This is the ONLY decent, honest thing to do.
38
09/03/2021 22:14:23 1 3
bbc
1: No time
2: let's put 250 students in one room with poor ventilation for up to 4 hours a day. Cant see that on our risk assessment
39
09/03/2021 22:49:10 11 6
bbc
So long as teacher performance is not rewarded solely on results gained from teacher based assessments instead of exams or course work etc then I have no issues. Pay and rewards have to be "uncoupled" from results in these circumstances.
51
09/03/2021 23:00:01 12 3
bbc
It specifically isn’t. These results, like last year, cannot be used for performance reviews or league tables. There is no incentive at all to be lenient. That’s published info, by the way, so anyone can check it’s true.
57
09/03/2021 23:06:55 6 2
bbc
You have no idea how teaching works. There are few, if any, bonuses for having successful students, but there are plenty of punishments if targets are not met.
273
10/03/2021 16:14:42 0 0
bbc
Payment by results was abolished in the 1902 [?] Act because it not only failed to 'raise' standards but made nonsense of the curriculum. It proved totally unworkable.
40
09/03/2021 22:51:03 5 7
bbc
Let’s just stay in and hide for the rest of our lives hey
108
09/03/2021 23:59:20 2 1
bbc
I bags you’re first.
1
09/03/2021 16:08:21 10 46
bbc
Teachers do a good job and are to be respected but they are not overworked. They have had most of the last year off. For my son, work set the night before online and that’s is it. Most teachers have been at home.
41
09/03/2021 22:50:58 2 4
bbc
I completely agree. My school has done lots of work, whereas others that I have heard of have done virtually no work at all in the 2020 lockdown... not handing in any work...
42
09/03/2021 22:51:48 4 4
bbc
I can understand why the pupils have to be given grades but it's far from ideal, more than likely that the grades will actually higher than if an exam had been sat.

Examinations are the ideal, the kids need to seen to perform under pressure to put them in good stead for the workplace.
53
09/03/2021 23:03:15 4 5
bbc
Why are examinations the ideal? There are very few situations in life where it's important to be able to regurgitate all your knowledge and understanding of a subject in one pre-determined 3 hour window.
43
09/03/2021 22:52:18 9 6
bbc
Last year N Sturgeon - hardly a bastian of educational standards - given 10 years plus of failures in raising standards - described teacher awarded grades as "not credible".

Resulting in widespread grade inflation - widely reported in order of 10-25% across subjects, nations and levels.

Why should the public have faith in teachers grades - if even those responsible for setting policy don't ?
181
10/03/2021 09:55:43 0 0
bbc
Bastion. A bastion is a strongly fortified projection on a castle, often the last point to surrender.
44
09/03/2021 22:57:02 29 10
bbc
Make your mind up! Last year teachers were slated for grade-inflation and accused by many of trying to protect their jobs or, laughably, get a pay rise. Now we hear that teachers’ judgement is ‘pretty reliable’. Is that just because teachers will be taking on probably 50+ extra unpaid hours to set and mark exams, which would normally be paid work for exam markers?
64
09/03/2021 23:12:18 14 9
bbc
unfortunately not all teacher -assessment is accurate
grade inflation is a well-known problem at A-level --- predicted grades for UCAS/Uni places are too often higher than those actually achieved

last year was a disaster, this year GCSE and A-Level grades are likely to be 'unusually' high unless appropriate measures are put in place

