Covid: Teachers' risk 'similar' to other under-65s
01/03/2021 | news | health | 1,313
The study measured infection rates in school staff and pupils in November and December.
1
01/03/2021 14:52:06 347 143
bbc
OOOOh that will upset the unions! :D
56
01/03/2021 15:12:56 244 130
bbc
Wrong answer yet again unions.

All children and students must go back asap. Yes it will increase infections and yes it will increase deaths (but not by much thanks to the success of the vaccine roll out) but this is a calculated risk and is WORTH IT for the future opportunities of 15 million young people.
65
01/03/2021 15:16:03 50 74
bbc
Wow you’ve swallowed the party line. Nice little puppy.
74
01/03/2021 15:18:21 50 69
bbc
LOL- great. Let’s see what they’ll cook up now. Maybe something like “ schools need to be safe ( whatever that means) and until the members are guaranteed ‘ danger money’ we cannot open. ‘Everyone out’. - remember that one! 1979 - outfits like theirs usually end up eating themselves.... they should be ashamed when most other are just cracking on.
83
01/03/2021 15:19:47 79 71
bbc
Unions are there to protect their members.. without their support do you think the safety measures in schools would have been implemented by Johnson and his Govt?
108
01/03/2021 15:23:40 55 43
bbc
Of course it is, their role is to look after the wellbeing of their members and this story goes against a lot of other evidence out there.
497
01/03/2021 16:32:23 6 3
bbc
It wasn't the teachers or their unions that sent kids home.
593
01/03/2021 16:50:59 3 7
bbc
Why the Union? The Unions have been great in supporting folk
598
01/03/2021 16:51:41 5 4
bbc
Because that's the important bit eh. Says more about you than anything else
704
01/03/2021 17:04:56 0 3
bbc
I suspect we’re in agreement on a lot of things - I think schools should reopen and that unions generally take extreme, unreasonable positions - but is this really an appropriate response? Ultimately this is about life or death stuff.
827
01/03/2021 17:36:19 3 3
bbc
That's right, don't miss another opportunity to bash teachers and their unions.
2
01/03/2021 14:52:30 256 132
bbc
Have no time for people that say teaching is an easy job.

I have a daughter who's a teacher and she does not have it easy. Long days and work doesn't stop at the 5pm whistle. You get home, and you mark and prepare for tomorrow.
THIS ARTICLE IS NOT ABOUT WHETHER TEACHING IS EASY OR NOT. GET OFF YOUR SOAP BOX. Removed
17
01/03/2021 15:02:44 72 33
bbc
No one is saying its easy. No key worker job has been easy throughout any of this . The only difference is is that the teachers unions and police unions are jumping up and down. No rhetoric from the fire brigade, transport workers, supermarket workers etcetc. Wait in line like the rest of us for the vaccine please.
28
01/03/2021 15:07:12 48 26
bbc
Stop banging the drum, nobody is saying it’s easy
84
01/03/2021 15:19:52 40 22
bbc
They say it is easy but none of them would do it. They would last about a week!
112
01/03/2021 15:24:17 67 24
bbc
My wife works in wine retail. During lockdown she works 10 hour days 6 days a week to facilitate all the people getting pissed. Which resulted in me doing all the childcare for a 2 and 6 year old, along with everything else associated with that, while still trying to keep my self employed business ticking over. Yes teachers work hard but so do millions of other people without the plaudits..
231
Rob
01/03/2021 15:44:34 11 7
bbc
It goes with the territory, I'm afraid. No teacher complained about this in the past.
261
01/03/2021 15:51:21 35 11
bbc
Nobody says its an easy job. What people take exception to are those who suggest it is somehow more difficult than other jobs. Most people are expected to work beyond their hours. Few people are getting pay rises at the moment. Plenty of people have to sacrifice their rest days and holidays to work overtime. H&s is inadequate everywhere. Stress abounds, life is hard, get on with it.
274
01/03/2021 15:54:00 24 4
bbc
Sounds just like most other prefessional jobs.
340
01/03/2021 16:04:51 10 8
bbc
No one's saying it's easy. People are upset that unions want the schools closed, even though all evidence suggests children can't pass the virus to teachers, who will also be a fair distance from their pupils - at no point as a teacher did I need a pupil to talk directly into my face from under 2m as well, so that issue is easily manageable.
371
01/03/2021 16:11:34 14 7
bbc
There are many many jobs that are not easy with long hours, not just teachers so please stop moaning just get on with it as most people are doing.
402
01/03/2021 16:17:22 7 15
bbc
Yeah no offence but it is pretty easy compared to a lot of jobs.
405
01/03/2021 16:17:36 14 14
bbc
"I have a daughter who's a teacher and she does not have it easy. Long days and work doesn't stop at the 5pm whistle."

Yes no one else works past 5pm, no one works on weekends (for no OT), no one has to travel for work, be separated from their families etc etc

I recognise that teachers work hard but they seem to presume they are the only ones. But the rest of us don't get 12 weeks holiday.
468
01/03/2021 16:26:41 6 4
bbc
And everyone chooses their occupation, I've had over twenty different jobs because when I am unhappy I move to do something else rather than moan about the injustice being served to me.
511
01/03/2021 16:35:51 7 12
bbc
Like most professional jobs.....but they don’t have 12 weeks off a year!
594
01/03/2021 16:51:00 4 12
bbc
5pm whistle? 3pm surely. Let’s not get onto the 14 weeks holiday and the numerous inset and snow days. You can see why people don’t really sympathise. Many I know went into teachers as they thought it would be just like school and did not fancy working for a living.
605
01/03/2021 16:52:46 3 10
bbc
It is an easy job compared to real work
649
01/03/2021 16:57:36 3 8
bbc
And you get 12 weeks holiday!
738
01/03/2021 17:12:19 4 10
bbc
Those that can do those that cannot........ teach.
800
01/03/2021 17:28:35 1 6
bbc
...and get 13 weeks holiday in recognition of this, regardless of how many claim 'much' of this is used in preparation. I'm not claiming it's an easy job, but it's on a par with many.
857
01/03/2021 17:43:41 3 2
bbc
Absolutely, but it suits the critics to bang on about "holidays", pensions, unions, a 9am-to-3pm day etc., etc., instead of the reality.
866
01/03/2021 17:43:37 2 5
bbc
Your daughters telling you lies I’m afraid to inform you.
872
01/03/2021 17:46:15 1 1
bbc
What's the 5pm whistle? Who said teaching was an easy job?
971
01/03/2021 18:14:13 1 0
bbc
Like all jobs, there are some that are good at it, and some that aren’t. Unfortunately, the get lumped together whenever sweeping generalisations are made. Not all teachers work long hours. Not all teachers enjoy their job. Fortunately, not all think the criticism is aimed at them.
01/03/2021 18:22:54 0 5
bbc
So what?Lots of people work hard. I'm sure the 13 weeks of holidays teachers get make up for it. And don't pretend that she works through those aswell. Round here, the kids have 6 weeks off in the summer, but then they have an extra day off for teacher training! Why can't they do that during the 6 weeks! Teachers are the highest paid part time workers in the country.
01/03/2021 18:29:21 1 0
bbc
Unfortunately, many on here are criticising the comment, because others do long hours with hard jobs. However the main criticism of teachers by what I hope is a minority is that they get away with only working during teaching (contact) hours & thus have an easy life, which is manifestly untrue.
Even if true, facing 30 kids with unruly elements for between 40 & 60 mins is draining & demoralising.
02/03/2021 09:47:57 0 0
bbc
In at 9am...car park empty at 3.40pm. Hour for lunch and 2 months off a year.....yeah they haven't got it easy
3
01/03/2021 14:53:12 15 14
bbc
Can I ask why the BBC has stopped linking to actual research articles lately? This data is complex - it's not as clear-cut as the headline suggests, sadly.

Also, one imagines teachers (as with medical staff) are acutely aware of the risks, so more likely to be cautious outside of work too, which will likely skew the data

Has anyone studied rates among parents vs childless adults?
19
01/03/2021 15:03:58 10 6
bbc
No as the results wouldnt fit their agenda.
27
Ed
01/03/2021 15:06:55 1 5
bbc
It is that clear cut. Teachers are not more vulnerable than anyone else. Keep saying they are, doesn't make it true!
4
CEP
01/03/2021 14:53:28 11 9
bbc
This ties up with what I see working in a school
157
01/03/2021 15:31:33 8 3
bbc
You can see the levels of antibody in your colleagues blood? Thats clever. It takes me 8 hours with an ELISA kit to do the same.....
5
01/03/2021 14:53:38 148 77
bbc
All children should be back in school. With the vast majority of vulnerable people now jagged it's time to get back to normality. We can't stay like this forever, the impact on mental and physical health, even before we talk about destroying the economy, is enormous. The debate has been entirely one-sided for too long, if you want to continue to hide, carry on, let the rest of us be free.
7
01/03/2021 14:55:42 55 16
bbc
psssst theres a roadmap
9
01/03/2021 14:58:02 24 17
bbc
We've come through so much, we *are* nearing the end.

