School uniform demand drives retail sales rebound
09/03/2021 | news | business | 60
UK retail sales rose 9.5% in February as plans to ease lockdown drove purchases of uniforms and computers.
1
09/03/2021 12:20:01 2 10
bbc
Rishi Boom Boom!
2
09/03/2021 12:23:24 34 6
bbc
Good to know there are still a few schools that require a proper uniform

And no I don't include a standard colour tracky top and trainers

Smart dress encourages smart up top
35
09/03/2021 14:12:24 3 5
bbc
"Smart dress encourages smart up top"

Genuine question/not picking arguments; do you have anything to back that - from what I can find online, studies has shown no evidence that uniforms improve performance & that, if anything, they slightly limit creativity.

Like I say, not picking holes, but would be curious to look at anything you can refer me to.
3
09/03/2021 12:23:50 9 11
bbc
Good new is always pleasing.

That'll upset the drama queens who'll be here in about 5 minutes or so.
6
09/03/2021 12:31:03 6 9
bbc
Wouldn't call buying loads of cheap tat from far east countries with poor working conditions "good news".
8
09/03/2021 12:33:16 8 2
bbc
8 minutes by the looks of it :)
4
09/03/2021 12:24:01 13 6
bbc
Obviously this is no way near going to make up for all the economic damage done (much of it avoidably), but it's good news and I welcome it all the same. And I'm particularly happy for all the children who are able to reconnect with friends and continue their education and development.
14
09/03/2021 12:42:26 1 5
bbc
Of course professor BPM you knew all the time how things would pan out. School uniforms not much of a story
5
09/03/2021 12:29:24 5 3
bbc
Most overused phrase in 2020: Covidiot.

Most overused phrase, already, in 2021: "Light at the end of the tunnel"
Good new is always pleasing.

That'll upset the drama queens who'll be here in about 5 minutes or so.
6
09/03/2021 12:31:03 6 9
bbc
Wouldn't call buying loads of cheap tat from far east countries with poor working conditions "good news".
9
Ben
09/03/2021 12:39:37 1 2
bbc
Might as well stop buying stuff then.

You can try and go 'buy British' but it is more expensive.
7
09/03/2021 12:31:27 2 7
bbc
""We've been very fortunate," says Luke Conod, who owns the School Uniform Shop in Hereford"

=Well, good news for Mr Conod, busy for China?
Good new is always pleasing.

That'll upset the drama queens who'll be here in about 5 minutes or so.
8
09/03/2021 12:33:16 8 2
bbc
8 minutes by the looks of it :)
6
09/03/2021 12:31:03 6 9
bbc
Wouldn't call buying loads of cheap tat from far east countries with poor working conditions "good news".
9
Ben
09/03/2021 12:39:37 1 2
bbc
Might as well stop buying stuff then.

You can try and go 'buy British' but it is more expensive.
10
09/03/2021 12:44:25 2 5
bbc
not just more expensive but also poor service, delay and quality lol is NOT that "world-beating"
9
Ben
09/03/2021 12:39:37 1 2
bbc
Might as well stop buying stuff then.

You can try and go 'buy British' but it is more expensive.
10
09/03/2021 12:44:25 2 5
bbc
not just more expensive but also poor service, delay and quality lol is NOT that "world-beating"
11
09/03/2021 12:44:28 7 1
bbc
sorrysorrysorry
“Well, good news for Mr Conod, busy for China?”
~
Yes, good news for a UK retailer irrespective of where the garments are made. There’s no ‘golden age’ beckoning for a UK economy divorced from the rest of the world. We need international trade, always have done.
16
09/03/2021 12:49:24 2 5
bbc
Here in China where I am currently staying to skip the lockdown UK is having annual congress meeting and some "people's Representatives" or MPs in the UK term complained that ports in China is running out of containers as demand from overseas retailers is soaring....
19
09/03/2021 12:51:04 2 2
bbc
Not sure we needed it much before 1600.
12
09/03/2021 12:45:29 8 2
bbc
Light at the end of the tunnel
It's a train
13
09/03/2021 12:41:00 5 13
bbc
Not too sure why uniforms needed now, my daughter has her uniform from last December so what’s all the rubbish, oh I forgot it’s a BBC website spoon feeding the have nots socialist who want more financial support, not only want the state to feed them but now clothe them, next it will be holidays need to be paid by the tax payer.
40
09/03/2021 14:56:21 8 2
bbc
I think maybe I missed the part of the article where the BBC said it wants the taxpayer to pay for school uniforms...?