this is probably too much for the Minister to manage
82
09/03/2021 23:26:44 5 2
bbc
50+ unpaid hours? I used to spend longer than that organising a yearly foreign trip for students.
196
10/03/2021 10:39:25 1 0
bbc
If William Hill were giving good odds on grade inflation this year I'd be INVESTING a substantial sum in placing such a bet. It would be far more secure than buying any shares.
254
mc
10/03/2021 14:59:18 0 1
bbc
they have 6 months paid holiday leave =do it then
36
09/03/2021 21:30:07 11 2
bbc
I don't think O-levels and A-levels have much relevance in the job market 10 years down the line!
45
09/03/2021 22:57:05 3 5
bbc
O-levels? These were replaced by GCSEs over 30 years ago as the main exam qualification at 16/Year 11.
Nice to see contributors are up to date with education qualifications!!
21
09/03/2021 18:18:48 5 9
bbc
It is how the grades will be perceived in 5 to 10 years time, when compared with the next generation coming up that issue. The reality over the next few years the academic asement system will be worthless to future job prospects. A switch to skills and setting up small business will be more effective. Brexit means a change in what skills we needed for the sort term we need to change what we do
46
09/03/2021 22:57:50 1 2
bbc
Do you know how old the cohort is who first sat the harder GCSE's? Of course you dont... unless you happen to be 23??... no one will remember in a few years if you sat exams or not - they will only look at result.
107
09/03/2021 23:59:12 1 3
bbc
I do, it was my year. It was a joke - teachers so underprepared. I remember my geography teacher looking at the paper - saying you are stuffed and walking out shaking his head.
47
09/03/2021 22:58:15 11 15
bbc
What tosh. Teacher grades were used last year and grades were 30% above the highest ever historic levels. So either last year was 30% better than any year EVER, or teachers consistently overgrade. They'll probably ask for a pay rise as grades have gone up as well.

Employers will discount all kids with 2020 (and 2021) grades by 30% because the teachers failed to do their job properly.
50
09/03/2021 23:00:00 8 12
bbc
Or about 30% of children underperform in exams due to the pressure involved.
55
09/03/2021 23:05:28 7 2
bbc
Those results cannot be used for performance management (good or bad). That’s stated policy, and presumably in place to remove incentive for grading too high. That’s not to say standards were the same in all schools from all teachers, and believe me every teacher I know did not want to be selecting the grades for the students instead of normal exams. But the “robust” algorithm was terrible.
58
09/03/2021 23:08:45 5 2
bbc
My issue with your comment is simple. Our judgements last year were never meant to be the final grade. They were part of a process. Only at the last minute (literally the day before) did we learn that our grades would be used in their entirety as the final grade. Last year we were absolutely thrown under the bus. I hope this year, we are on the bus.
94
09/03/2021 23:35:58 4 2
bbc
Teachers did their job properly. Then, they got given a new job (exam-replacing assessment) with no training and assurance it would be moderated and standardised.
This moderation was done by a shoddy algorithm and abondoned. It quickly transpired that state schools were not responsible for grade inflation.
Happy to reference all points made in another post, but Google will confirm.
1
09/03/2021 16:08:21 10 46
bbc
Teachers do a good job and are to be respected but they are not overworked. They have had most of the last year off. For my son, work set the night before online and that’s is it. Most teachers have been at home.
48
09/03/2021 22:52:16 3 1
bbc
in the first lockdown, we were given independent work to complete on our own for the whole week, from March to July, but from January 2021, the school changed the policy and we did full online lessons according to the school timetable - the latter far more productive if you ask me...
28
09/03/2021 20:04:24 13 21
bbc
Don't make me laugh. Trust?
The neo liberals have spent 43 years undermining trust in every institution and aspect of modern Britain.
Why would anyone trust a Teacher?
49
09/03/2021 22:59:26 4 5
bbc
Education does suit everybody and clearly it failed you, but don't blame the teachers.

Instead, try looking in a mirror.
88
09/03/2021 23:31:35 5 5
bbc
I obtained two degrees at Uni'. I largely educated myself by reading.
Most Teachers were pretty hopeless.
47
09/03/2021 22:58:15 11 15
bbc
What tosh. Teacher grades were used last year and grades were 30% above the highest ever historic levels. So either last year was 30% better than any year EVER, or teachers consistently overgrade. They'll probably ask for a pay rise as grades have gone up as well.

Employers will discount all kids with 2020 (and 2021) grades by 30% because the teachers failed to do their job properly.
50
09/03/2021 23:00:00 8 12
bbc
Or about 30% of children underperform in exams due to the pressure involved.
215
10/03/2021 11:24:52 1 0
bbc
You sound like one of those who falsely tell kids that they are all capable of being Einsteins or David Beckhams.

