Updated coronavirus vaccines can be fast-tracked like flu jabs
04/03/2021 | news | health | 977
Rapid approval without lengthy tests can happen if new vaccines are needed to fight variants, say regulators.
1
W 6
04/03/2021 10:15:11 36 10
bbc
I don't like giving Matt Hancock credit but he did use a good analogy for fast updated vaccine trials - "if a Range Rover is fitted with a new wing mirror, it should still be considered a Range Rover"

I think the government would be very wise to invest heavily on updates. Surely it is a prudent move if they allow us to avoid any restrictions come next winter and may speed up international travel.
61
04/03/2021 10:33:38 6 4
bbc
They are 1.6billion in budget yesterday.
232
04/03/2021 11:15:53 2 6
bbc
I think the opening line was sufficient!
He is a walking disaster and needs to be held to account.
Jail preferably.

Covid deaths have happened predominantly in hispitals and care homes. That falls under Government health policy.
He is responsible.
30,000 of the first 50,000 deaths had disabilities.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-56033813
496
kh
04/03/2021 11:50:03 0 1
bbc
And if Matt Hancock is sent into exile via international travel he will still be Matt Hancock.
2
04/03/2021 10:15:19 166 29
bbc
Good news, let’s keep rolling out the vaccines now, get back to normal and if necessary roll out more vaccines in future, like we do with flu, and stop making the issue of mutations (that happen anyway) more of an issue than needed.
10
04/03/2021 10:17:56 58 66
bbc
The new normal isn't going to be "normal" - we'll have covid jabs as well as flu for the foreseeable future and I think some will think twice about certain activities....
64
04/03/2021 10:30:38 12 3
bbc
varied mutations due to travel across the world
178
VoR
04/03/2021 11:05:12 25 0
bbc
Mutations are an issue if you have lots of virus to begin with, because the (successful) mutations will occur regularly. Once the level (case count, and viral load) is driven down, mutations will be far more manageable. But you do need to drive the level down. If we don't do that, mutations will be a big issue.
229
04/03/2021 11:14:58 7 11
bbc
Rapid approval works right up to the point it goes badly wrong.
373
04/03/2021 11:40:45 8 0
bbc
Problem is your idea of "normal" and SAGE's is not the same.
402
GH
04/03/2021 11:45:23 1 2
bbc
Never forget, the root cause of why we will need to manage this indefinitely is unknown, and subject to a WHO investigation. I won’t hold my breath.
498
kh
04/03/2021 11:51:11 4 5
bbc
Continuously rolling out vaccines is not normal.
641
04/03/2021 12:29:27 3 0
bbc
The reason we have so many variants developing is because of countries like the UK who have not followed good practice like Australia, NZ, South Korea, Vietnam and Japan.

If there had been sensible processes in place to slow/stop the spread of CV19 we wouldn't have seen so many deaths & such a big hit to the economy.
647
04/03/2021 12:29:43 1 1
bbc
Also, the current vaccines would have been enough to see an end to CV19, but now we are talking about living with CV19.
3
04/03/2021 10:09:54 7 14
bbc
They should all be properly trialled and proved to be safe.
52
04/03/2021 10:22:15 3 1
bbc
proven, even.
59
04/03/2021 10:32:53 3 0
bbc
Isn't that what the report says?
67
04/03/2021 10:34:41 3 0
bbc
It's the vaccine vector that has to be proved safe. Once that's done, as it has been for Pfizer and AZ, tweaks to the spike protein it makes cells produce won't affect safety.
82
04/03/2021 10:36:42 2 2
bbc
Can you believe a comment complementing the BBC reporting on the face masks relaxation in Texas has been removed by the BBC? It's all relevant
Is this the free speech we now have?
I merely stated it will be useful to analyse data from Texas and Mississippi in 3-6 months to compare and contrast. I also said it is wrong of a president to call his own citizens 'Neander...'.
His words not mine BBC
597
04/03/2021 12:19:11 0 0
bbc
Don't have it then. Then pray you don't catch covid.
Great article re Texans and face masks. Can the BBC please follow this up and report again in 3-6 months to show if and what difference it has made.
Lets have the figures do the talking not Biden calling Americans Neanderthals.
Awful President calling his own citizens such things. Disgraceful and disrespectful and divisive.
Removed
14
04/03/2021 10:21:26 2 2
bbc
Different president, same problems. That country is in freefall.
22
04/03/2021 10:23:09 2 1
bbc
No he is insulting Neanderthals comparing them to idiots who drop their guard against Covid
28
04/03/2021 10:25:04 2 3
bbc
Biden used masks as a political tool to help ease Trump out of office.
The fact the tiny benefit they bring is almost certainly cancelled by the way most people handle them in the real World is irrelevant to him.
On the plus side, Trumps gone.
Removed
5
04/03/2021 10:15:56 9 6
bbc
Great news! ??
105
04/03/2021 10:44:09 9 3
bbc
To the down voter, cheer up and keep yourself positive, for the benefit of your mental health ??
6
04/03/2021 10:15:59 14 3
bbc
This is a good preemptive step. Bringing the situation in line with that of the flu jab which is regularly updated.
7
mss
04/03/2021 10:16:00 19 4
bbc
So, can the new Covid-19 vaccines be combined with the Flu jab, to have one convenient annual jab?
24
GS
04/03/2021 10:23:41 12 15
bbc
no
75
04/03/2021 10:32:15 1 4
bbc
also include MMR if its going to be Covid school vaccine
147
04/03/2021 10:55:22 7 0
bbc
Yes
159
04/03/2021 10:59:51 2 1
bbc
Would Andy and GS care to explain their reasoning given they are opposite answers
8
04/03/2021 10:16:14 42 15
bbc
The vaccine makers have done an amazing job.
The NHS is working hard to roll this out.
We may need an annual jab like flu which will bring a new challenge to everyone.
We all need to be grateful to the scientists, the regulators and the NHS delivery program. We also have to thank the government for their funding support.
The Spanish flu disaster of 1918 has been avoided.
121
04/03/2021 10:48:05 32 15
bbc
The cost of refusing the Oxford vaccine in Germany and France is beginning to show through with both countries 7 day death average of Covid now higher than the UK.
208
04/03/2021 11:12:00 4 10
bbc
Coronavirus could never have caused as much serious illness (per person) as Spanish flu because it simply isn't dangerous enough.
That said, the vaccinations should significantly reduce the damage from coronavirus
9
04/03/2021 10:17:34 93 19
bbc
Yearly event like flu.. but uptake needs to be much higher and wider than flu. That’s the problem. Hope we get more responsible and learn from 2020
18
04/03/2021 10:22:33 87 82
bbc
Only worthwhile if it enables society and the borders to reopen. Prof Whitty keeps talking about an acceptable level of deaths and refers to the 20,000 a year that society has accepted for flu.

I just worry that as soon as deaths start creeping up next winter that the snowflakes will start bleating on social media and the government will cave in again and start adding further restrictions.
56
04/03/2021 10:31:42 26 7
bbc
It already is or has the 21 million vaccinated, with 94% minimum uptake, escaped your attention?

I'm growing a bit tired of the pushy middle classes SJW's shouting from their insulated ivory towers about "the others". Do you know that they are the ones cleaning the shops, putting food on the shelves, packaging and preparing items for supermarkets. They don't sit at home behind a keyboard..
74
04/03/2021 10:31:28 2 22
bbc
vaccinations at schools is key
499
kh
04/03/2021 11:53:10 0 9
bbc
And what happens one day if there is a major international disaster and vaccinations cannot be issued. Without a lifetime of natural immunity from exposure we will be be a huge risk.
2
04/03/2021 10:15:19 166 29
bbc
Good news, let’s keep rolling out the vaccines now, get back to normal and if necessary roll out more vaccines in future, like we do with flu, and stop making the issue of mutations (that happen anyway) more of an issue than needed.
10
04/03/2021 10:17:56 58 66
bbc
The new normal isn't going to be "normal" - we'll have covid jabs as well as flu for the foreseeable future and I think some will think twice about certain activities....
36
04/03/2021 10:28:24 31 16
bbc
Too right - and the sooner everyone wises up to the fact things won't be completely "normal" again, the better.
44
JWG
04/03/2021 10:30:31 20 29
bbc
Well let them go ahead and do what they want however they should no longer be influential on what others do. Enough is enough.
77
04/03/2021 10:33:58 3 56
bbc
Think night clubs and pubs will have to stay closed
207
04/03/2021 11:11:58 15 4
bbc
which activities, I'm intrigued? You are going to stop certain aspects of your life now?
397
04/03/2021 11:44:21 4 1
bbc
I think you are right but from reports around the World, most people get back to 'normal' very quickly indeed!
407
Pip
04/03/2021 11:46:04 3 0
bbc
And hopefully, that will be up to them........?
806
Rae
04/03/2021 13:19:56 0 0
bbc
What is normal , my normal is not your normal ......
We all just want freedom to live our own normal ....
11
04/03/2021 10:19:13 12 12
bbc
It's worth differentiating between success and absence of failure.

