Covid: Fresh air 'key to safer classrooms'
05/03/2021 | news | health | 186
Knowing which windows to open and having shorter lessons could help when children return to school.
1
05/03/2021 11:17:40 7 8
bbc
Just like outside, stay up wind of others. Breezes or drafts, just carry diseases further than this 2 yard distancing concept. Has it really taken some this long to work this out?
4
05/03/2021 11:32:48 10 5
bbc
Breezes disperse the virus making it less likely you will catch it! Not more likely
14
05/03/2021 11:58:46 4 4
bbc
Brilliant! So, how can every student in a classroom be up wind of all the others? You'd need some theoretical 13 dimension mathematics to make that work!

Your comment comes straight from the Michael Gove 'all pupils should be above average' school of thought!
118
05/03/2021 20:15:55 2 1
bbc
Was a case in Hong Kong or China, where in a restaurant which had socially distanced tables and Perspex barriers between, an old fashioned air air-conditioning fan which just blew the air, moved the particulates from one table with an infected person to the another, infecting both of them.
In my estate all fans in lifts which just blow air and don't extract now turned off.
2
05/03/2021 11:28:27 2 1
bbc
https://airborne.cam/

a tool to show how to mitigate effects in indoor environments - and it's free!
3
05/03/2021 11:32:19 26 3
bbc
Fresh air also improves oxygen levels, keeps students awake and aids learning.
21
05/03/2021 12:07:16 29 2
bbc
Strangely, most of us know this and have always had the windows open in classrooms despite the little darlings complaining that they are cold.

And I just told them to put their coats on. I was doing this for years before Covid was a twinkle in the previous virus's eye.

Teachers aren't stupid you know.......... wait for it...........
32
05/03/2021 12:46:08 1 9
bbc
Increases oxygen levels! Ha- are you seriously suggesting that closed windows lead to hypoxia?
1
05/03/2021 11:17:40 7 8
bbc
Just like outside, stay up wind of others. Breezes or drafts, just carry diseases further than this 2 yard distancing concept. Has it really taken some this long to work this out?
4
05/03/2021 11:32:48 10 5
bbc
Breezes disperse the virus making it less likely you will catch it! Not more likely
9
05/03/2021 11:42:38 3 5
bbc
If virus particles are dispersed by ventilating a room, these will be spread more thinly across a greater volume of space within the room, but the amount of virus will be the same. So another person in the room may inhale a smaller amount of virus, but more people in the room will inhale some virus particles, as these will have spread further, and more people may therefore be infected.
149
05/03/2021 23:48:42 1 1
bbc
No if you are up wind, virus and all particles including smell go away from you towards others. It is the long known basic primitive hunting knowledge.

Yes it disburses but away from you. Have a bonfire and stand down wind from it! Disbursed smoke all over you.
5
05/03/2021 11:32:51 19 16
bbc
Hospital staff to get derisory 1% pay rise - no HYS. Opening windows warrants an HYS. Words fail me
10
as
05/03/2021 11:43:31 16 13
bbc
A real shot in the foot by Torys. A lot of people very upset by this, but the Tory run BBC won't allow any comment.
12
05/03/2021 11:55:14 9 7
bbc
I agree. BBC probably cant be bothered to monitor such a hot topic! Government ministers were recommended a greater payrise...yet nurses 1%...stinks. Talking about striking...i hope they do.
13
05/03/2021 11:56:34 6 6
bbc
Yes, but it is another opportunity for the teacher-bashers to get going.

And they already have.

The BBC is just another branch of the DM these days.
38
05/03/2021 12:58:44 11 5
bbc
Nurse and junior doctors have recently had way above inflation pay rises; now their unions are demanding another 12.5%! Where's the money coming from?
55
05/03/2021 14:36:55 8 4
bbc
I wouldn't call an above inflation pay rise derisory.
57
05/03/2021 14:45:42 3 3
bbc
Better air & flow for Children, yes

I've been a lifelong supporter/advocate of the BBC but you are starting to irk me...
HYS should be open for EVERY item likely to inspire debate/comment
You recently took down my comment, I challenged, response - 'taken down in error & now reinstated'...the HYS item had disappeared!!! Very poor

And why no HYS on pathetic attention-seeking spill-all to Oprah W?
59
05/03/2021 14:58:16 7 2
bbc
Nobody in the public sector should be getting a pay rise which includes MPs, we have a massive debt to pay off but after that then yes they do deserve one. Meanwhile those in the private sector are being thrown out of a job.
109
05/03/2021 19:57:54 3 4
bbc
So much for the millions promised to the NHS by Brexit. What happened to it?
116
05/03/2021 20:09:54 1 3
bbc
This government said it wanted to be like Singapore when talking about trade deal after Brexit.
Singapore just announced nurses will get increases of 5-14% & other healthcare staff, e.g. allied health professionals, pharmacists & administrative & ancillary staff 3-7% over 2 years. Also increasing funding for salaries at publicly-funded community care organisations to keep them competitive.
6
05/03/2021 11:35:16 2 3
bbc
Yeah
Most are living on it
8
05/03/2021 11:36:55 1 3
bbc
As in, most can’t afford to breath
7
05/03/2021 11:27:40 10 13
bbc
The victorians could have told you this.

I note that the BBC isn't asking why the teaching profession - it seems universally - want windows open, but also wants to enforce their petty powers on school uniform so are also insisting that coats cannot be worn. Why?

Is the virus attracted to coats? If this virus is really so dangerous, can school uniform rules not be set aside?
18
05/03/2021 12:04:13 16 2
bbc
Would you like to show the proof that this is what 'the teaching profession' (all of us) wants?

Students work and behave better in a uniform (ask the child psychologists why) and if it is cold in a classroom then pupils are allowed to put coats on.

