Asda says 5,000 jobs at risk in new business plan
25/02/2021 | news | business | 1,534
The supermarket says it has begun consulting with workers over a major restructuring of its business.
1
25/02/2021 11:01:23 14 9
bbc
A restructuring of many businesses was inevitable after changes in buying patterns during covid
25/02/2021 20:41:56 0 0
bbc
It’s a supermarket they can be conventional. It’s laden with debt now and waiting to be asset stripped after being sold down the river by previous owners Walmart
2
25/02/2021 11:02:10 109 5
bbc
They think they can run a Supermarket chain the same way they run Petrol Stations?? Outstanding service with no or very few staff.
12
25/02/2021 11:04:28 129 3
bbc
Fortunately it’s a very competitive market therefore if customer service deteriorates people will shop elsewhere
26
25/02/2021 11:07:28 11 4
bbc
yep, same as when they introduced the self service tils, thinking there was no need to have til staff. I refuse to use a self service in my main shop, I have enough times when scanning a couple of things when I have to keep asking for the staff to pop across.
372
25/02/2021 11:53:04 2 1
bbc
What choice? The big four? Before, we could choose where we shopped because there was more competition.
849
25/02/2021 13:20:02 1 0
bbc
Only ones out standing were the customers by the pumps
3
25/02/2021 11:02:25 153 4
bbc
Typical output from a debt laden purchase of a company
4
25/02/2021 11:02:52 217 9
bbc
Business never seems to tire of finding new ways to do away with workers and increase its profits.
247
25/02/2021 11:34:10 100 30
bbc
congratulations on working out what capitalism is
464
25/02/2021 12:07:24 6 10
bbc
Staff are a necessary evil up to a point. If i could run my business without staff (or less) and make more profit I would. Wouldnt you??
25/02/2021 14:05:07 4 2
bbc
An argument going back to the Luddites. What's your alternative? Hand looms, hand knitting, candles and oil lamps, barrows shovels and horses? Throw in well water, mud roads, no internet, TV, cars bikes, busses, lorries, electric, gas, plastic. Sounds great, I bag the best straw palias near the fire in the middle of the hut.
25/02/2021 21:27:24 0 0
bbc
Business did not increase profits. That would be positive news. Here, it will be Issa brothers and lenders to benefit.
5
ps
25/02/2021 11:03:05 16 10
bbc
This could be good news for Asda in the long run as they adapt their business to new customer habits. Also, if they can redeploy most staff at risk, then redundancies should be reduced once natural staff turnover is taken into account. Here's hoping anyway. Good luck to the staff.
6
25/02/2021 11:03:17 243 8
bbc
Its more to do with the $4bn debt that was used to buy Asda that Covid
189
25/02/2021 11:27:05 15 5
bbc
You can’t call it communism...
982
25/02/2021 13:53:47 1 0
bbc
The loan is being taken out at a time when servicing even such a huge amount is incredibly cheap and well within the ability of the combined companies. The company taking over has a different business model not based on huge out of town premises. Like all business managers the company is being restructured.
25/02/2021 22:42:27 0 0
bbc
unfortunately I think you are wrong, many retail businesses from food sales to cars have experienced a significant shift to online, my own job may also be consumed by the acceleration of this phenomenon.
just remember, what you save when you buy cheap or conveniently for you, it has a cost and an inconvenience to someone else......
7
25/02/2021 11:03:50 13 15
bbc
With the jobs market moving towards automation, universal basic income is inevitable and should not just be looked at as some lefty nonsense.
21
25/02/2021 11:06:45 11 13
bbc
Nope, it is still lefty nonsense.
22
25/02/2021 11:06:57 0 6
bbc
It would help solve so many problems (massively reduce housing debt, almost eliminate poverty, physical/mental health/NHS) and prepare our country for the future of our economy and lead to a fairer society... cost less in long run... but why isn’t it being seriously looked at?
256
25/02/2021 11:16:20 1 0
bbc
How would we pay for it? Genuinely interested to know how it can be done.
431
25/02/2021 12:02:12 1 1
bbc
Ah communism my old friend. Where we are all equally poor except the elite. Can't wait
25/02/2021 14:50:27 0 0
bbc
Automation is not going to help the country. Robots don't pay tax.
If Corporation Tax was going to increase to compensate it would not be so bad
but production in the hands of corporations without workers is a scary prospect.
8
25/02/2021 11:03:55 538 12
bbc
Anything to do with ASDA having just been bought by people who took out enormous loans to do so, hence need to sell off everything they can to service the debt?
172
25/02/2021 11:24:53 228 8
bbc
ASDA - Add Substantial Debt Again.
201
25/02/2021 11:28:25 8 6
bbc
Not in the sense you imply. They were able to get the loans in the first place exactly because they planned to get rid of all those people. It is a perfectly transparent transfer of value: from the pockets of people who would otherwise have continued to receive these salaries, to the shareholders of the ASDA and the banks. It's capitalism. Don't be hired labour. Easier said than done, though.
227
25/02/2021 11:31:39 9 16
bbc
Having bought it as a going concern, your comment makes no sense whatsoever.