The successes in the vaccines are all done by scientists.

The govt didn't fail to purchase the vaccines before someone else.

The person who engineers there Aston Martin should be credited, not the person who drives it.
23
04/03/2021 10:23:23 11 6
bbc
I spy sour grapes
63
04/03/2021 10:29:49 5 1
bbc
most of the scientist aren't British ...high skilled immigration is key
12
04/03/2021 10:20:28 45 3
bbc
With genetic sequencing changing vaccines is much faster than it used to be. Less hit and miss.
128
04/03/2021 10:50:11 79 1
bbc
My wife was a volunteer for the novavax vaccine. She’s now been asked to be tested on a tweaked vaccine to combat the South African variant. This is happening all the time and will on going. My thanks to her and the scientists
491
kh
04/03/2021 11:45:11 0 1
bbc
Not heard as much about covid tests having to change, as the virus mutates and it's genetic sequence changes.
13
04/03/2021 10:20:33 3 10
bbc
This is good news, but how will the NHS budgets cope with circa 50 million people getting vaccinated annually going forward, it will already take 6 months to roll out first phase, and the resources around it including many volunteers may not be available in the future. Perhaps NI should be increased in the short term to fund can't expect government to pay forever.
27
04/03/2021 10:24:59 10 3
bbc
Only a tiny percentage will need it every year a la the flu jab. The vast majority will get it once this year but after their second dose won't need it again until they are over 60 as mega low risk.
54
04/03/2021 10:23:31 3 4
bbc
gov. pays zero, nothing, nada.
We pay them, they put it in the Caymans.
104
04/03/2021 10:44:08 0 0
bbc
Easy enough to mix it with the regular flu vaccine for a single jab
505
04/03/2021 12:03:08 0 2
bbc
You don't seriously think they'll offer it for free every year do you? After this year, anyone who wants the vaccine will have to pay for it unless they work in certain professions, have certain illnesses, or have an employer willing to pay for it for their staff, just like the flu vaccine nowadays
Great article re Texans and face masks. Can the BBC please follow this up and report again in 3-6 months to show if and what difference it has made.
Lets have the figures do the talking not Biden calling Americans Neanderthals.
Awful President calling his own citizens such things. Disgraceful and disrespectful and divisive.
Removed
14
04/03/2021 10:21:26 2 2
bbc
Different president, same problems. That country is in freefall.
15
04/03/2021 10:16:58 22 20
bbc
Fast tracked yes......unless your in the EU that is...
69
04/03/2021 10:35:35 20 3
bbc
What does the EU have to do with anything? As a researcher myself (although not in the medical sciences) I can assure you that scientific collaboration transcends political borders. We work with counterparts in the EU and further afield, and the work is always presented in international conferences and journals.
139
04/03/2021 10:52:28 6 1
bbc
The vaccines approved in the EU and the UK were done under exactly the same law. I'd be very surprised if we've passed legislation to diverge from this law in the past few weeks to allow for fast tracked approval of vaccines catering for new variants of Covid.

So stop making pathetic, childish and inaccurate political comments.
224
VoR
04/03/2021 11:14:19 5 0
bbc
EU members are free to fast track vaccine approvals in emergencies, and were not obliged to join its joint vaccination purchase program. So actually, we could have achieved the same in or out of the EU. Don't let the truth get in the way of your misguided crusade though.
322
04/03/2021 11:32:21 0 0
bbc
Thanks for your very intelligent comment.
16
04/03/2021 10:19:58 5 19
bbc
Thank you Science and NHS.

Prosecute the 'govt' over PPE - for starters.
48
04/03/2021 10:30:58 3 0
bbc
Thought that had already happened, in a case a couple of weeks ago. To a resounding chorus of "so what??" from most people it seems.
60
04/03/2021 10:33:32 2 1
bbc
It is my understanding that it was National Health England that cocked up the PPE delivery, and Health Minister did not have powers to disciple NHE.

I have spoken to some members of the Military charged with helping delivery logistics, and they were utterly scathing about the failures in National Health England getting in the way of getting the job done. Bumbling Jobsworths seemed to be the case.
17
04/03/2021 10:20:20 34 6
bbc
Is this the start of a brave new world where we will have vaccine passports that require you to get a new jab every year to update them?
55
04/03/2021 10:31:35 10 5
bbc
Vaccine passports being debated in the commons 15th March so we should soon find out!
80
04/03/2021 10:37:11 6 6
bbc
It will be tweaked just like Flu vaccines and your just as free to decline if you so wish.

No doubt many public places, work, travel companies etc will require proof of vaccination to safeguard themselves, thier workers or as a result of public liability requirements.

Thats the way it is and will be an no amount of HYS led paranioa or ventilating about it affecting your HR will change that.
101
04/03/2021 10:43:22 5 7
bbc
You are completely missing the point of most people's opposition to vaccine passports. The vast majority of us will have the vaccine when our number gets called. The problem is, and the reason passports are discriminationary, is that we won't be offered ours for months, second does three months later, passport two weeks after that.

Meanwhile the pubs and bars are full of octogenarians.
116
04/03/2021 10:47:14 1 4
bbc
Yes, No & No as they won't be mandatory as you well know.

There-Hope that helps the paranioa
495
kh
04/03/2021 11:48:54 7 7
bbc
Nothing brave about people that queue up for vaccines without understanding or researching the science for themselves.
521
04/03/2021 12:05:32 6 6
bbc
I've signed the petition and written to my MP opposing the vaccine passport. I think it's a disgrace that it is even a consideration.

Know this though, if, after the debate they say they won't introduce a domestic one, you can guarantee they will. This government simply cannot be trusted
747
04/03/2021 12:54:32 0 1
bbc
Been the plan since day 1
749
04/03/2021 12:54:42 1 0
bbc
Well they'll have to come up with something better than the little card I've been given with my first vax shot. Just my name handwritten on the card with nothing to link to my actual identity.
943
LH
04/03/2021 20:45:20 0 0
bbc
No problem for me!!
959
04/03/2021 22:54:44 0 0
bbc
we already have to do this for our cat, he cannot stay in a cattery unless his vaccination card is up to date....he hasn't tried to book a flight to Benidorm yet though.
9
04/03/2021 10:17:34 93 19
bbc
Yearly event like flu.. but uptake needs to be much higher and wider than flu. That’s the problem. Hope we get more responsible and learn from 2020
18
04/03/2021 10:22:33 87 82
bbc
Only worthwhile if it enables society and the borders to reopen. Prof Whitty keeps talking about an acceptable level of deaths and refers to the 20,000 a year that society has accepted for flu.

I just worry that as soon as deaths start creeping up next winter that the snowflakes will start bleating on social media and the government will cave in again and start adding further restrictions.
31
04/03/2021 10:26:54 34 35
bbc
If you mean mandatory mask wearing going forward and social distancing, and limiting large gatherings don't see the issue to protect public health. Nothing snowflake about reasonable precautions.
40
04/03/2021 10:29:11 10 2
bbc
@voice of reason
It’s always a balance. Concern is population will not or the role out will fail to reach the and spread the net wide enough. In which case hospitals will see admission and deaths. The figure of 20000
was a bad year. So I guess DOH has to decide the threshold!
66
04/03/2021 10:34:28 9 10
bbc
So nice that you maintain the abuse of others with an opinion differing to yours.
72
04/03/2021 10:36:08 18 6
bbc
Re-opening of borders will be more dependent on other countries that our vaccination levels.