But don't let the truth get in the way of your teacher-bashing, eh?
22
05/03/2021 12:08:02 0 2
bbc
They’re just gearing up the masses for their Monday madness, if there’s a spike it’s because the windows were shut
I agree about the uniform
Gloves, hat, depending on weather, face mask, negative test result
Hazmat suit?
Never ending
23
Dea
05/03/2021 12:09:26 7 2
bbc
I have had my windows open (as far as they go - which isn't far for H&S reasons) since September and I have worn my coat in the classroom a fair amount. I have also allowed any students that i am teaching to wear their coats (over their uniform) if they are cold.
31
05/03/2021 12:37:34 5 1
bbc
As a teacher I'm all for students being told they can wear comfortable layers - fleeces for instance, in the current circumstances.
41
05/03/2021 13:16:17 1 1
bbc
Ooop! Someone got detention as a kid....
60
05/03/2021 14:58:48 3 2
bbc
Baseless comment. Every school in the city where I work adopted a policy that coats could be worn in lessons in cold weather. Genuine facts are such a pain for those who love the look of their own words in print, no matter what garbage they may contain.
97
05/03/2021 19:27:34 0 1
bbc
School uniform has its advantages (avoiding "look at my expensive clothes") but can be taken too far. All this guff about "preparing for the world of work" in the modern era when most offices (even pre-covid) were becoming more relaxed in their dress codes. Plus most German schools don't have uniform and their economy seems to work quite well...
6
05/03/2021 11:35:16 2 3
bbc
Yeah
Most are living on it
8
05/03/2021 11:36:55 1 3
bbc
As in, most can’t afford to breath
30
05/03/2021 12:31:32 1 1
bbc
Nonsense. Let them waste less money and then they'd have more of it left.
4
05/03/2021 11:32:48 10 5
bbc
Breezes disperse the virus making it less likely you will catch it! Not more likely
9
05/03/2021 11:42:38 3 5
bbc
If virus particles are dispersed by ventilating a room, these will be spread more thinly across a greater volume of space within the room, but the amount of virus will be the same. So another person in the room may inhale a smaller amount of virus, but more people in the room will inhale some virus particles, as these will have spread further, and more people may therefore be infected.
16
05/03/2021 12:03:29 4 3
bbc
If someone is breathing out virus in a closed room for an hour then the particles they are emitting will be well spread around the room by convection and diffusion (masked or not), aided by everyone else breathing and any heating system. Opening windows will rapidly deplete/remove the viral load and reduce risk. This is all assuming any asyptomatic pupil is actually emitting any virus at all.
17
05/03/2021 12:04:02 0 4
bbc
Not true! Less virus in air the less likely you are to catch it
5
05/03/2021 11:32:51 19 16
bbc
Hospital staff to get derisory 1% pay rise - no HYS. Opening windows warrants an HYS. Words fail me
10
as
05/03/2021 11:43:31 16 13
bbc
A real shot in the foot by Torys. A lot of people very upset by this, but the Tory run BBC won't allow any comment.
37
05/03/2021 12:54:38 9 6
bbc
More left wing Corbinite rubbish! The BBC in reality are very Left Wing biased!
11
05/03/2021 11:54:23 16 1
bbc
For all the complicated messaging around creating 'Covid secure' environments, one-way systems, etc. the best solution really is as simple as "Open the windows a bit more".
5
05/03/2021 11:32:51 19 16
bbc
Hospital staff to get derisory 1% pay rise - no HYS. Opening windows warrants an HYS. Words fail me
12
05/03/2021 11:55:14 9 7
bbc
I agree. BBC probably cant be bothered to monitor such a hot topic! Government ministers were recommended a greater payrise...yet nurses 1%...stinks. Talking about striking...i hope they do.
5
05/03/2021 11:32:51 19 16
bbc
Hospital staff to get derisory 1% pay rise - no HYS. Opening windows warrants an HYS. Words fail me
13
05/03/2021 11:56:34 6 6
bbc
Yes, but it is another opportunity for the teacher-bashers to get going.

And they already have.

The BBC is just another branch of the DM these days.
1
05/03/2021 11:17:40 7 8
bbc
Just like outside, stay up wind of others. Breezes or drafts, just carry diseases further than this 2 yard distancing concept. Has it really taken some this long to work this out?
14
05/03/2021 11:58:46 4 4
bbc
Brilliant! So, how can every student in a classroom be up wind of all the others? You'd need some theoretical 13 dimension mathematics to make that work!

Your comment comes straight from the Michael Gove 'all pupils should be above average' school of thought!
148
05/03/2021 23:42:14 1 1
bbc
They can't that was the point. Schools should not be open. The very basis of the behaviour, functioning of herd based schooling is a disease risk at all times.
15
05/03/2021 12:00:31 5 3
bbc
There should be more research into portable air filter machines. The HEPA quality ones, some of which have an internal UV light which kills viruses and bacteria, as well as taking out pollen .They cost about £200 each, are very quiet and energy efficient. When windows have to be closed-most of the winter, then they could be very useful. They also indicate how polluted the air is.
9
05/03/2021 11:42:38 3 5
bbc
If virus particles are dispersed by ventilating a room, these will be spread more thinly across a greater volume of space within the room, but the amount of virus will be the same. So another person in the room may inhale a smaller amount of virus, but more people in the room will inhale some virus particles, as these will have spread further, and more people may therefore be infected.
16
05/03/2021 12:03:29 4 3
bbc
If someone is breathing out virus in a closed room for an hour then the particles they are emitting will be well spread around the room by convection and diffusion (masked or not), aided by everyone else breathing and any heating system. Opening windows will rapidly deplete/remove the viral load and reduce risk. This is all assuming any asyptomatic pupil is actually emitting any virus at all.
150
05/03/2021 23:50:49 0 1
bbc
Yes lower risk than sealed up, a very little bit. Still 'suicidal' to be in the room at any risk for no good reason but getting dumped for free childcare.
9
05/03/2021 11:42:38 3 5
bbc
If virus particles are dispersed by ventilating a room, these will be spread more thinly across a greater volume of space within the room, but the amount of virus will be the same. So another person in the room may inhale a smaller amount of virus, but more people in the room will inhale some virus particles, as these will have spread further, and more people may therefore be infected.
17
05/03/2021 12:04:02 0 4
bbc
Not true! Less virus in air the less likely you are to catch it
47
05/03/2021 13:33:27 1 1
bbc
Maccles40 & Brian, virus particles don't just disappear because a window is open. It is more likely that air will be drawn IN (than out) through an open window, but only if air is being drawn out of the room elsewhere (such as into a corridor). Hence any reduction in viral load within the room will simply displace virus into the corridor, potentially then infecting anyone who walks past the door.
48
05/03/2021 13:36:10 1 1
bbc
...also Brian, do we know what the threshold is to guarantee non-infection on inhalation of air containing viral particles? If it is possible to get infected by inhaling air with very little viral load, then diluting the virus in the air doesn't necessarily significantly reduce the risk of infection.
7
05/03/2021 11:27:40 10 13
bbc
The victorians could have told you this.

I note that the BBC isn't asking why the teaching profession - it seems universally - want windows open, but also wants to enforce their petty powers on school uniform so are also insisting that coats cannot be worn. Why?

Is the virus attracted to coats? If this virus is really so dangerous, can school uniform rules not be set aside?
18
05/03/2021 12:04:13 16 2
bbc
Would you like to show the proof that this is what 'the teaching profession' (all of us) wants?

Students work and behave better in a uniform (ask the child psychologists why) and if it is cold in a classroom then pupils are allowed to put coats on.

