Budget 2021: PM has 'no doubt' about strong jobs recovery
01/03/2021 | news | politics | 553
Boris Johnson's comments come as Tory MPs lobby the Chancellor to cut rates for business in the budget
1
01/03/2021 10:42:01 22 10
bbc
There is no need for Business Rates. Just charge businesses for the services they use.
118
01/03/2021 12:53:36 11 6
bbc
Fiddling with business rates or taxing online companies will not change the fundamentals.

We need to find the new future for high streets, not waste money trying to resucitate that which is now dead.
119
01/03/2021 12:56:27 2 1
bbc
So how do you fill the taxation gap your policy would produce ?
Perhaps we tax everyone more for working ... or tax people more for travel ?
259
01/03/2021 15:21:35 2 0
bbc
How would this work?
Call the police / fire brigade - they get billed upfront - no payment, no service.
Streelighting, have never outside each business?
Street cleaning, charged per metre.
The list goes on, it would be an admin nightmare.
301
01/03/2021 16:43:19 2 0
bbc
So why not do that for domestic properties too? Oh I forgot, LAs provide services beyond the pockets of residents.
2
01/03/2021 10:48:07 49 27
bbc
TAX THE INTERNET COMPANIES WHO ARE CLOSING DOWN OUR HIGH STREET - NOT US.

WHAT IS SO DIFFICULT ABOUT THIS?
5
01/03/2021 10:53:34 53 37
bbc
Nope. Why should I subsidise your lifestyle choices? You want a High Street, you pay for it. And no need to shout.
10
01/03/2021 10:58:34 10 4
bbc
We are taxed! We pay have to charge VAT on the goods, VAT on the postage and VAT on the packaging!
14
Bob
01/03/2021 11:11:57 14 9
bbc
If people wanted the high street they'd shop there.

They don't, though.

It is also eco-friendly to shop online. And people seem up for econess at the moment.
141
01/03/2021 13:06:15 6 3
bbc
high street is out of date. people prefer retail parks and shopping malls with free car parks
173
01/03/2021 13:58:02 6 4
bbc
Internet Companies are already taxed. They pay;

1) Business Rates on their warehouses & server farms (& have not benefited from a 12 month holiday like retail premises).
2) Employer NI contributions,
3) VAT,
4) Vehicle Excise & Fuel duty on their delivery vans,
5) Insurance Premium Tax for Vans & property etc.
6) Corporation tax

& their employees pay Ni & income tax
177
01/03/2021 14:01:10 6 3
bbc
WRITING IN CAPITALS MAKES YOUR POINT NO MORE EFFECTIVE!
236
01/03/2021 14:51:10 0 3
bbc
WHICH BUNCH OF THE SUPER RICH DO YOU WANT RIPPING YOU OFF!!
265
01/03/2021 15:24:26 1 0
bbc
Your CAPS lock is stuck.
392
01/03/2021 22:25:51 0 0
bbc
WHY THE BLOCK CAPITALS?
3
01/03/2021 10:52:42 84 26
bbc
While i sympathise with the high street workers the pandemic has just speeded up an already apparent decline in bricks and mortar retail.

Is it the best use of public funds to prop up an out of date model?
28
01/03/2021 11:19:57 30 14
bbc
The successive lockdowns have proven the necessity of internet shopping - and the overheads relating to High St. stores reduce their profitability due the choice of the vendor to operate from High St. premises.

I don't agree that propping up a less than sustainable form of shopping is a necessity.
48
01/03/2021 11:38:06 9 3
bbc
The High St myth is burst in my home town. Charity shops, nail bars, tattoo parlours and the night time economy are all that’s left.

I never venture into town anymore. It’s not relevant, pleasant or easy to park. 20 years ago I went in weekly.
66
01/03/2021 11:53:53 6 2
bbc
Good point.

But it's one that is lost on many in central and local government.

My local council blew £80 million on a new shopping centre. It opened 4 or 5 years ago but is still largely empty.

Meanwhile local council tax payers are having to foot the bill for the interest on the mortgage and the council pleads poverty - deciding to knock down the local college and sell the land for housing.
105
nog
01/03/2021 12:42:33 9 3
bbc
Not at all. Supporting local business and therefore local people is absolutely essential for a cultured society to thrive. Of course we can all survive on brands but is rather who We want to be? I’d much rather buy good quality products from a specialist rather than a monopoly.
140
01/03/2021 13:06:04 4 3
bbc
high street is out of date. people prefer retail parks and shopping malls with free car parks
189
01/03/2021 14:07:02 4 3
bbc
Yeah!
While you at scrap car manufacture, restaurants, building sites, schools, hospitals, pubs, sports. Have a missed something?
All this models are so pre-Covid.
290
01/03/2021 16:16:35 1 0
bbc
In the short term to help better cope with a transition, yes. On an ongoing basis, no. These are unprecedented times, it's too soon to assume current attitudes (triggered by Covid) are the new normal.
348
01/03/2021 19:12:04 0 2
bbc
We are going to need a government that is prepared to do what the Labour Party did after WW2. The debt then dwarfed today's debt, and borrowing is much cheaper today; in fact, BoE interest rates are negative.

Labour rebuilt the economy with a spending policy that rebuilt the infrastructure, including a million new council houses. In 1956 MacMillan said we had never had it so good.
467
02/03/2021 09:44:17 0 0
bbc
Yes.
High Streets provide jobs, build communities, challenge the multinationals.
And support our local authorities, though business rates of 50% of notional rents seem punitive.
4
01/03/2021 10:52:59 9 12
bbc
Shadow Chancellor going to blame 'Tory mismanagement of the economy' - really! Most right-minded people just thank god we hadn't suffered Labour rule for the 10 years before the pandemic as we definitely wouldn't have had the money to pay for it then!
9
01/03/2021 10:57:43 8 6
bbc
Most people ignore Dodds, she is not a patch on Rishi.
21
01/03/2021 11:16:51 1 2
bbc
Spot on.

For those who haven't grasped it, it's a bit like putting some money away each month so when something bad happens (say, the boiler packs up) you're not in the brown stuff ... just on a larger scale.
2
01/03/2021 10:48:07 49 27
bbc
TAX THE INTERNET COMPANIES WHO ARE CLOSING DOWN OUR HIGH STREET - NOT US.

WHAT IS SO DIFFICULT ABOUT THIS?
5
01/03/2021 10:53:34 53 37
bbc
Nope. Why should I subsidise your lifestyle choices? You want a High Street, you pay for it. And no need to shout.
100
01/03/2021 12:25:28 7 4
bbc
What has that got to do with it?!

These internet companies don't pay tax, instead use "transfer practices" via Dublin and Luxembourg. It costs us between GBP10Bn and GBP25Bn in lost tax revenue each year.

The government needs to close this loophole and then charge them corporation tax.

Get it now? Probably not.
295
01/03/2021 16:33:49 0 0
bbc
We already subsidise lifestyle choices, why is this particular one so irksome to you?
6
01/03/2021 10:55:38 21 6
bbc
quite obvious that a sales tax - no matter what format is the way forward. So internet, market, shop etc
12
Bob
01/03/2021 11:08:36 39 3
bbc
You've just described VAT.
22
01/03/2021 11:17:01 15 2
bbc
.... it's already in place - it's called VAT.
135
CSE
01/03/2021 13:18:01 5 3
bbc
"Common Sense" is advocating a sales tax that the company pays - it is not VAT. VAT is paid by you, the consumer, not the company itself. The company simply pays it over to the taxman on your behalf. Example of VAT - you pay 120, company keeps 100 & pays 20 over to the taxman. Example of sales tax - you pay 120, company keeps 95; pays your VAT of 20 plus their own 5 for sales tax.
7
01/03/2021 11:02:05 6 7
bbc
JudgeJ

"Most right-minded people just thank god we hadn't suffered Labour rule for the 10 years before the pandemic as we definitely wouldn't have had the money to pay for it then!"