That aside, children grow and sometimes need new clothes/shoes. Surely that doesn't come as a surprise to you?
44
09/03/2021 17:39:16 2 1
bbc
Why do I need to buy uniform now? Like many, my son's trousers bought in September last year are now ankle swingers and his football boots are a size too small. Who would have guessed that kids could grow in 6 months? Not expecting the tax payer to pay for them but then the article doesn't mention that at all, just a surge in sales of uniform but why let that stop your political rant!
4
09/03/2021 12:24:01 13 6
bbc
Obviously this is no way near going to make up for all the economic damage done (much of it avoidably), but it's good news and I welcome it all the same. And I'm particularly happy for all the children who are able to reconnect with friends and continue their education and development.
14
09/03/2021 12:42:26 1 5
bbc
Of course professor BPM you knew all the time how things would pan out. School uniforms not much of a story
25
09/03/2021 13:00:31 3 1
bbc
I'll break this down for you;

"Of course professor BPM you knew all the time how things would pan out" - not a professor but allowing people to move in/out of/around the UK unchecked during an pandemic is still pretty sodding obvious. Heard of the Black Death?

"School uniforms not much of a story" - Then why did you click on it, head to the comments section, start reading through and replying?
15
09/03/2021 12:48:08 20 3
bbc
Uniform shopS are a monopoly.
We have to buy our G/Daughter her uniform from a shop the school chose.
It sells poor quality clothing that rarely lasts the school year.
2 years ago we bought a jumper in M&S in exactly the same style and colour, school sent her home because it was not a jumper that they approved of, in other words they were not receiving any commission from the sale of that jumper.
41
09/03/2021 14:59:58 1 2
bbc
Fortunately I have been able to make use of my boys unused sports kits for gardening, so not entirely wasted.
11
09/03/2021 12:44:28 7 1
bbc
sorrysorrysorry
“Well, good news for Mr Conod, busy for China?”
~
Yes, good news for a UK retailer irrespective of where the garments are made. There’s no ‘golden age’ beckoning for a UK economy divorced from the rest of the world. We need international trade, always have done.
16
09/03/2021 12:49:24 2 5
bbc
Here in China where I am currently staying to skip the lockdown UK is having annual congress meeting and some "people's Representatives" or MPs in the UK term complained that ports in China is running out of containers as demand from overseas retailers is soaring....
17
09/03/2021 12:49:28 5 22
bbc
Cases down 93% in five weeks. Deaths down 86% in four weeks. England average below 50 per 100,000. 24 million vaccinated and five million have had the virus and recovered. Close to 60% of all adults.
But the restrictions stay for another ten weeks.
Sadly we are led by cowards and fools.
18
09/03/2021 12:50:58 10 7
bbc
Why do all the "activist" types and "socialist" types always assume clothes are made in a sweatshop in China and then just moan about it.

Someone somewhere is getting paid for it and if that's what they are used to they don't need you being outraged on their behalf using terms like "Ethically sourced". While no doubt tweeting using their iPhone which "as we all know, were made in California".
11
09/03/2021 12:44:28 7 1
bbc
sorrysorrysorry
“Well, good news for Mr Conod, busy for China?”
~
Yes, good news for a UK retailer irrespective of where the garments are made. There’s no ‘golden age’ beckoning for a UK economy divorced from the rest of the world. We need international trade, always have done.
19
09/03/2021 12:51:04 2 2
bbc
Not sure we needed it much before 1600.
22
09/03/2021 12:59:48 2 2
bbc
Windy Shepherd Henderson
“Not sure we needed it much before 1600”
~
Indeed you’re probably correct, but I’m pretty confident that not many of us would like to go back to life in Britain pre-1600.
20
09/03/2021 12:55:25 4 10
bbc
Why do all the "activist" types and "socialist" types always assume clothes are made in a sweatshop in China and then just moan about it.