But don't let the truth get in the way of your teacher-bashing, eh?
34
05/03/2021 12:53:55 2 4
bbc
"Students work and behave better in a uniform"

Unless I bucked the trend, child psychologists are talking a load of cr@p.
19
05/03/2021 12:05:24 25 4
bbc
Open the windows and just ensure children wear more clothes layers.
89
05/03/2021 18:55:26 3 12
bbc
Hard to write with gloves on
20
05/03/2021 12:05:42 43 2
bbc
Circumstantial evidence of airborne spread of Covid-19 was available early on in the pandemic. However, demonstrating differences in transmission rates between differently ventilated environments is difficult and time consuming. Instead we were confidently told there was 'no evidence for airborne transmission' - as a scientist I say absence of evidence is not the same as evidence of absence
24
05/03/2021 12:10:35 6 16
bbc
Lot of research gone into this and most agree it is not Airbourne it is particle bourne rerducing the distance and viability of the virus spread
120
05/03/2021 20:16:32 0 7
bbc
Spot on - we are actually almost wholly unaware of how aerosol spread of viral spores works

This is shocking given we've been aware it might happen for 40 years - the lack of interest in how suggests scientist aren't our saviours at all

Just a bunch of freeloaders taking cash and pretending to deliver stuff

Engineers do all the real problem solving in the world
137
05/03/2021 21:53:17 0 5
bbc
Yup. Millions of people globally are dead. Many many more will die from poverty and from illnesses that would could have been treatable had the virus not interrupted healthcare.

Yet the WHO, who were responsible for spreading the most deadly and irresponsible false information in history, still have their social media accounts.

Mr Icke caused a few cell phone towers to be burned, and was erased.
171
06/03/2021 18:04:18 0 0
bbc
If you go to alston dot com you'll find encouraging news on a repurposed drug that is producing fantastic results in the treatment and even prevention of C-19
177
06/03/2021 19:01:15 0 0
bbc
science we are good at ,common sense gone away a long time ago
3
05/03/2021 11:32:19 26 3
bbc
Fresh air also improves oxygen levels, keeps students awake and aids learning.
21
05/03/2021 12:07:16 29 2
bbc
Strangely, most of us know this and have always had the windows open in classrooms despite the little darlings complaining that they are cold.

And I just told them to put their coats on. I was doing this for years before Covid was a twinkle in the previous virus's eye.

Teachers aren't stupid you know.......... wait for it...........
181
06/03/2021 22:16:10 0 0
bbc
My daughter teaches Reception and has consistently asked parents to equip the children with warm coats, gloves, boots, etc. They have spent lots of time outdoors, even in winter, as they are lucky enough to have a field surrounded by trees. She says most of her curriculum can be covered by activities there, for this yr. Part of they day needs to be indoors for phonics, etc, so all windows open
7
05/03/2021 11:27:40 10 13
bbc
The victorians could have told you this.

I note that the BBC isn't asking why the teaching profession - it seems universally - want windows open, but also wants to enforce their petty powers on school uniform so are also insisting that coats cannot be worn. Why?

Is the virus attracted to coats? If this virus is really so dangerous, can school uniform rules not be set aside?
22
05/03/2021 12:08:02 0 2
bbc
They’re just gearing up the masses for their Monday madness, if there’s a spike it’s because the windows were shut
I agree about the uniform
Gloves, hat, depending on weather, face mask, negative test result
Hazmat suit?
Never ending
7
05/03/2021 11:27:40 10 13
bbc
The victorians could have told you this.

I note that the BBC isn't asking why the teaching profession - it seems universally - want windows open, but also wants to enforce their petty powers on school uniform so are also insisting that coats cannot be worn. Why?

Is the virus attracted to coats? If this virus is really so dangerous, can school uniform rules not be set aside?
23
Dea
05/03/2021 12:09:26 7 2
bbc
I have had my windows open (as far as they go - which isn't far for H&S reasons) since September and I have worn my coat in the classroom a fair amount. I have also allowed any students that i am teaching to wear their coats (over their uniform) if they are cold.
20
05/03/2021 12:05:42 43 2
bbc
Circumstantial evidence of airborne spread of Covid-19 was available early on in the pandemic. However, demonstrating differences in transmission rates between differently ventilated environments is difficult and time consuming. Instead we were confidently told there was 'no evidence for airborne transmission' - as a scientist I say absence of evidence is not the same as evidence of absence
24
05/03/2021 12:10:35 6 16
bbc
Lot of research gone into this and most agree it is not Airbourne it is particle bourne rerducing the distance and viability of the virus spread
40
05/03/2021 13:14:41 10 1
bbc
I mean....I'd go with what a scientist tells me rather than you, Brian.
114
05/03/2021 20:08:38 2 1
bbc
Yes there has, and no it isn't.
This link to the BMJ: the alert was out for this months ago. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m2720
Putting it right costs money, as does distancing. Government does not think community safety is something they should be wasting our hard earned cash on, when they could be stuffing the chumocracy's pockets with it instead.
161
06/03/2021 10:06:04 2 1
bbc
Most people would really struggle to differentiate between airborne and particle borne. I suppose it means droplets or attached to other air borne particles but both ways are through the air rather than by contamination of surfaces or food.
The point was lack of proof does not mean its not true. It just adjusts the probability of truth. Probably.
25
05/03/2021 12:17:16 16 4
bbc
Also excellent for dissipating silently released noxious gases such as dinitrogen fartoxide and carbon dibackside.
26
05/03/2021 12:20:02 5 3
bbc
"We've all sensed when eyelids start drooping in an airless room. "

"General Studies" has a similar effect.
27
05/03/2021 12:20:13 4 7
bbc
Students work and behave better in a uniform (ask the child psychologists why) and if it is cold in a classroom then pupils are allowed to put coats on.

I beg to differ on that. I would have worked better in the past if I felt that I wasn't trussed up like a chicken.(Psychologists don't know everything despite a fancy name).
28
05/03/2021 12:29:41 0 2
bbc
Obviously the word is windows!
29
05/03/2021 12:31:30 25 4
bbc
Next thing will be to open the windows in hospitals ... stuffy smelly places at the best of times.
61
05/03/2021 14:59:37 12 2
bbc
Chance would be a fine thing - most I have worked in have no opening windows just ineffective/poorly functioning air con :-(
8
05/03/2021 11:36:55 1 3
bbc
As in, most can’t afford to breath
30
05/03/2021 12:31:32 1 1
bbc
Nonsense. Let them waste less money and then they'd have more of it left.
7
05/03/2021 11:27:40 10 13
bbc
The victorians could have told you this.

I note that the BBC isn't asking why the teaching profession - it seems universally - want windows open, but also wants to enforce their petty powers on school uniform so are also insisting that coats cannot be worn. Why?