That's *if* we take care now to get cases down and keep them there

Do you really want to risk allowing vaccine-defeating variants to appear and spread, rendering the vaccine rollout useless before it's even finished? That really would send us back to square one

I know it's hard, but it really is worth taking it slowly - don't blow it!
158
01/03/2021 15:28:03 7 10
bbc
He/she says no doubt working safely from home...
240
01/03/2021 15:46:34 11 10
bbc
Agreed. Millions of people have had covid and not known they have. Millions of the most vulnerable group, nearly a 3rd of the population, will have been vaccinated by the 8th. The take it slow brigade either have a vested interest in doing so or are not feeling any pain from the restrictions.
305
01/03/2021 15:58:38 5 11
bbc
Teachers and other school and college staff are not being offered vaccines. Many of these have underlying health issues, but are not a priority.
411
01/03/2021 16:18:27 4 6
bbc
I bet you are the one who pitched their tent on a dangerous cliff edge.
487
me
01/03/2021 16:29:47 1 4
bbc
The vast amount of vunerable people have been partially jabbed. Please check your facts
610
01/03/2021 16:53:22 1 2
bbc
Free? Oh dear.............tin foil not working?
742
01/03/2021 17:13:26 2 2
bbc
Well said life's too short to be locked up.
01/03/2021 18:22:27 0 0
bbc
You only want to carry on going to the pub, how responsible you are.
01/03/2021 18:41:10 1 0
bbc
Well if we had locked down properly at the beginning then all the children would be back in School from August.

Unfortunately we opened early to allow everyone to go on their 'essential' summer holidays and then had 'eat out to help out' while the scientists were totally ignored.

You are right the debate is one sided - its all politics and no science.
6
01/03/2021 14:55:20 7 29
bbc
I wonder how reliable this data is. The last time the bbc quoted data about teachers not being at high risk was taken from when they were working from home and the summer holiday.

Hardly proof that schools are not a vector
13
01/03/2021 14:59:36 23 4
bbc
It tells you - November and December, when they were working
30
01/03/2021 15:08:19 2 2
bbc
It also compares them to hospitals and care homes the staff of which have all been offered the vaccine. It should compare to other jobs that are not considered to be frontline.
55
01/03/2021 15:12:14 2 6
bbc
Wonder all you want sonny Jim, but this data represents facts, unlike extreme Left wing Union hearsay and political posturing which has caused chaos with tuition and set back students a year with their incessant "fear mongering."
Well done Unionists, you've damaged students education in the name of "having a go" at the Government.
Unions... Setting the country back since their inception.
5
01/03/2021 14:53:38 148 77
bbc
All children should be back in school. With the vast majority of vulnerable people now jagged it's time to get back to normality. We can't stay like this forever, the impact on mental and physical health, even before we talk about destroying the economy, is enormous. The debate has been entirely one-sided for too long, if you want to continue to hide, carry on, let the rest of us be free.
7
01/03/2021 14:55:42 55 16
bbc
psssst theres a roadmap
298
01/03/2021 15:57:54 8 1
bbc
Yes - and getting the kids back to school is phase 1. If we don't do that then we'll never get to the end of the road.
348
01/03/2021 16:06:41 10 6
bbc
A far too slow roadmap though. 5,455 cases and 104 deaths today. Infections are containing to fall very rapidly and the vaccinations are having an increasingly large effect and will already be reducing the R rate significantly are more and more every day.
2
01/03/2021 14:52:30 256 132
bbc
Have no time for people that say teaching is an easy job.

I have a daughter who's a teacher and she does not have it easy. Long days and work doesn't stop at the 5pm whistle. You get home, and you mark and prepare for tomorrow.
8
bbc
THIS ARTICLE IS NOT ABOUT WHETHER TEACHING IS EASY OR NOT. GET OFF YOUR SOAP BOX. Removed
33
Ian
01/03/2021 15:08:52 17 9
bbc
Stop Shouting!
123
01/03/2021 15:26:41 15 2
bbc
Turn the caps lock off please.
144
RPH
01/03/2021 15:29:41 17 2
bbc
Is your Caps -Lock key stuck, or are you just an unpleasant, shouty person?
5
01/03/2021 14:53:38 148 77
bbc
All children should be back in school. With the vast majority of vulnerable people now jagged it's time to get back to normality. We can't stay like this forever, the impact on mental and physical health, even before we talk about destroying the economy, is enormous. The debate has been entirely one-sided for too long, if you want to continue to hide, carry on, let the rest of us be free.
9
01/03/2021 14:58:02 24 17
bbc
We've come through so much, we *are* nearing the end.

That's *if* we take care now to get cases down and keep them there

Do you really want to risk allowing vaccine-defeating variants to appear and spread, rendering the vaccine rollout useless before it's even finished? That really would send us back to square one

I know it's hard, but it really is worth taking it slowly - don't blow it!
63
01/03/2021 15:15:45 8 20
bbc
Meanwhile, kids are forgetting how to use knives and forks... Yeah, let's go really slow.
354
01/03/2021 16:08:19 3 6
bbc
No, it wouldn't send us back to square one. Firstly, it's very unlikely the vaccine wouldn't at least prevent a significant amount of serious illness in any mutation and a vaccine which targeted the mutation would require only a single booster dose, not two doses.
507
01/03/2021 16:34:58 1 3
bbc
How likely is it that a variant emerges which evades 100% of the protection from a vaccine?
577
01/03/2021 16:48:16 1 4
bbc
We are NOT nearing the end. The idea that the end is in sight is an illusion that has perpetuated since the very start. Just lockdown for 3 weeks, sorry make that 3 months. Test n trace will work and we will be back to normal by September, oh except we need another lockdown, and another, wait till Easter, no sorry just keep going. The new variant narrative will spin out a good while yet...
02/03/2021 07:06:32 0 0
bbc
Well said.
10
01/03/2021 14:58:06 16 32
bbc
If I teach a full day of five classes, with roughly 30 pupils in each, I'm being exposed to upwards of 150 different households on any day of the week, in a crowded room. Yet I haven't been able to see my family outside and have to wait for permission to be given as such.
16
01/03/2021 15:01:42 16 10
bbc
I had to go to the supermarket on Saturday afternoon. I was exposed to over 300 households a lot who think social distancing is no more than 50 people per aisle.

I know where I would rather be for the week
21
01/03/2021 15:05:15 8 3
bbc
So how do you explain the findings of Public Health England, the Office for National Statistics and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine?

I guess we could rely on your 'back of the fag packet' risk-assessment - or we could rely on the actual observations reported by some of the country's leading scientists.
32
01/03/2021 15:08:32 10 5
bbc
I thought teachers were supposed to be clever.

You're not high risk and teaching the nations children is more important than you seeing your family.

Why is it always teachers we keep hearing from? You don't hear from the shelve-fillers or the cleaners in the news every day saying 'me first' and they are genuinely higher risk and haven't been able to stop to catch their breath.
11
01/03/2021 14:54:45 11 27
bbc
If schools are open, I don;t see why the pubs shouldn't be.

And no comments from people that are obviously too young to actually have been in a pub please. Apart from ones students go in, pubs are civilised places where people do not get drunk but socialize quietly.
14
01/03/2021 15:00:24 28 10
bbc
Quite easy, school pupils tend not to be rolling drunk when they leave

The drunken antics of a few last summer spoilt it for us all
15
01/03/2021 15:01:15 8 4
bbc
People can socialise quietly elsewhere somewhere safer.
20
01/03/2021 15:04:22 11 2
bbc
Its a choice pubs or schools at the moment. The risks are probably the same.

But the benefits for parents and kids are far greater.
23
01/03/2021 15:05:59 9 3
bbc
From your own words
"pubs are places where people socialise"
Socialising indoors with people not of your own household is still not allowed.
There is no magic that says you can catch it in your friends house, but not if you share a table with them in a pub.
Having a pint with friends is not as important than children's education
132
01/03/2021 15:28:16 0 3
bbc
If that's not an ironic comment then I think you need to call some professionals.
12
01/03/2021 14:59:05 192 32
bbc
The truth tends to be whatever suits the agenda of whoever is claiming it.
68
01/03/2021 15:16:32 52 7
bbc
I heard so many claims for and against... hopefully the truth will come out when the politics around the issue dies away.
69
01/03/2021 15:16:34 7 1
bbc
It's what they've said for years - lies, damn lies & statistics
89
Bob
01/03/2021 15:21:46 0 2
bbc
Only trouble is this team of people have been consistent throughout the pandemic regardless of the government view on shutting schools.
528
01/03/2021 16:38:00 1 1
bbc
A statement with evidence comes before a statement without it, whether you agree with it or not.
780
01/03/2021 17:20:40 4 1
bbc
Oh look, here's a study that fits my narrative. Let's use that. But we won't use those one's over there...
01/03/2021 19:30:00 0 0
bbc
Sadly that is all to true these days.
6
01/03/2021 14:55:20 7 29
bbc
I wonder how reliable this data is. The last time the bbc quoted data about teachers not being at high risk was taken from when they were working from home and the summer holiday.

Hardly proof that schools are not a vector
13
01/03/2021 14:59:36 23 4
bbc
It tells you - November and December, when they were working
11
01/03/2021 14:54:45 11 27
bbc
If schools are open, I don;t see why the pubs shouldn't be.