=lol

they want clothes made in GreeeeeaaaaTA Britain
24
09/03/2021 13:00:16 12 2
bbc
More often they are made by short sighted orphans in Bangladesh, in unsafe buildings close to toxic waste dumps that used to be rivers.
I'll wear what the wife tells me to wear as my fashion sense died in the Late 1980's. I have a court order preventing me from buying my own clothes.
21
09/03/2021 12:58:52 4 4
bbc
Conod constructs concentrated connected contacts consol for coveted Covid control.
Confirm congratulations considered.
I've just pulled a jaw muscle trying to say that.
19
09/03/2021 12:51:04 2 2
bbc
Not sure we needed it much before 1600.
22
09/03/2021 12:59:48 2 2
bbc
Windy Shepherd Henderson
“Not sure we needed it much before 1600”
~
Indeed you’re probably correct, but I’m pretty confident that not many of us would like to go back to life in Britain pre-1600.
30
09/03/2021 13:09:51 1 2
bbc
Britain was founded in 1707.
21
09/03/2021 12:58:52 4 4
bbc
Conod constructs concentrated connected contacts consol for coveted Covid control.
Confirm congratulations considered.
23
09/03/2021 13:00:06 4 1
bbc
I've just pulled a jaw muscle trying to say that.
28
09/03/2021 13:07:43 1 1
bbc
A confusing conundrum covering Covid contracts.
20
09/03/2021 12:55:25 4 10
bbc
Why do all the "activist" types and "socialist" types always assume clothes are made in a sweatshop in China and then just moan about it.

=lol

they want clothes made in GreeeeeaaaaTA Britain
24
09/03/2021 13:00:16 12 2
bbc
More often they are made by short sighted orphans in Bangladesh, in unsafe buildings close to toxic waste dumps that used to be rivers.
But how do you know that?

Have you been to Bangladesh and seen it for yourself?

Sounds a bit like being a Drama Queen to me.
14
09/03/2021 12:42:26 1 5
bbc
Of course professor BPM you knew all the time how things would pan out. School uniforms not much of a story
25
09/03/2021 13:00:31 3 1
bbc
I'll break this down for you;

"Of course professor BPM you knew all the time how things would pan out" - not a professor but allowing people to move in/out of/around the UK unchecked during an pandemic is still pretty sodding obvious. Heard of the Black Death?

"School uniforms not much of a story" - Then why did you click on it, head to the comments section, start reading through and replying?
20
09/03/2021 12:55:25 4 10
bbc
Why do all the "activist" types and "socialist" types always assume clothes are made in a sweatshop in China and then just moan about it.

=lol

they want clothes made in GreeeeeaaaaTA Britain
26
09/03/2021 13:01:41 6 2
bbc
I'll wear what the wife tells me to wear as my fashion sense died in the Late 1980's. I have a court order preventing me from buying my own clothes.
24
09/03/2021 13:00:16 12 2
bbc
More often they are made by short sighted orphans in Bangladesh, in unsafe buildings close to toxic waste dumps that used to be rivers.
27
09/03/2021 13:04:10 5 6
bbc
But how do you know that?

Have you been to Bangladesh and seen it for yourself?

Sounds a bit like being a Drama Queen to me.
29
09/03/2021 13:08:30 2 3
bbc
Stacy Dooley went.
I've just pulled a jaw muscle trying to say that.
28
09/03/2021 13:07:43 1 1
bbc
A confusing conundrum covering Covid contracts.
34
09/03/2021 13:39:20 2 1
bbc
It's nearly as confusing as,

Ken Dodd's dead Dad's dog's dead?
But how do you know that?

Have you been to Bangladesh and seen it for yourself?