Is the virus attracted to coats? If this virus is really so dangerous, can school uniform rules not be set aside?
31
05/03/2021 12:37:34 5 1
bbc
As a teacher I'm all for students being told they can wear comfortable layers - fleeces for instance, in the current circumstances.
3
05/03/2021 11:32:19 26 3
bbc
Fresh air also improves oxygen levels, keeps students awake and aids learning.
32
05/03/2021 12:46:08 1 9
bbc
Increases oxygen levels! Ha- are you seriously suggesting that closed windows lead to hypoxia?
165
06/03/2021 16:33:27 2 0
bbc
Might not go as far as Hypoxia unless you sealed the room airtight. However, it stands to reason that a room that has closed doors and windows with 30 or more breathing people inside WILL have reduced oxygen and increased carbon dioxide.
33
05/03/2021 12:48:05 2 16
bbc
Now wait for those to bleat about windows being a poor state of repair so not possible to open and pupils too poor to have a coat.
35
05/03/2021 13:01:38 6 1
bbc
Judging by your user name you're likely to remember, as I do, schools with 'temporary' 20 year old prefab classroms. Open or not, the windows let about the same amount of air in. That was far outweighed though by thr draughty roof and the occasional hole in the walls. Ironically, ideal for the current situation. ??
18
05/03/2021 12:04:13 16 2
bbc
Would you like to show the proof that this is what 'the teaching profession' (all of us) wants?

Students work and behave better in a uniform (ask the child psychologists why) and if it is cold in a classroom then pupils are allowed to put coats on.

But don't let the truth get in the way of your teacher-bashing, eh?
34
05/03/2021 12:53:55 2 4
bbc
"Students work and behave better in a uniform"

Unless I bucked the trend, child psychologists are talking a load of cr@p.
42
05/03/2021 13:17:43 2 2
bbc
Let's go with you then Gary, the unqualified expert.
33
05/03/2021 12:48:05 2 16
bbc
Now wait for those to bleat about windows being a poor state of repair so not possible to open and pupils too poor to have a coat.
35
05/03/2021 13:01:38 6 1
bbc
Judging by your user name you're likely to remember, as I do, schools with 'temporary' 20 year old prefab classroms. Open or not, the windows let about the same amount of air in. That was far outweighed though by thr draughty roof and the occasional hole in the walls. Ironically, ideal for the current situation. ??
44
05/03/2021 13:25:21 2 3
bbc
Indeed. With the lavatory in an unheated outbuilding at the far side of the playground. Money was very tight in those days too. Meals out were a rare treat (once or twice a year). As for clothing, it was one item being worn, one being washed and one ready to wear next at best. I don't believe I or anyone else had a "spare" school blazer or more than two pairs of "outside" shoes.
36
05/03/2021 13:02:26 13 2
bbc
Split air conditioners are a problem, they should either be turned off or have UVC lamps in them to kill viruses.
10
as
05/03/2021 11:43:31 16 13
bbc
A real shot in the foot by Torys. A lot of people very upset by this, but the Tory run BBC won't allow any comment.
37
05/03/2021 12:54:38 9 6
bbc
More left wing Corbinite rubbish! The BBC in reality are very Left Wing biased!
53
as
05/03/2021 14:24:49 4 6
bbc
Dear me, utter rubbish spouted again. I'm neither right or left wing adherent, but I can see what is morally wrong or right, and will support whatever particular wing has similar views on an issue by issue basis. Go away troll!
155
06/03/2021 07:50:42 0 1
bbc
when you look at the number of claims about both left and right wing bias you know the BBC must be getting it about right.
5
05/03/2021 11:32:51 19 16
bbc
Hospital staff to get derisory 1% pay rise - no HYS. Opening windows warrants an HYS. Words fail me
38
05/03/2021 12:58:44 11 5
bbc
Nurse and junior doctors have recently had way above inflation pay rises; now their unions are demanding another 12.5%! Where's the money coming from?
156
06/03/2021 07:52:33 0 1
bbc
look at history and you will see it comes from inflation. The only way for all to have a bigger slice of pie is to have a bigger pie. Come to think about it that is also the problem with our food supplies....if we all go plant based we will all need to eat more to get the same level of nutrition.
39
05/03/2021 13:12:51 8 6
bbc
Open windows won't stop the Spreaders next week. Lessons in 'how not to be a thicky' are desparately needed.
I cant believe how thicky you are. Removed
24
05/03/2021 12:10:35 6 16
bbc
Lot of research gone into this and most agree it is not Airbourne it is particle bourne rerducing the distance and viability of the virus spread
40
05/03/2021 13:14:41 10 1
bbc
I mean....I'd go with what a scientist tells me rather than you, Brian.
46
05/03/2021 13:31:47 1 6
bbc
Read up on it yourself! Thats what Scientists are saying
7
05/03/2021 11:27:40 10 13
bbc
The victorians could have told you this.

I note that the BBC isn't asking why the teaching profession - it seems universally - want windows open, but also wants to enforce their petty powers on school uniform so are also insisting that coats cannot be worn. Why?

Is the virus attracted to coats? If this virus is really so dangerous, can school uniform rules not be set aside?
41
05/03/2021 13:16:17 1 1
bbc
Ooop! Someone got detention as a kid....
34
05/03/2021 12:53:55 2 4
bbc
"Students work and behave better in a uniform"

Unless I bucked the trend, child psychologists are talking a load of cr@p.
42
05/03/2021 13:17:43 2 2
bbc
Let's go with you then Gary, the unqualified expert.
39
05/03/2021 13:12:51 8 6
bbc
Open windows won't stop the Spreaders next week. Lessons in 'how not to be a thicky' are desparately needed.
43
bbc
I cant believe how thicky you are. Removed
35
05/03/2021 13:01:38 6 1
bbc
Judging by your user name you're likely to remember, as I do, schools with 'temporary' 20 year old prefab classroms. Open or not, the windows let about the same amount of air in. That was far outweighed though by thr draughty roof and the occasional hole in the walls. Ironically, ideal for the current situation. ??
44
05/03/2021 13:25:21 2 3
bbc
Indeed. With the lavatory in an unheated outbuilding at the far side of the playground. Money was very tight in those days too. Meals out were a rare treat (once or twice a year). As for clothing, it was one item being worn, one being washed and one ready to wear next at best. I don't believe I or anyone else had a "spare" school blazer or more than two pairs of "outside" shoes.
54
05/03/2021 14:34:15 3 2
bbc
School? You were lucky to have a SCHOOL! We used to learn in one room, all hundred and twenty-six of us, no furniture. Half the floor was missing; we were all huddled together in one corner for fear of FALLING!
45
05/03/2021 13:28:44 15 4
bbc
Breaking news for school teachers - fresh air is a good idea
40
05/03/2021 13:14:41 10 1
bbc
I mean....I'd go with what a scientist tells me rather than you, Brian.
46
05/03/2021 13:31:47 1 6
bbc
Read up on it yourself! Thats what Scientists are saying
68
05/03/2021 16:19:54 7 1
bbc
No, they're not. As the OP says it was originally assumed that aerosols were not important but that turned out to be wrong. One of the many errors in the response to covid in the West.
70
05/03/2021 16:26:25 0 3
bbc
Also (and this isn't scientific) but covid is a disease of bats, which hang upside down in caves, so if it was only particles, ie snot, that caused infection, it wouldn't spread between bats as the particles would just drop on the floor.
17
05/03/2021 12:04:02 0 4
bbc
Not true! Less virus in air the less likely you are to catch it
47
05/03/2021 13:33:27 1 1
bbc
Maccles40 & Brian, virus particles don't just disappear because a window is open. It is more likely that air will be drawn IN (than out) through an open window, but only if air is being drawn out of the room elsewhere (such as into a corridor). Hence any reduction in viral load within the room will simply displace virus into the corridor, potentially then infecting anyone who walks past the door.
17
05/03/2021 12:04:02 0 4
bbc
Not true! Less virus in air the less likely you are to catch it
48
05/03/2021 13:36:10 1 1
bbc
...also Brian, do we know what the threshold is to guarantee non-infection on inhalation of air containing viral particles? If it is possible to get infected by inhaling air with very little viral load, then diluting the virus in the air doesn't necessarily significantly reduce the risk of infection.
49
05/03/2021 13:40:10 5 7
bbc
Seems to me arrangements are last-minute, cobbled-together, NOT as per a rigorous protocol of scientific mitigation measures strictly implemented. Maybe safer to keep schools closed until we are prepared.