And no comments from people that are obviously too young to actually have been in a pub please. Apart from ones students go in, pubs are civilised places where people do not get drunk but socialize quietly.
14
01/03/2021 15:00:24 28 10
bbc
Quite easy, school pupils tend not to be rolling drunk when they leave

The drunken antics of a few last summer spoilt it for us all
44
01/03/2021 15:10:18 6 9
bbc
Rubbish. It has been proven that very few transmissions could be traced back to pubs or people beaches. Penalizing the hospitality industry just to get kids back to school is wrong. What about people's livelihoods? Well?
11
01/03/2021 14:54:45 11 27
bbc
If schools are open, I don;t see why the pubs shouldn't be.

And no comments from people that are obviously too young to actually have been in a pub please. Apart from ones students go in, pubs are civilised places where people do not get drunk but socialize quietly.
15
01/03/2021 15:01:15 8 4
bbc
People can socialise quietly elsewhere somewhere safer.
10
01/03/2021 14:58:06 16 32
bbc
If I teach a full day of five classes, with roughly 30 pupils in each, I'm being exposed to upwards of 150 different households on any day of the week, in a crowded room. Yet I haven't been able to see my family outside and have to wait for permission to be given as such.
16
01/03/2021 15:01:42 16 10
bbc
I had to go to the supermarket on Saturday afternoon. I was exposed to over 300 households a lot who think social distancing is no more than 50 people per aisle.

I know where I would rather be for the week
60
01/03/2021 15:15:01 6 6
bbc
Plenty of teacher vacancies join up. Of course why anyone would want to be teacher with the kind of comments seen here is beyond reason. Still eventually the teacher bashers will have to teach their children when there are no teachers!
76
01/03/2021 15:18:27 2 2
bbc
The people you were exposed to in the supermarkets would be wearing masks though. Primary school children won't be. Would you feel the same if you were in a room with 30 others and none of them wore masks?
02/03/2021 07:18:14 0 0
bbc
I think both your and FreddieAteMyCake's model are slightly simplistic.
2
01/03/2021 14:52:30 256 132
bbc
Have no time for people that say teaching is an easy job.

I have a daughter who's a teacher and she does not have it easy. Long days and work doesn't stop at the 5pm whistle. You get home, and you mark and prepare for tomorrow.
17
01/03/2021 15:02:44 72 33
bbc
No one is saying its easy. No key worker job has been easy throughout any of this . The only difference is is that the teachers unions and police unions are jumping up and down. No rhetoric from the fire brigade, transport workers, supermarket workers etcetc. Wait in line like the rest of us for the vaccine please.
02/03/2021 18:10:30 0 0
bbc
The police do not have a union
They do have a federation though that has absolutely no power to influence anything
18
01/03/2021 15:03:21 11 19
bbc
I wonder what the data would look like if you included all of the cases that were supposedly 'not school-based transmission.' A school near me had over 140 covid cases in an outbreak out of around 260 students. You guessed it, consistently claimed that it was 'community based spread not school based.' Regardless, schools opening fully leads to more infections - proven by the data.
26
01/03/2021 15:06:42 12 2
bbc
Did you read the article?

This was based on antibody testing of a sample of teachers and comaprative other workers, so school based transmission is nothing to do with the data
38
01/03/2021 15:09:33 3 2
bbc
15% of school staff had antibodies, there is no mention of where it was caught from. So slightly lower risk than the general population (18%). But obviously higher than if they work from home.
Infection rates are currently relatively low, and children are all due to be tested before returning.
113
01/03/2021 15:24:17 1 2
bbc
I wasn't questioning the antibody rate amongst teachers and I wasn't referring specifically to teachers who caught the virus. They are trying to use the antibody data to push the idea that schools are safe. It's like putting a whole community on a bus and saying it is safe because the bus driver has the same infection rate as the passengers.
3
01/03/2021 14:53:12 15 14
bbc
Can I ask why the BBC has stopped linking to actual research articles lately? This data is complex - it's not as clear-cut as the headline suggests, sadly.

Also, one imagines teachers (as with medical staff) are acutely aware of the risks, so more likely to be cautious outside of work too, which will likely skew the data

Has anyone studied rates among parents vs childless adults?
19
01/03/2021 15:03:58 10 6
bbc
No as the results wouldnt fit their agenda.
11
01/03/2021 14:54:45 11 27
bbc
If schools are open, I don;t see why the pubs shouldn't be.

And no comments from people that are obviously too young to actually have been in a pub please. Apart from ones students go in, pubs are civilised places where people do not get drunk but socialize quietly.
20
01/03/2021 15:04:22 11 2
bbc
Its a choice pubs or schools at the moment. The risks are probably the same.

But the benefits for parents and kids are far greater.
10
01/03/2021 14:58:06 16 32
bbc
If I teach a full day of five classes, with roughly 30 pupils in each, I'm being exposed to upwards of 150 different households on any day of the week, in a crowded room. Yet I haven't been able to see my family outside and have to wait for permission to be given as such.
21
01/03/2021 15:05:15 8 3
bbc
So how do you explain the findings of Public Health England, the Office for National Statistics and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine?

I guess we could rely on your 'back of the fag packet' risk-assessment - or we could rely on the actual observations reported by some of the country's leading scientists.
64
01/03/2021 15:15:50 2 4
bbc
By some ... What about the others?
22
01/03/2021 15:05:40 15 21
bbc
Whoops, they're not going to like that. Place your bets now for excuse number 583 why they should stay at home for another year (or more)...
39
01/03/2021 15:09:43 13 3
bbc
You do know that teachers are in work at the moment teaching groups of up to 30 children, all the while also being responsible for home learners?
46
01/03/2021 15:10:46 6 1
bbc
Every teacher I know has been in everyday, including some holidays, looking after the key worker kids.

The idea that they're all sat at home is a complee fallacy.
49
01/03/2021 15:10:56 6 1
bbc
What exactly are you on about, teachers have been working every day they have been required to since the first lockdown. Or are you one of those who suggests his next door neighbours, who are teachers have been doing nothing for the last year? Disgusting and uneducated comment.
53
01/03/2021 15:12:01 7 1
bbc
We are not at home. We are at work. Working!! As we have been for the last year including breaks and bank holidays. But, hey, let's not let facts get in the way of a good rant.

PS. Delighted all the kids will be back on Monday.
11
01/03/2021 14:54:45 11 27
bbc
If schools are open, I don;t see why the pubs shouldn't be.

And no comments from people that are obviously too young to actually have been in a pub please. Apart from ones students go in, pubs are civilised places where people do not get drunk but socialize quietly.
23
01/03/2021 15:05:59 9 3
bbc
From your own words
"pubs are places where people socialise"
Socialising indoors with people not of your own household is still not allowed.
There is no magic that says you can catch it in your friends house, but not if you share a table with them in a pub.
Having a pint with friends is not as important than children's education
47
01/03/2021 15:10:47 2 5
bbc
Says you, but not many.
48
01/03/2021 15:08:00 5 5
bbc
Children socialise while they are at school. Far more of them, playing quite physical games, much riskier than pubs.
24
01/03/2021 15:06:20 19 19
bbc
During the summer holidays the infection rate went right down. Then the schools went back and the rate shot up. Now they are off again and the rate is dropping drastically.

I know we have millions vaccinated now but the link does seem more than tenuous.
29
01/03/2021 15:07:43 13 4
bbc
Schools are off, and everywhere else is closed too
50
01/03/2021 15:11:31 6 2
bbc
rates were rising before schools went back, but everyone wanted to ignore it at the time as they were enjoying going out.
around 1/3 a children in schools now as children of key workers
rates did not go down over the christmas holidays.
51
01/03/2021 15:11:56 6 1
bbc
The data does show and has proven that full school opening causes a very significant increase in the rate of transmission, which filters through to the rest of the community very efficiently. They are being careful with what they quote. Schools opening may increase the R rate by several points, but as it increases for lots of other people too, it's easy to claim schools are just as 'safe.'
122
Bob
01/03/2021 15:26:17 0 2
bbc
Actually if you look at it on a local level you will discover that in many regions cases were high in August than in September when they returned.

You will find the opposite in other regions. But those regions saw growth starting prior to schools returning.

In other words as was previously found, school cases reflected the community figures - not the other way round.
25
Dom
01/03/2021 15:06:27 18 34
bbc
Hopefully teachers will now stop whingeing and get back to work.
31
01/03/2021 15:08:25 27 7
bbc
Teachers havent stopped working
The majority have worked through, including being in school teaching
35
01/03/2021 15:09:16 20 3
bbc
We are at work! Shows what you know!
36
01/03/2021 15:09:21 19 4
bbc
They have not stopped working.
37
01/03/2021 15:09:33 19 4
bbc
Teachers have always been at work since the start of the very first, please educate yourself before posting such tripe.
45
01/03/2021 15:10:37 16 4
bbc
We all know who you are.

You were the kid at the back of the class that couldn't behave. The one who used to shout out swear words and blame someone else. The little boy that pushed smaller boys over because it made him feel big. The one who thought anything too tough for him to understand was stupid. The one now working for the kids you tried to bully.

Really, we all know who you are.
18
01/03/2021 15:03:21 11 19
bbc
I wonder what the data would look like if you included all of the cases that were supposedly 'not school-based transmission.' A school near me had over 140 covid cases in an outbreak out of around 260 students. You guessed it, consistently claimed that it was 'community based spread not school based.' Regardless, schools opening fully leads to more infections - proven by the data.
26
01/03/2021 15:06:42 12 2
bbc
Did you read the article?