Sounds a bit like being a Drama Queen to me.
29
09/03/2021 13:08:30 2 3
bbc
Stacy Dooley went.
37
09/03/2021 14:24:15 1 3
bbc
Who???
22
09/03/2021 12:59:48 2 2
bbc
Windy Shepherd Henderson
“Not sure we needed it much before 1600”
~
Indeed you’re probably correct, but I’m pretty confident that not many of us would like to go back to life in Britain pre-1600.
30
09/03/2021 13:09:51 1 2
bbc
Britain was founded in 1707.
38
09/03/2021 14:44:20 3 2
bbc
Windy Shepherd Henderson
“Britain was founded in 1707”
~
That would be the Kingdom of Great Britain. The term ‘Britain’ is older, and refers to land to the north-west of the continent of Europe.
The point is that we need to trade with other countries for our future economic success, even if that makes places like China, 'busy'.
31
09/03/2021 13:15:02 5 21
bbc
They want those who voted Brexit to dress like Unicorns.
We call them the uninformed Unicorn uniforms.
Removed
33
09/03/2021 13:37:06 1 1
bbc
My mate Arbuthnott reckons that 'demand' is driven by Angus McKinnon Young.
28
09/03/2021 13:07:43 1 1
bbc
A confusing conundrum covering Covid contracts.
34
09/03/2021 13:39:20 2 1
bbc
It's nearly as confusing as,

Ken Dodd's dead Dad's dog's dead?
58
10/03/2021 09:26:12 1 0
bbc
Ken Dodd's Dad died.

Did he?

No, Doddy.
2
09/03/2021 12:23:24 34 6
bbc
Good to know there are still a few schools that require a proper uniform

And no I don't include a standard colour tracky top and trainers

Smart dress encourages smart up top
35
09/03/2021 14:12:24 3 5
bbc
"Smart dress encourages smart up top"

Genuine question/not picking arguments; do you have anything to back that - from what I can find online, studies has shown no evidence that uniforms improve performance & that, if anything, they slightly limit creativity.

Like I say, not picking holes, but would be curious to look at anything you can refer me to.
36
09/03/2021 14:19:05 4 1
bbc
Had retail sales fallen by 9.5%, this would be a headline story proclaiming the biggest fall since it was last this big.

The retail economy is all over the place at the moment, and clearly will not return to anything like normal until everything, including foreign travel, is opened up again.
29
09/03/2021 13:08:30 2 3
bbc
Stacy Dooley went.
37
09/03/2021 14:24:15 1 3
bbc
Who???
39
09/03/2021 14:52:11 3 2
bbc
The Queen of the Ballroom.
She is like an extra from Eastenders who does so called serious exposes.
30
09/03/2021 13:09:51 1 2
bbc
Britain was founded in 1707.
38
09/03/2021 14:44:20 3 2
bbc
Windy Shepherd Henderson
“Britain was founded in 1707”
~
That would be the Kingdom of Great Britain. The term ‘Britain’ is older, and refers to land to the north-west of the continent of Europe.
The point is that we need to trade with other countries for our future economic success, even if that makes places like China, 'busy'.
56
10/03/2021 09:20:45 0 0
bbc
Sorry to disappoint you. But the term Britain was only ever historic, referring to Roman and Celtic Britain. We were the British Isles, Britannia or Albion.
First use of Great Britain was 1604 when James VI of Scotland took the English throne. As a formal political entity Britain commenced in 1707 and the United Kingdom in 1801.
37
09/03/2021 14:24:15 1 3
bbc
Who???
39
09/03/2021 14:52:11 3 2
bbc
The Queen of the Ballroom.
She is like an extra from Eastenders who does so called serious exposes.
13
09/03/2021 12:41:00 5 13
bbc
Not too sure why uniforms needed now, my daughter has her uniform from last December so what’s all the rubbish, oh I forgot it’s a BBC website spoon feeding the have nots socialist who want more financial support, not only want the state to feed them but now clothe them, next it will be holidays need to be paid by the tax payer.
40
09/03/2021 14:56:21 8 2
bbc
I think maybe I missed the part of the article where the BBC said it wants the taxpayer to pay for school uniforms...?