Ehhh.... we DON'T have any money to pay for it, and have record levels of public borrowing at the moment: 100% of GDP, compared to 60% or less in countries like Germany, the Netherlands, Scandinavian countries...
107
01/03/2021 12:44:35 0 1
bbc
Neither side honest with voters re tax and services.

The left trot out the disproven tax the rich and borrow.

The right cut taxes and borrow. Since 2010 PA inc by c6000 (6475 to 12500), 'saving' millions £1200.

The debt now grows under both, Cons used to cut.

UK cannot borrow for ever, debt £2.1Tn>GDP, credit rating down.

Interest on debt - even before Covid, £48 bn, c 8% of tax income 2018.
8
01/03/2021 10:57:10 9 6
bbc
High streets are finished. I no longer have much reason, apart from an occasional bit of banking, and the library, to visit my local town. Oh, and I might go to the veg stall ass I walk past on the way. As shops close choice diminishes, so I end up shopping online anyway to get what I need. I say knock the shops down and convert them to residential.
136
01/03/2021 13:18:56 2 2
bbc
The housing occupants will work where?
4
01/03/2021 10:52:59 9 12
bbc
Shadow Chancellor going to blame 'Tory mismanagement of the economy' - really! Most right-minded people just thank god we hadn't suffered Labour rule for the 10 years before the pandemic as we definitely wouldn't have had the money to pay for it then!
9
01/03/2021 10:57:43 8 6
bbc
Most people ignore Dodds, she is not a patch on Rishi.
2
01/03/2021 10:48:07 49 27
bbc
TAX THE INTERNET COMPANIES WHO ARE CLOSING DOWN OUR HIGH STREET - NOT US.

WHAT IS SO DIFFICULT ABOUT THIS?
10
01/03/2021 10:58:34 10 4
bbc
We are taxed! We pay have to charge VAT on the goods, VAT on the postage and VAT on the packaging!
412
02/03/2021 05:25:32 0 0
bbc
You don't have to charge your customers VAT you could afford to pay the VAT out of you own pocket.
11
01/03/2021 11:04:20 10 3
bbc
Business rates are no longer fit for purpose in the 21st century.

A whole new system needs to be found for this and for council tax.
6
01/03/2021 10:55:38 21 6
bbc
quite obvious that a sales tax - no matter what format is the way forward. So internet, market, shop etc
12
Bob
01/03/2021 11:08:36 39 3
bbc
You've just described VAT.
13
01/03/2021 11:09:39 24 5
bbc
There decline of the highstreets is far more complicated than business rates. I think we need to except the decline and look at how we can repurpose these places.
391
01/03/2021 22:25:09 3 1
bbc
Accept not except
2
01/03/2021 10:48:07 49 27
bbc
TAX THE INTERNET COMPANIES WHO ARE CLOSING DOWN OUR HIGH STREET - NOT US.

WHAT IS SO DIFFICULT ABOUT THIS?
14
Bob
01/03/2021 11:11:57 14 9
bbc
If people wanted the high street they'd shop there.

They don't, though.

It is also eco-friendly to shop online. And people seem up for econess at the moment.
73
01/03/2021 11:59:37 12 10
bbc
Bob, bob bob, you think millions of white vans delivering 1 parcel per house hold is eco friendly....
15
01/03/2021 11:13:27 6 3
bbc
LOCAL COUNCILS WILL KILL OFF THE HIGH STREET BY INCREASING PARKING CHARGES AND BUSINESS RATES, MORE CHARITY SHOPS ARE COMMING.
Watch VAT INCLUDE FOOD that was vat free now included.
16
01/03/2021 11:13:43 61 8
bbc
So who should pay taxes? Why is evereyone insisting that different parts of the economy shouldn't pay tax. It's the usual rich get richer the poor pay the tax
27
01/03/2021 11:19:20 52 20
bbc
Suggest you compare UK tax income with other nations.

Basic rate taxes make up a lower percentage of total taxation income than in many European nations.

France tried to milk the rich, they left in droves, policy reversed, some returned tax take recovered.

Labour tried the same, money went offshore.

Cons cut rates, overall take went up.

If we want public services we will all have to pay
85
01/03/2021 12:05:27 12 3
bbc
Who should pay taxes? It's an interesting one - but the answer invariably comes down to basically "someone else"
17
01/03/2021 11:15:12 1 3
bbc
Look to the USA - High Streets gone, convenient shopping at great Malls with ample free parking. However big stores gone for good. Successive HMG’s just burn our money in every area - let business just prosper where they can sell.
37
Bob
01/03/2021 11:29:58 3 1
bbc
I suggest you do some reading on the decline of the mall. The American mall is dying too.
95
01/03/2021 12:18:51 0 1
bbc
America is littered with dead or dying malls and many dead or dying town centres too like in Detroit and other ghost cities - where only the poor remain.

In some cases decades old malls were replaced with new ones, just few miles down the road, as system made it cheaper for retailers and developers to build new.

Many big mall key store chains gone, leave others hollowed out, just like UK.
18
01/03/2021 11:15:39 10 3
bbc
why do we have a tax on gas, electric , face masks, ppe, insurance costs for car, house ,pet and life.
26
01/03/2021 11:19:20 3 12
bbc
It's a 'Ransom Tax'. Pay whether you can afford it or not.

Ditch VAT.

It would save businness a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in property.
Re-employ the VAT people to HMRC to -
Recoup the loss on revamped and fairer Income and other taxes.
We don't need it as it is no longer a EU imposition.
Simples?
49
01/03/2021 11:39:05 2 1
bbc
In order to keep the true tax hidden from many, by taking it in dribs and drabs.

These taxes all go to the same place, and add up.

Vat was originally called the "luxury tax" but is taken on essentials.

If chancellor needs more cash, suspect will see a further hit on private pensions, leaving state untouched.

Time to end salary sacrifice tax and NI minimising schemes, and other tax loopholes.
19
01/03/2021 11:15:47 34 17
bbc
I wish people would stop regarding the "High Street" as some kind of sacred cow which must be preserved at all costs. If people don't want to shop there, that's their choice. For those businesses who offer a service or product which is in demand - good luck to you, you'll survive. The "High Street" has been dying since the 1960's. Time to put it out of it's misery
79
01/03/2021 12:03:58 40 5
bbc
I remember as a child going shopping with my parents, we used to go to different towns round us every week. They had one or two big chains, but mostly they were small independents, and inevitably had a large market that was always worth a look around. Now, high streets are all too often generic, having the same shops and markets have all but gone to the wall. Where is the draw for people to visit?
548
02/03/2021 18:12:19 0 0
bbc
It is the car that has put the high street out of business. Women started working so they had limited time to shop. My mum shopped almost every day. Households in the late '60's and early '70's started doing the "big weekly" shop often getting up early on the weekend to stock up for the coming week. And, of course they wanted the supermarket with "everything" and free parking.
20
01/03/2021 11:16:43 2 5
bbc
'Wonderif' the UK ditched VAT would stimulate economy not only on the high street but commerce as well?

It would save businness a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in property.
Re-employ the VAT people to HMRC to -
Recoup the loss on revamped and fairer Income and other taxes.
We don't need it as it is no longer a EU imposition.
Simples?
29
01/03/2021 11:21:36 0 4
bbc
Down voters please add to the constructive conversation please.
35
Bob
01/03/2021 11:29:00 3 1
bbc
It represents over a fifth of the tax take.