Dude, the real world doesn't work like this. 30% were awarded grades much higher than they deserved!
39
09/03/2021 22:49:10 11 6
bbc
So long as teacher performance is not rewarded solely on results gained from teacher based assessments instead of exams or course work etc then I have no issues. Pay and rewards have to be "uncoupled" from results in these circumstances.
51
09/03/2021 23:00:01 12 3
bbc
It specifically isn’t. These results, like last year, cannot be used for performance reviews or league tables. There is no incentive at all to be lenient. That’s published info, by the way, so anyone can check it’s true.
3
09/03/2021 16:21:12 3 3
bbc
FTAO BBC person, may want to pixelate the first image...
52
09/03/2021 23:00:39 1 4
bbc
You assume the press agency credited hasn't got appropriate privacy consent. Its dangerous to assume.
78
09/03/2021 23:23:18 1 1
bbc
You assume that he is assuming, you assume that they do have consent.
42
09/03/2021 22:51:48 4 4
bbc
I can understand why the pupils have to be given grades but it's far from ideal, more than likely that the grades will actually higher than if an exam had been sat.

Examinations are the ideal, the kids need to seen to perform under pressure to put them in good stead for the workplace.
53
09/03/2021 23:03:15 4 5
bbc
Why are examinations the ideal? There are very few situations in life where it's important to be able to regurgitate all your knowledge and understanding of a subject in one pre-determined 3 hour window.
89
09/03/2021 23:32:45 2 1
bbc
There are in fact many people who need to a very firm grasp on specialisms. Medics, scientist, engineers etc. - garnered from school basics to 4+ yrs at uni + on the job - and have to use daily - often under pressure.

But many will never use much of what is taught.

Sadly recent attempts to move away from exams to assesment failed - due to fear of grade inflation - last year being extreme case.
54
09/03/2021 23:04:40 18 7
bbc
Teacher assessment MUST be subjected to adequate moderation. Many will be spot on with their judgements but too many will be over-generous, and this will lead to grade inflation and disadvantaging those candidates whose teachers are making accurate assessments of their students' ability.
167
10/03/2021 09:35:15 0 1
bbc
Or UNDER-generous Micky - bloimey !!!!
202
10/03/2021 10:53:49 1 0
bbc
But, you see, it would be far, far easier to simply reinstate exams than do this. And for some unfathomable reason the government is determined not to do this.

Well, actually, I think the reason is because they would reveal just how much learning students have lost.
47
09/03/2021 22:58:15 11 15
bbc
What tosh. Teacher grades were used last year and grades were 30% above the highest ever historic levels. So either last year was 30% better than any year EVER, or teachers consistently overgrade. They'll probably ask for a pay rise as grades have gone up as well.

Employers will discount all kids with 2020 (and 2021) grades by 30% because the teachers failed to do their job properly.
55
09/03/2021 23:05:28 7 2
bbc
Those results cannot be used for performance management (good or bad). That’s stated policy, and presumably in place to remove incentive for grading too high. That’s not to say standards were the same in all schools from all teachers, and believe me every teacher I know did not want to be selecting the grades for the students instead of normal exams. But the “robust” algorithm was terrible.
56
09/03/2021 23:06:26 19 15
bbc
I remember the Sixties when I was ignored by teachers who favoured the popular students . I was saved only by impartial examinations . The Headmasters comments on my final report were those of amazement and disbelief . What evidence of teacher objectivity ? Grade inflation will be rampant and the show offs will do very well in this ridiculous new world
73
09/03/2021 23:19:23 9 9
bbc
Wow! If only those teachers could see you now!
79
09/03/2021 23:25:08 3 3
bbc
Same here Bill. I was predicted to get DDD at A level and got ABB back in 1981.
Teachers were so say very surprised.
124
10/03/2021 00:21:53 4 4
bbc
It's not the sixties any more.
175
10/03/2021 09:49:48 3 1
bbc
The teaching profession is very different to fifty years ago. I was a teacher, and you could not get away with favouritism today. This is as it should be.
39
09/03/2021 22:49:10 11 6
bbc
So long as teacher performance is not rewarded solely on results gained from teacher based assessments instead of exams or course work etc then I have no issues. Pay and rewards have to be "uncoupled" from results in these circumstances.
57
09/03/2021 23:06:55 6 2
bbc
You have no idea how teaching works. There are few, if any, bonuses for having successful students, but there are plenty of punishments if targets are not met.
47
09/03/2021 22:58:15 11 15
bbc
What tosh. Teacher grades were used last year and grades were 30% above the highest ever historic levels. So either last year was 30% better than any year EVER, or teachers consistently overgrade. They'll probably ask for a pay rise as grades have gone up as well.