That aside, children grow and sometimes need new clothes/shoes. Surely that doesn't come as a surprise to you?
15
09/03/2021 12:48:08 20 3
bbc
Uniform shopS are a monopoly.
We have to buy our G/Daughter her uniform from a shop the school chose.
It sells poor quality clothing that rarely lasts the school year.
2 years ago we bought a jumper in M&S in exactly the same style and colour, school sent her home because it was not a jumper that they approved of, in other words they were not receiving any commission from the sale of that jumper.
41
09/03/2021 14:59:58 1 2
bbc
Fortunately I have been able to make use of my boys unused sports kits for gardening, so not entirely wasted.
42
09/03/2021 16:25:28 1 3
bbc
There's always a silver lining......for retailers. As Lord Sugar would say, "Smell what sells" and pile into it!
43
ken
09/03/2021 16:30:09 4 2
bbc
Biggest rip off for parents as most schools dictate where they have to buy school uniform, not allowing them to buy cheaper else where.
48
09/03/2021 18:56:57 5 2
bbc
School uniform isn't expensive. If parents are happy to pay £1000 plus for a phone, when one a quarter the price is just as good, then they can afford a few quid for their children's uniform.
13
09/03/2021 12:41:00 5 13
bbc
Not too sure why uniforms needed now, my daughter has her uniform from last December so what’s all the rubbish, oh I forgot it’s a BBC website spoon feeding the have nots socialist who want more financial support, not only want the state to feed them but now clothe them, next it will be holidays need to be paid by the tax payer.
44
09/03/2021 17:39:16 2 1
bbc
Why do I need to buy uniform now? Like many, my son's trousers bought in September last year are now ankle swingers and his football boots are a size too small. Who would have guessed that kids could grow in 6 months? Not expecting the tax payer to pay for them but then the article doesn't mention that at all, just a surge in sales of uniform but why let that stop your political rant!
45
Bob
09/03/2021 17:41:32 1 2
bbc
I have a hard time imagining that school uniforms accounted for a 9.5% growth. Items cost a pittance a piece.

The growth is also interesting given that the tail-end of February is when panic-buying began to start - hence the falls in toilet roll and pasta.
46
09/03/2021 17:46:02 3 3
bbc
"Items cost a pittance"
You obviously don't a school/shop unique deal, where they can charge what they like!
60
10/03/2021 09:29:53 0 0
bbc
7 million kids needing £75 of clothes each equates to £570 million.
45
Bob
09/03/2021 17:41:32 1 2
bbc
I have a hard time imagining that school uniforms accounted for a 9.5% growth. Items cost a pittance a piece.