Where are you going to recover that? As a consumption tax is it one of the fairer taxes. You buy more, you pay more. Recover it from anything else like income tax or a tax on the company and everyone pays.
46
01/03/2021 11:37:00 1 1
bbc
It's one potential solution - or ditch all business rates and keep VAT, but with a proportion paid by the seller.
47
01/03/2021 11:37:23 2 1
bbc
You’d need a serious revamp of income tax because VAT makes those pay tax that otherwise avoid it. As long as they live in the UK they have to pay VAT.
4
01/03/2021 10:52:59 9 12
bbc
Shadow Chancellor going to blame 'Tory mismanagement of the economy' - really! Most right-minded people just thank god we hadn't suffered Labour rule for the 10 years before the pandemic as we definitely wouldn't have had the money to pay for it then!
21
01/03/2021 11:16:51 1 2
bbc
Spot on.

For those who haven't grasped it, it's a bit like putting some money away each month so when something bad happens (say, the boiler packs up) you're not in the brown stuff ... just on a larger scale.
6
01/03/2021 10:55:38 21 6
bbc
quite obvious that a sales tax - no matter what format is the way forward. So internet, market, shop etc
22
01/03/2021 11:17:01 15 2
bbc
.... it's already in place - it's called VAT.
23
01/03/2021 11:17:58 53 13
bbc
Local councils could help by removing parking charges.

80 p per half hour parking at my local town.

No wonder out of town malls and online stores are more popular.
72
01/03/2021 11:58:49 27 6
bbc
What we need are revitalised town centres, where people want to go. That aren't half boarded up. That are full of things to see and do. What's the point of cheap parking if there is little or nothing there for people to go for?
87
01/03/2021 12:06:58 4 4
bbc
Councils are sinking under salary and pension debt.

The bad ones boosting latter for many years by inc. service yrs under redundancy to cut the former - like Lab Glasgow boosting many 10%+.

Their Central Grant's have been cut, and so other income streams come on line.

Taxation needs simplified.

Local and central.

Cut reliefs and avoidance, boost tax and NI by ending salary sacrifice etc.
293
01/03/2021 16:30:36 3 0
bbc
Do that and they'll have to raise revenue some other way. Waiving charges for residents might help but administering will cost money & doubtless there will be fraud to deal with too.

Ultimately we need to rethink what we need and make sure we fund that, then consider if there is anything else we'd pay more to have them do for us. It would focus minds if we were all conscious contributors.
315
01/03/2021 17:20:58 1 2
bbc
Its not the 80p (which is cheap), it is when you get stung with a PCN because you are 5 mins over or your car is 2 foot into next bay (because the other cars were as well). Had a couple in my city and now I go to city centre (only the Intu part) once or twice a year and park in private parking
360
01/03/2021 19:40:43 2 1
bbc
LOL... this old red herring and untruth. Council parking charges are to prevent illegal parking and to keep traffic flowing. Most car parks are in fact operated by private companies.
24
01/03/2021 11:18:37 3 2
bbc
High streets are too big, and the collapse of Debenhams has exposed this. It's fine for shops to close on the peripheries, where commercial and residential properties are side by side. But empty department stores mean less choice, less reason to go into town. They are also an eyesore, further diminishing high streets' appeal.

Condense the high street - to 1/2 - even 1/3 of its current size.
42
01/03/2021 11:33:59 1 2
bbc
Maybe there’s an opportunity here. To make more city Centre housing available. Using surplus trading premises for housing could make attractive use of otherwise derelict premises while increasing demand for remaining businesses. Housing close to city centers is, after all, quite expensive, suggesting there is demand.
74
01/03/2021 12:00:38 1 1
bbc
whos going to pay for that total major multi millions restructure , you and the other upvoters. your obviously not bricks and morter retailers or construction and town planners
149
01/03/2021 13:29:16 0 1
bbc
This is not just about 'High Streets'.
ALL retail businesses are affected whatever there location.
Expand your town-centric view.
25
01/03/2021 11:18:59 4 2
bbc
buisness rates before the HUMONGOUS RISE OF THE INTERNET and cheaper per square mtr retail parks with FREE parking to get joe public off the high st and AWAY from town and city centres was in line with the dynamics of trad retail, WELL THAT AINT THE CASE NOW and most non essential buisnesses are hung out to dry . TIME TO STICK BUISNESS RATES on the internet traders as a trading license TAX .
18
01/03/2021 11:15:39 10 3
bbc
why do we have a tax on gas, electric , face masks, ppe, insurance costs for car, house ,pet and life.
26
01/03/2021 11:19:20 3 12
bbc
It's a 'Ransom Tax'. Pay whether you can afford it or not.

Ditch VAT.

It would save businness a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in property.
Re-employ the VAT people to HMRC to -
Recoup the loss on revamped and fairer Income and other taxes.
We don't need it as it is no longer a EU imposition.
Simples?
34
01/03/2021 11:28:41 1 5
bbc
spot on
332
01/03/2021 18:29:28 0 0
bbc
Agree to ditching VAT on essentials, but up it on non-essential/luxury items.
16
01/03/2021 11:13:43 61 8
bbc
So who should pay taxes? Why is evereyone insisting that different parts of the economy shouldn't pay tax. It's the usual rich get richer the poor pay the tax
27
01/03/2021 11:19:20 52 20
bbc
Suggest you compare UK tax income with other nations.

Basic rate taxes make up a lower percentage of total taxation income than in many European nations.

France tried to milk the rich, they left in droves, policy reversed, some returned tax take recovered.

Labour tried the same, money went offshore.

Cons cut rates, overall take went up.

If we want public services we will all have to pay
125
01/03/2021 13:08:18 7 3
bbc
Agree all should pay, the problem is the inequity in rate of pay and lack of crafty beancounters working for a large proportion of the population.
231
01/03/2021 14:50:31 8 1
bbc
EXCEPT THE RICH WHO HAVE ALL THEIR MONEY OFF SHORE !!
264
01/03/2021 15:20:34 7 1
bbc
We also have higher indirect taxes than many other countries. Duty on fuel, booze and fags is really high compared with say France. Also our NHS is free to use, in may other countries payments have to be made towards treatment, on top of whatever has already come out of tax.
356
01/03/2021 19:35:36 4 3
bbc
Fake news alert!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The wealthy have never left en masse from any country because of taxes.

Most of their wealth is tied into the economy via tangible assets. They can run, but they can't hide away from the fact that they need their country. Governments' can if they wish to make life very difficult for the rich, but the will is not there because of the gravy train.
3
01/03/2021 10:52:42 84 26
bbc
While i sympathise with the high street workers the pandemic has just speeded up an already apparent decline in bricks and mortar retail.

Is it the best use of public funds to prop up an out of date model?
28
01/03/2021 11:19:57 30 14
bbc
The successive lockdowns have proven the necessity of internet shopping - and the overheads relating to High St. stores reduce their profitability due the choice of the vendor to operate from High St. premises.

I don't agree that propping up a less than sustainable form of shopping is a necessity.
183
01/03/2021 14:03:42 8 3
bbc
The point you have made is valid, however I for one would be sad to see the end of the high street because when I need to buy cloths or shoe's I prefer to try them on. I have bought cloths on line in the past and they did not fit. The same with shoes, I have had to send all the item back, whereas trying an item on first before you buy is a much better way.
239
01/03/2021 14:53:36 9 1
bbc
Internet shopping and cashless society is lockdown by stealth, be carful what you wish for!
306
Pip
01/03/2021 17:00:03 0 1
bbc
Has anyone noticed just how much delivery charges have increased on there online sales, just saying..............?
20
01/03/2021 11:16:43 2 5
bbc
'Wonderif' the UK ditched VAT would stimulate economy not only on the high street but commerce as well?

It would save businness a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in property.
Re-employ the VAT people to HMRC to -
Recoup the loss on revamped and fairer Income and other taxes.
We don't need it as it is no longer a EU imposition.
Simples?
29
01/03/2021 11:21:36 0 4
bbc
Down voters please add to the constructive conversation please.
78
01/03/2021 12:03:51 0 1
bbc
I think VAT is one of fairer taxes, the more you spend the more you pay. Another answer would be reduce it to 15% for basic items and increase it to 30% for luxury ones. The problem would be, where do you draw the line?
30
01/03/2021 11:22:29 3 2
bbc
Let's face it the city model is finished.