Epidemiologist says it’s NOT safe for Scottish pupils to go back to school
https://peterdow.wordpress.com/2021/02/21/epidemiologist-says-its-not-safe-for-scottish-pupils-to-go-back-to-school/
50
05/03/2021 13:53:41 8 13
bbc
The World Health Organisation says the Covid 19 death rate is a “wake-up call” to the overweight West. Lets start addressing that and stop penalising children (including mine) who should always have been been in school.
84
05/03/2021 17:46:11 1 1
bbc
A lot of the kids are overweight!
51
05/03/2021 13:54:02 22 6
bbc
Been advocating for years to throw open the windows in Schools; Hospitals; Offices; & Public Buildings!! Alleviates snuffles; sinus problems; headaches; bad building syndrome. Stop recycling air. Campaign to air cut pollution!

We Always sleep with a window open, slightly ajar, or window vents open, even in the depth of winter and it is cold here in Scotland. Just have a good tog double duvet!
71
05/03/2021 16:26:56 9 1
bbc
I totally agree. I suffer from sinus problems. It is a long standing joke amongst my friends that I will start sneezing and leave a restaurant at the end of the night with a red runny nose due to air conditioning! Nobody ever seems to clean vents - if you ever look up at the ceiling you can see dust blowing from the grids. Is one modern invention that I detest. I am a fresh air freak!
78
05/03/2021 17:10:02 2 1
bbc
Yep, I had to stay overnight in hospital and caused a major incident by opening the window next to my bed by half an inch. It was mid summer...
52
05/03/2021 14:22:18 4 3
bbc
Interesting article and comments thereafter.
Everyone contributing, including the author, are welcome to avail themselves of the information contained in this link. Incidentally it's not PC to refer to fresh air from an engineers point of view, now say outside air because fresh it ain't any more!
https://www.fmj.co.uk/besa-says-opening-windows-will-not-protect-schools/
37
05/03/2021 12:54:38 9 6
bbc
More left wing Corbinite rubbish! The BBC in reality are very Left Wing biased!
53
as
05/03/2021 14:24:49 4 6
bbc
Dear me, utter rubbish spouted again. I'm neither right or left wing adherent, but I can see what is morally wrong or right, and will support whatever particular wing has similar views on an issue by issue basis. Go away troll!
44
05/03/2021 13:25:21 2 3
bbc
Indeed. With the lavatory in an unheated outbuilding at the far side of the playground. Money was very tight in those days too. Meals out were a rare treat (once or twice a year). As for clothing, it was one item being worn, one being washed and one ready to wear next at best. I don't believe I or anyone else had a "spare" school blazer or more than two pairs of "outside" shoes.
54
05/03/2021 14:34:15 3 2
bbc
School? You were lucky to have a SCHOOL! We used to learn in one room, all hundred and twenty-six of us, no furniture. Half the floor was missing; we were all huddled together in one corner for fear of FALLING!
64
05/03/2021 15:36:39 1 2
bbc
You had a room, luxury! We really had it tough, we didn't even have one iPhone between the lot of us.
5
05/03/2021 11:32:51 19 16
bbc
Hospital staff to get derisory 1% pay rise - no HYS. Opening windows warrants an HYS. Words fail me
55
05/03/2021 14:36:55 8 4
bbc
I wouldn't call an above inflation pay rise derisory.
56
MAC
05/03/2021 14:43:53 14 2
bbc
What you need are heat exchangers. They allow fresh air in, but do not waste the heat of the stale/warm air that is expelled.
5
05/03/2021 11:32:51 19 16
bbc
Hospital staff to get derisory 1% pay rise - no HYS. Opening windows warrants an HYS. Words fail me
57
05/03/2021 14:45:42 3 3
bbc
Better air & flow for Children, yes

I've been a lifelong supporter/advocate of the BBC but you are starting to irk me...
HYS should be open for EVERY item likely to inspire debate/comment
You recently took down my comment, I challenged, response - 'taken down in error & now reinstated'...the HYS item had disappeared!!! Very poor

And why no HYS on pathetic attention-seeking spill-all to Oprah W?
58
05/03/2021 14:51:37 18 3
bbc
Having worked in an office with air conditioning, and the windows locked shut, I can confidently say this:

Everyone would like to be able to open the windows more.

Recycled air from air conditioners does not cut it - especially when there's a particularly whiffy fart.

Governemnt - want to do something nice for no cost? Simply mandate that office windows must be allowed to open.
83
05/03/2021 17:44:22 4 1
bbc
All windows open.

May need the subtle use of a brick ??
153
06/03/2021 07:42:18 1 1
bbc
I remember working in an office block that had no opening windows. You could sense the increased CO2 levels. Finding it hard to stay focussed in the afternoon the suggestion was 'have a coffee' - all we needed was some oxygen!
166
06/03/2021 16:39:55 0 0
bbc
The same goes for hotel rooms!
5
05/03/2021 11:32:51 19 16
bbc
Hospital staff to get derisory 1% pay rise - no HYS. Opening windows warrants an HYS. Words fail me
59
05/03/2021 14:58:16 7 2
bbc
Nobody in the public sector should be getting a pay rise which includes MPs, we have a massive debt to pay off but after that then yes they do deserve one. Meanwhile those in the private sector are being thrown out of a job.
128
05/03/2021 21:09:27 0 2
bbc
That's a generalisation - some in the private sector are doing very well out of the pandemic, e.g. parcel deliveries, PPE, supermarkets, many more.
7
05/03/2021 11:27:40 10 13
bbc
The victorians could have told you this.