Employers will discount all kids with 2020 (and 2021) grades by 30% because the teachers failed to do their job properly.
58
09/03/2021 23:08:45 5 2
bbc
My issue with your comment is simple. Our judgements last year were never meant to be the final grade. They were part of a process. Only at the last minute (literally the day before) did we learn that our grades would be used in their entirety as the final grade. Last year we were absolutely thrown under the bus. I hope this year, we are on the bus.
59
09/03/2021 23:08:58 11 8
bbc
Well they were overly generous last year when grading pupils which led to an influx of students incapable of completing the college courses they enrolled onto causing huge amounts of grief for the college lecturers.
112
10/03/2021 00:03:37 7 2
bbc
Some so called universities are very well able to handle grade inflation, many widely thought to have been practising it for the last 10+ years.

As reflected by things like % of first class degrees awarded - makes their grading highly questionable.

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2020/nov/19/students-england-awarded-first-class-degrees-grade-inflation
60
09/03/2021 23:10:31 4 4
bbc
I’m sure it won’t be fair again and everyone will get their grades bumped up for free
30
09/03/2021 20:24:56 18 15
bbc
You clearly didn’t do well at school and now you blame every teacher for being a loser. Poor you.
61
gog
09/03/2021 23:11:38 5 5
bbc
I am with Windy Shepard and before you hark on I am a professional with a six figure salary. My teachers predicted an E an N and a U at A level mocks, I aced the exams. Clearly my teachers knew stack all.
62
xlr
09/03/2021 23:11:41 12 5
bbc
Teachers probably don't want to teach through the summer holidays, 8 hours a day. They won't even get the insulting 1% "pay rise" offered to NHS staff whether they do or not.
68
09/03/2021 23:16:12 4 5
bbc
Just give them a clap
76
09/03/2021 23:21:14 0 8
bbc
At least they don’t get physically attacked like other key workers eh
132
10/03/2021 00:38:34 5 0
bbc
This has been the hardest work year ever, working from home has been very difficult, extremely difficult. Everything takes twice as long. I'm in the Utilities industry and am an "essential worker". Teachers (and NHS workers) have done an unbelievable job, but they aren't on heir own. I can't justify giving my excellent staff a rise last year nor this, nor myself. Sorry, its the times we're in
274
10/03/2021 16:20:57 0 0
bbc
Teachers got a 3.1% pay raise last year which Rishi Sunak called a reward for the “vital contribution” frontline workers made during the coronavirus pandemic.
63
09/03/2021 23:11:52 7 4
bbc
Its difficult to fall back and ask for public trust after 30+ years of the governments own mistrust and the subsequent installation of massive regulation, coupled with centralisation of directed education policy and philosophy to the extent that the education secretary now has greater potential power to dictate what is taught in classrooms in England than his equivalent in Russia or China.
44
09/03/2021 22:57:02 29 10
bbc
Make your mind up! Last year teachers were slated for grade-inflation and accused by many of trying to protect their jobs or, laughably, get a pay rise. Now we hear that teachers’ judgement is ‘pretty reliable’. Is that just because teachers will be taking on probably 50+ extra unpaid hours to set and mark exams, which would normally be paid work for exam markers?
64
09/03/2021 23:12:18 14 9
bbc
unfortunately not all teacher -assessment is accurate
grade inflation is a well-known problem at A-level --- predicted grades for UCAS/Uni places are too often higher than those actually achieved

last year was a disaster, this year GCSE and A-Level grades are likely to be 'unusually' high unless appropriate measures are put in place

this is probably too much for the Minister to manage
85
09/03/2021 23:28:52 2 2
bbc
Unfortunately the "appropriate measures" would again lead to an outcry from teachers, parents and students alike, ensuring another u-turn
271
Leo
10/03/2021 16:11:43 0 0
bbc
I agree with you about grade inflation. Frankly the GCSE which is really equal to the old CSE, not the O Level shouldn't need grade inflation. It is so easy to score high on.