Need to invest in our villages and towns.
33
01/03/2021 11:24:04 1 6
bbc
City centres are doi g better than town centres...
31
01/03/2021 11:21:18 17 8
bbc
Poor Rishi.

Less money coming in from all his usual sources.

More demand from Covid and Brexit hit businesses and people needing support.

And he has to pretend he knows how we'll pay it off!
40
01/03/2021 11:32:24 28 25
bbc
It's taken a global pandemic to arrive at this situation. A Labour government would have had us in this mess well before Covid.
553
02/03/2021 18:27:13 0 0
bbc
Atlee had a worse problem post WW2.
32
Bob
01/03/2021 11:26:01 28 5
bbc
The decline of the high street began long before the the average Joe was starting to shop online.

The truth is it never recovered from the financial crash. That's what killed the likes of Woolworths and other outlets have been bumbling along ever since.
77
01/03/2021 12:02:33 36 4
bbc
The truth is it never recovered from the supermarkets replacing Jones the Butcher and Hodges the Grocer
134
01/03/2021 13:17:51 8 1
bbc
And since the dash by councils for edge of town 'malls'.
Impossible to access if you don't have a vehicle and no public transport route either
428
02/03/2021 08:32:42 2 0
bbc
A shift to out-of-town supermarkets nailed the high street in 70s/80s. Then the chains moved in and found that property, not retailing, was profitable. When property prices collapsed, they had no memory of how to do retail well.. Some form of online tax is coming, but it was the supermarkets and retail groups (i.e. Arcadia) that killed the high street, well before the internet was invented :D
30
01/03/2021 11:22:29 3 2
bbc
Let's face it the city model is finished.

Need to invest in our villages and towns.
33
01/03/2021 11:24:04 1 6
bbc
City centres are doi g better than town centres...
43
01/03/2021 11:34:55 2 1
bbc
Trouble is that town and district centres were trying to emulate the city centres - by attracting the big high street names. That was never going to be sustainable.

Town and district centres have a much brighter outlook as people recognise the value of shopping locally and using local independent traders. The high street names will retreat to online and a few strategic sites.
26
01/03/2021 11:19:20 3 12
bbc
It's a 'Ransom Tax'. Pay whether you can afford it or not.

Ditch VAT.

It would save businness a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in property.
Re-employ the VAT people to HMRC to -
Recoup the loss on revamped and fairer Income and other taxes.
We don't need it as it is no longer a EU imposition.
Simples?
34
01/03/2021 11:28:41 1 5
bbc
spot on
20
01/03/2021 11:16:43 2 5
bbc
'Wonderif' the UK ditched VAT would stimulate economy not only on the high street but commerce as well?

It would save businness a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in property.
Re-employ the VAT people to HMRC to -
Recoup the loss on revamped and fairer Income and other taxes.
We don't need it as it is no longer a EU imposition.
Simples?
35
Bob
01/03/2021 11:29:00 3 1
bbc
It represents over a fifth of the tax take.

Where are you going to recover that? As a consumption tax is it one of the fairer taxes. You buy more, you pay more. Recover it from anything else like income tax or a tax on the company and everyone pays.
57
01/03/2021 11:43:15 0 2
bbc
Recoup the loss on revamped and fairer Income, CGT and other taxes.
36
01/03/2021 11:29:38 3 1
bbc
Rate cuts would be a good start, but more needs to be done to level the playing field between city centers and out of town centers, as well as between physical and internet shopping. This should include fair taxation and improved accessibility (for all).
39
01/03/2021 11:31:09 2 1
bbc
Trouble is that everyone has a different definition of what constitutes 'fair'.
17
01/03/2021 11:15:12 1 3
bbc
Look to the USA - High Streets gone, convenient shopping at great Malls with ample free parking. However big stores gone for good. Successive HMG’s just burn our money in every area - let business just prosper where they can sell.
37
Bob
01/03/2021 11:29:58 3 1
bbc
I suggest you do some reading on the decline of the mall. The American mall is dying too.
38
01/03/2021 11:30:15 6 4
bbc
The tories could always take control of High St rates instead of lambasting local authorities. Could. But won't.
146
01/03/2021 13:25:15 2 1
bbc
Oh dear. There is something called the Rateable Valuation Panel/body/ organisation which is an arms length Government body.
Contrary to the thinking of many, local government (Councils) do NOT set Business Rates.
36
01/03/2021 11:29:38 3 1
bbc
Rate cuts would be a good start, but more needs to be done to level the playing field between city centers and out of town centers, as well as between physical and internet shopping. This should include fair taxation and improved accessibility (for all).
39
01/03/2021 11:31:09 2 1
bbc
Trouble is that everyone has a different definition of what constitutes 'fair'.
31
01/03/2021 11:21:18 17 8
bbc
Poor Rishi.

Less money coming in from all his usual sources.

More demand from Covid and Brexit hit businesses and people needing support.

And he has to pretend he knows how we'll pay it off!
40
01/03/2021 11:32:24 28 25
bbc
It's taken a global pandemic to arrive at this situation. A Labour government would have had us in this mess well before Covid.
59
01/03/2021 11:46:18 14 3
bbc
We were in a mess before covid
256
01/03/2021 15:17:14 4 6
bbc
The Tories had already doubled the Nat debt before covid...
513
02/03/2021 11:07:49 0 0
bbc
The thought of Corbyn &co anywhere near no10 thankfully stoped that.
41
01/03/2021 11:33:31 5 3
bbc
We need a completely new tax to replace rates, that is linked to profits. If a shop makes low profits then the rates will be low. If profits are high (as in certain types of shop) the rates will be proportionately higher. Of course the business accounts have to reflect the true position.
45
01/03/2021 11:36:55 3 1
bbc
Correct.

Business rates and VAT are a 'Ransom Tax' that has to be paid whether you can afford it or not.
52
01/03/2021 11:41:03 0 1
bbc
...or based on sales revenue - like a retailers element of VAT
54
Bob
01/03/2021 11:41:55 2 2
bbc
We already have a tax on profits, it is called Corporation Tax.
76
01/03/2021 12:01:15 0 2
bbc
You've just described Corporation Tax
145
01/03/2021 13:22:34 1 1
bbc
Creative accountants are rubbing their hands with glee at your idea.
24
01/03/2021 11:18:37 3 2
bbc
High streets are too big, and the collapse of Debenhams has exposed this. It's fine for shops to close on the peripheries, where commercial and residential properties are side by side. But empty department stores mean less choice, less reason to go into town. They are also an eyesore, further diminishing high streets' appeal.

Condense the high street - to 1/2 - even 1/3 of its current size.
42
01/03/2021 11:33:59 1 2
bbc
Maybe there’s an opportunity here. To make more city Centre housing available. Using surplus trading premises for housing could make attractive use of otherwise derelict premises while increasing demand for remaining businesses. Housing close to city centers is, after all, quite expensive, suggesting there is demand.
61
01/03/2021 11:49:26 0 1
bbc
WFH has in the short term severely hampered town and city centre businesses - large and small.

Sandwich and coffee shops, people popping in casually in lunch hour etc.

Many probably will return, but many maybe only part time - 2 or 3 days not 5 etc.

And during Covid, the need for personal or local outdoor space is high in many minds, a flat on the high st in a former dept store with none isn't.
62
01/03/2021 11:49:46 0 1
bbc
And has the added bonus of not building all over villages and green belt.
33
01/03/2021 11:24:04 1 6
bbc
City centres are doi g better than town centres...
43
01/03/2021 11:34:55 2 1
bbc
Trouble is that town and district centres were trying to emulate the city centres - by attracting the big high street names. That was never going to be sustainable.