For Example, if the US state governments keep lifting restrictions and ignoring the science while many don't take up the vaccine due to financial or conspiracy concerns we will not see quarantine-free travel from the USA any time soon.
346
MrW
04/03/2021 11:36:21 8 9
bbc
Why is someone a "snowflake" just because they tend towards caution and sensibility?
Do you wear a seatbelt when driving? Does that mean you should be labelled as a "snowflake" or a "sheep"?
Do try to have some perspective, if only for the sake of your mental health.
And 20,000 a year is an extreme; deaths associated with flu are usually in the low thousands, not tens of thousands.
429
04/03/2021 11:50:17 1 4
bbc
I get your general message but it’s not ‘snowflakes’ that lead to lockdown. Quite rightly, the Government is scared stiff of hospitals filling up and even just one person dying because there was no space or staff to treat him/her
430
04/03/2021 11:50:32 6 6
bbc
Objecting to 20,000 deaths makes you a snowflake? This up there with being called "Woke" for pointing out the holocaust happened!
453
04/03/2021 11:55:54 5 7
bbc
‘Snowflake’ the term utilised by those lacking the intelligence to make a rational argument, usually a ‘Populist’ who can’t see beyond their own narrow agenda.
750
04/03/2021 12:54:48 0 0
bbc
"snowflakes bleating" are ewe mixing metaphors?
19
04/03/2021 10:22:45 5 8
bbc
works needs to be done now to get vaccines to be delivered in a more efficient way. We need to do away with needles, we need to work on getting a patch that can be sent out and absorbed into the skin so that it can be self administered.
42
04/03/2021 10:30:06 2 1
bbc
We are where we are.
57
GS
04/03/2021 10:32:14 2 0
bbc
Do you not think scientists have been thinking that since the Spanish Flu of 1918-1919 when the concept of mass flu jabs was started.
86
04/03/2021 10:37:59 1 0
bbc
Why?
20
04/03/2021 10:22:53 4 16
bbc
As an over 60 im still waiting to hear from my GP for my jab. The roll out is not happening as quickly as the government is leading us to believe!
29
04/03/2021 10:25:48 12 0
bbc
Get in touch with your GP. My dad didn't hear anything as they didn't have his mobile number on file.
38
04/03/2021 10:28:46 5 0
bbc
Phone your GP
Simple solution
41
04/03/2021 10:29:29 3 0
bbc
Be patient, it depends on local circumstances.
I booked my jab yesterday and I am in the same age group. A friend of mine in another part of the country had his a couple of weeks back..
43
04/03/2021 10:30:29 3 0
bbc
Ring 119 and inquire, very helpful.
45
Jim
04/03/2021 10:30:39 1 2
bbc
Strange, my wife and I are both healthy mid 40's. We had ours yesterday.

Bit ache today, but hey ho
49
04/03/2021 10:31:00 7 0
bbc
I'm 64, and was phoned last Saturday morning to invite me for the vaccination at a local centre that morning.
From phone call to vaccination to back home took 35 minutes.
Very professional, very slick operation, and staffed by professionals and volunteers.
Yes, it is working.
58
JWG
04/03/2021 10:32:21 0 0
bbc
Have you contacted them? I'm 46 and getting mine in 9 days (Cat 6)
315
04/03/2021 11:31:11 0 0
bbc
Just go online and book it
337
04/03/2021 11:35:13 2 0
bbc
The roll out is happening at an incredible pace, that's a fact. You appear to have fallen through the net so do the right thing and contact your GP to straighten it out.
621
04/03/2021 12:24:59 1 0
bbc
Our doctor's surgery is now on the over 55s - so faster than the government would have us believe. It won't be uniform everywhere I think is the answer
21
04/03/2021 10:22:55 2 21
bbc
More hog wash.
136
04/03/2021 10:52:01 0 1
bbc
Only to those who don't have basic understanding.
Great article re Texans and face masks. Can the BBC please follow this up and report again in 3-6 months to show if and what difference it has made.
Lets have the figures do the talking not Biden calling Americans Neanderthals.
Awful President calling his own citizens such things. Disgraceful and disrespectful and divisive.
Removed
22
04/03/2021 10:23:09 2 1
bbc
No he is insulting Neanderthals comparing them to idiots who drop their guard against Covid
11
04/03/2021 10:19:13 12 12
bbc
It's worth differentiating between success and absence of failure.

The successes in the vaccines are all done by scientists.

The govt didn't fail to purchase the vaccines before someone else.

The person who engineers there Aston Martin should be credited, not the person who drives it.
23
04/03/2021 10:23:23 11 6
bbc
I spy sour grapes
117
04/03/2021 10:47:23 4 2
bbc
I merely object to people claiming credit for the work of others. Reeks to much of the days of the empire
7
mss
04/03/2021 10:16:00 19 4
bbc
So, can the new Covid-19 vaccines be combined with the Flu jab, to have one convenient annual jab?
24
GS
04/03/2021 10:23:41 12 15
bbc
no
328
04/03/2021 11:33:25 3 1
bbc
Yes. vaccines are combined all the time MMR for instance. But thanks for the bull.
25
04/03/2021 10:24:14 19 23
bbc
the UK SURGING FORWARD without the EU shackles...
76
04/03/2021 10:32:52 3 2
bbc
EU is happy UK is ordering some vaccines from Germany
96
04/03/2021 10:40:53 1 1
bbc
You do realise that we approved this and began the rollout while we were still in the EU
26
04/03/2021 10:24:42 5 13
bbc
Apparently the vaccine its self can be fast -tracked if your a Oxford Councillor or a celeb
630
04/03/2021 12:26:55 0 0
bbc
Only Labour supporters apparently
13
04/03/2021 10:20:33 3 10
bbc
This is good news, but how will the NHS budgets cope with circa 50 million people getting vaccinated annually going forward, it will already take 6 months to roll out first phase, and the resources around it including many volunteers may not be available in the future. Perhaps NI should be increased in the short term to fund can't expect government to pay forever.
27
04/03/2021 10:24:59 10 3
bbc
Only a tiny percentage will need it every year a la the flu jab. The vast majority will get it once this year but after their second dose won't need it again until they are over 60 as mega low risk.
37
04/03/2021 10:28:30 3 4
bbc
Not if variants spread and become highly transmittable, which for the next few years is highly likely according to WHO
Great article re Texans and face masks. Can the BBC please follow this up and report again in 3-6 months to show if and what difference it has made.
Lets have the figures do the talking not Biden calling Americans Neanderthals.
Awful President calling his own citizens such things. Disgraceful and disrespectful and divisive.
Removed
28
04/03/2021 10:25:04 2 3
bbc
Biden used masks as a political tool to help ease Trump out of office.
The fact the tiny benefit they bring is almost certainly cancelled by the way most people handle them in the real World is irrelevant to him.
On the plus side, Trumps gone.
20
04/03/2021 10:22:53 4 16
bbc
As an over 60 im still waiting to hear from my GP for my jab. The roll out is not happening as quickly as the government is leading us to believe!
29
04/03/2021 10:25:48 12 0
bbc
Get in touch with your GP. My dad didn't hear anything as they didn't have his mobile number on file.
30
04/03/2021 10:26:07 13 22
bbc
Yes, lump this in with flu, vaccinate the old and vulnerable and leave the rest of us to get on with things. I shall be glad when this hysteria abates.
133
04/03/2021 10:51:29 3 1
bbc
I have noticed you tend to leave a lot of uneducated comments.
156
04/03/2021 10:59:22 2 0
bbc
We shall all be glad when we can return to normality but hysteria is not a phrase I would use in dealing with a pandemic
530
04/03/2021 12:07:11 0 3
bbc
Why not just call it flu and be done with it? We all know that's what it is anyway
18
04/03/2021 10:22:33 87 82
bbc
Only worthwhile if it enables society and the borders to reopen. Prof Whitty keeps talking about an acceptable level of deaths and refers to the 20,000 a year that society has accepted for flu.