They are not asset stripping, restructuring to improve profitability has no bearing whatsoever on funding.

You are conflating two completely different issues.
296
25/02/2021 11:40:51 1 1
bbc
Sounds like the AA
328
25/02/2021 11:44:48 10 2
bbc
Isn't that how Trump has always operated?
652
25/02/2021 12:41:39 1 1
bbc
And who own 6000 petrol stations, when some of if not most of the main car manufacturer's have pledged to go all electric over the coming years.
768
25/02/2021 13:06:20 0 0
bbc
All part of HR and Corporate Strategy [allegedly]
980
25/02/2021 13:53:13 1 4
bbc
Yes, it's how Tory Britain operates
as
25/02/2021 20:18:39 0 0
bbc
Don't forget that they will also have to have pay their board members large bonuses for implementing the cuts.
9
25/02/2021 11:03:56 929 23
bbc
Well, that didn't take long, did it? Who could have predicted the recent debt-funded sale would result in job losses?
17
25/02/2021 11:05:57 344 17
bbc
Absolutely spot on. Definitely what's happening.
32
25/02/2021 11:08:35 40 5
bbc
Couldn't have put it better.
107
25/02/2021 11:16:47 12 3
bbc
If you do what you always did ,you'll get what you always got.
140
25/02/2021 11:20:47 36 2
bbc
Exactly right. How this is allowed is beyond me.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56085128
154
xlr
25/02/2021 11:22:45 53 6
bbc
And who could have guessed the people keeping the country fed and running would be first under the axe?
235
25/02/2021 11:33:01 21 18
bbc
Well most of the jobs are for retraining in a different business plan to suit today's market, so not as bad as it sounds.
265
25/02/2021 11:36:06 46 2
bbc
I worked for Asda a few years ago including after the Walmart takeover, they were genuinely a fun company to work for. I feared for them as soon as I read about this recent takeover.
266
25/02/2021 11:36:07 41 2
bbc
Not only are ASDA up against a mass of debt but they are also up against increasing competition.
Decreasing staff is one way to tackle it but will it also lead to them doing a Tesco and squeezing suppliers?
Expect there to be poor customer service, a cut in staff hours to 4 hour shifts, saving staff costs, less bargain prices and another increase in prices.
How long have they got?
364
25/02/2021 11:51:56 7 18
bbc
Just capitalism at work

Clear out non performing jobs and adapting to the new economy

Totally expected and how is it surprising that entrepreneurs want to cut out waste
430
25/02/2021 11:50:56 19 2
bbc
Leveraged buyouts should not be allowed.