Town and district centres have a much brighter outlook as people recognise the value of shopping locally and using local independent traders. The high street names will retreat to online and a few strategic sites.
44
MVP
01/03/2021 11:35:11 38 17
bbc
The high street is finished.

I do not understand this fascination with "saving" it.

I thought that the conservative party believed in market forces?
129
01/03/2021 13:13:35 24 7
bbc
Because not everyone wants to sit at home ALL the time?
How do you buy shoes?
440
02/03/2021 09:04:33 4 0
bbc
Town centres are vital, not just for the shops but for bars restaurants, galleries, cinemas, cafes and socialising, they maake us feel good about where we live.
494
02/03/2021 10:55:11 2 0
bbc
Maybe things have changed a bit, and you need to change your preconceptions.
508
02/03/2021 11:02:52 2 0
bbc
There in layeth the problem, this govt is no more ‘Conservative’ than Blaire’s or Major’s. Free markets, self reliance and responsibility means nothing, people have been split into so many ‘communities’ no one supports anything in their local area.
41
01/03/2021 11:33:31 5 3
bbc
We need a completely new tax to replace rates, that is linked to profits. If a shop makes low profits then the rates will be low. If profits are high (as in certain types of shop) the rates will be proportionately higher. Of course the business accounts have to reflect the true position.
45
01/03/2021 11:36:55 3 1
bbc
Correct.

Business rates and VAT are a 'Ransom Tax' that has to be paid whether you can afford it or not.
20
01/03/2021 11:16:43 2 5
bbc
'Wonderif' the UK ditched VAT would stimulate economy not only on the high street but commerce as well?

It would save businness a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in property.
Re-employ the VAT people to HMRC to -
Recoup the loss on revamped and fairer Income and other taxes.
We don't need it as it is no longer a EU imposition.
Simples?
46
01/03/2021 11:37:00 1 1
bbc
It's one potential solution - or ditch all business rates and keep VAT, but with a proportion paid by the seller.
20
01/03/2021 11:16:43 2 5
bbc
'Wonderif' the UK ditched VAT would stimulate economy not only on the high street but commerce as well?

It would save businness a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in admin.
It would save the Govt. a mint in property.
Re-employ the VAT people to HMRC to -
Recoup the loss on revamped and fairer Income and other taxes.
We don't need it as it is no longer a EU imposition.
Simples?
47
01/03/2021 11:37:23 2 1
bbc
You’d need a serious revamp of income tax because VAT makes those pay tax that otherwise avoid it. As long as they live in the UK they have to pay VAT.
3
01/03/2021 10:52:42 84 26
bbc
While i sympathise with the high street workers the pandemic has just speeded up an already apparent decline in bricks and mortar retail.

Is it the best use of public funds to prop up an out of date model?
48
01/03/2021 11:38:06 9 3
bbc
The High St myth is burst in my home town. Charity shops, nail bars, tattoo parlours and the night time economy are all that’s left.

I never venture into town anymore. It’s not relevant, pleasant or easy to park. 20 years ago I went in weekly.
308
Pip
01/03/2021 17:02:59 0 1
bbc
The 'Shopping Tax' hasn't helped, you have to pay it where ever you park, when you go to town, and it ain't cheap............?
18
01/03/2021 11:15:39 10 3
bbc
why do we have a tax on gas, electric , face masks, ppe, insurance costs for car, house ,pet and life.
49
01/03/2021 11:39:05 2 1
bbc
In order to keep the true tax hidden from many, by taking it in dribs and drabs.

These taxes all go to the same place, and add up.

Vat was originally called the "luxury tax" but is taken on essentials.

If chancellor needs more cash, suspect will see a further hit on private pensions, leaving state untouched.

Time to end salary sacrifice tax and NI minimising schemes, and other tax loopholes.
50
01/03/2021 11:39:32 21 6
bbc
Put the money and effort into high streets for the future.

Don't waste it propping up something that has (sadly) failed.

The future will not be a return to past - get used to it!
158
01/03/2021 13:45:13 14 1
bbc
Yes, drastic re-planning of town centres is essential. Most have probably at least twice the amount of retail space that they can sustain, and a rates holiday will not change that. Repurposing redundant retail and office space for housing is the only way to save high streets from being increasingly abandoned.
415
02/03/2021 05:46:58 0 0
bbc
It might not fully return but it will return in some form. The High Street is dying yes because most shops are now closed plus there is a reduction in public transport. We all don't have cars there still quite a few left
51
01/03/2021 11:40:04 7 1
bbc
Cut business rates. You should try running a business in Northern Ireland. We got a rates holiday until last July when they started charging again and now we are getting an increase in the bills from next month. Clowns and the circus come to mind. And we really do have a circus.
41
01/03/2021 11:33:31 5 3
bbc
We need a completely new tax to replace rates, that is linked to profits. If a shop makes low profits then the rates will be low. If profits are high (as in certain types of shop) the rates will be proportionately higher. Of course the business accounts have to reflect the true position.
52
01/03/2021 11:41:03 0 1
bbc
...or based on sales revenue - like a retailers element of VAT
53
01/03/2021 11:41:37 0 2
bbc
More than help for the High Street and fair-tax for the on-line, we need security for all (not least customers, also investment agents and authorities) enabling all decisions to be responsible, in-conscience. This will be ONLY with agreed conditional income-equal partnership, real democracy with a foundation of shared existential awareness, the gifts accepted of Reason and Care, fit for survival.
41
01/03/2021 11:33:31 5 3
bbc
We need a completely new tax to replace rates, that is linked to profits. If a shop makes low profits then the rates will be low. If profits are high (as in certain types of shop) the rates will be proportionately higher. Of course the business accounts have to reflect the true position.
54
Bob
01/03/2021 11:41:55 2 2
bbc
We already have a tax on profits, it is called Corporation Tax.
69
01/03/2021 11:57:16 1 1
bbc
Many small shops are not limited companies and therefore are out of the scope of Corporation Tax.
55
01/03/2021 11:42:02 5 3
bbc
Would these be the same MP's who make up the so called " Red Wall, by any chance....???
56
01/03/2021 11:43:12 64 6
bbc
....and collect taxes from the internet giants and tech companies - Amazon and Apple.

We live in a Corporatocracy though, so I doubt they will.
65
01/03/2021 11:52:29 47 55
bbc
Amazon, Google, Apple etc pay all their legal taxes. Any issues you might have with this requires a change in international law.

They are allowed to avoid tax, as we all are. We have ISA's. Tax avoidance.

They will not evade tax, unlike a tradesman paying cash in hand for example.
261
01/03/2021 15:22:06 7 1
bbc
If companies can find loopholes for tax avoidance then why can’t the treasury advisors and senior civil servants show the government how to close them?

Most taxpayers are screaming out for this to be done!
492
02/03/2021 10:52:40 0 0
bbc
Would it were so simple.
35
Bob
01/03/2021 11:29:00 3 1
bbc
It represents over a fifth of the tax take.

Where are you going to recover that? As a consumption tax is it one of the fairer taxes. You buy more, you pay more. Recover it from anything else like income tax or a tax on the company and everyone pays.
57
01/03/2021 11:43:15 0 2
bbc
Recoup the loss on revamped and fairer Income, CGT and other taxes.
58
01/03/2021 11:46:16 1 2
bbc
In the closing years of ruinous dictatorship by Money, with almost universal existential and social-contract ignorance, ipolitical choice is as ever between hypocrisies, pretence either that in fear and corruption 'all has been for the best', or that rescue from growing desperation is in deeper division on such as 'tax', by drift or decision both heading us for ruin, life-denying for our children.
40
01/03/2021 11:32:24 28 25
bbc
It's taken a global pandemic to arrive at this situation. A Labour government would have had us in this mess well before Covid.
59
01/03/2021 11:46:18 14 3
bbc
We were in a mess before covid
60
01/03/2021 11:47:12 3 4
bbc
It's only right and proper that great minds such as Steve Baker, David Davis, and Jake Berry get together a cabal of the self-righteous to pressurise the government into doing their bidding on Brexit, Covid, and business rates.