I note that the BBC isn't asking why the teaching profession - it seems universally - want windows open, but also wants to enforce their petty powers on school uniform so are also insisting that coats cannot be worn. Why?

Is the virus attracted to coats? If this virus is really so dangerous, can school uniform rules not be set aside?
60
05/03/2021 14:58:48 3 2
bbc
Baseless comment. Every school in the city where I work adopted a policy that coats could be worn in lessons in cold weather. Genuine facts are such a pain for those who love the look of their own words in print, no matter what garbage they may contain.
29
05/03/2021 12:31:30 25 4
bbc
Next thing will be to open the windows in hospitals ... stuffy smelly places at the best of times.
61
05/03/2021 14:59:37 12 2
bbc
Chance would be a fine thing - most I have worked in have no opening windows just ineffective/poorly functioning air con :-(
62
05/03/2021 15:02:05 29 2
bbc
As soon as the weather allows my classroom will be in the playground. Out door classrooms are a great learning environment any way.
63
05/03/2021 14:46:46 20 7
bbc
Some of my daughter's reaction (sec school teacher) about this: Most schools are run down, out of date, poorly insulated and that classes are, most of the time, at maximum capacity. There were staff members wrapped up in sleeping bags teaching in December as all the windows were open".
Teachers have now had their pay frozen; they have definitely been taken for granted during the past year.
67
05/03/2021 15:54:28 7 52
bbc
Teachers only work part time at the best 39 weeks and have been known to be out the gate at home time before the kids
106
05/03/2021 19:52:58 0 3
bbc
Give them some more holidays to compensate for it.
110
05/03/2021 19:59:11 1 2
bbc
When I was at school, we had a visit from a Tory junior treasury minister, Nigel Lawson(later Chancellor) and he mentioned how the windows were open but the heating was on & it was a waste.
The head teacher then said the heating system was broken and no money in budget to get a new one, due to his government's cut backs. There was money to pay the power bill however allowed by the government.
54
05/03/2021 14:34:15 3 2
bbc
School? You were lucky to have a SCHOOL! We used to learn in one room, all hundred and twenty-six of us, no furniture. Half the floor was missing; we were all huddled together in one corner for fear of FALLING!
64
05/03/2021 15:36:39 1 2
bbc
You had a room, luxury! We really had it tough, we didn't even have one iPhone between the lot of us.
74
05/03/2021 16:31:59 2 1
bbc
Phone? We could only dream of a phone, there were 500 of us in a hole in the ground. With only one toilet in an unreachable hole on the other side of town and the teacher would draw sums in the mud wall.
65
05/03/2021 15:39:15 15 2
bbc
If only we still had all those Victorian schools with high ceilings and built in draughts regardless of windows being open. A wool blazer and fingerless gloves (and a hat in one particular classroom I remember was needed) and no stuffiness at all...
66
05/03/2021 15:51:39 0 3
bbc
Not so healthy if school is situated on one of the many congested arteries in our towns & cities, then it will exacerbate your asthma or give you asthma; once again EU will be fining UK for poor air quality; I would not risk my child's health if the school was situated on marylebone road, north or south circular; anywhere near busy town centres where there is congestion & pollution
94
05/03/2021 19:14:35 0 1
bbc
The EU won't be fining the UK as it's no longer in it. Why do you think you left? I mean, air quality isn't a problem in Eton so who cares?
63
05/03/2021 14:46:46 20 7
bbc
Some of my daughter's reaction (sec school teacher) about this: Most schools are run down, out of date, poorly insulated and that classes are, most of the time, at maximum capacity. There were staff members wrapped up in sleeping bags teaching in December as all the windows were open".
Teachers have now had their pay frozen; they have definitely been taken for granted during the past year.
67
05/03/2021 15:54:28 7 52
bbc
Teachers only work part time at the best 39 weeks and have been known to be out the gate at home time before the kids
73
05/03/2021 16:31:10 12 4
bbc
My wife was a teacher until she retired, so I know teaching is NOT a part time job. Time in front of the pupils is only part of the job. The necessary lesson preparation, marking and admin. take place when the kids have gone. ie in the evenings and in significant chunks of the holidays. Yes, there will always be a few skivvers, as in any job, but most teachers do about a 50-60 hour week.
75
05/03/2021 16:53:47 8 4
bbc
Absolute nonsense. Embarrassing, and grammatically incorrect, cliches being peddled.
85
05/03/2021 17:52:26 8 4
bbc
You're just a wind up merchant. Half the school staff are taking home less pay than many enjoying a furlough holiday.
My mate is a furloughed airline pilot on 2500 a month (furlough) telling his kids that the TAs in their class (working flat out from £1000) a month are lazy.
91
05/03/2021 19:02:41 11 4
bbc
If it’s so easy then why don’t you give it a go??? We have plenty of vacancies in my school and you seem to know it all...
96
05/03/2021 19:26:02 5 3
bbc
Not that old chestnut. When I was teaching (in a primary school) I arrived at school at 8.00 a.m. and rarely left before 6.00p.m. I would spend 3-4 hours every evening marking and preparing for the next day. In the "holidays" I had chance to review the term and tweak my planning for the following term and spent days in school. Hope you work as hard?
103
05/03/2021 19:43:45 0 4
bbc
Based on your assessment it's probably true...I doubt you had a full time education.
123
Dil
05/03/2021 20:25:32 4 2
bbc
It's life affirming to be reminded that the demise of village idiots is merely a myth. You are proof that the tradition is well and truly alive.
140
05/03/2021 22:16:27 2 2
bbc
Many teachers work 8am-6pm in school, and then continue well into the evening marking and preparing. They spend those "holidays" preparing for the next term. Yes, they may get a bit of a respite in the summer. But here's the thing - they're actually only PAID for the term time. So you're right that they're _paid_ as part time workers. But in reality, they work a heck of a lot unpaid.
167
06/03/2021 16:42:07 0 0
bbc
Huge amounts of a teacher's work is done at home during 'holidays', weekends and evenings. You clearly have never worked in a school!
46
05/03/2021 13:31:47 1 6
bbc
Read up on it yourself! Thats what Scientists are saying
68
05/03/2021 16:19:54 7 1
bbc
No, they're not. As the OP says it was originally assumed that aerosols were not important but that turned out to be wrong. One of the many errors in the response to covid in the West.
69
05/03/2021 16:20:20 2 18
bbc
Get the schools, pubs, restaurants, hospitality, shops and business all open. Enough is enough. Lockdowns are a crime.
80
IJB
05/03/2021 17:15:30 7 1
bbc
Stop drivelling on and follow the guidelines, it's not rocket science
95
05/03/2021 19:21:17 1 1
bbc
Great so then the infection will spread and new mutants appear. Just remember no one, no matter what age, is safe and the herd immunity idea never worked. Hope you have a long life.
46
05/03/2021 13:31:47 1 6
bbc
Read up on it yourself! Thats what Scientists are saying
70
05/03/2021 16:26:25 0 3
bbc
Also (and this isn't scientific) but covid is a disease of bats, which hang upside down in caves, so if it was only particles, ie snot, that caused infection, it wouldn't spread between bats as the particles would just drop on the floor.
107
05/03/2021 19:55:18 2 2
bbc
Bats or what ever animal have such pathogens aren't infected by them, or very mildly so & it's when they're passed to other species that it causes more serious effects.
Even happened between peoples from different continents e.g European settlers went to the Americas & passed on viruses & diseases to indigenous peoples, with estimates by places like UCL saying deaths in tens of millions
172
06/03/2021 18:08:21 0 0
bbc
I don't think bats are 'responsible' for Covid-19. It is of course a theory, but another theory is lab escape.
51
05/03/2021 13:54:02 22 6
bbc
Been advocating for years to throw open the windows in Schools; Hospitals; Offices; & Public Buildings!! Alleviates snuffles; sinus problems; headaches; bad building syndrome. Stop recycling air. Campaign to air cut pollution!