This was based on antibody testing of a sample of teachers and comaprative other workers, so school based transmission is nothing to do with the data
52
01/03/2021 15:11:59 2 1
bbc
Whilst your point is entirely appropriate, I think it's clear from the contents of the comment you replied to that they didn't read and/or understand the article.
54
01/03/2021 15:12:14 1 2
bbc
So data is irrelevant?
3
01/03/2021 14:53:12 15 14
bbc
Can I ask why the BBC has stopped linking to actual research articles lately? This data is complex - it's not as clear-cut as the headline suggests, sadly.

Also, one imagines teachers (as with medical staff) are acutely aware of the risks, so more likely to be cautious outside of work too, which will likely skew the data

Has anyone studied rates among parents vs childless adults?
27
Ed
01/03/2021 15:06:55 1 5
bbc
It is that clear cut. Teachers are not more vulnerable than anyone else. Keep saying they are, doesn't make it true!
2
01/03/2021 14:52:30 256 132
bbc
Have no time for people that say teaching is an easy job.

I have a daughter who's a teacher and she does not have it easy. Long days and work doesn't stop at the 5pm whistle. You get home, and you mark and prepare for tomorrow.
28
01/03/2021 15:07:12 48 26
bbc
Stop banging the drum, nobody is saying it’s easy
24
01/03/2021 15:06:20 19 19
bbc
During the summer holidays the infection rate went right down. Then the schools went back and the rate shot up. Now they are off again and the rate is dropping drastically.

I know we have millions vaccinated now but the link does seem more than tenuous.
29
01/03/2021 15:07:43 13 4
bbc
Schools are off, and everywhere else is closed too
42
01/03/2021 15:10:18 8 1
bbc
Schools are not 'off'. We are open to Key Worker/Vulnerable kids. Then we teach those at home.
43
01/03/2021 15:10:18 3 2
bbc
Not true. Millions are still going to work.
6
01/03/2021 14:55:20 7 29
bbc
I wonder how reliable this data is. The last time the bbc quoted data about teachers not being at high risk was taken from when they were working from home and the summer holiday.

Hardly proof that schools are not a vector
30
01/03/2021 15:08:19 2 2
bbc
It also compares them to hospitals and care homes the staff of which have all been offered the vaccine. It should compare to other jobs that are not considered to be frontline.
25
Dom
01/03/2021 15:06:27 18 34
bbc
Hopefully teachers will now stop whingeing and get back to work.
31
01/03/2021 15:08:25 27 7
bbc
Teachers havent stopped working
The majority have worked through, including being in school teaching
130
mc
01/03/2021 15:23:02 0 1
bbc
majority means more than minority so try again
10
01/03/2021 14:58:06 16 32
bbc
If I teach a full day of five classes, with roughly 30 pupils in each, I'm being exposed to upwards of 150 different households on any day of the week, in a crowded room. Yet I haven't been able to see my family outside and have to wait for permission to be given as such.
32
01/03/2021 15:08:32 10 5
bbc
I thought teachers were supposed to be clever.

You're not high risk and teaching the nations children is more important than you seeing your family.

Why is it always teachers we keep hearing from? You don't hear from the shelve-fillers or the cleaners in the news every day saying 'me first' and they are genuinely higher risk and haven't been able to stop to catch their breath.
77
01/03/2021 15:18:37 6 5
bbc
So when one is stocking up the baked beans they are surrounded by 30 young ones who have no concept of social distancing? Or do the cleaners clean the classroom when there are 30 children in the room? keep on teacher bashing till no one wants the job. Maybe you had a hard time at school.
THIS ARTICLE IS NOT ABOUT WHETHER TEACHING IS EASY OR NOT. GET OFF YOUR SOAP BOX. Removed
33
Ian
01/03/2021 15:08:52 17 9
bbc
Stop Shouting!
34
01/03/2021 15:09:15 10 12
bbc
Was this research involving the old variant or the new (Kent) variant? Most likely the former as the Kent variant didn't become dominant until December/January.

The worry is that the Kent variant may spread more easily among children. Rates among children were higher than among adults at the point schools closed.
25
Dom
01/03/2021 15:06:27 18 34
bbc
Hopefully teachers will now stop whingeing and get back to work.
35
01/03/2021 15:09:16 20 3
bbc
We are at work! Shows what you know!
25
Dom
01/03/2021 15:06:27 18 34
bbc
Hopefully teachers will now stop whingeing and get back to work.
36
01/03/2021 15:09:21 19 4
bbc
They have not stopped working.
131
mc
01/03/2021 15:23:17 0 1
bbc
??
25
Dom
01/03/2021 15:06:27 18 34
bbc
Hopefully teachers will now stop whingeing and get back to work.
37
01/03/2021 15:09:33 19 4
bbc
Teachers have always been at work since the start of the very first, please educate yourself before posting such tripe.
134
mc
01/03/2021 15:24:28 1 3
bbc
not really my daughter a teacher ben at home since november and many more like that so don't tell porkies to justify the hugh part time salaries you get
18
01/03/2021 15:03:21 11 19
bbc
I wonder what the data would look like if you included all of the cases that were supposedly 'not school-based transmission.' A school near me had over 140 covid cases in an outbreak out of around 260 students. You guessed it, consistently claimed that it was 'community based spread not school based.' Regardless, schools opening fully leads to more infections - proven by the data.
38
01/03/2021 15:09:33 3 2
bbc
15% of school staff had antibodies, there is no mention of where it was caught from. So slightly lower risk than the general population (18%). But obviously higher than if they work from home.
Infection rates are currently relatively low, and children are all due to be tested before returning.
22
01/03/2021 15:05:40 15 21
bbc
Whoops, they're not going to like that. Place your bets now for excuse number 583 why they should stay at home for another year (or more)...
39
01/03/2021 15:09:43 13 3
bbc
You do know that teachers are in work at the moment teaching groups of up to 30 children, all the while also being responsible for home learners?
40
01/03/2021 15:09:45 74 39
bbc
It's not really the teachers getting infected that's the worry with schools.

It's the kids's getting infected then taking it home to the family.

Circumstantial evidence between the impact of lockdowns where schools have shut vs the failed November lockdown where they did not suggests that schools provide a significant vector for transmission.
67
01/03/2021 15:16:21 55 28
bbc
cases dropped significantly in the November lockdown from 25,000 per day to 15,000 per day.
Cases rose by when schools were closed at Christmas from 25,000 to 50,000
But obviously schools are the problem. ?????
Meanwhile cases will be detected due to routine testing that would otherwise be missed.
73
01/03/2021 15:18:19 3 8
bbc
It's more the fact that porters, cleaners, shelf fillers and the like can easily be replaced for a couple of weeks by temp staff.

Due to the nature of the profession and the legal requirement for DBS checks, if 10% (or more) of the staff are off they can't be replaced within a day and the school has to send kids home for 2 weeks whilst staff are self isolating. So kids back to school fails.
96
She
01/03/2021 15:18:50 7 11
bbc
Clearly there are no teachers amongst your loved ones.
117
mc
01/03/2021 15:22:09 6 10
bbc
kids are out everyday mixing-at weekend 20 playing football, get back to school
442
01/03/2021 16:22:10 3 5
bbc
Who cares, life's for living.
726
01/03/2021 17:07:58 1 3
bbc
So if family vulnerable don't send the kids to school resr deserve an education
774
01/03/2021 17:17:58 3 1
bbc
Yep, this is me. I taught all Autumn term, socially distanced, no problems and then caught it at home the day term ended from my own kids, who can only have caught it at... School! So I spent the Christmas holiday in bed and couldn't taste the turkey. Actually I couldn't even taste the Colmans.
41
01/03/2021 15:10:05 47 45
bbc
This is blatant government propaganda. My kids were in schools before Christmas and it was rampant!

Our local numbers were sky high and fell dramatically once schools were closed.
78
01/03/2021 15:18:52 8 9
bbc
This article is really only about teachers risk.

And merely builds on ONS and other data.

To counter demands by Lab and unions that healthy teachers (av age 39 in 2018/9) should be prioritised against general population.

No one can easily deny schools cause community wide spread.

That's why they, despite SAGE estimating higher risk than retail, even hosp etc, govts talk of being prioritised
95
mee
01/03/2021 15:18:41 5 2
bbc
Yep. The 3 local pubs I frequented last summer had zero track and trace cases, yet during the same period the local high school had multiple outbreaks and my niece had to self isolate 3 separate times.
104
Bob
01/03/2021 15:23:10 5 4
bbc
1. This is about teachers, not students.
2. It was rampant in the community in those months, too.