That's exactly what a majority voted for.
42
01/03/2021 11:33:59 1 2
bbc
Maybe there’s an opportunity here. To make more city Centre housing available. Using surplus trading premises for housing could make attractive use of otherwise derelict premises while increasing demand for remaining businesses. Housing close to city centers is, after all, quite expensive, suggesting there is demand.
61
01/03/2021 11:49:26 0 1
bbc
WFH has in the short term severely hampered town and city centre businesses - large and small.

Sandwich and coffee shops, people popping in casually in lunch hour etc.

Many probably will return, but many maybe only part time - 2 or 3 days not 5 etc.

And during Covid, the need for personal or local outdoor space is high in many minds, a flat on the high st in a former dept store with none isn't.
42
01/03/2021 11:33:59 1 2
bbc
Maybe there’s an opportunity here. To make more city Centre housing available. Using surplus trading premises for housing could make attractive use of otherwise derelict premises while increasing demand for remaining businesses. Housing close to city centers is, after all, quite expensive, suggesting there is demand.
62
01/03/2021 11:49:46 0 1
bbc
And has the added bonus of not building all over villages and green belt.
63
01/03/2021 11:51:29 4 1
bbc
As a method of raising taxes business rates makes sense.

You can't hide or move physical property, someone owns the property and it is simple to administer (Councils collect it for Government)

What has changed is the property market. Warehouses are now more popular than high street stores, the rates system needs to reflect this.
71
01/03/2021 11:58:16 0 1
bbc
It already does. Business Rates are based on the rental value of the property.

Less desirable = lower rent so lower business rates.....

Warehouses are often much bigger than physical retail shops so while shops pay higher £/sqft rent/rates than warehouses do the final bill will be about the same as warehouses have much more sqft.
64
01/03/2021 11:52:21 28 5
bbc
Do these MPs believe that cutting business rates going to get people back to spending on the high street rather than online? High streets need to be destinations where people want to go - where there is plenty for us to see and do, before we can be persuaded to go back in any numbers. Who wants to go to a place that's half derelict, with (sometimes threatening) beggars on every street corner?
462
02/03/2021 09:39:51 1 3
bbc
They'll believe anything. After all, they think that 2 or 3 million extra unemployed on the back of these unnecessary lockdowns is a jobs led recovery. Career politicians suck.
504
02/03/2021 11:00:07 0 0
bbc
It shows how bad the situation for high st is when I have to fully agree with every word !
56
01/03/2021 11:43:12 64 6
bbc
....and collect taxes from the internet giants and tech companies - Amazon and Apple.

We live in a Corporatocracy though, so I doubt they will.
65
01/03/2021 11:52:29 47 55
bbc
Amazon, Google, Apple etc pay all their legal taxes. Any issues you might have with this requires a change in international law.

They are allowed to avoid tax, as we all are. We have ISA's. Tax avoidance.

They will not evade tax, unlike a tradesman paying cash in hand for example.
94
01/03/2021 12:18:34 11 6
bbc
An ISA is not tax avoidance but a tax allowance. Really they are more useful to the rich as few ordinary people need to worry about Capital Gains Tax (exemption on the first £12,300 of realised gains each year) and are unlikely to get more than £2,000 p.a. in dividend income from shares, so normal allowances make most investment pretty much tax free.
96
01/03/2021 12:20:49 11 6
bbc
> this requires a change in international law.

No it doesn't it's UK Law that allows corporations in a different tax location to offshore their profits by charging for "Brand" and similar.
Aka Apple UK is charged by Apple International (registered in some tax haven) for the use of the "Apple" brand.
UK registered companies pay tax on. This is how they export their profits to lower tax companies
124
01/03/2021 13:04:57 5 3
bbc
Accountant? Of the creative accountancy bent?
142
01/03/2021 13:07:10 0 6
bbc
ISA is not good. American companies are wise to offshore their HQ . Ireland and Netherlands
148
01/03/2021 13:28:52 6 11
bbc
ISA is not tax avoidance. It is my hard-earned money (taxed money), I put to earn interest or buy stocks which should not taxed again. In order to gain this benefit, I have to deposit the money first.
191
01/03/2021 14:08:28 7 8
bbc
Amazon, Google, Apple etc pay all their legal taxes.

Another apologist for monopolies. Are you on their payroll?
203
01/03/2021 14:24:10 8 2
bbc
What an absolutely ridiculous post presumably done to provoke a reaction because no one with any common sense could be serious with such comments. Can you tell me how to avoid tax as someone who is on PAYE? The difference is tax avoidance is legal, tax evasion is illegal currently under the law.
214
01/03/2021 14:35:04 3 2
bbc
That's why I don't much respect the law. It is an ass. It takes from the poor to give to the wealthy.
311
01/03/2021 17:07:36 3 5
bbc
The rich pay 99% of the taxes in this country- maybe it would be fair if they had more of a saying in running it?
312
Pip
01/03/2021 17:09:39 3 1
bbc
The local plumber changing a tap washer isn't quite the same as Jeff Bezos............?
421
02/03/2021 08:06:27 1 0
bbc
'Amazon, Google, Apple etc pay all their legal taxes. Any issues you might have with this requires a change in international law.

No, what it ‘required was that the foolish Brits did NOT vote Leave, then these companies would have come under the new EU Tax avoidance Law and paid their share share of Tax, just like you and I have too
463
02/03/2021 09:41:43 1 0
bbc
It can be done in national law; but the gov are terrified of invoking the ire of our American cousins.
The Aussies have far more guts than our incompetents.

Always worries me when Johnson has no doubts.
3
01/03/2021 10:52:42 84 26
bbc
While i sympathise with the high street workers the pandemic has just speeded up an already apparent decline in bricks and mortar retail.

Is it the best use of public funds to prop up an out of date model?
66
01/03/2021 11:53:53 6 2
bbc
Good point.

But it's one that is lost on many in central and local government.

My local council blew £80 million on a new shopping centre. It opened 4 or 5 years ago but is still largely empty.

Meanwhile local council tax payers are having to foot the bill for the interest on the mortgage and the council pleads poverty - deciding to knock down the local college and sell the land for housing.
117
01/03/2021 12:51:45 1 1
bbc
council planners and contracters arnt geniuses , IME AFRAID
67
01/03/2021 11:55:14 8 4
bbc
The high st is finished. We are seeing an existential shift in peoples behavior similar to the transition from horse and cart to automobile.
88
01/03/2021 12:07:21 5 2
bbc
Maybe for you personally, but Covid aside, 80% of people still buy from the high street. You are in the significant minority.
93
01/03/2021 12:18:15 0 1
bbc
Good point, well made.

But there's a certain element who want the automobile un-invented; the implication being that the horse and cart would then have to make a comeback.

So maybe there's hope for high-street shopping after all? ;-)
68
01/03/2021 11:55:59 4 5
bbc
Why are we throwing good money after bad? Out of town shopping started to kill the High Street & now online is killing both. Move with the times!

Growth in online shopping will create jobs to replace those lost on the High Street - Look at the tens of thousands of delivery driver & warehouse jobs created in 2020?
54
Bob
01/03/2021 11:41:55 2 2
bbc
We already have a tax on profits, it is called Corporation Tax.
69
01/03/2021 11:57:16 1 1
bbc
Many small shops are not limited companies and therefore are out of the scope of Corporation Tax.
70
01/03/2021 11:57:20 4 8
bbc
CUT MPs salaries and expenses to realistic levels, get rid of final salary pensions schemes and inflation proofing for the same and public sector its unafforable. Use the money saved to support the economy.
63
01/03/2021 11:51:29 4 1
bbc
As a method of raising taxes business rates makes sense.