We Always sleep with a window open, slightly ajar, or window vents open, even in the depth of winter and it is cold here in Scotland. Just have a good tog double duvet!
71
05/03/2021 16:26:56 9 1
bbc
I totally agree. I suffer from sinus problems. It is a long standing joke amongst my friends that I will start sneezing and leave a restaurant at the end of the night with a red runny nose due to air conditioning! Nobody ever seems to clean vents - if you ever look up at the ceiling you can see dust blowing from the grids. Is one modern invention that I detest. I am a fresh air freak!
72
05/03/2021 16:30:30 13 2
bbc
"five classes of just 30 minutes". Roll on Wednesday when I've got a double period (120 minutes) with year 11 in a small classroom!
113
05/03/2021 20:03:25 4 1
bbc
That made me laugh - so what do you do with a group of 14 year olds for the second half of their lesson??
67
05/03/2021 15:54:28 7 52
bbc
Teachers only work part time at the best 39 weeks and have been known to be out the gate at home time before the kids
73
05/03/2021 16:31:10 12 4
bbc
My wife was a teacher until she retired, so I know teaching is NOT a part time job. Time in front of the pupils is only part of the job. The necessary lesson preparation, marking and admin. take place when the kids have gone. ie in the evenings and in significant chunks of the holidays. Yes, there will always be a few skivvers, as in any job, but most teachers do about a 50-60 hour week.
64
05/03/2021 15:36:39 1 2
bbc
You had a room, luxury! We really had it tough, we didn't even have one iPhone between the lot of us.
74
05/03/2021 16:31:59 2 1
bbc
Phone? We could only dream of a phone, there were 500 of us in a hole in the ground. With only one toilet in an unreachable hole on the other side of town and the teacher would draw sums in the mud wall.
81
05/03/2021 17:28:32 2 1
bbc
A wall, you had it it easy. Try telling the youth of today that and they won't believe you.
67
05/03/2021 15:54:28 7 52
bbc
Teachers only work part time at the best 39 weeks and have been known to be out the gate at home time before the kids
75
05/03/2021 16:53:47 8 4
bbc
Absolute nonsense. Embarrassing, and grammatically incorrect, cliches being peddled.
76
05/03/2021 17:06:20 5 3
bbc
Strewth, this is going to be my challenge next week - getting teachers to open windows... ??
77
05/03/2021 17:05:40 0 22
bbc
Schools have been safe all along and should never have been closed. The Tories wanted to protect the vulnerable but it's not just older people who are vulnerable - kids are too and have been hung out to dry by these odious, dishonest crooks.
79
05/03/2021 17:11:06 7 1
bbc
How do you work out they've been safe all along? They have been a breeding ground for disease. I should know - I'm a tutor.
51
05/03/2021 13:54:02 22 6
bbc
Been advocating for years to throw open the windows in Schools; Hospitals; Offices; & Public Buildings!! Alleviates snuffles; sinus problems; headaches; bad building syndrome. Stop recycling air. Campaign to air cut pollution!

We Always sleep with a window open, slightly ajar, or window vents open, even in the depth of winter and it is cold here in Scotland. Just have a good tog double duvet!
78
05/03/2021 17:10:02 2 1
bbc
Yep, I had to stay overnight in hospital and caused a major incident by opening the window next to my bed by half an inch. It was mid summer...
77
05/03/2021 17:05:40 0 22
bbc
Schools have been safe all along and should never have been closed. The Tories wanted to protect the vulnerable but it's not just older people who are vulnerable - kids are too and have been hung out to dry by these odious, dishonest crooks.
79
05/03/2021 17:11:06 7 1
bbc
How do you work out they've been safe all along? They have been a breeding ground for disease. I should know - I'm a tutor.
93
05/03/2021 19:12:18 0 1
bbc
But not for them. Why should they suffer for you or me?
69
05/03/2021 16:20:20 2 18
bbc
Get the schools, pubs, restaurants, hospitality, shops and business all open. Enough is enough. Lockdowns are a crime.
80
IJB
05/03/2021 17:15:30 7 1
bbc
Stop drivelling on and follow the guidelines, it's not rocket science
82
05/03/2021 17:43:09 0 3
bbc
Nor was the concept of ventilation & social distancing.

Instead the silly demand of mask wearing was decreed. Mask according to the WHO was only a weak defence.
74
05/03/2021 16:31:59 2 1
bbc
Phone? We could only dream of a phone, there were 500 of us in a hole in the ground. With only one toilet in an unreachable hole on the other side of town and the teacher would draw sums in the mud wall.
81
05/03/2021 17:28:32 2 1
bbc
A wall, you had it it easy. Try telling the youth of today that and they won't believe you.
80
IJB
05/03/2021 17:15:30 7 1
bbc
Stop drivelling on and follow the guidelines, it's not rocket science
82
05/03/2021 17:43:09 0 3
bbc
Nor was the concept of ventilation & social distancing.

Instead the silly demand of mask wearing was decreed. Mask according to the WHO was only a weak defence.
58
05/03/2021 14:51:37 18 3
bbc
Having worked in an office with air conditioning, and the windows locked shut, I can confidently say this:

Everyone would like to be able to open the windows more.

Recycled air from air conditioners does not cut it - especially when there's a particularly whiffy fart.

Governemnt - want to do something nice for no cost? Simply mandate that office windows must be allowed to open.
83
05/03/2021 17:44:22 4 1
bbc
All windows open.