I just worry that as soon as deaths start creeping up next winter that the snowflakes will start bleating on social media and the government will cave in again and start adding further restrictions.
31
04/03/2021 10:26:54 34 35
bbc
If you mean mandatory mask wearing going forward and social distancing, and limiting large gatherings don't see the issue to protect public health. Nothing snowflake about reasonable precautions.
73
04/03/2021 10:36:09 22 2
bbc
What number do you put on ‘large gatherings’? Do you propose indefinitely cancelling festivals? Football stadiums? Cinemas??
There are significant health issues with wearing masks. Your mouth is an exhaust used to expell CO2 and other things that your body doesn't want. Normally thi is expelled into the atmosphere, but wearing a mask recycles it straight back in. There will be future health issues caused by mask wearing. We do it now because it is the lesser of the evils - but it cannot continue. Removed
People like you make me wonder why you’ve even bothered living in the first place Removed
166
04/03/2021 11:02:12 14 6
bbc
That’s not living a normal free life is it . We are too risk averse we can’t risk assess against eventual death.
We can imprison ourselves and destroy our economy and way of life but for what? We have lived with respiratory illnesses for years and we have to accept that some people will die . No more restrictions after the vaccine roll out, enough is enough.
168
04/03/2021 11:02:55 12 2
bbc
There are enormous costs to these seemingly innocuous restrictions. They are unacceptable in the long term, which is why it is fortunate that the vaccinations are so effective
202
amb
04/03/2021 11:11:05 13 7
bbc
You may not want your life back but some of us do.
236
04/03/2021 11:17:06 14 7
bbc
Mask wearing wearing should be optional.
326
04/03/2021 11:32:49 11 8
bbc
Ridiculous. Stay at home if you are so petrified.
777
04/03/2021 13:02:29 0 2
bbc
This is completely non-viable in the long term and permanently screws over many vulnerable people. Face Masks can exacerbate respiratory problems due to the way they disrupt breathing patterns and there are a lot of people with memory issues who can only recognise other's by their faces who you are perfectly happy to throw under the bus in the name of permanent "reasonable precautions"
I'm just waiting for the llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch variant.

It'll be fun watching the news presenters deal with that.
Removed
65
04/03/2021 10:34:12 8 6
bbc
Best laugh so far today
68
04/03/2021 10:34:50 5 2
bbc
The downvotes to this post just show that MrGrumpy is alive and well!
127
04/03/2021 10:49:49 2 0
bbc
It will probably named the North Wales variant by the spoil sports
158
04/03/2021 10:59:38 1 0
bbc
Excellent:-)
848
04/03/2021 14:07:07 0 0
bbc
Nice...
33
GS
04/03/2021 10:27:59 6 13
bbc
Quote from article
'The aim is to shorten the process, where possible, so that vaccine approval could happen in weeks and months, not years'.
So, just like for what we are putting in our arms now?
34
04/03/2021 10:28:11 47 4
bbc
Go scientists
492
kh
04/03/2021 11:45:32 7 35
bbc
Go pharmaceutical profits
515
04/03/2021 12:04:32 0 8
bbc
Since when was it normal to vaccinate entire populations on a regular basis? This is not normal and should be done with a great deal of care and caution.

These are novel vaccines and the long term effects are an unknown. Obviously, evidence has proved they are safe in the short term.

Only vulnerable had flue vaccines previously.
35
04/03/2021 10:28:16 59 18
bbc
Yes, the vaccines were developed by scientists

BUT it was the Government which gave them the elbow room and financial backing to speed the process

Normal vaccine and medical treatments go slowly because the Scientists and their employers like to ensure each stage is secure before committing next stage expenditure

“Go for it Guys we will hold your financial risks” is what speeded process in UK
85
04/03/2021 10:37:49 31 47
bbc
One scientist has more value to the country that the whole Cabinet.
Total boll***s

Astrazeneca took on the financial risk in ramping up production of the vaccines massively BEFORE they were approved. If the vaccine had failed, they'd have lost millions.

The government stepped in to assist with the delivery program and thanks to them actually using local services (for once) instead of outsourcing, this was a success. Shame they didn't do this with T&T.
Removed
262
04/03/2021 11:23:05 6 9
bbc
Nice try at PR. The science team saw the early data and took a flier to go develop the vacine the g'vmt had no involvement. They also reached out to Astra to manufacture, again on their own nowse. The Goverment just shotgunned cash on everything they could throw cash at. Not exactly A+. This, an so many U turns nobody knew what was what, resulted in huge deaths, again not A+
393
04/03/2021 11:43:39 6 7
bbc
You are wrong.

The head of the Astra-Zeneca research programme (Oxford) that was working on it for years said that the time it normally takes to develop new vaccines is due to scrabbling around for funding, sometimes for years, between each stage of the work. Much came from EU research funds.

Short term thinking & tax cuts for the rich were the UK government's priorities before Covid arrived.
461
04/03/2021 11:57:30 3 2
bbc
Not true. UK Govt funding for science is trivial. Almost all cancer research is funded by charity. Actually developing drugs needs serious venture capitalist investment. £1 in £8 spent on UK science came from the EU and that shortfall has not been made up. Quite the opposite. Also supplies from the EU are now 20% more expensive and supplies delayed in UK customs.
648
04/03/2021 12:29:58 1 3
bbc
Financial restrictions are not the main driver of vaccination development process.

Reading articles from those in the industry, typical process for NEW vaccines is 2.5yrs+2.5yrs+2.5yrs. Allows short, medium and long term impacts to be highlighted/rectified.

What are the medium/long term side effects of these new vaccines?

What QA processes in place?

What impact if mRNA divides the wrong cells?
872
04/03/2021 14:40:33 0 0
bbc
The Country's holding the £ risk, not the Govt.
In normal world, your3rd para holds true...like any 'business' enterprise required to stand on its own 2 feet & answer shareholders
However, Govt. was desperate for a rapid result & asked the scientists to come up trumps...which they did in spades
Cerebally/technically competent, upscaled rapidly - delivered
Brunel BUILT the bridge, not the £ backers
10
04/03/2021 10:17:56 58 66
bbc
The new normal isn't going to be "normal" - we'll have covid jabs as well as flu for the foreseeable future and I think some will think twice about certain activities....
36
04/03/2021 10:28:24 31 16
bbc
Too right - and the sooner everyone wises up to the fact things won't be completely "normal" again, the better.
182
04/03/2021 11:06:05 27 12
bbc
If other people don't want to go back to normal, that is fine by me.
It is however obviously unacceptable for them to force such a lifestyle on me
27
04/03/2021 10:24:59 10 3
bbc
Only a tiny percentage will need it every year a la the flu jab. The vast majority will get it once this year but after their second dose won't need it again until they are over 60 as mega low risk.
37
04/03/2021 10:28:30 3 4
bbc
Not if variants spread and become highly transmittable, which for the next few years is highly likely according to WHO
20
04/03/2021 10:22:53 4 16
bbc
As an over 60 im still waiting to hear from my GP for my jab. The roll out is not happening as quickly as the government is leading us to believe!
38
04/03/2021 10:28:46 5 0
bbc
Phone your GP
Simple solution
39
04/03/2021 10:29:00 82 7
bbc
Vaccine scientists have done well. I hope they are also paid well. That is what you call 'earning' your money in the proper sense of the word'.
87
04/03/2021 10:38:44 63 3
bbc
Have worked in a couple different parts of the industry as a scientist...yeah, we're not paid as well as you'd think.
247
04/03/2021 11:18:49 5 0
bbc
Pharma companies pay well after years of low paid university research jobs to get the experience. Or pick your brains.
940
LH
04/03/2021 20:35:49 0 0
bbc
My God, there is more to doing a job, than receiving money! There is something in doing a job "for the goodness of mankind"!!
18
04/03/2021 10:22:33 87 82
bbc
Only worthwhile if it enables society and the borders to reopen. Prof Whitty keeps talking about an acceptable level of deaths and refers to the 20,000 a year that society has accepted for flu.