This lot bought the company by paying a tiny amount and then loading the rest of the debt onto the company which it will be paying off for decades.
441
NJD
25/02/2021 12:04:00 27 2
bbc
Private equity-job destroying parasites 100%
548
25/02/2021 12:20:20 12 2
bbc
Bet the management fees charged by the brothers won't be reduced like the employee numbers!
550
25/02/2021 12:20:24 8 1
bbc
Agreed, a no-brainer. Could see it coming a mile off. If it were not for the jobs already within the ASDA stores I would say, shop elsewhere. Feel for the staff, shame the Billionaire owners could not show more compassion and spend a bit of their wealth.
647
25/02/2021 12:40:07 8 0
bbc
Next in line will be the supply chain. Saw this happen when Boots were bought and they extended the payment terms to 90 days and slashed the profit margin by around 75%. Their response? Well, if you don't like it there are plenty of others who will....
705
25/02/2021 12:54:03 8 0
bbc
After Cadbury this practice was going to be stopped. Unfortunately the word of a UK MP is only as good as the last lobby firm that buys him/her a prawn sandwich. Same with letting massive supermarkets to set up shop on village high streets chasing out butchers, bakers and fishmongers - not allowed in many European states - English councils have given up objecting as always overruled by MPs.
724
25/02/2021 12:56:49 6 0
bbc
There needs to be robust legislation in place governing the purchase of companies with debt. I go to a bank and say I want to take out a loan with a realistic business plan to pay it back, I'll get laughed out of the branch. If I'm an unscrupulous business person with a portfolio of assets funded by debt, the bank will throw money at me. You need to be some sort of narcissistic sociopath.
816
25/02/2021 13:13:38 2 1
bbc
Hit the nail on head pal only the rich can purchase in that manner not for us common folk to do . wake up people it’s us and them
830
25/02/2021 13:16:21 6 1
bbc
To be fair I used to work there in the head office and came from a smaller discounter - the head office had far too many staff, stores have duplicated administration roles (like a HR manager per store, etc). Real waste of labour and red tape PC claptrap everywhere. This has been coming for years after bloated Walmart ownerism.
840
25/02/2021 13:18:09 5 1
bbc
Indeed! Well what a surprise! Asda was recently purchased by £billionaire brothers Zuber and Mohsin Issa and private equity firm TDR Capital. And now they are selling off the Asda family silver and making 5000 loyal colleagues potentially redundant.
Gives a whole new meaning to "That's Asda Price!"
901
25/02/2021 13:34:15 1 4
bbc
It's only 500 job losses in total if you read the article properly. To keep the business alive and profitable it's a small price to pay unlike the wholesale job losses of all that work in Debenhams! Maybe if the previous owners had taken such action before they wouldn't have had to sell it in the first place
965
25/02/2021 13:49:26 5 1
bbc
Entrusting such an important food chain to the highwaymen version of the chuckle brothers is going to end in an Arcadia style disaster. Believe me, I’ve worked for them.
25/02/2021 14:01:14 4 0
bbc
Vulture capitalism at its finest.
10
25/02/2021 11:04:04 85 5
bbc
Plentymore firms are going to use the pandemic as the excuse they need to cut costs . Not even waiting to see if shopping habits return to normal.
851
25/02/2021 13:20:36 4 9
bbc
Hope shopping habits don't return as to what was.
Needs RADICAL overhaul.
25/02/2021 14:57:11 0 0
bbc
A major telephone company is just doing exactly this. You know the one
11
kss
25/02/2021 11:04:15 719 28
bbc
Riding roughshod over the people who risked their and their familes health through the pandemic. Classy.
282
25/02/2021 11:38:46 693 15
bbc
Supermarket workers are very much the forgotten heroes of the last 12 months, nobody claps for them, they don't get incredibly generous pensions or banded pay with regular increases, but they've been very much at risk throughout and just got on with it. Thank you to them all.
429
25/02/2021 12:02:04 2 53
bbc
No, its just business. Companies need to make efficiencies. They didnt have to put themselves at risk.
497
25/02/2021 12:12:45 17 2
bbc
Didnt you know it's only NHS staff that worked through the pandemic. Retail staff, delivery drivers etc dont matter.
594
25/02/2021 12:28:12 3 9
bbc
ASDA is a for profit charity company not a charity. ASDA was not created the owner in order to employ people. Creating jobs is a by product of pursuing profit. If you build factory your aim is to make profit, but you also have hire workers in order to for the factory to function.
885
25/02/2021 13:28:37 0 0
bbc
They were at risk from the flu were they?
912
25/02/2021 13:38:09 0 11
bbc
Supermarket workers aren't heroes in the slightest. They do a menial job for no money. Nobody's forcing them to, and they can pretty much be automated tomorrow and few consumers would care.
Sad truth but it is what it is.
979
25/02/2021 13:52:55 1 3
bbc
It's the Tory way
25/02/2021 18:42:01 0 0
bbc
just another case of capitalist tory dream uk .
2
25/02/2021 11:02:10 109 5
bbc
They think they can run a Supermarket chain the same way they run Petrol Stations?? Outstanding service with no or very few staff.
12
25/02/2021 11:04:28 129 3
bbc
Fortunately it’s a very competitive market therefore if customer service deteriorates people will shop elsewhere
842
25/02/2021 13:18:21 3 0
bbc
and SO it should be!
Vote with your feet!
Demand what you deserve, what is just and right!
13
25/02/2021 11:05:39 351 9
bbc
Weren’t supermarkets pretty much the only ones to prosper during Covid?. This is someway to repay the staff that kept going during all this. Awful way to treat staff.
23
25/02/2021 11:06:58 21 131
bbc
Can't see the shop floor workers being affected
174
25/02/2021 11:25:06 4 0
bbc
No. Lots of businesses have done well during Covid.
210
nsf
25/02/2021 11:29:30 23 3
bbc
Refuse to use self service checkouts that should keep staff on
457
25/02/2021 12:06:15 1 34
bbc
Staff did a job, they got paid. That is reward! If they didnt want to do it they could have left. They had a choice. There was a need for pay and an offer of employment. They took it. Nobody forced them.
891
25/02/2021 13:30:07 1 0
bbc
Well when you introduce a cashless society and more systems such as self scan and being able to scan and bag as you go around the store what do you expect to happen?
946
25/02/2021 13:45:07 0 0
bbc
They got paid for their work, as did delivery drivers, bus drivers, train drivers, bank workers, NHS workers. Who is a non essential worker? I doubt pub staff or restaurant staff, actors and musicians are in reality not needed!
25/02/2021 20:15:33 0 0
bbc
It's called, 'know your place'
14
Jon
25/02/2021 11:05:41 87 7
bbc
Way to say thanks for all that 'key workers'.
15
igd
25/02/2021 11:05:49 4 5
bbc
would have the Sainsbury's merger been any better for the employees?
16
25/02/2021 11:05:54 19 2
bbc
The Asda slogan is ‘Save Money, live better’ (for the shareholders maybe)
69
25/02/2021 11:13:08 8 3
bbc
Private equity and 2 billionaires are the "shareholders"
9
25/02/2021 11:03:56 929 23
bbc
Well, that didn't take long, did it? Who could have predicted the recent debt-funded sale would result in job losses?
17
25/02/2021 11:05:57 344 17
bbc
Absolutely spot on. Definitely what's happening.
175
25/02/2021 11:25:07 95 5
bbc
It's about time debt funded acquisitions were made illegal in this country. So many of our companies have been taken over this way, always to the detriment of local workers.
391
25/02/2021 11:56:07 6 13
bbc
Its more a case of staff are very expensive & wont be needed anyway in a few years. People will shop, walk out the door & be automatically charged. Sensors will know what you are taking!
873
25/02/2021 13:26:48 2 1
bbc
.Well what a surprise! Asda was recently purchased by £billionaire brothers Zuber and
Mohsin Issa and private equity firm TDR Capital. And now they are selling off the Asda family silver and making 5000 loyal colleagues potentially redundant. Gives a whole new meaning to "That's Asda Price!"
18
25/02/2021 11:06:01 2 13
bbc
Rishi will get it sorted
19
25/02/2021 11:06:09 776 13
bbc
Buys the business, loads it up with debt, sack workers to help pay down the debt and then walk away with the profits.