The growth is also interesting given that the tail-end of February is when panic-buying began to start - hence the falls in toilet roll and pasta.
46
09/03/2021 17:46:02 3 3
bbc
"Items cost a pittance"
You obviously don't a school/shop unique deal, where they can charge what they like!
47
09/03/2021 18:59:02 0 1
bbc
"Separate retail data showed a shift in demand for the "cupboard necessities" that dominated shopping habits at the start of the pandemic."
For goodness sakes, this shows nothing of the sort , what is shows year on year is that unlike this time last year people are not panic buying stuff. This sort of , well this years sales aren't the same as last is garbage analysis .
50
09/03/2021 20:09:38 1 2
bbc
Err 90% of UK was oblivious to Covid this time last year ..
43
ken
09/03/2021 16:30:09 4 2
bbc
Biggest rip off for parents as most schools dictate where they have to buy school uniform, not allowing them to buy cheaper else where.
48
09/03/2021 18:56:57 5 2
bbc
School uniform isn't expensive. If parents are happy to pay £1000 plus for a phone, when one a quarter the price is just as good, then they can afford a few quid for their children's uniform.
52
09/03/2021 23:06:26 1 1
bbc
Hostamosta
“If parents are happy to pay £1000 plus for a phone..”
~
In the main, young single adults buy expensive phones whereas most parents are looking for value for money.
‘ken’ is right. I'm fortunate that my daughter’s school allows supermarket bought clothing to be worn and the only branded items, a jumper and tie, are both reasonably priced.
Removed
47
09/03/2021 18:59:02 0 1
bbc
"Separate retail data showed a shift in demand for the "cupboard necessities" that dominated shopping habits at the start of the pandemic."
For goodness sakes, this shows nothing of the sort , what is shows year on year is that unlike this time last year people are not panic buying stuff. This sort of , well this years sales aren't the same as last is garbage analysis .
50
09/03/2021 20:09:38 1 2
bbc
Err 90% of UK was oblivious to Covid this time last year ..
51
09/03/2021 21:47:26 0 3
bbc
School uniforms are a rip off and the quality is not even where it used to be. Shameful to ask for new uniforms for the little time left of the school year
59
10/03/2021 09:28:05 2 1
bbc
I once saw a delightful woman in seedy club in Paris.
She had a rip off school uniform too.
48
09/03/2021 18:56:57 5 2
bbc
School uniform isn't expensive. If parents are happy to pay £1000 plus for a phone, when one a quarter the price is just as good, then they can afford a few quid for their children's uniform.
52
09/03/2021 23:06:26 1 1
bbc
Hostamosta
“If parents are happy to pay £1000 plus for a phone..”
~
In the main, young single adults buy expensive phones whereas most parents are looking for value for money.
‘ken’ is right. I'm fortunate that my daughter’s school allows supermarket bought clothing to be worn and the only branded items, a jumper and tie, are both reasonably priced.
53
10/03/2021 02:07:05 2 1
bbc
No doubt they will be Chinese imports
54
10/03/2021 07:51:54 1 1
bbc
It’s unbelievable that UK manufacturers and retailers could not prepare for this.
High demand was as predictable as snowdrops appearing in my garden.
They had weeks, no months to prepare and should have built up sufficient stock and developed distribution methods to cope with post lockdown demand. School uniform does not change with fashion.
Ban school uniforms as outdated as the cane.
57
10/03/2021 09:24:31 2 0
bbc
No pet food due to a pouch shortage from the EU.
Trade with Germany down 25%.
£37 billion Track and Trace was required to meet post Brexit travel riles for lorry drivers.
55
Bob
10/03/2021 08:55:20 0 0
bbc
Two school shirts, pair of trousers and a blazer (no monogram) cost £40 at authorised school shop. However due to COVID and greed the shop is DELIVER ONLY at extra cost of £20
38
09/03/2021 14:44:20 3 2
bbc
Windy Shepherd Henderson
“Britain was founded in 1707”
~
That would be the Kingdom of Great Britain. The term ‘Britain’ is older, and refers to land to the north-west of the continent of Europe.
The point is that we need to trade with other countries for our future economic success, even if that makes places like China, 'busy'.
56
10/03/2021 09:20:45 0 0
bbc
Sorry to disappoint you. But the term Britain was only ever historic, referring to Roman and Celtic Britain. We were the British Isles, Britannia or Albion.
First use of Great Britain was 1604 when James VI of Scotland took the English throne. As a formal political entity Britain commenced in 1707 and the United Kingdom in 1801.
54
10/03/2021 07:51:54 1 1
bbc
It’s unbelievable that UK manufacturers and retailers could not prepare for this.
High demand was as predictable as snowdrops appearing in my garden.
They had weeks, no months to prepare and should have built up sufficient stock and developed distribution methods to cope with post lockdown demand. School uniform does not change with fashion.
Ban school uniforms as outdated as the cane.
57
10/03/2021 09:24:31 2 0
bbc
No pet food due to a pouch shortage from the EU.
Trade with Germany down 25%.
£37 billion Track and Trace was required to meet post Brexit travel riles for lorry drivers.
34
09/03/2021 13:39:20 2 1
bbc
It's nearly as confusing as,

Ken Dodd's dead Dad's dog's dead?
58
10/03/2021 09:26:12 1 0
bbc
Ken Dodd's Dad died.

Did he?

No, Doddy.
51
09/03/2021 21:47:26 0 3
bbc
School uniforms are a rip off and the quality is not even where it used to be. Shameful to ask for new uniforms for the little time left of the school year
59
10/03/2021 09:28:05 2 1
bbc
I once saw a delightful woman in seedy club in Paris.
She had a rip off school uniform too.
45
Bob
09/03/2021 17:41:32 1 2
bbc
I have a hard time imagining that school uniforms accounted for a 9.5% growth. Items cost a pittance a piece.

The growth is also interesting given that the tail-end of February is when panic-buying began to start - hence the falls in toilet roll and pasta.
60
10/03/2021 09:29:53 0 0
bbc
7 million kids needing £75 of clothes each equates to £570 million.