As was shown months ago, school cases reflect the levels existing community, not the other way round.
116
mc
01/03/2021 15:21:34 1 2
bbc
only 1 school then out of 1000's
133
01/03/2021 15:28:22 2 2
bbc
you're saying infections fell over the christmas holidays?
Or did they just fall once everything was closed, not just schools? (in fact schools partially open since January, while cases falling)
201
01/03/2021 15:39:18 2 1
bbc
They were also in School during November when cases fell.
29
01/03/2021 15:07:43 13 4
bbc
Schools are off, and everywhere else is closed too
42
01/03/2021 15:10:18 8 1
bbc
Schools are not 'off'. We are open to Key Worker/Vulnerable kids. Then we teach those at home.
66
01/03/2021 15:16:17 0 6
bbc
Teaching at home ... think you mean set work for kids to go through with help from their parents... whilst I appreciate the effort, please don’t describe as teaching... teaching is when you are interacting with kids during the lesson .. if you are doing this remotely good on you but that’s not our experience
29
01/03/2021 15:07:43 13 4
bbc
Schools are off, and everywhere else is closed too
43
01/03/2021 15:10:18 3 2
bbc
Not true. Millions are still going to work.
14
01/03/2021 15:00:24 28 10
bbc
Quite easy, school pupils tend not to be rolling drunk when they leave

The drunken antics of a few last summer spoilt it for us all
44
01/03/2021 15:10:18 6 9
bbc
Rubbish. It has been proven that very few transmissions could be traced back to pubs or people beaches. Penalizing the hospitality industry just to get kids back to school is wrong. What about people's livelihoods? Well?
71
01/03/2021 15:17:54 3 3
bbc
"What about people's livelihoods? Well?"

By the same token, penalising education just for profits is wrong
What about people's education?
25
Dom
01/03/2021 15:06:27 18 34
bbc
Hopefully teachers will now stop whingeing and get back to work.
45
01/03/2021 15:10:37 16 4
bbc
We all know who you are.

You were the kid at the back of the class that couldn't behave. The one who used to shout out swear words and blame someone else. The little boy that pushed smaller boys over because it made him feel big. The one who thought anything too tough for him to understand was stupid. The one now working for the kids you tried to bully.

Really, we all know who you are.
102
01/03/2021 15:22:59 1 3
bbc
And you seem so much nicer.
22
01/03/2021 15:05:40 15 21
bbc
Whoops, they're not going to like that. Place your bets now for excuse number 583 why they should stay at home for another year (or more)...
46
01/03/2021 15:10:46 6 1
bbc
Every teacher I know has been in everyday, including some holidays, looking after the key worker kids.

The idea that they're all sat at home is a complee fallacy.
23
01/03/2021 15:05:59 9 3
bbc
From your own words
"pubs are places where people socialise"
Socialising indoors with people not of your own household is still not allowed.
There is no magic that says you can catch it in your friends house, but not if you share a table with them in a pub.
Having a pint with friends is not as important than children's education
47
01/03/2021 15:10:47 2 5
bbc
Says you, but not many.
23
01/03/2021 15:05:59 9 3
bbc
From your own words
"pubs are places where people socialise"
Socialising indoors with people not of your own household is still not allowed.
There is no magic that says you can catch it in your friends house, but not if you share a table with them in a pub.
Having a pint with friends is not as important than children's education
48
01/03/2021 15:08:00 5 5
bbc
Children socialise while they are at school. Far more of them, playing quite physical games, much riskier than pubs.
02/03/2021 07:25:33 0 0
bbc
Yes! And who dreamed up allowing *indoor* sports in schools too, right from the go on March 8th? School kids are very likely to be breathing heavily during physical exercise which will spread infection especially at secondary school age. I'm surprised Prof. Whitty would have agreed to it. If all schools must go back, then *outdoor* sports is ample, at least til the end if this term.
22
01/03/2021 15:05:40 15 21
bbc
Whoops, they're not going to like that. Place your bets now for excuse number 583 why they should stay at home for another year (or more)...
49
01/03/2021 15:10:56 6 1
bbc
What exactly are you on about, teachers have been working every day they have been required to since the first lockdown. Or are you one of those who suggests his next door neighbours, who are teachers have been doing nothing for the last year? Disgusting and uneducated comment.
24
01/03/2021 15:06:20 19 19
bbc
During the summer holidays the infection rate went right down. Then the schools went back and the rate shot up. Now they are off again and the rate is dropping drastically.

I know we have millions vaccinated now but the link does seem more than tenuous.
50
01/03/2021 15:11:31 6 2
bbc
rates were rising before schools went back, but everyone wanted to ignore it at the time as they were enjoying going out.
around 1/3 a children in schools now as children of key workers
rates did not go down over the christmas holidays.
24
01/03/2021 15:06:20 19 19
bbc
During the summer holidays the infection rate went right down. Then the schools went back and the rate shot up. Now they are off again and the rate is dropping drastically.

I know we have millions vaccinated now but the link does seem more than tenuous.
51
01/03/2021 15:11:56 6 1
bbc
The data does show and has proven that full school opening causes a very significant increase in the rate of transmission, which filters through to the rest of the community very efficiently. They are being careful with what they quote. Schools opening may increase the R rate by several points, but as it increases for lots of other people too, it's easy to claim schools are just as 'safe.'
26
01/03/2021 15:06:42 12 2
bbc
Did you read the article?

This was based on antibody testing of a sample of teachers and comaprative other workers, so school based transmission is nothing to do with the data
52
01/03/2021 15:11:59 2 1
bbc
Whilst your point is entirely appropriate, I think it's clear from the contents of the comment you replied to that they didn't read and/or understand the article.
22
01/03/2021 15:05:40 15 21
bbc
Whoops, they're not going to like that. Place your bets now for excuse number 583 why they should stay at home for another year (or more)...
53
01/03/2021 15:12:01 7 1
bbc
We are not at home. We are at work. Working!! As we have been for the last year including breaks and bank holidays. But, hey, let's not let facts get in the way of a good rant.

PS. Delighted all the kids will be back on Monday.
26
01/03/2021 15:06:42 12 2
bbc
Did you read the article?

This was based on antibody testing of a sample of teachers and comaprative other workers, so school based transmission is nothing to do with the data
54
01/03/2021 15:12:14 1 2
bbc
So data is irrelevant?
6
01/03/2021 14:55:20 7 29
bbc
I wonder how reliable this data is. The last time the bbc quoted data about teachers not being at high risk was taken from when they were working from home and the summer holiday.

Hardly proof that schools are not a vector
55
01/03/2021 15:12:14 2 6
bbc
Wonder all you want sonny Jim, but this data represents facts, unlike extreme Left wing Union hearsay and political posturing which has caused chaos with tuition and set back students a year with their incessant "fear mongering."
Well done Unionists, you've damaged students education in the name of "having a go" at the Government.
Unions... Setting the country back since their inception.
196
01/03/2021 15:38:21 2 1
bbc
Sonny Jim? A touch insulting. As is your view! I think you'll find it was Williamson who has messed up education or have you forgotten the exams fiasco? Or sending kids back to school for just one day because in the end he had to listen to the scientists?
1
01/03/2021 14:52:06 347 143
bbc
OOOOh that will upset the unions! :D
56
01/03/2021 15:12:56 244 130
bbc
Wrong answer yet again unions.

All children and students must go back asap. Yes it will increase infections and yes it will increase deaths (but not by much thanks to the success of the vaccine roll out) but this is a calculated risk and is WORTH IT for the future opportunities of 15 million young people.
115
01/03/2021 15:24:30 50 29
bbc
It may be worth it for the population as a whole, but will it be worth it for the bereaved families?
119
01/03/2021 15:25:56 15 5
bbc
8.2 million young people actually. This figure is bad enough so dont try over inflating it for effect as you lose all credibility when you do:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/number-of-schools-teachers-and-students-in-england
So people dying is worth it? You heartless Tory b astar d. I hope you catch the virus and suffer. Removed
184
01/03/2021 15:36:56 13 19
bbc
Most definitely not .Not one single extra death is worth that.
344
01/03/2021 16:05:18 7 11
bbc
there's no way all the lost teaching can be made up in the few weeks before Summer. If you really cared about children you should support every pupil (and student) repeating this year. Crocodile tears from Tory duffers will do nothing to help these children.
368
01/03/2021 16:09:39 4 6
bbc
All the evidence and publications state no effect on mortality and that there was no evidence to justify closing schools at all. SAGE or government standing up in a press conference isn't evidence.
377
01/03/2021 16:12:40 9 10
bbc
Try listening to teachers & their unions. Everybody including teachers WANTS children back in school. The complaints are because Govt have done almost nothing to make schools in any way safe despite all the distancing ideas last summer. Reason is Govt want cheap babysitters.
446
01/03/2021 16:22:43 7 5
bbc
The children engaged in distant learning are receiving a very comprehensive education while at home. The Australian Schools of the Air have been working like this since the 1930s.
545
01/03/2021 16:41:20 7 4
bbc
I wonder if you would make such a glib response if it was your life directly on the line?
562
01/03/2021 16:45:51 3 4
bbc
No death is acceptable if it can be avoided. To suggest otherwise is cold and heartless. Human life should not be part of any transaction.
595
01/03/2021 16:51:18 3 4
bbc
No it is not.
602
01/03/2021 16:52:00 2 2
bbc
Yep, glad you are choosing to be the one that dies from Covid for the sake of the kids!
628
01/03/2021 16:55:26 1 2
bbc
Because you know so much....I doubt it.
657
01/03/2021 16:53:51 3 3
bbc
How many people in education have died from C19? Answer, 204 since March. 139 were teachers. Does that seem safe? Source: ONS
849
01/03/2021 17:41:33 1 3
bbc
We could repeat years, we could move the academic year Jan to Jan, we could enhance educational opportunities for all post school leaving age. (beyond the current poor night-school offerings). There's lots we could do to help children without rushing back. It's only three weeks to Easter break.
856
01/03/2021 17:43:16 3 4
bbc
Teachers are simply calling for a phased return so if no increase in infection then more kids go back until all are back in school Why rush it when lives are at stake The MPs arent rushing back to parliament are they ?
867
01/03/2021 17:44:10 2 3
bbc
Are you a teacher?
57
01/03/2021 15:12:58 26 26
bbc
The caveat, "naive" to think teachers going into schools wouldn't have higher risks than those working from home'.