You can't hide or move physical property, someone owns the property and it is simple to administer (Councils collect it for Government)

What has changed is the property market. Warehouses are now more popular than high street stores, the rates system needs to reflect this.
71
01/03/2021 11:58:16 0 1
bbc
It already does. Business Rates are based on the rental value of the property.

Less desirable = lower rent so lower business rates.....

Warehouses are often much bigger than physical retail shops so while shops pay higher £/sqft rent/rates than warehouses do the final bill will be about the same as warehouses have much more sqft.
23
01/03/2021 11:17:58 53 13
bbc
Local councils could help by removing parking charges.

80 p per half hour parking at my local town.

No wonder out of town malls and online stores are more popular.
72
01/03/2021 11:58:49 27 6
bbc
What we need are revitalised town centres, where people want to go. That aren't half boarded up. That are full of things to see and do. What's the point of cheap parking if there is little or nothing there for people to go for?
266
01/03/2021 15:22:15 3 0
bbc
There is highly unlikely to be much in town centres that people want to go to now. For me it is the library and the bank. The bank only because it has closed all its local branches
503
02/03/2021 10:59:06 2 0
bbc
When tiny micro business has to pay a minum wage of nearly £9 per hour (plus up to an extra 30% for the other expenses of employing) plus mad business rates and all the other pointless guff forced on them it’s no wonder little business onthe high st is dying a painful death.
14
Bob
01/03/2021 11:11:57 14 9
bbc
If people wanted the high street they'd shop there.

They don't, though.

It is also eco-friendly to shop online. And people seem up for econess at the moment.
73
01/03/2021 11:59:37 12 10
bbc
Bob, bob bob, you think millions of white vans delivering 1 parcel per house hold is eco friendly....
176
01/03/2021 14:01:03 8 3
bbc
1 van delivering to 20-30 houses at a time is far more efficient than 20-30 cars being on the road. a) congestion is massively reduced meaning less emissions due to less idling & b) delivery vehicles are arguable more likely to be more modern/efficient than most cars.
249
01/03/2021 15:00:56 4 3
bbc
Hundreds of white vans making multiple deliveries is certainly more eco friendly that thousands of people driving from place to place to compare and buy the items they want.
268
01/03/2021 15:24:17 4 1
bbc
More eco friendly than thousands of cars driving to a town to buy one item each! And some of the delivery companies are starting to roll out electric vans now, which are much better suited to multi drop delivery than diesels.
24
01/03/2021 11:18:37 3 2
bbc
High streets are too big, and the collapse of Debenhams has exposed this. It's fine for shops to close on the peripheries, where commercial and residential properties are side by side. But empty department stores mean less choice, less reason to go into town. They are also an eyesore, further diminishing high streets' appeal.

Condense the high street - to 1/2 - even 1/3 of its current size.
74
01/03/2021 12:00:38 1 1
bbc
whos going to pay for that total major multi millions restructure , you and the other upvoters. your obviously not bricks and morter retailers or construction and town planners
75
01/03/2021 12:01:00 4 4
bbc
It's a bit like giving somebody the kiss of life who's been dead for years sadly.
41
01/03/2021 11:33:31 5 3
bbc
We need a completely new tax to replace rates, that is linked to profits. If a shop makes low profits then the rates will be low. If profits are high (as in certain types of shop) the rates will be proportionately higher. Of course the business accounts have to reflect the true position.
76
01/03/2021 12:01:15 0 2
bbc
You've just described Corporation Tax
82
01/03/2021 12:05:12 1 1
bbc
Again, many small shops are not limited companies and therefore are out of the scope of Corporation Tax
32
Bob
01/03/2021 11:26:01 28 5
bbc
The decline of the high street began long before the the average Joe was starting to shop online.

The truth is it never recovered from the financial crash. That's what killed the likes of Woolworths and other outlets have been bumbling along ever since.
77
01/03/2021 12:02:33 36 4
bbc
The truth is it never recovered from the supermarkets replacing Jones the Butcher and Hodges the Grocer
89
01/03/2021 12:08:46 8 2
bbc
Not just supermarkets - all the large national chains moving in flashing the cash which caused the smaller independents that made each town centre individual and worth a look to be forced out.
286
01/03/2021 16:06:30 1 1
bbc
Was Hodges not a greengrocer?
480
02/03/2021 10:14:48 1 0
bbc
I still but my meat from the local butcher or the farm shop occasionally to the local slaughterhouse. I can ger it cut as I want, and the butcher has a much wider range of cuts than the standardised prepacked supermarket meat.
Cost a little more, but better choice.
29
01/03/2021 11:21:36 0 4
bbc
Down voters please add to the constructive conversation please.
78
01/03/2021 12:03:51 0 1
bbc
I think VAT is one of fairer taxes, the more you spend the more you pay. Another answer would be reduce it to 15% for basic items and increase it to 30% for luxury ones. The problem would be, where do you draw the line?
19
01/03/2021 11:15:47 34 17
bbc
I wish people would stop regarding the "High Street" as some kind of sacred cow which must be preserved at all costs. If people don't want to shop there, that's their choice. For those businesses who offer a service or product which is in demand - good luck to you, you'll survive. The "High Street" has been dying since the 1960's. Time to put it out of it's misery
79
01/03/2021 12:03:58 40 5
bbc
I remember as a child going shopping with my parents, we used to go to different towns round us every week. They had one or two big chains, but mostly they were small independents, and inevitably had a large market that was always worth a look around. Now, high streets are all too often generic, having the same shops and markets have all but gone to the wall. Where is the draw for people to visit?
549
02/03/2021 18:13:55 0 0
bbc
Even the modern "farmers markets" are not a patch on the old ones.
80
01/03/2021 12:04:21 2 1
bbc
We should know by now, the ways are ENDLESS of taxation and avoidance and evasion, AS of crime and escape from justice, in a world governed NOT by conscience in equal-partnership but rather by competition in fear and greed and corruption. NO longer to be told with Dickensian humour, the tale of our collective betrayal of people and planet will be our children's bitter Ozymandian lesson. For whom?
81
01/03/2021 12:04:41 6 3
bbc
Shops on a defined high street, below a certain square footage should pay no rates, only a proportion of profits. This could potentially increase number of small shops filling empty retail units. Tesco/Asda have killed high street by selling everything.
327
01/03/2021 18:01:30 0 0
bbc
Great, I can open a shop and sell to Tescos at a loss and help them avoid more tax
76
01/03/2021 12:01:15 0 2
bbc
You've just described Corporation Tax
82
01/03/2021 12:05:12 1 1
bbc
Again, many small shops are not limited companies and therefore are out of the scope of Corporation Tax
83
01/03/2021 12:05:16 16 7
bbc
Must be a lot of Tory MP's with interests in commercial properties. The High Street model needs to change, shrink them and change their use to something sustainable but more of the same is chucking good money after bad.
144
01/03/2021 13:20:38 16 1
bbc
Pension funds own much of the retail properties.
510
02/03/2021 11:06:01 0 0
bbc
Why ‘Tory?’ some people can’t keep there own bigotry out of anything.
84
01/03/2021 12:05:26 8 5
bbc
High Street shopping will remain but will be smaller than before as people switch increasingly to on line. Tax reforms are needed to reflect this fundamental change. Taxes on online shopping need to be increased to reflect their impact on the environment with increased number of van deliveries and town centre rates need to be reduced to encourage new activities in town centres. Simple really.
326
01/03/2021 18:00:04 1 0
bbc
A delivery van is much better for the environment than me having travel into town.