I just worry that as soon as deaths start creeping up next winter that the snowflakes will start bleating on social media and the government will cave in again and start adding further restrictions.
40
04/03/2021 10:29:11 10 2
bbc
@voice of reason
It’s always a balance. Concern is population will not or the role out will fail to reach the and spread the net wide enough. In which case hospitals will see admission and deaths. The figure of 20000
was a bad year. So I guess DOH has to decide the threshold!
20
04/03/2021 10:22:53 4 16
bbc
As an over 60 im still waiting to hear from my GP for my jab. The roll out is not happening as quickly as the government is leading us to believe!
41
04/03/2021 10:29:29 3 0
bbc
Be patient, it depends on local circumstances.
I booked my jab yesterday and I am in the same age group. A friend of mine in another part of the country had his a couple of weeks back..
19
04/03/2021 10:22:45 5 8
bbc
works needs to be done now to get vaccines to be delivered in a more efficient way. We need to do away with needles, we need to work on getting a patch that can be sent out and absorbed into the skin so that it can be self administered.
42
04/03/2021 10:30:06 2 1
bbc
We are where we are.
20
04/03/2021 10:22:53 4 16
bbc
As an over 60 im still waiting to hear from my GP for my jab. The roll out is not happening as quickly as the government is leading us to believe!
43
04/03/2021 10:30:29 3 0
bbc
Ring 119 and inquire, very helpful.
10
04/03/2021 10:17:56 58 66
bbc
The new normal isn't going to be "normal" - we'll have covid jabs as well as flu for the foreseeable future and I think some will think twice about certain activities....
44
JWG
04/03/2021 10:30:31 20 29
bbc
Well let them go ahead and do what they want however they should no longer be influential on what others do. Enough is enough.
548
04/03/2021 12:10:04 4 0
bbc
What enough is enough?
589
04/03/2021 12:16:16 4 0
bbc
Who is this "they" you speak of? From where I'm standing it's all about "us".
20
04/03/2021 10:22:53 4 16
bbc
As an over 60 im still waiting to hear from my GP for my jab. The roll out is not happening as quickly as the government is leading us to believe!
45
Jim
04/03/2021 10:30:39 1 2
bbc
Strange, my wife and I are both healthy mid 40's. We had ours yesterday.

Bit ache today, but hey ho
46
04/03/2021 10:30:47 31 14
bbc
I believe this, coupled with adhering to Government advice - which clearly isn't happening at the moment - is the only way forward. Amazing to see that people here still think that they know better than scientists even though these are the people that hold the key to the only way out of this.
For me, one of the saddest aspects is that the Govt tried to cover up their failings by blameing the people instead of accepting responsability & so many Brits believe this spin

There are rule breakers in every nation, many much worse then here

But its better for Boris if you blame a tiny minority for the fact the UK has the highest number of Covid deaths per capita of any major nation worldwide
Surely everything that can possibly be said in HYS have been said about covid & the vaccine.. go on bbc be brave, open one up about Harry and Meghan Removed
103
04/03/2021 10:44:05 3 0
bbc
If you want to be mindbendingly shallow and like celebrity/Royalty piffle that has zero bearing to real lives there are plenty of alternatives aout there.

Please go away.
16
04/03/2021 10:19:58 5 19
bbc
Thank you Science and NHS.

Prosecute the 'govt' over PPE - for starters.
48
04/03/2021 10:30:58 3 0
bbc
Thought that had already happened, in a case a couple of weeks ago. To a resounding chorus of "so what??" from most people it seems.
20
04/03/2021 10:22:53 4 16
bbc
As an over 60 im still waiting to hear from my GP for my jab. The roll out is not happening as quickly as the government is leading us to believe!
49
04/03/2021 10:31:00 7 0
bbc
I'm 64, and was phoned last Saturday morning to invite me for the vaccination at a local centre that morning.
From phone call to vaccination to back home took 35 minutes.
Very professional, very slick operation, and staffed by professionals and volunteers.
Yes, it is working.
50
04/03/2021 10:21:15 4 15
bbc
Glad they admit the current stuff is being testing on the public
329
04/03/2021 11:33:30 0 0
bbc
Ultimately, all drugs are 'tested on the public'.
Great article re Texans and face masks. Can the BBC please follow this up and report again in 3-6 months to show if and what difference it has made.
Lets have the figures do the talking not Biden calling Americans Neanderthals.
Awful President calling his own citizens such things. Disgraceful and disrespectful and divisive.
Removed
Removed
3
04/03/2021 10:09:54 7 14
bbc
They should all be properly trialled and proved to be safe.
52
04/03/2021 10:22:15 3 1
bbc
proven, even.
53
04/03/2021 10:22:45 7 21
bbc
Prevention is surely the optimum strategy.The Brazilian strain is only here because of sustained monumental incompetence.
Patel despite being a hardline bully has capitulated to Johnson who in turn is capitulating to the wealthy elites who still need to fly between Moscow and London.
138
04/03/2021 10:52:24 1 0
bbc
Yawn.
327
04/03/2021 11:32:50 0 0
bbc
I've got a brand new roll of BacoFoil here as you seem in danger of running out.
13
04/03/2021 10:20:33 3 10
bbc
This is good news, but how will the NHS budgets cope with circa 50 million people getting vaccinated annually going forward, it will already take 6 months to roll out first phase, and the resources around it including many volunteers may not be available in the future. Perhaps NI should be increased in the short term to fund can't expect government to pay forever.
54
04/03/2021 10:23:31 3 4
bbc
gov. pays zero, nothing, nada.
We pay them, they put it in the Caymans.
17
04/03/2021 10:20:20 34 6
bbc
Is this the start of a brave new world where we will have vaccine passports that require you to get a new jab every year to update them?
55
04/03/2021 10:31:35 10 5
bbc
Vaccine passports being debated in the commons 15th March so we should soon find out!
266
04/03/2021 11:23:36 1 1
bbc
goverment havnt a choice if other countrys say you need a passport to enter their country.
9
04/03/2021 10:17:34 93 19
bbc
Yearly event like flu.. but uptake needs to be much higher and wider than flu. That’s the problem. Hope we get more responsible and learn from 2020
56
04/03/2021 10:31:42 26 7
bbc
It already is or has the 21 million vaccinated, with 94% minimum uptake, escaped your attention?

I'm growing a bit tired of the pushy middle classes SJW's shouting from their insulated ivory towers about "the others". Do you know that they are the ones cleaning the shops, putting food on the shelves, packaging and preparing items for supermarkets. They don't sit at home behind a keyboard..
70
04/03/2021 10:35:55 2 0
bbc
@Grim reaper
No need to get angry. It was meant to suggest gov needs to make sure they are protected so everyone can get on with their jobs and country can move on safely.
170
04/03/2021 11:03:50 10 6
bbc
Brilliant reply totally agree.
Time for normality and start paying for this indulgent mess.
466
04/03/2021 11:58:36 4 1
bbc
someone's found their inner inverted snob - what a righteous, salt of the earth, rank and file citizen you must be. grimreaper changing the world, by posting to a BBC HYS from your keyboard warrior bunker.
834
04/03/2021 13:48:08 0 0
bbc
And 21m leaves 46m unvacc - many of them key workers at higher risk than gen popn (factories, food prep /retail)

94% is I suspect at best regional average, not minimum area coverage, given strong pockets of vaccine hesitancy.

But 94%, better than last fig I saw Lon was c85%, but that was to Feb 21.

Loads of time to go yet before roll outs or Covid itself remotely over in UK, let alone abroad.
19
04/03/2021 10:22:45 5 8
bbc
works needs to be done now to get vaccines to be delivered in a more efficient way. We need to do away with needles, we need to work on getting a patch that can be sent out and absorbed into the skin so that it can be self administered.
57
GS
04/03/2021 10:32:14 2 0
bbc
Do you not think scientists have been thinking that since the Spanish Flu of 1918-1919 when the concept of mass flu jabs was started.
20
04/03/2021 10:22:53 4 16
bbc
As an over 60 im still waiting to hear from my GP for my jab. The roll out is not happening as quickly as the government is leading us to believe!
58
JWG
04/03/2021 10:32:21 0 0
bbc
Have you contacted them? I'm 46 and getting mine in 9 days (Cat 6)
3
04/03/2021 10:09:54 7 14
bbc
They should all be properly trialled and proved to be safe.
59
04/03/2021 10:32:53 3 0
bbc
Isn't that what the report says?
16
04/03/2021 10:19:58 5 19
bbc
Thank you Science and NHS.

Prosecute the 'govt' over PPE - for starters.
60
04/03/2021 10:33:32 2 1
bbc
It is my understanding that it was National Health England that cocked up the PPE delivery, and Health Minister did not have powers to disciple NHE.