May need the subtle use of a brick ??
50
05/03/2021 13:53:41 8 13
bbc
The World Health Organisation says the Covid 19 death rate is a “wake-up call” to the overweight West. Lets start addressing that and stop penalising children (including mine) who should always have been been in school.
84
05/03/2021 17:46:11 1 1
bbc
A lot of the kids are overweight!
67
05/03/2021 15:54:28 7 52
bbc
Teachers only work part time at the best 39 weeks and have been known to be out the gate at home time before the kids
85
05/03/2021 17:52:26 8 4
bbc
You're just a wind up merchant. Half the school staff are taking home less pay than many enjoying a furlough holiday.
My mate is a furloughed airline pilot on 2500 a month (furlough) telling his kids that the TAs in their class (working flat out from £1000) a month are lazy.
86
05/03/2021 18:24:17 10 1
bbc
30 years in Primary education.
Nothing smells worse than an Infant classroom.
The windows will be open.
87
05/03/2021 18:30:04 5 2
bbc
Give all school students and teachers a work fleece. The sort that outdoor industrial work clothing suppliers sell. You even can get them with a company (school) logo. Even at retail they only cost about £12, less in wholesale quantities, and a snip to our gullible government for twice that. This is cheap functional school uniform. Give it to all students and staff without cost.
132
05/03/2021 21:39:44 3 1
bbc
Good recycle & reuse of all those plastic bags we've collected from online deliveries. Trouble is most of them probably are already in landfill...
154
06/03/2021 07:49:03 0 1
bbc
in principle you are right ...but shouldn't be a plastic fleece. We need to remember where the word came from- and return to wool! Reviving wool in fashion makes both fashion and agriculture less harmful to the planet.
88
05/03/2021 18:54:53 0 1
bbc
Perhaps they can have Purified air conditioning like the House of Commons
19
05/03/2021 12:05:24 25 4
bbc
Open the windows and just ensure children wear more clothes layers.
89
05/03/2021 18:55:26 3 12
bbc
Hard to write with gloves on
90
05/03/2021 19:00:23 8 1
bbc
I’m a secondary teacher in NW Leics. (currently worst area in country for Covid) and 3 out of the 4 rooms I teach KS4 classes in don’t have windows to the outside at all!! 2 have windows into internal corridors and one has no windows at all! Many of the other classrooms are the same (~1800 14-18 year olds)
Natural ventilation is great if you can get it - until then I will keep my mask on next week
99
05/03/2021 19:37:27 3 2
bbc
I know the problem well. Most schools are of appalling design anyway. But yet again we have this simplistic idea that opening the windows sorts the problem. So the concerns of teachers are dismissed and life goes on except for some who will rapidly come to the end of theirs!
102
05/03/2021 19:42:26 2 3
bbc
How is it that the rest of the uk gets HSE protection - facemarks, distancing-but schools have a special "plan" that overrules all of that? How is that even legal?According to the ONS in this week's school safety survey, as few as half of schools 'had or could open windows continuousl'y: as few as ten percent 'had mechanical ventilation on continuously'. Your situation really takes the biscuit.
67
05/03/2021 15:54:28 7 52
bbc
Teachers only work part time at the best 39 weeks and have been known to be out the gate at home time before the kids
91
05/03/2021 19:02:41 11 4
bbc
If it’s so easy then why don’t you give it a go??? We have plenty of vacancies in my school and you seem to know it all...
92
05/03/2021 19:04:44 0 1
bbc
No sh*t!
79
05/03/2021 17:11:06 7 1
bbc
How do you work out they've been safe all along? They have been a breeding ground for disease. I should know - I'm a tutor.
93
05/03/2021 19:12:18 0 1
bbc
But not for them. Why should they suffer for you or me?
100
05/03/2021 19:39:38 0 1
bbc
Because nobody should die for the sake of a slightly delayed education.
66
05/03/2021 15:51:39 0 3
bbc
Not so healthy if school is situated on one of the many congested arteries in our towns & cities, then it will exacerbate your asthma or give you asthma; once again EU will be fining UK for poor air quality; I would not risk my child's health if the school was situated on marylebone road, north or south circular; anywhere near busy town centres where there is congestion & pollution
94
05/03/2021 19:14:35 0 1
bbc
The EU won't be fining the UK as it's no longer in it. Why do you think you left? I mean, air quality isn't a problem in Eton so who cares?
101
05/03/2021 19:40:50 0 1
bbc
The U.K. left because the government would rather people die than do the decent thing when it comes to health and safety.
69
05/03/2021 16:20:20 2 18
bbc
Get the schools, pubs, restaurants, hospitality, shops and business all open. Enough is enough. Lockdowns are a crime.
95
05/03/2021 19:21:17 1 1
bbc
Great so then the infection will spread and new mutants appear. Just remember no one, no matter what age, is safe and the herd immunity idea never worked. Hope you have a long life.
67
05/03/2021 15:54:28 7 52
bbc
Teachers only work part time at the best 39 weeks and have been known to be out the gate at home time before the kids
96
05/03/2021 19:26:02 5 3
bbc
Not that old chestnut. When I was teaching (in a primary school) I arrived at school at 8.00 a.m. and rarely left before 6.00p.m. I would spend 3-4 hours every evening marking and preparing for the next day. In the "holidays" I had chance to review the term and tweak my planning for the following term and spent days in school. Hope you work as hard?
7
05/03/2021 11:27:40 10 13
bbc
The victorians could have told you this.

I note that the BBC isn't asking why the teaching profession - it seems universally - want windows open, but also wants to enforce their petty powers on school uniform so are also insisting that coats cannot be worn. Why?

Is the virus attracted to coats? If this virus is really so dangerous, can school uniform rules not be set aside?
97
05/03/2021 19:27:34 0 1
bbc
School uniform has its advantages (avoiding "look at my expensive clothes") but can be taken too far. All this guff about "preparing for the world of work" in the modern era when most offices (even pre-covid) were becoming more relaxed in their dress codes. Plus most German schools don't have uniform and their economy seems to work quite well...
98
05/03/2021 19:30:00 8 1
bbc
I have noted the comments by engineers pointing out correctly that there are flaws in assuming "open the windows" us enough, but realistically in a time of imminent austerity who do those engineers think is going to pay for thousands of schools to get top-quality new ventilation systems? For many it's "open the windows" or nothing, and opening the windows seems to be a better option than nothing.
90
05/03/2021 19:00:23 8 1
bbc
I’m a secondary teacher in NW Leics. (currently worst area in country for Covid) and 3 out of the 4 rooms I teach KS4 classes in don’t have windows to the outside at all!! 2 have windows into internal corridors and one has no windows at all! Many of the other classrooms are the same (~1800 14-18 year olds)
Natural ventilation is great if you can get it - until then I will keep my mask on next week
99
05/03/2021 19:37:27 3 2
bbc
I know the problem well. Most schools are of appalling design anyway. But yet again we have this simplistic idea that opening the windows sorts the problem. So the concerns of teachers are dismissed and life goes on except for some who will rapidly come to the end of theirs!
93
05/03/2021 19:12:18 0 1
bbc
But not for them. Why should they suffer for you or me?
100
05/03/2021 19:39:38 0 1
bbc
Because nobody should die for the sake of a slightly delayed education.