It's sort of like the CSE except everyone gets a grade 1.
65
09/03/2021 23:13:58 3 6
bbc
Who is going to assess a teachers ability to assess students ?.
72
09/03/2021 23:18:18 3 3
bbc
There's an algorithm, backed up by lateral flow test, backed up by a PCR test.
80
09/03/2021 23:26:29 0 2
bbc
Ah the old 'Quis cusdodiet ipsos custodes' question - nice.
185
10/03/2021 10:05:40 0 0
bbc
It is oft said, that's Ofsted.
66
09/03/2021 23:14:19 12 4
bbc
Does no-one actually remember last year? We were asked to submit grades and a ranking position as part of a process to determine final grades. Schools were then judged on the previous 3 years performance and grades adjusted accordingly. Only at the 11th hour were our original grades used - they were never intended to be used for the purpose they were, in their entirety.
113
10/03/2021 00:04:03 2 5
bbc
The IBO are doing an even worse version of this! Schools are being GIVEN the grades they can award based on 2016-19 data. The curriculum is not even the same let alone the kids, the teachers, the management and of course THE KIDS (they are important so get 2 mentions)
127
10/03/2021 00:26:07 3 2
bbc
Yes I remember last year. Grades were up 9% weren't they? My daughter is in year 11, I really don't know what to make of it to be honest. From her point of view, I expect her to move on to 6th form without too much hassle. As far as I'm concerned, as an employer, I will generally disregard "results" from last year and this and just judge the person in front of me. TBH that's served me well so far.
67
09/03/2021 23:14:22 6 4
bbc
There are so many ways of carrying out assessments remotely - plus exams should be carried out with social distancing anyways - I find it astonishing that this is the best option.
93
09/03/2021 23:35:57 5 5
bbc
Not everyone has access to remote learning - this has been highlighted by this pandemic. The less well off, suffer the most. All remote assessment platforms still cannot solve the problem of students using two devices at the same time, one to search, the other to answer...
208
10/03/2021 11:09:11 0 0
bbc
If you remotely access then you are absolutely guaranteed that some students will get someone else, who knows the subject inside out, to do their assessment for them. There's no way to prevent this.
62
xlr
09/03/2021 23:11:41 12 5
bbc
Teachers probably don't want to teach through the summer holidays, 8 hours a day. They won't even get the insulting 1% "pay rise" offered to NHS staff whether they do or not.
68
09/03/2021 23:16:12 4 5
bbc
Just give them a clap
138
10/03/2021 00:49:44 1 3
bbc
Thinking back to some of my teachers, I suspect quite a few already had the clap.
69
09/03/2021 23:16:28 8 4
bbc
I used to mark exam papers. We were told we had to look for key words.

So a question on internet protocols required the word ‘rules’ to be in the answer. Context was irrelevant, they could literally talk about the ‘rules’ of football or cake eating competitions. If they had the right word, they got the mark. Without the right word, they got nothing, even if the student understood.