It is a disgrace that teachers & other emergency services workers have to face an elevated risk by going back to work. Schools do need to open but teachers should have been vaccinated. If teachers had wanted to sacrifice lives in their jobs they'd have joined the Armed Forces.
72
01/03/2021 15:18:09 10 15
bbc
Oh what utter tripe.
75
01/03/2021 15:18:25 7 1
bbc
I should add that teachers have actually been at work on rota systems, it just most pupils haven't been in Jan and Feb. They've continued to work at home.
110
mc
01/03/2021 15:21:03 0 8
bbc
how many teachers have died-0
126
01/03/2021 15:27:13 0 6
bbc
Best close the supermarkets then as the shelf stackers are at significantly elevated risk and have not been vaccinated.
They would also be pushed further back in the queue by moving teachers forward. In addition to slowing down the general vaccination rate, by creating a more complicated order of preference.
169
01/03/2021 15:33:53 1 1
bbc
My wife works in food retail and has not lost a day off her customer facing roll since begining of the lock down last March. Daily numbers in her store well excide most school pupil numbers. All the stay at home bregade are quite happy to carry on sitting at home while getting paid. Get over it and get back to work. Thankfuly some teachers have been in to teach the critical workers children.
200
01/03/2021 15:39:07 1 4
bbc
Really, have we become such wimps in this country that everything we do and say has to be 'safe'. Where is our backbone.
02/03/2021 07:36:48 0 0
bbc
Good point, actually.
58
01/03/2021 15:13:05 15 13
bbc
How convenient .....
59
01/03/2021 15:12:49 13 12
bbc
I’m pleased at this news and teachers must now put this worry behind them
109
mc
01/03/2021 15:20:32 5 19
bbc
they be more worried now, they have to get our of bed and go to work although my school not to 11th as they say they are not ready, only had 10 months
16
01/03/2021 15:01:42 16 10
bbc
I had to go to the supermarket on Saturday afternoon. I was exposed to over 300 households a lot who think social distancing is no more than 50 people per aisle.

I know where I would rather be for the week
60
01/03/2021 15:15:01 6 6
bbc
Plenty of teacher vacancies join up. Of course why anyone would want to be teacher with the kind of comments seen here is beyond reason. Still eventually the teacher bashers will have to teach their children when there are no teachers!
61
01/03/2021 15:15:21 62 26
bbc
So if the danger to teachers is about average, it's safe for everywhere to fully open on 8th March, right? Because this works both ways, yeah? Average infections are a-okay?
91
01/03/2021 15:21:59 12 8
bbc
??
94
01/03/2021 15:22:10 8 6
bbc
It is a balance (like everything else in life where there is NO certainty), most people think that the benefit of children receiving an education is "worth" the risk of infection. That does NOT mean that it is safe to have a party with your mates yet, but if we are careful then that too will be safe enough to justify.
62
01/03/2021 15:15:30 63 13
bbc
And here in lies the problem of telling a population, for nearly a year, that going outside is akin to murder. When it comes to saying everything's fine now they can't reassured. That and many are happy to continue like this. Which I find bizarre.
85
01/03/2021 15:19:59 5 8
bbc
So what is better, in or out? Life on Mars?
412
Mup
01/03/2021 16:18:30 7 3
bbc
Too true, project fear is great (until you need to undo it)
451
01/03/2021 16:24:12 8 3
bbc
What's bizarre about it? A huge proportion of predominantly non-essential public sector staff are raking in the cash with reduced outgoings whilst the private sector & young rot away. Of course they want it to continue!
9
01/03/2021 14:58:02 24 17
bbc
We've come through so much, we *are* nearing the end.

That's *if* we take care now to get cases down and keep them there

Do you really want to risk allowing vaccine-defeating variants to appear and spread, rendering the vaccine rollout useless before it's even finished? That really would send us back to square one

I know it's hard, but it really is worth taking it slowly - don't blow it!
63
01/03/2021 15:15:45 8 20
bbc
Meanwhile, kids are forgetting how to use knives and forks... Yeah, let's go really slow.
248
01/03/2021 15:47:51 29 2
bbc
If children are at home more at present then there is even more time for them to be taught to use knives and forks where this should be being taught - at home. If children are forgetting how to use them then this is a poor reflection on their parents, not school teachers or politicians.
691
01/03/2021 17:03:14 7 1
bbc
I seem to remember that I taught my daughter how to use a knife and fork, it’s not on the curriculum you know?
21
01/03/2021 15:05:15 8 3
bbc
So how do you explain the findings of Public Health England, the Office for National Statistics and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine?

I guess we could rely on your 'back of the fag packet' risk-assessment - or we could rely on the actual observations reported by some of the country's leading scientists.
64
01/03/2021 15:15:50 2 4
bbc
By some ... What about the others?
1
01/03/2021 14:52:06 347 143
bbc
OOOOh that will upset the unions! :D
65
01/03/2021 15:16:03 50 74
bbc
Wow you’ve swallowed the party line. Nice little puppy.
97
01/03/2021 15:22:22 8 26
bbc
Shame you can't read sacasm isnt it!
42
01/03/2021 15:10:18 8 1
bbc
Schools are not 'off'. We are open to Key Worker/Vulnerable kids. Then we teach those at home.
66
01/03/2021 15:16:17 0 6
bbc
Teaching at home ... think you mean set work for kids to go through with help from their parents... whilst I appreciate the effort, please don’t describe as teaching... teaching is when you are interacting with kids during the lesson .. if you are doing this remotely good on you but that’s not our experience
40
01/03/2021 15:09:45 74 39
bbc
It's not really the teachers getting infected that's the worry with schools.

It's the kids's getting infected then taking it home to the family.

Circumstantial evidence between the impact of lockdowns where schools have shut vs the failed November lockdown where they did not suggests that schools provide a significant vector for transmission.
67
01/03/2021 15:16:21 55 28
bbc
cases dropped significantly in the November lockdown from 25,000 per day to 15,000 per day.
Cases rose by when schools were closed at Christmas from 25,000 to 50,000
But obviously schools are the problem. ?????
Meanwhile cases will be detected due to routine testing that would otherwise be missed.
952
MJH
01/03/2021 18:08:24 3 0
bbc
That's more like it - some proper made-up statistics!

Cases rose during the November lockdown whilst schools remained fully open. They had fallen during earlier periods when schools were closed. We were told that this was due to the "new strain" - but the same new strain that was around when schools closed in January, and cases plunged.

Irresponsible Christmas behaviour doesn't relate to schools
963
01/03/2021 18:11:40 2 0
bbc
There's a delay between becoming infected and showing symptoms, therefore getting tested. The drop in November coincided with half term. The December increase being from when the kids were in school and the government threatened court action if they closed.
02/03/2021 07:33:34 0 0
bbc
Did they really? And who told you that? Since schools opened in September there has been a steady rise in cases into November, the half-term holiday saw a reduction and then from late November the new Kent variant made cases rocket into late December. Schools in the south east were crying out to be closed because of the damage their infections were doing locally! And the government ignored them...
12
01/03/2021 14:59:05 192 32
bbc
The truth tends to be whatever suits the agenda of whoever is claiming it.
68
01/03/2021 15:16:32 52 7
bbc
I heard so many claims for and against... hopefully the truth will come out when the politics around the issue dies away.
137
TC
01/03/2021 15:29:01 0 2
bbc
When we are rid of the present politicians of all parties. That goes for Westminster and the assembly governments.
12
01/03/2021 14:59:05 192 32
bbc
The truth tends to be whatever suits the agenda of whoever is claiming it.
69
01/03/2021 15:16:34 7 1
bbc
It's what they've said for years - lies, damn lies & statistics
375
01/03/2021 16:12:09 1 5
bbc
Oh, I thought it was "lies, damned lies and Johnson" these days. Did you not get the memo?
70
01/03/2021 15:17:08 3 8
bbc
Oh I see, yet another study "suggests" and " indicates" does it. And there lies the problem, little is definite in anything. Common sense says to me that kids not get the vurus, and should they transmit it (as yet unknown) most teachers and parents are under 35 and while might feel unwell it they catch it, they certainly (not "suggests" ) won't die from it. High time to end this utter bullshit.
81
01/03/2021 15:19:25 3 1
bbc
"Oh I see, yet another study "suggests" and " indicates" does it" - Well, yes, that's how a study works.

Also, you missed a question mark. Perhaps a primary school teacher can help you with that?
88
01/03/2021 15:21:27 3 1
bbc
Most teachers are not under 35. Please check before writing nonsense.
167
JoP
01/03/2021 15:32:52 0 1
bbc
School children are aged 4 to 18 yrs, most parents are not under 35.
44
01/03/2021 15:10:18 6 9
bbc
Rubbish. It has been proven that very few transmissions could be traced back to pubs or people beaches. Penalizing the hospitality industry just to get kids back to school is wrong. What about people's livelihoods? Well?
71
01/03/2021 15:17:54 3 3
bbc
"What about people's livelihoods? Well?"