I can visit 20 shops and receive a delivery for much less energy than it would take to visit 1 shop
16
01/03/2021 11:13:43 61 8
bbc
So who should pay taxes? Why is evereyone insisting that different parts of the economy shouldn't pay tax. It's the usual rich get richer the poor pay the tax
85
01/03/2021 12:05:27 12 3
bbc
Who should pay taxes? It's an interesting one - but the answer invariably comes down to basically "someone else"
86
01/03/2021 12:05:44 10 6
bbc
It seems that many people seem happy to let the high street die.

Please don't forget though, many people still love the high street - it's the social centre of a town.

The demise isn't helped by extortionate business rates & parking fees. Come on Councils & Government, if you are serious about helping high streets, do something about it!
90
01/03/2021 12:13:08 6 5
bbc
FORGET RATES AND PARKING prices , ITS THE internet and retail parks built on wasteland with free parking thats slaughtered the mid to large size town /city centres and traditional smaller town high st
116
01/03/2021 12:50:28 2 2
bbc
If you want a high street, pay for it. Don't expect me to subsidise your lifestyle choices.
536
02/03/2021 14:28:20 0 0
bbc
I'm sure high streets still have their fans - but clearly not enough (or enough people but not spending enough) to keep them going. I'm afraid the high streets of yesteryear have gone. Most have made their choice as regards how and where they want to shop - and it isn't the high street.
23
01/03/2021 11:17:58 53 13
bbc
Local councils could help by removing parking charges.

80 p per half hour parking at my local town.

No wonder out of town malls and online stores are more popular.
87
01/03/2021 12:06:58 4 4
bbc
Councils are sinking under salary and pension debt.

The bad ones boosting latter for many years by inc. service yrs under redundancy to cut the former - like Lab Glasgow boosting many 10%+.

Their Central Grant's have been cut, and so other income streams come on line.

Taxation needs simplified.

Local and central.

Cut reliefs and avoidance, boost tax and NI by ending salary sacrifice etc.
362
01/03/2021 19:43:48 1 2
bbc
Councils are sinking because the Tories have kept the Rate Support Grant (collected via local business rates) since 2010 and because they prevented councils from increasing Council Tax from 2010/11 - 2017/18.
67
01/03/2021 11:55:14 8 4
bbc
The high st is finished. We are seeing an existential shift in peoples behavior similar to the transition from horse and cart to automobile.
88
01/03/2021 12:07:21 5 2
bbc
Maybe for you personally, but Covid aside, 80% of people still buy from the high street. You are in the significant minority.
77
01/03/2021 12:02:33 36 4
bbc
The truth is it never recovered from the supermarkets replacing Jones the Butcher and Hodges the Grocer
89
01/03/2021 12:08:46 8 2
bbc
Not just supermarkets - all the large national chains moving in flashing the cash which caused the smaller independents that made each town centre individual and worth a look to be forced out.
86
01/03/2021 12:05:44 10 6
bbc
It seems that many people seem happy to let the high street die.

Please don't forget though, many people still love the high street - it's the social centre of a town.

The demise isn't helped by extortionate business rates & parking fees. Come on Councils & Government, if you are serious about helping high streets, do something about it!
90
01/03/2021 12:13:08 6 5
bbc
FORGET RATES AND PARKING prices , ITS THE internet and retail parks built on wasteland with free parking thats slaughtered the mid to large size town /city centres and traditional smaller town high st
91
01/03/2021 12:14:03 6 3
bbc
High Streets were destroyed by the chain stores years ago. Cookie cutter shopping areas, the same wherever you go.

If we do get a business rate reduction, please let it only apply to stores with less than 5 outlets a limited floor space and not the multinationals.

We need diversity and we need local people with local businesses.
115
01/03/2021 12:49:58 2 3
bbc
Pay for it then. Stop whining.
92
01/03/2021 12:15:50 2 5
bbc
just saw picc of daffy dodds above and cant stop laughing, it explains gap still with the parties. Just hopeless not a single question answered
67
01/03/2021 11:55:14 8 4
bbc
The high st is finished. We are seeing an existential shift in peoples behavior similar to the transition from horse and cart to automobile.
93
01/03/2021 12:18:15 0 1
bbc
Good point, well made.

But there's a certain element who want the automobile un-invented; the implication being that the horse and cart would then have to make a comeback.

So maybe there's hope for high-street shopping after all? ;-)
65
01/03/2021 11:52:29 47 55
bbc
Amazon, Google, Apple etc pay all their legal taxes. Any issues you might have with this requires a change in international law.

They are allowed to avoid tax, as we all are. We have ISA's. Tax avoidance.

They will not evade tax, unlike a tradesman paying cash in hand for example.
94
01/03/2021 12:18:34 11 6
bbc
An ISA is not tax avoidance but a tax allowance. Really they are more useful to the rich as few ordinary people need to worry about Capital Gains Tax (exemption on the first £12,300 of realised gains each year) and are unlikely to get more than £2,000 p.a. in dividend income from shares, so normal allowances make most investment pretty much tax free.
104
01/03/2021 12:41:43 13 3
bbc
you can use any words you like, but keeping my cash there avoids me paying tax on it.
292
01/03/2021 16:25:51 4 1
bbc
As I understand it tax avoidance is legally arranging your affairs to reduce tax, so yes, choosing to put your money in an an ISA rather than a normal account is tax avoidance.

Not a very profitable one at the moment though.
17
01/03/2021 11:15:12 1 3
bbc
Look to the USA - High Streets gone, convenient shopping at great Malls with ample free parking. However big stores gone for good. Successive HMG’s just burn our money in every area - let business just prosper where they can sell.
95
01/03/2021 12:18:51 0 1
bbc
America is littered with dead or dying malls and many dead or dying town centres too like in Detroit and other ghost cities - where only the poor remain.

In some cases decades old malls were replaced with new ones, just few miles down the road, as system made it cheaper for retailers and developers to build new.

Many big mall key store chains gone, leave others hollowed out, just like UK.
65
01/03/2021 11:52:29 47 55
bbc
Amazon, Google, Apple etc pay all their legal taxes. Any issues you might have with this requires a change in international law.

They are allowed to avoid tax, as we all are. We have ISA's. Tax avoidance.

They will not evade tax, unlike a tradesman paying cash in hand for example.
96
01/03/2021 12:20:49 11 6
bbc
> this requires a change in international law.

No it doesn't it's UK Law that allows corporations in a different tax location to offshore their profits by charging for "Brand" and similar.
Aka Apple UK is charged by Apple International (registered in some tax haven) for the use of the "Apple" brand.
UK registered companies pay tax on. This is how they export their profits to lower tax companies
97
01/03/2021 12:28:50 1 1
bbc
Rent for land-use, rates for services, no quarrel but over 'ownership' and 'shares'. We cannot trust even ourselves, so tangled the webs, even to be sure of own integrity let alone of atomised fellow citizens all subject to insecurity of income and pension, fears for family and friends, alliances of defence or offence - witting-or-not - our sources of protective order and destructive privilege.
98
01/03/2021 12:30:10 1 2
bbc
Dont forget there's people who aren't getting anything from the goverment and are being forced to use their life savings. I've just lost my job and can't get anything. All businesses should be made to use their saving before any tax cuts. Why should businesses be treated differently.
99
01/03/2021 12:32:39 1 2
bbc
Your about a decade behind the curve with the statement, much has already disappeared. Companies with over 200 years heritage GONE.
5
01/03/2021 10:53:34 53 37
bbc
Nope. Why should I subsidise your lifestyle choices? You want a High Street, you pay for it. And no need to shout.
100
01/03/2021 12:25:28 7 4
bbc
What has that got to do with it?!

These internet companies don't pay tax, instead use "transfer practices" via Dublin and Luxembourg. It costs us between GBP10Bn and GBP25Bn in lost tax revenue each year.

The government needs to close this loophole and then charge them corporation tax.

Get it now? Probably not.