No joke.
137
10/03/2021 00:48:37 3 3
bbc
I too marked exam papers once, and only once because of the following:
One answer on an English paper needed to include reference to the city of Bristol. We were to to accept as a correct spelling "Bristle". On an ENGLISH paper?!
The reason given was that so many people have used the bristle spelling in the past, we just have to accept it.
Way to maintain standards!!!
70
09/03/2021 23:16:36 6 2
bbc
Its lucky we haven't created a system where schools are rewarded based on the exam grades they achieve. Except we have.
170
10/03/2021 09:41:35 1 0
bbc
Not for last year or this year. These results are not being used for school performance. However league tables, in ‘normal’ years, are an awful way of judging different schools in vastly different situations and pressures them into becoming exam factories.
71
09/03/2021 23:17:09 4 4
bbc
In the school I work in the algorithm produced higher grades in some cases than teacher assessment... In some cases by a significant amount of grades. However, when these students move on, they have grades higher than their performance.... And everyone thinks that we have inflated the grades!
65
09/03/2021 23:13:58 3 6
bbc
Who is going to assess a teachers ability to assess students ?.
72
09/03/2021 23:18:18 3 3
bbc
There's an algorithm, backed up by lateral flow test, backed up by a PCR test.
56
09/03/2021 23:06:26 19 15
bbc
I remember the Sixties when I was ignored by teachers who favoured the popular students . I was saved only by impartial examinations . The Headmasters comments on my final report were those of amazement and disbelief . What evidence of teacher objectivity ? Grade inflation will be rampant and the show offs will do very well in this ridiculous new world
73
09/03/2021 23:19:23 9 9
bbc
Wow! If only those teachers could see you now!
74
09/03/2021 23:19:38 6 17
bbc
Have the teachers given the children and parents any reason to trust them over the past months?
90
09/03/2021 23:33:20 9 5
bbc
Yes they have worked hard to ensure children are educated to the very highest level, under extremely difficult conditions. They are working double hours to ensure equality of learning
218
10/03/2021 11:30:56 0 0
bbc
To be fair, despite what Downing Street would have you believe, online "learning" really sucks. So, although many teachers have worked a hell of a lot harder, the learning outcome has nonetheless been a hell of a lot worse.
75
09/03/2021 23:21:12 2 3
bbc
Do we favour learning centred teaching or teacher centred learning?
We will test this all over the east of West Sussex and the west of East Sussex.
84
09/03/2021 23:28:38 2 3
bbc
Clearly, your glass is neither half-full nor half-empty. It was full and is now empty. Next train to Bedfordshire for you.....
62
xlr
09/03/2021 23:11:41 12 5
bbc
Teachers probably don't want to teach through the summer holidays, 8 hours a day. They won't even get the insulting 1% "pay rise" offered to NHS staff whether they do or not.
76
09/03/2021 23:21:14 0 8
bbc
At least they don’t get physically attacked like other key workers eh
123
10/03/2021 00:20:14 5 2
bbc
Tell that to the family of Ann Maguire. Or the hundreds of teachers assaulted by pupils every year.
159
10/03/2021 08:46:37 1 0
bbc
Unfortunately, they do.
9
09/03/2021 16:57:41 47 16
bbc
maybe ministers should be asked not to pressure the teachers.... as soon as the results are out they will be first to comment they are to high and they will stoke the tabloids into more teacher hating.
77
09/03/2021 23:22:26 17 10
bbc
Too high.
140
10/03/2021 01:04:14 1 5
bbc
Pedant.
52
09/03/2021 23:00:39 1 4
bbc
You assume the press agency credited hasn't got appropriate privacy consent. Its dangerous to assume.
78
09/03/2021 23:23:18 1 1
bbc
You assume that he is assuming, you assume that they do have consent.
56
09/03/2021 23:06:26 19 15
bbc
I remember the Sixties when I was ignored by teachers who favoured the popular students . I was saved only by impartial examinations . The Headmasters comments on my final report were those of amazement and disbelief . What evidence of teacher objectivity ? Grade inflation will be rampant and the show offs will do very well in this ridiculous new world
79
09/03/2021 23:25:08 3 3
bbc
Same here Bill. I was predicted to get DDD at A level and got ABB back in 1981.
Teachers were so say very surprised.
143
10/03/2021 01:09:32 1 5
bbc
RE, Geography and Humanities? . . .
65
09/03/2021 23:13:58 3 6
bbc
Who is going to assess a teachers ability to assess students ?.
80
09/03/2021 23:26:29 0 2
bbc
Ah the old 'Quis cusdodiet ipsos custodes' question - nice.
81
09/03/2021 23:26:39 3 3
bbc
Sales of apples will soar.........................
86
09/03/2021 23:31:29 0 1
bbc
Are these your apples?
44
09/03/2021 22:57:02 29 10
bbc
Make your mind up! Last year teachers were slated for grade-inflation and accused by many of trying to protect their jobs or, laughably, get a pay rise. Now we hear that teachers’ judgement is ‘pretty reliable’. Is that just because teachers will be taking on probably 50+ extra unpaid hours to set and mark exams, which would normally be paid work for exam markers?
82
09/03/2021 23:26:44 5 2
bbc
50+ unpaid hours? I used to spend longer than that organising a yearly foreign trip for students.
13
09/03/2021 17:11:46 32 15
bbc
Can we assess Gavin Williamson's performance please?
83
09/03/2021 23:28:36 2 3
bbc
Slapdash and incomplete. Looks like he does his homework on the school bus.
199
10/03/2021 10:41:36 0 0
bbc
While watching something on his smart(er than him) phone at the same time.
75
09/03/2021 23:21:12 2 3
bbc
Do we favour learning centred teaching or teacher centred learning?
We will test this all over the east of West Sussex and the west of East Sussex.
84
09/03/2021 23:28:38 2 3
bbc
Clearly, your glass is neither half-full nor half-empty. It was full and is now empty. Next train to Bedfordshire for you.....
64
09/03/2021 23:12:18 14 9
bbc
unfortunately not all teacher -assessment is accurate
grade inflation is a well-known problem at A-level --- predicted grades for UCAS/Uni places are too often higher than those actually achieved