By the same token, penalising education just for profits is wrong
What about people's education?
57
01/03/2021 15:12:58 26 26
bbc
The caveat, "naive" to think teachers going into schools wouldn't have higher risks than those working from home'.

It is a disgrace that teachers & other emergency services workers have to face an elevated risk by going back to work. Schools do need to open but teachers should have been vaccinated. If teachers had wanted to sacrifice lives in their jobs they'd have joined the Armed Forces.
72
01/03/2021 15:18:09 10 15
bbc
Oh what utter tripe.
93
01/03/2021 15:22:09 4 1
bbc
Makes a change from you swearing. You sound like a Brexiteer. Nothing of consequence to argue so I'll just hurl insult. Retreat to your Magic Roundabout Kennel Dougal.
98
01/03/2021 15:22:36 1 1
bbc
Sounds like a reasoned argument on your behalf.
40
01/03/2021 15:09:45 74 39
bbc
It's not really the teachers getting infected that's the worry with schools.

It's the kids's getting infected then taking it home to the family.

Circumstantial evidence between the impact of lockdowns where schools have shut vs the failed November lockdown where they did not suggests that schools provide a significant vector for transmission.
73
01/03/2021 15:18:19 3 8
bbc
It's more the fact that porters, cleaners, shelf fillers and the like can easily be replaced for a couple of weeks by temp staff.

Due to the nature of the profession and the legal requirement for DBS checks, if 10% (or more) of the staff are off they can't be replaced within a day and the school has to send kids home for 2 weeks whilst staff are self isolating. So kids back to school fails.
1
01/03/2021 14:52:06 347 143
bbc
OOOOh that will upset the unions! :D
74
01/03/2021 15:18:21 50 69
bbc
LOL- great. Let’s see what they’ll cook up now. Maybe something like “ schools need to be safe ( whatever that means) and until the members are guaranteed ‘ danger money’ we cannot open. ‘Everyone out’. - remember that one! 1979 - outfits like theirs usually end up eating themselves.... they should be ashamed when most other are just cracking on.
181
01/03/2021 15:35:50 14 6
bbc
check your childs education, they HAVE been getting lessons. I think you might learn a thing or two if you do their biology lessons.
503
01/03/2021 16:34:22 0 5
bbc
RP9548631 reporting, Sarge! Apologies, I've missed today's HYS outraged online mothers' meeting because I was on duty in school, Sergeant! No danger money, Sarge. Perhaps you've confused us with the D-Day Dodgers, Sarge? 'We landed in Salerno, a holiday with pay!' That was a bunch of old guff, too, Sarge! 1979? Don't remember that one, Sarge! One for the pensioners like you, I think, Sarge! ;-)
57
01/03/2021 15:12:58 26 26
bbc
The caveat, "naive" to think teachers going into schools wouldn't have higher risks than those working from home'.

It is a disgrace that teachers & other emergency services workers have to face an elevated risk by going back to work. Schools do need to open but teachers should have been vaccinated. If teachers had wanted to sacrifice lives in their jobs they'd have joined the Armed Forces.
75
01/03/2021 15:18:25 7 1
bbc
I should add that teachers have actually been at work on rota systems, it just most pupils haven't been in Jan and Feb. They've continued to work at home.
16
01/03/2021 15:01:42 16 10
bbc
I had to go to the supermarket on Saturday afternoon. I was exposed to over 300 households a lot who think social distancing is no more than 50 people per aisle.

I know where I would rather be for the week
76
01/03/2021 15:18:27 2 2
bbc
The people you were exposed to in the supermarkets would be wearing masks though. Primary school children won't be. Would you feel the same if you were in a room with 30 others and none of them wore masks?
32
01/03/2021 15:08:32 10 5
bbc
I thought teachers were supposed to be clever.

You're not high risk and teaching the nations children is more important than you seeing your family.

Why is it always teachers we keep hearing from? You don't hear from the shelve-fillers or the cleaners in the news every day saying 'me first' and they are genuinely higher risk and haven't been able to stop to catch their breath.
77
01/03/2021 15:18:37 6 5
bbc
So when one is stocking up the baked beans they are surrounded by 30 young ones who have no concept of social distancing? Or do the cleaners clean the classroom when there are 30 children in the room? keep on teacher bashing till no one wants the job. Maybe you had a hard time at school.
41
01/03/2021 15:10:05 47 45
bbc
This is blatant government propaganda. My kids were in schools before Christmas and it was rampant!

Our local numbers were sky high and fell dramatically once schools were closed.
78
01/03/2021 15:18:52 8 9
bbc
This article is really only about teachers risk.

And merely builds on ONS and other data.

To counter demands by Lab and unions that healthy teachers (av age 39 in 2018/9) should be prioritised against general population.

No one can easily deny schools cause community wide spread.

That's why they, despite SAGE estimating higher risk than retail, even hosp etc, govts talk of being prioritised
105
01/03/2021 15:23:11 4 5
bbc
But the implication is that schools are safe. It’s very clever PR to reassure parents that it’s ok to send children back. But rates are going to rise significantly when they do, before the priority vaccines have been given. (I think after Easter makes more sense).
79
01/03/2021 15:19:16 239 78
bbc
So if there is no extra risk for teachers why aren’t non-teachers allowed to get together in groups of 30+ in a small room?
125
01/03/2021 15:27:08 182 73
bbc
They are. In hospitals, supermarkets, and other essential settings. I guess it boils down to whether you consider educating our children as essential. I do.
140
01/03/2021 15:29:09 16 15
bbc
Good point
141
01/03/2021 15:29:16 22 26
bbc
There you go bringing logic into it! That will never do. We're supposed to shut up and do whatever Bozo and chums tell us, or else.
145
01/03/2021 15:29:50 20 3
bbc
Where social distancing is almost impossible I might add... Covid regulators forbid it in other roles.
318
01/03/2021 16:00:51 11 19
bbc
Have you been in a school?
The 30 other people in a classroom are children, who have been consistently shown to not spread the virus to adults.
Teachers will display the virus present in their local population, picking it up at shops and the likes, not picking it up from the pupils.
Why is this even up for debate, it's almost like Auntie has an agenda?
325
01/03/2021 16:01:46 5 5
bbc
do you have 30 teachers in each classroom??
430
01/03/2021 16:20:21 6 1
bbc
In my daughters school the whole school is tested twice a week. Staff have been tested twice weekly since nov. The school operates in a one way system within bubbles. 2m distancing and wipedowns at the start of every lesson. The rules are adhered to by everyone.

General public cant be trusted to adhere to simple rules such as not driving to beauty spots or gathering in groups.
544
01/03/2021 16:41:16 0 1
bbc
Because they wouldn't be able to agree who goes in first!
694
01/03/2021 17:03:28 0 2
bbc
Hope you are not responsible for the educat6of our children having posted such an unbelievable statement
736
01/03/2021 17:11:28 1 1
bbc
30 children in a small room, doing something essential, and all being tested routinely.
might be allowed
30 untested adults just out for a good time - not so much.
863
01/03/2021 17:45:08 0 2
bbc
Dumb question. Read up.
883
01/03/2021 17:49:42 0 1
bbc
Because children catch and spread covid and far lower rates than adults. That's been established for a long time now.
906
01/03/2021 17:55:27 0 0
bbc
Because it is the interaction with young children.

Jeepers read the article and use your noggin.
989
01/03/2021 18:18:47 0 4
bbc
Except that you know perfectly well the teachers will not be in small rooms with 30 other people. The schools will be opening with social distancing and much smaller classroom groups. Stop scaremongering. Get the teachers back to work like millions of other people already are.
01/03/2021 18:58:37 0 0
bbc
They are. Many other essential and non essential workers are 'bubbled' and working with limited number of the same colleagues in shops and offices
Sadly he same professions dont have the luxury of being able to limit the 'outsiders' they come into contact with, ie general public
PJD
01/03/2021 19:14:19 0 0
bbc
Very true, like politicians for example. Of course children are naturally immune, don't mix at playtime and don't have revolting habits. Not. Having seen 1 kid share his lollipop with 5 other kids it turns my stomach to think they "can't catch it".
02/03/2021 22:37:48 0 0
bbc
teachers are not allowed to get together of groups of 30.

you are making stuff up.
80
01/03/2021 15:19:22 10 12
bbc
"Experts described the results as very reassuring". Which experts? what results? My Auntie Fanny on her Ouija board?

FAKE NEWS

FAKE NEWS

FAKE NEWS

FAKE NEWS
70
01/03/2021 15:17:08 3 8
bbc
Oh I see, yet another study "suggests" and " indicates" does it. And there lies the problem, little is definite in anything. Common sense says to me that kids not get the vurus, and should they transmit it (as yet unknown) most teachers and parents are under 35 and while might feel unwell it they catch it, they certainly (not "suggests" ) won't die from it. High time to end this utter bullshit.
81
01/03/2021 15:19:25 3 1
bbc
"Oh I see, yet another study "suggests" and " indicates" does it" - Well, yes, that's how a study works.