I have spoken to some members of the Military charged with helping delivery logistics, and they were utterly scathing about the failures in National Health England getting in the way of getting the job done. Bumbling Jobsworths seemed to be the case.
1
W 6
04/03/2021 10:15:11 36 10
bbc
I don't like giving Matt Hancock credit but he did use a good analogy for fast updated vaccine trials - "if a Range Rover is fitted with a new wing mirror, it should still be considered a Range Rover"

I think the government would be very wise to invest heavily on updates. Surely it is a prudent move if they allow us to avoid any restrictions come next winter and may speed up international travel.
61
04/03/2021 10:33:38 6 4
bbc
They are 1.6billion in budget yesterday.
62
04/03/2021 10:28:46 29 3
bbc
Covid vaccine will be an annual thing like the Flu vaccine
71
04/03/2021 10:36:01 25 31
bbc
Only for those at real risk of it!!!
78
GS
04/03/2021 10:36:39 1 4
bbc
Talk about stating the obvious that we have know for weeks and months
90
04/03/2021 10:39:10 5 1
bbc
Thankfully the coronaviruses mutate more slowly than the influenza viruses so the vaccines we develop for COVID should be more effective and need to be given less frequently
611
04/03/2021 12:22:20 2 0
bbc
There are groups working on generic CoV vaccines (ie, universal); while the first wave vaccines are specific, it may not always be so
759
04/03/2021 12:56:07 1 0
bbc
Yes because that creates an ever lasting gravy train of £££££
789
04/03/2021 13:07:22 0 0
bbc
Yes that was the plan from the outset
11
04/03/2021 10:19:13 12 12
bbc
It's worth differentiating between success and absence of failure.

The successes in the vaccines are all done by scientists.

The govt didn't fail to purchase the vaccines before someone else.

The person who engineers there Aston Martin should be credited, not the person who drives it.
63
04/03/2021 10:29:49 5 1
bbc
most of the scientist aren't British ...high skilled immigration is key
2
04/03/2021 10:15:19 166 29
bbc
Good news, let’s keep rolling out the vaccines now, get back to normal and if necessary roll out more vaccines in future, like we do with flu, and stop making the issue of mutations (that happen anyway) more of an issue than needed.
64
04/03/2021 10:30:38 12 3
bbc
varied mutations due to travel across the world
91
04/03/2021 10:39:10 45 2
bbc
Mutations are the natural evolution of viruses and nothing to do with travel. They occur everywhere and simply named from the source they are discovered.
I'm just waiting for the llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch variant.

It'll be fun watching the news presenters deal with that.
Removed
65
04/03/2021 10:34:12 8 6
bbc
Best laugh so far today
18
04/03/2021 10:22:33 87 82
bbc
Only worthwhile if it enables society and the borders to reopen. Prof Whitty keeps talking about an acceptable level of deaths and refers to the 20,000 a year that society has accepted for flu.

I just worry that as soon as deaths start creeping up next winter that the snowflakes will start bleating on social media and the government will cave in again and start adding further restrictions.
66
04/03/2021 10:34:28 9 10
bbc
So nice that you maintain the abuse of others with an opinion differing to yours.
911
04/03/2021 16:34:05 0 0
bbc
Precisely. I thought vaccination was to take us forward not backwards.
3
04/03/2021 10:09:54 7 14
bbc
They should all be properly trialled and proved to be safe.
67
04/03/2021 10:34:41 3 0
bbc
It's the vaccine vector that has to be proved safe. Once that's done, as it has been for Pfizer and AZ, tweaks to the spike protein it makes cells produce won't affect safety.
I'm just waiting for the llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch variant.

It'll be fun watching the news presenters deal with that.
Removed
68
04/03/2021 10:34:50 5 2
bbc
The downvotes to this post just show that MrGrumpy is alive and well!
853
04/03/2021 14:12:18 0 0
bbc
Don't worry...the downvoters are the Presenters! +:-(==
15
04/03/2021 10:16:58 22 20
bbc
Fast tracked yes......unless your in the EU that is...
69
04/03/2021 10:35:35 20 3
bbc
What does the EU have to do with anything? As a researcher myself (although not in the medical sciences) I can assure you that scientific collaboration transcends political borders. We work with counterparts in the EU and further afield, and the work is always presented in international conferences and journals.
213
04/03/2021 11:13:09 0 4
bbc
But we were told if we left the EU we could no longer collaborate with scientists based in the EU, thanks for clearing that lie up Icarus
56
04/03/2021 10:31:42 26 7
bbc
It already is or has the 21 million vaccinated, with 94% minimum uptake, escaped your attention?

I'm growing a bit tired of the pushy middle classes SJW's shouting from their insulated ivory towers about "the others". Do you know that they are the ones cleaning the shops, putting food on the shelves, packaging and preparing items for supermarkets. They don't sit at home behind a keyboard..
70
04/03/2021 10:35:55 2 0
bbc
@Grim reaper
No need to get angry. It was meant to suggest gov needs to make sure they are protected so everyone can get on with their jobs and country can move on safely.
478
04/03/2021 11:59:47 1 1
bbc
you are confusing grimreaper with someone who thinks rationally instead of looking for a reason to be an angry troll.
62
04/03/2021 10:28:46 29 3
bbc
Covid vaccine will be an annual thing like the Flu vaccine
71
04/03/2021 10:36:01 25 31
bbc
Only for those at real risk of it!!!
89
04/03/2021 10:38:59 14 7
bbc
If you do that you have the bulk of the population breeding new strains
100
04/03/2021 10:43:16 11 8
bbc
Issue is that you don't necessarily know if you're high risk. It has killed otherwise seemingly healthy people, so it is sensible to get it if you can.
125
04/03/2021 10:49:14 8 7
bbc
~10% of all infected (all age groups, asymptomatic as well as severe cases) go on to develop long-covid. A condition of variable severity from mildly debilitating to totally incapacitating. A condition for which no treatment or cure yet exists and on past form, such could be decades away if ever.
198
VoR
04/03/2021 11:10:04 3 2
bbc
Which is most. Long covid (well, everything that falls under the poorly defined umbrella of long covid) affects about 1 in 10 of those infected, and data is now available that shows it is often serious. I don't think people realise how serious.
294
04/03/2021 11:26:49 3 2
bbc
Everyone's at risk. Yes, the death rate is much higher amongst the elderly, but there are now more youngsters in hospital with Covid than elderly.

Then there's Long Covid - a debilitating long term disease that effects all ages. This has not had as much discussion in the press, but it's of growing concern amongst the scientists and medics.
381
04/03/2021 11:42:38 5 2
bbc
No, for everyone. Each person who gets it, regardless of risk, is a Covid test bed for creating new variants increasing the risk that the vaccine becomes less effective. When we have our foot on Covid's neck we need to keep the pressure on.
18
04/03/2021 10:22:33 87 82
bbc
Only worthwhile if it enables society and the borders to reopen. Prof Whitty keeps talking about an acceptable level of deaths and refers to the 20,000 a year that society has accepted for flu.

I just worry that as soon as deaths start creeping up next winter that the snowflakes will start bleating on social media and the government will cave in again and start adding further restrictions.
72
04/03/2021 10:36:08 18 6
bbc
Re-opening of borders will be more dependent on other countries that our vaccination levels.

For Example, if the US state governments keep lifting restrictions and ignoring the science while many don't take up the vaccine due to financial or conspiracy concerns we will not see quarantine-free travel from the USA any time soon.
319
04/03/2021 11:31:45 1 1
bbc
Joe Biden reckons they will have the whole country vaccinated ahead of the UK target.
Possibly significant outbreak before they reach that point due to removal of controls.
31
04/03/2021 10:26:54 34 35
bbc
If you mean mandatory mask wearing going forward and social distancing, and limiting large gatherings don't see the issue to protect public health. Nothing snowflake about reasonable precautions.
73
04/03/2021 10:36:09 22 2
bbc
What number do you put on ‘large gatherings’? Do you propose indefinitely cancelling festivals? Football stadiums? Cinemas??
9
04/03/2021 10:17:34 93 19
bbc
Yearly event like flu.. but uptake needs to be much higher and wider than flu. That’s the problem. Hope we get more responsible and learn from 2020
74
04/03/2021 10:31:28 2 22
bbc
vaccinations at schools is key
803
04/03/2021 13:15:32 1 0
bbc
Why?

The vaccination doesn't stop you being infected, it just reduces the symptoms to a level that reduces the likelihood of death. The young already have this level of reduction through their natural immunity.

Mass vaccinating children is just a waste of time and money.
837
04/03/2021 13:52:49 0 0
bbc
Vacc of school kids would be key, not just teachers.

And jcvi and PHE stats have kicked that idea where it needed to go.

But as vacc only just entered tests unlikely kids even before next years autumn term.

Till then we have our own in built pool of c15m potential spreaders.