last year was a disaster, this year GCSE and A-Level grades are likely to be 'unusually' high unless appropriate measures are put in place

this is probably too much for the Minister to manage
85
09/03/2021 23:28:52 2 2
bbc
Unfortunately the "appropriate measures" would again lead to an outcry from teachers, parents and students alike, ensuring another u-turn
81
09/03/2021 23:26:39 3 3
bbc
Sales of apples will soar.........................
86
09/03/2021 23:31:29 0 1
bbc
Are these your apples?
87
09/03/2021 23:31:32 6 15
bbc
Yeah right, like we’ve trusted them to educate our children over the past year, instead of politicising COVID and being led by their militant unions.
158
10/03/2021 08:44:40 0 1
bbc
instead of politicising COVID and being led by their militant unions. Look everyone it's time warp tory.
49
09/03/2021 22:59:26 4 5
bbc
Education does suit everybody and clearly it failed you, but don't blame the teachers.

Instead, try looking in a mirror.
88
09/03/2021 23:31:35 5 5
bbc
I obtained two degrees at Uni'. I largely educated myself by reading.
Most Teachers were pretty hopeless.
53
09/03/2021 23:03:15 4 5
bbc
Why are examinations the ideal? There are very few situations in life where it's important to be able to regurgitate all your knowledge and understanding of a subject in one pre-determined 3 hour window.
89
09/03/2021 23:32:45 2 1
bbc
There are in fact many people who need to a very firm grasp on specialisms. Medics, scientist, engineers etc. - garnered from school basics to 4+ yrs at uni + on the job - and have to use daily - often under pressure.

But many will never use much of what is taught.

Sadly recent attempts to move away from exams to assesment failed - due to fear of grade inflation - last year being extreme case.
121
10/03/2021 00:18:22 3 1
bbc
Even when it comes to emergency medicine, nobody would say to the attending consultant that they had to make all the decisions without talking to anyone or referring to anything.

Exams just don't reflect how real life works.

The only reason they still exist is because those at the top did exams and think good exams lead to success.
152
10/03/2021 06:30:51 2 0
bbc
but in real life it doesn't have to be a memory test. I've regularly had doctors look things up when talking to them and I would much rather that than they had to remember every possible thing they've ever studied. Analytical and problem solving is what we should test.
74
09/03/2021 23:19:38 6 17
bbc
Have the teachers given the children and parents any reason to trust them over the past months?
90
09/03/2021 23:33:20 9 5
bbc
Yes they have worked hard to ensure children are educated to the very highest level, under extremely difficult conditions. They are working double hours to ensure equality of learning
91
09/03/2021 23:34:10 9 5
bbc
If we're not going to have exams, i'd rather trust teachers than politicians or algorithms.
Better still, we need to revamp the whole education system to get away from learning by rote and regurgitating facts in exams. Children need to know how to learn, how to access information, to develop social skills and a greater understanding of the world & the complex issues facing them in their lives
95
09/03/2021 23:37:11 0 3
bbc
Are you 'the Philip Allen' of Philip Allen publishing?
141
10/03/2021 01:06:23 0 1
bbc
Wrong. If you have never learned anything and memorised it, you will have nothing in your help to synthesize into new innovations. You can only access detail on something if you know the concept exists already.
204
10/03/2021 11:00:54 1 0
bbc
External, independent exams may be far from perfect. However, by a very large measure, they are the fairest system there is.
8
09/03/2021 16:49:36 55 7
bbc
"Parents urged not to pressure teachers over exam grades"

What exams ?

The corrected sentence is :

Parents urged not to pressure teachers over grades
92
09/03/2021 23:35:37 31 15
bbc
Correct, but you are dealing with the BBC who are little more than taboid journalists these days.
122
10/03/2021 00:18:35 4 10
bbc
"Brah ! BBC ! Brah! Communists ! Brah!"
Bet you can't wait for GB News, can you?
67
09/03/2021 23:14:22 6 4
bbc
There are so many ways of carrying out assessments remotely - plus exams should be carried out with social distancing anyways - I find it astonishing that this is the best option.
93
09/03/2021 23:35:57 5 5
bbc
Not everyone has access to remote learning - this has been highlighted by this pandemic. The less well off, suffer the most. All remote assessment platforms still cannot solve the problem of students using two devices at the same time, one to search, the other to answer...
47
09/03/2021 22:58:15 11 15
bbc
What tosh. Teacher grades were used last year and grades were 30% above the highest ever historic levels. So either last year was 30% better than any year EVER, or teachers consistently overgrade. They'll probably ask for a pay rise as grades have gone up as well.