Also, you missed a question mark. Perhaps a primary school teacher can help you with that?
82
01/03/2021 15:19:36 13 14
bbc
Maybe show this to the disgraceful union leaders ... who are using pandemic as a political weapon...
136
01/03/2021 15:28:44 0 2
bbc
Union Leaders may be misled/mistaken, & they do have a propensity to get their retaliation in first...in seeking to protect & defend their membership proactively - but 'disgraceful'? I don't think so - and using the pandemic as a political weapon? Even Union Leaders know such a weapon has boomerang tendencies
I'd have more sympathy with your assertion if it wasn't for some disgraceful companies
163
01/03/2021 15:32:35 0 1
bbc
Which union leaders? Maybe the leaders of; the 1922 committee, the ERG, the CRG and the NRG.
1
01/03/2021 14:52:06 347 143
bbc
OOOOh that will upset the unions! :D
83
01/03/2021 15:19:47 79 71
bbc
Unions are there to protect their members.. without their support do you think the safety measures in schools would have been implemented by Johnson and his Govt?
114
01/03/2021 15:24:19 77 33
bbc
The unions had next to nothing to do with the safety measures
Most were down to the individual heads

In my wife's school the unions have done nothing but try to close schools for a year - against the wishes of their members
351
01/03/2021 16:07:24 9 5
bbc
A decade as a teacher, obiedently going on strike when voted for, whether I voted for or against. In that time I never saw any unions help any teachers over any misdoing by pupils or senior management (look up TKAT's record on poor behaviour towards staff).
491
01/03/2021 16:30:02 1 6
bbc
YES - of course they would. What utter nonsense
627
01/03/2021 16:55:15 2 1
bbc
Yes......
731
01/03/2021 17:09:44 1 6
bbc
Unions exist primarily to stunt progress
766
01/03/2021 17:17:37 2 4
bbc
So why didn't the unions give practical help by providing their members with twice weekley testing like nhs and care workers have. Also provide with masks and screens
2
01/03/2021 14:52:30 256 132
bbc
Have no time for people that say teaching is an easy job.

I have a daughter who's a teacher and she does not have it easy. Long days and work doesn't stop at the 5pm whistle. You get home, and you mark and prepare for tomorrow.
84
01/03/2021 15:19:52 40 22
bbc
They say it is easy but none of them would do it. They would last about a week!
408
01/03/2021 16:18:23 5 14
bbc
Wouldn't do it because I can get paid 5x as much working harder. If I wanted an easier life I could teach kids. That's OK for those who choose that life. I wouldn't.
62
01/03/2021 15:15:30 63 13
bbc
And here in lies the problem of telling a population, for nearly a year, that going outside is akin to murder. When it comes to saying everything's fine now they can't reassured. That and many are happy to continue like this. Which I find bizarre.
85
01/03/2021 15:19:59 5 8
bbc
So what is better, in or out? Life on Mars?
86
01/03/2021 15:20:03 39 12
bbc
So ... on the one hand ... why close them ?

On the other hand ... 10+ million people all leaving home at the same time, on the same day (Monday 8th March) to go to a very large number of indoor venues across the whole country ... now, I'm no rocket scientist ... but both hands can't be wrong, surely !!!
219
01/03/2021 15:42:29 17 2
bbc
Both true.

Like many things re Covid, not a simple binary choice.

Schools closed as cases much higher in Jan, data showed pupils spreading to homes.

Govt now using up headroom created by vaccines and lower gen case rates and predict less NHS beds and deaths.

Schools are not zero risk,
one of SAGEs higher impacts (R+0.2-0.5, sec 0.35+, pubs,retail 0.1-0.2 etc) just govts view higher priority.
87
01/03/2021 15:20:24 32 23
bbc
Sorry, don’t believe it. The rises in rates around the time schools went back can’t be coincidence. From people I know so many years pupils were at home self isolating last term the schools were never really open anyway. This is actually all about politics, and the gov have backed themselves so far into a corner, and now can’t be seen to not open schools.
106
01/03/2021 15:23:14 11 13
bbc
Pupils self isolating at home, how many went on to catch covid or pass to their family?
Very few. The fact so many were self isolating at home is proof the systems in place to prevent transmission within schools were robust.
Unlike children going to the park to meet their friends instead, where there is no regulation.
146
01/03/2021 15:29:54 1 1
bbc
They are not saying that schools don't increase transmission, because they do and this has been shown in the national data quite clearly. What they are doing is saying that when schools are open, teachers are as likely to catch it as other people in the community. Given that the virus won't stay within the school walls but will propagate out to everywhere else, this is hardly a surprise.
147
01/03/2021 15:30:06 2 1
bbc
Read the article -nothing to do with kids levels, or them infecting parents etc impacting wider society.

It is purely about teachers and staff, to counter calls for vacc priority by Lab and unions.

Data backs up ONS data that shows schools actually safer than gen popn and by inference millions of other key workers.

Retail, factory, food prep etc all score far higher than schools in ONS data.
70
01/03/2021 15:17:08 3 8
bbc
Oh I see, yet another study "suggests" and " indicates" does it. And there lies the problem, little is definite in anything. Common sense says to me that kids not get the vurus, and should they transmit it (as yet unknown) most teachers and parents are under 35 and while might feel unwell it they catch it, they certainly (not "suggests" ) won't die from it. High time to end this utter bullshit.
88
01/03/2021 15:21:27 3 1
bbc
Most teachers are not under 35. Please check before writing nonsense.
12
01/03/2021 14:59:05 192 32
bbc
The truth tends to be whatever suits the agenda of whoever is claiming it.
89
Bob
01/03/2021 15:21:46 0 2
bbc
Only trouble is this team of people have been consistent throughout the pandemic regardless of the government view on shutting schools.
90
01/03/2021 15:21:52 10 15
bbc
Good news. Now can the NUTs shut up and get on with their job and educate our children.
120
01/03/2021 15:25:58 2 2
bbc
The NUT doesn't exist anymore. I suggest you become informed about EVERYTHING before you make statements ignorant of the facts.
124
01/03/2021 15:27:03 1 1
bbc
NUT disolved in 2017
151
01/03/2021 15:30:20 0 1
bbc
There is no such organisation as the NUT. But, that should not spoil your rant.
61
01/03/2021 15:15:21 62 26
bbc
So if the danger to teachers is about average, it's safe for everywhere to fully open on 8th March, right? Because this works both ways, yeah? Average infections are a-okay?
91
01/03/2021 15:21:59 12 8
bbc
??
92
01/03/2021 15:22:00 4 3
bbc
"experts" i thought we were all still learning, but now we have covid experts!!! wow well done lets see the certificates.
72
01/03/2021 15:18:09 10 15
bbc
Oh what utter tripe.
93
01/03/2021 15:22:09 4 1
bbc
Makes a change from you swearing. You sound like a Brexiteer. Nothing of consequence to argue so I'll just hurl insult. Retreat to your Magic Roundabout Kennel Dougal.
02/03/2021 07:38:38 0 0
bbc
You're absolutely right; he does sound like a Brexiteer!
61
01/03/2021 15:15:21 62 26
bbc
So if the danger to teachers is about average, it's safe for everywhere to fully open on 8th March, right? Because this works both ways, yeah? Average infections are a-okay?
94
01/03/2021 15:22:10 8 6
bbc
It is a balance (like everything else in life where there is NO certainty), most people think that the benefit of children receiving an education is "worth" the risk of infection. That does NOT mean that it is safe to have a party with your mates yet, but if we are careful then that too will be safe enough to justify.
152
01/03/2021 15:30:42 11 5
bbc
Isn't that you putting your mates above teachers despite the data? You and your mates still don't want to risk it, but are prepared for teachers and their families to?
41
01/03/2021 15:10:05 47 45
bbc
This is blatant government propaganda. My kids were in schools before Christmas and it was rampant!

Our local numbers were sky high and fell dramatically once schools were closed.
95
mee
01/03/2021 15:18:41 5 2
bbc
Yep. The 3 local pubs I frequented last summer had zero track and trace cases, yet during the same period the local high school had multiple outbreaks and my niece had to self isolate 3 separate times.
40
01/03/2021 15:09:45 74 39
bbc
It's not really the teachers getting infected that's the worry with schools.

It's the kids's getting infected then taking it home to the family.

Circumstantial evidence between the impact of lockdowns where schools have shut vs the failed November lockdown where they did not suggests that schools provide a significant vector for transmission.
96
She
01/03/2021 15:18:50 7 11
bbc
Clearly there are no teachers amongst your loved ones.
65
01/03/2021 15:16:03 50 74
bbc
Wow you’ve swallowed the party line. Nice little puppy.
97
01/03/2021 15:22:22 8 26
bbc
Shame you can't read sacasm isnt it!
155
01/03/2021 15:31:17 17 5
bbc
No one can as tone is impossible to sense from text
228
01/03/2021 15:43:58 7 7
bbc
Shame you can't spell it.
72
01/03/2021 15:18:09 10 15
bbc
Oh what utter tripe.
98
01/03/2021 15:22:36 1 1
bbc
Sounds like a reasoned argument on your behalf.
99
01/03/2021 15:22:38 9 9
bbc
As before, pure message management from number ten, spouting their preferences in the hope we'll believe them. Yeah sure, like we believe Boris the liar, come on.
100
01/03/2021 15:22:52 1 3
bbc
such utter lies - like you tell children get to bed or a monster will eat you - get up there is no such thing - they think we are all moronic