Plus many millions of adults who will decline vaccines.
7
mss
04/03/2021 10:16:00 19 4
bbc
So, can the new Covid-19 vaccines be combined with the Flu jab, to have one convenient annual jab?
75
04/03/2021 10:32:15 1 4
bbc
also include MMR if its going to be Covid school vaccine
25
04/03/2021 10:24:14 19 23
bbc
the UK SURGING FORWARD without the EU shackles...
76
04/03/2021 10:32:52 3 2
bbc
EU is happy UK is ordering some vaccines from Germany
10
04/03/2021 10:17:56 58 66
bbc
The new normal isn't going to be "normal" - we'll have covid jabs as well as flu for the foreseeable future and I think some will think twice about certain activities....
77
04/03/2021 10:33:58 3 56
bbc
Think night clubs and pubs will have to stay closed
179
04/03/2021 11:05:46 16 2
bbc
Big Billy Goat Gruff called...

He is waiting by your bridge to chase you again!
206
JWG
04/03/2021 11:11:52 16 2
bbc
TROLL ALERT
62
04/03/2021 10:28:46 29 3
bbc
Covid vaccine will be an annual thing like the Flu vaccine
78
GS
04/03/2021 10:36:39 1 4
bbc
Talk about stating the obvious that we have know for weeks and months
79
04/03/2021 10:36:47 1 3
bbc
Even if they continue down the dark road of challenge trials and inoculate vaccinated volunteers with new strains to test efficacy, it will still take six months to vaccinate the population

This is no defence against vaccine escape
17
04/03/2021 10:20:20 34 6
bbc
Is this the start of a brave new world where we will have vaccine passports that require you to get a new jab every year to update them?
80
04/03/2021 10:37:11 6 6
bbc
It will be tweaked just like Flu vaccines and your just as free to decline if you so wish.

No doubt many public places, work, travel companies etc will require proof of vaccination to safeguard themselves, thier workers or as a result of public liability requirements.

Thats the way it is and will be an no amount of HYS led paranioa or ventilating about it affecting your HR will change that.
88
04/03/2021 10:38:56 1 1
bbc
You seem to be pre-empting the Commons debate next week.
833
04/03/2021 13:47:26 0 0
bbc
There will be no public liability for covid

You done sue your local pub if you catch flu of hiv from a customer
885
04/03/2021 15:03:44 0 0
bbc
True.

Just look at smoking, a much lower or at least long term exposure risk.

Many smokers complained, still happened and now accepted as norm.

Same with car seatbelts.

Knowldege of risks change, attitudes and rules change, society adapts.

If that means a few by choice excluded then so be it.

Covid kills and everyones potential part in speead could mean changes if health impacts stay high.
81
04/03/2021 10:37:22 175 27
bbc
I don't want the old 'normal': I want a new normal of personal responsibility, community spirit and mutual respect....surely we've learnt something from all this?
113
04/03/2021 10:45:39 124 43
bbc
I yearn for the good old days; when we could leave our key dangling on string in the letterbox, the back didn't have key, cars were left unlocked & unalarmed
Kids played out; innocent games not anti-social behaviour
There was petty crime but criminals got punished & there were victims
Now crime is out of control & while the perp gets helped the victim gets forgotten
I don't recognise this country
124
04/03/2021 10:49:06 11 5
bbc
Not from what I can see.
184
NP
04/03/2021 11:06:39 22 1
bbc
It will down to individual but you are right, the definition of "normal" is about to adopt a new meaning. I changed my lifestyle a lot during covid and there are many good changes that I intend to keep including saving, cutting down on crazy consumerism, and utilizing backyard more than ever. Never realized that I have very good garden before.
196
04/03/2021 11:09:50 8 4
bbc
As long as it doesn't involve sweeping legislation on everyday activities...
223
04/03/2021 11:14:16 6 2
bbc
Hope springs eternal...
238
04/03/2021 11:17:28 5 4
bbc
And what about any responses on HYS, has shown you that is going to be remotely possible?

It's a lovely thought Cumlus, but I think you're head is in the clouds.....Ba Dum Tsss
380
04/03/2021 11:42:34 7 2
bbc
The only thing I've learnt from this is that there is a minority of people in this country trapped in an "us versus them" mentality that will attack people with a different no matter what. And this is persistant despite providing evidence to support the view that they are against.

Its crap yes, but some people just like being contrary and as such your vision isn't possible which is a shame
561
04/03/2021 12:12:02 5 4
bbc
Absolutely agree but reality says that is wishful thinking.
Sadly we are surrounded by far too many selfish, thoughtless, lazy individuals. What’s worse are the Liberals who make excuses for this lot by describing them as ‘disadvantaged’. A good ‘new normal’ would be were people were told to take responsibility and get a grip
655
04/03/2021 12:30:59 2 2
bbc
I think your judgement might be clouded?
656
04/03/2021 12:31:21 1 1
bbc
or? sorry to rain on your parade?
794
04/03/2021 12:58:28 1 1
bbc
Yes, we’ve learned what a selfish rotten country we are. That’s what we’ve learned.

Look after yourself and your family and screw everyone else.

That’s our society.
867
04/03/2021 14:28:58 0 0
bbc
Well said, we learn by taking ownership of the problem & focus on solutions that will work for the most vulnerable, whilst looking after everyone else according to their needs/risk at the same time

Aim, Strategy, Structure & Process lie at the heart of any organisational endeavour. The 5th paradigm element trumping these is Culture; your 3 elements nicely shape the who & how of a healthy Culture
969
05/03/2021 10:18:05 0 0
bbc
I learnt that I hate humans more than I already thought I did
3
04/03/2021 10:09:54 7 14
bbc
They should all be properly trialled and proved to be safe.
82
04/03/2021 10:36:42 2 2
bbc
Can you believe a comment complementing the BBC reporting on the face masks relaxation in Texas has been removed by the BBC? It's all relevant
Is this the free speech we now have?
I merely stated it will be useful to analyse data from Texas and Mississippi in 3-6 months to compare and contrast. I also said it is wrong of a president to call his own citizens 'Neander...'.
His words not mine BBC
485
04/03/2021 12:00:55 0 0
bbc
I also said it is wrong of a president to call his own citizens 'Neander...'. I agree. I've been to Texas: the US president is being completely insulting to Neanderthals.
83
04/03/2021 10:37:32 0 6
bbc
There is a massive pool of hosts for the virus to try out mutations within and there have probably been hundreds if not thousands that have already occurred.
It is the incidence of persistent propagating mutations I.e. variants that may affect us, we need to prepare for our annual combined Covid and Flu jabs being the norm - and the cost to nation/nhs to deliver this
Tax rise anyone?
164
04/03/2021 11:01:08 0 2
bbc
Rubbish.
Firstly it won't be combined with the flu vaccine as they're different and secondly the cost will not be that significant, and absolutely tiny in comparison to the costs of hospitalisation and long term treatment for chronic conditions resulting from catching it.
84
SP
04/03/2021 10:37:36 20 8
bbc
UK planned well ahead and took some calculated risks in vaccines and its now bearing the fruit

We need same kind of future planning and quick & bold action on variant virus vaccines. UK is truly leading the world in this.
161
QED
04/03/2021 11:00:04 4 14
bbc
After Russia, China, Taiwan...
35
04/03/2021 10:28:16 59 18
bbc
Yes, the vaccines were developed by scientists

BUT it was the Government which gave them the elbow room and financial backing to speed the process

Normal vaccine and medical treatments go slowly because the Scientists and their employers like to ensure each stage is secure before committing next stage expenditure