Employers will discount all kids with 2020 (and 2021) grades by 30% because the teachers failed to do their job properly.
94
09/03/2021 23:35:58 4 2
bbc
Teachers did their job properly. Then, they got given a new job (exam-replacing assessment) with no training and assurance it would be moderated and standardised.
This moderation was done by a shoddy algorithm and abondoned. It quickly transpired that state schools were not responsible for grade inflation.
Happy to reference all points made in another post, but Google will confirm.
91
09/03/2021 23:34:10 9 5
bbc
If we're not going to have exams, i'd rather trust teachers than politicians or algorithms.
Better still, we need to revamp the whole education system to get away from learning by rote and regurgitating facts in exams. Children need to know how to learn, how to access information, to develop social skills and a greater understanding of the world & the complex issues facing them in their lives
95
09/03/2021 23:37:11 0 3
bbc
Are you 'the Philip Allen' of Philip Allen publishing?
96
09/03/2021 23:40:12 1 5
bbc
Allocate grades to school based on past performance, plus an uplift if you wish.

Allow teachers to distribute those grade to the pupils.

What teacher doesn't want to give their pupils the best chance possible, this caps their options and essentially they are now just rating within the school where the available evidence should be similar.
100
09/03/2021 23:45:46 6 2
bbc
What if your cohort was stronger, or you were a rapidly improving school (or conversely a declining school), your current students are impacted by previous performance - not an acceptable answer. This was part of the process last year and it was simply wrong.
102
09/03/2021 23:46:52 2 1
bbc
Then you are already disadvantaging them. There can be a massive variation in ability between year groups. If you have had a couple of weak years followed by a strong year, they will be unfairly penalised. The opposite is true, with a weaker year getting higher grades.
106
09/03/2021 23:56:16 4 1
bbc
Horrendous suggestion.
Why on earth should any pupils grade be in any way affected by an unrelated person from X amount of years ago.
Would you like your salary to be based on someone else performance from years gone by if they were not good at the job, but you are??
178
10/03/2021 09:50:48 0 0
bbc
At a national level, maybe grades should be similar year on year. At a school level it becomes quite tricky - why are schools constantly targeted with improving results, often spending huge sums of money on training and intervention to achieve this, if their improved results are then normalised back to where they “used to be”? For A Level classes, with sometimes < 10 kids per year, it is madness.
14
09/03/2021 17:16:16 20 13
bbc
Unfortunately we don't have a marking scheme that can deal with results that are worse than doing nothing!
97
09/03/2021 23:40:55 0 5
bbc
He's not done nothing, he has already been found to have acted unlawfully . . . . . so he's probably in line for a gold star or something . . . . .

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/nov/24/gavin-williamson-unlawfully-removed-child-safeguards-in-pandemic-court-rules
98
09/03/2021 23:43:30 6 3
bbc
Thousands of school all now coming up with their own way of grading their students. How in any way is this fair or indeed a robust way of assessing standards.
101
09/03/2021 23:46:45 5 1
bbc
But to be fair, no system is going to be ideal this year. These teachers have been teaching the students from the same syllabus using the same past papers and grade boundaries from previous years and so therefore with the same expectations (hopefully). What other options are there that will work fairly and logistically?
207
10/03/2021 11:06:14 0 0
bbc
Yes, and most will access on the easier topics and previous exam questions.
99
bbc
Removed
96
09/03/2021 23:40:12 1 5
bbc
Allocate grades to school based on past performance, plus an uplift if you wish.

Allow teachers to distribute those grade to the pupils.

What teacher doesn't want to give their pupils the best chance possible, this caps their options and essentially they are now just rating within the school where the available evidence should be similar.
100
09/03/2021 23:45:46 6 2
bbc
What if your cohort was stronger, or you were a rapidly improving school (or conversely a declining school), your current students are impacted by previous performance - not an acceptable answer. This was part of the process last year and it was simply wrong.