“Go for it Guys we will hold your financial risks” is what speeded process in UK
85
04/03/2021 10:37:49 31 47
bbc
One scientist has more value to the country that the whole Cabinet.
118
04/03/2021 10:47:42 6 7
bbc
I would take this more seriously if you could at least type it out correctly.
204
04/03/2021 11:11:20 15 2
bbc
Why pick on the Cabinet - people trying their best to keep running this country in the face of a pandemic ? Scientists also have more value than highly paid footballers, actors, ‘celebrities’, Meghan & Harry....why don’t you pick on them ?
231
VoR
04/03/2021 11:15:51 6 8
bbc
We could, of course, change that, and elect a scientist, like the Germans did. But instead we elect Boris, which is about the polar opposite.
296
04/03/2021 11:27:20 4 0
bbc
Is that a fact?
493
kh
04/03/2021 11:48:01 0 1
bbc
Likely there some scientists that are really bad at their jobs. To praise all scientists require some form of dubious faith in 'the science'.
19
04/03/2021 10:22:45 5 8
bbc
works needs to be done now to get vaccines to be delivered in a more efficient way. We need to do away with needles, we need to work on getting a patch that can be sent out and absorbed into the skin so that it can be self administered.
86
04/03/2021 10:37:59 1 0
bbc
Why?
39
04/03/2021 10:29:00 82 7
bbc
Vaccine scientists have done well. I hope they are also paid well. That is what you call 'earning' your money in the proper sense of the word'.
87
04/03/2021 10:38:44 63 3
bbc
Have worked in a couple different parts of the industry as a scientist...yeah, we're not paid as well as you'd think.
106
04/03/2021 10:44:13 9 16
bbc
Make sure you don't give the EU any credit for developing and making two of the three, technologically most advanced vaccines currently available.
129
04/03/2021 10:50:16 32 0
bbc
Yes, I know. I have seen jobs advertised in the New Scientist magazine. PhD required and several years post-doctoral experience. Starting pay £32,000pa!! Utter disgrace - yet MPs, who need no qualifications, get £70,000!! Even the useless ones.
188
VoR
04/03/2021 11:08:04 13 0
bbc
Like most businesses, the people at the top to very nicely. The rest often get far less than they deserve (the well paid who generate far more value than they are paid), or get far less than they need (the poorly paid, who are effectively commoditised by businesses).
446
04/03/2021 11:54:15 5 0
bbc
Nor is there any job security. 1-2 year fixed term contracts if you're lucky.
713
04/03/2021 12:47:25 2 0
bbc
I used to work in the pharma industry as a microbiologist which was one of the worst paid branches of science. In my first job in a hospital path lab I was paid less than my wife to be got as a secretary!

The closer to the money the more you get paid (an far more perks) - sad fact of life. But without us scientists, the sales and finance people wouldn't have a job but they cant/wont see that.
856
04/03/2021 14:15:38 0 0
bbc
It's a bit like any walk of life, top dog gets the biscuits...the working dogs get the crumbs
Thank you for the work you do we appreciate all that scientists - and the 'let's get this done' community have done for everybody - impressive
80
04/03/2021 10:37:11 6 6
bbc
It will be tweaked just like Flu vaccines and your just as free to decline if you so wish.

No doubt many public places, work, travel companies etc will require proof of vaccination to safeguard themselves, thier workers or as a result of public liability requirements.

Thats the way it is and will be an no amount of HYS led paranioa or ventilating about it affecting your HR will change that.
88
04/03/2021 10:38:56 1 1
bbc
You seem to be pre-empting the Commons debate next week.
71
04/03/2021 10:36:01 25 31
bbc
Only for those at real risk of it!!!
89
04/03/2021 10:38:59 14 7
bbc
If you do that you have the bulk of the population breeding new strains
98
04/03/2021 10:41:29 8 2
bbc
Time to move on, find something else to fret about.
62
04/03/2021 10:28:46 29 3
bbc
Covid vaccine will be an annual thing like the Flu vaccine
90
04/03/2021 10:39:10 5 1
bbc
Thankfully the coronaviruses mutate more slowly than the influenza viruses so the vaccines we develop for COVID should be more effective and need to be given less frequently
64
04/03/2021 10:30:38 12 3
bbc
varied mutations due to travel across the world
91
04/03/2021 10:39:10 45 2
bbc
Mutations are the natural evolution of viruses and nothing to do with travel. They occur everywhere and simply named from the source they are discovered.
544
04/03/2021 12:09:39 3 0
bbc
Yes, but viruses can only travel between different areas on people
596
04/03/2021 12:19:07 3 0
bbc
Yes, mutations are natural; that doesn't mean we should encourage variants to criss-cross the world willy-nilly, though. We have a much better chance of responding to new variants if they can be at least temporarily contained.
723
04/03/2021 12:49:24 0 1
bbc
Like the first and second waves, the virus is carried by travellers.

Kent exported, SA and Bra v1 imported etc.

So foreign mutations are everything to do with travel, and testing and quarantining is here for the medium term at least, as a result, regardless of vaccinations.
92
04/03/2021 10:39:45 69 5
bbc
Its clear that Covid-19 and its various variants are very easily seeded. Trying to prevent and eliminate them is not realistic. So we have to live with them, with updated vaccines to drastically reduce the number of people who get seriously ill and accept a small number will continue to die from Covid-19 just as they do from 'flu.

We can't put life on hold forever.
99
04/03/2021 10:42:28 22 7
bbc
That appears to be the goal they are aiming for
149
04/03/2021 10:56:21 4 11
bbc
Which is all well
And good unless it’s a member of your family
Or friend who dies , that’s not a sacrifice I want to go through
93
Joe
04/03/2021 10:40:37 9 2
bbc
For everything that has gone wrong in the past year it’s good to see something going right for a change.

Of course it will upset the ones who have used the past 12 months as a platform to attention seek though but thankfully they’re only a minority
873
04/03/2021 14:42:20 0 0
bbc
Good and fair comment...
20
04/03/2021 10:22:53 4 16
bbc
As an over 60 im still waiting to hear from my GP for my jab. The roll out is not happening as quickly as the government is leading us to believe!
20
04/03/2021 10:22:53 4 16
bbc
As an over 60 im still waiting to hear from my GP for my jab. The roll out is not happening as quickly as the government is leading us to believe!
25
04/03/2021 10:24:14 19 23
bbc
the UK SURGING FORWARD without the EU shackles...
96
04/03/2021 10:40:53 1 1
bbc
You do realise that we approved this and began the rollout while we were still in the EU
148
04/03/2021 10:55:57 0 2
bbc
He doesn't realise any of that. It's part of being thick as mince.
626
04/03/2021 12:26:20 0 0
bbc
not factually true - but I know where you are coming from
97
04/03/2021 10:40:56 9 9
bbc
Most on HYS will not be scientists, who remain too busy doing the science. The only warning that seems worth repeating: just sometimes a medical advance triggers an adverse response which is only apparent once huge numbers are "crunched" decades later. ( as with thalidomide) . So nations must remain on their guard, and never say the "risk" is a price worth paying because the alternative is worse.
108
04/03/2021 10:45:18 5 0
bbc
Hopefully things have moved on from the 1950's
110
04/03/2021 10:45:29 6 1
bbc
Thalidomide caused an issue because the drug actually sold wasn't the one tested. They made it a different way. That's why it got through trials. It's a mistake that has never and will never be repeated.
150
04/03/2021 10:57:08 5 2
bbc
Its clear that you aren't.

More like one of the AV crowd using the rather tediously obvious 'Selective Alternative Facts' ploy.

1. Thalidomide isn't a vaccine 2. Testing & regulation has moved on massively since then and 3. Its still in use for cancer treatment and skin conditions.
152
04/03/2021 10:58:19 3 0
bbc
Thalidomide is the main reason why the advice to pregant women not have the covid vaccine. Not one person on this planet has had a covid vaccine and given birth 9 months later yet.
89
04/03/2021 10:38:59 14 7
bbc
If you do that you have the bulk of the population breeding new strains
98
04/03/2021 10:41:29 8 2
bbc
Time to move on, find something else to fret about.
115
04/03/2021 10:46:24 8 7
bbc
Time to get back in to reality pal, the worry is real, ignoring it is silly at best.
123
04/03/2021 10:48:53 2 5
bbc
Not at all

I know exactly what will happen

I'm not fretting
92
04/03/2021 10:39:45 69 5
bbc
Its clear that Covid-19 and its various variants are very easily seeded. Trying to prevent and eliminate them is not realistic. So we have to live with them, with updated vaccines to drastically reduce the number of people who get seriously ill and accept a small number will continue to die from Covid-19 just as they do from 'flu.

We can't put life on hold forever.
99
04/03/2021 10:42:28 22 7
bbc
That appears to be the goal they are aiming for
107
04/03/2021 10:44:49 5 1
bbc
May I ask who ‘they’ are ?
551
04/03/2021 12:10:39 1 0
bbc
It's the only realistic goal in practice.
71
04/03/2021 10:36:01 25 31
bbc
Only for those at real risk of it!!!
100
04/03/2021 10:43:16 11 8
bbc
Issue is that you don't necessarily know if you're high risk. It has killed otherwise seemingly healthy people, so it is sensible to get it if you can.
112
04/03/2021 10:45:36 11 10
bbc
It has killed young and healthy people in almost undetectably small amounts. Really it has.