Been here and seen this before. These practices should not be allowed.
Surprised the remainer’s haven’t claimed it’s due to Brexit! Removed
443
25/02/2021 12:04:10 11 62
bbc
Why not? There loyalties are to shareholders not staff. Business is there to make profits & the more the better. They are not obliged to keep people in paid employment. They have their own priorities. If people dont like it, they can always go and start their own business. They may have a different view then.
632
25/02/2021 12:35:44 12 1
bbc
That’s greedy capitalism for you.
633
25/02/2021 12:36:06 6 8
bbc
It's almost as if the business doesn't exist for the reason of employing people but to maximise profits.
Which I hope all businesses do. As that is their role. Rather than charity.
697
25/02/2021 12:52:00 4 9
bbc
Yeah let’s ban capitalism and have everybody as equals and see how that @#£&s up the country even more
774
25/02/2021 13:07:37 7 0
bbc
Then off to spend it in Dubai.
978
25/02/2021 13:52:33 3 1
bbc
Don't forget the generous donation to the Tory party so the Gov turns a blind eye
20
25/02/2021 11:06:31 22 23
bbc
headline: 5000 jobs at risk.. article: 5000 (lower skilled) jobs COULD be at risk.. company plans to create 4500 (higher skilled) jobs.. worst case is loss of 500 lower skilled jobs but 1000s higher skilled jobs.. but pos creating more jobs anyway

But instead of saying ASDA is actually showing initiative to protect jobs long term by adapting to the times.. we get sensationalised hyperbole
42
Jay
25/02/2021 11:09:52 4 7
bbc
Spot on!
61
25/02/2021 11:12:14 2 3
bbc
Actually not reported here is that a number of those losing jobs would move over to the on-line push.
Asda are "hoping" their plans would result in a net 1500 gain.
Not sure where you got the notion these jobs would all be highly skilled.
71
25/02/2021 11:13:11 2 3
bbc
In-store pickers are higher skilled jobs? Right...
72
25/02/2021 11:13:18 2 5
bbc
Typical BBC.
120
25/02/2021 11:18:41 1 2
bbc
But it says they are cutting in store management posts to move to more on line working. That is replacing higher paid skilled workers with lower paid pickers. The complete opposite of what you are suggesting.
7
25/02/2021 11:03:50 13 15
bbc
With the jobs market moving towards automation, universal basic income is inevitable and should not just be looked at as some lefty nonsense.
21
25/02/2021 11:06:45 11 13
bbc
Nope, it is still lefty nonsense.
7
25/02/2021 11:03:50 13 15
bbc
With the jobs market moving towards automation, universal basic income is inevitable and should not just be looked at as some lefty nonsense.
22
25/02/2021 11:06:57 0 6
bbc
It would help solve so many problems (massively reduce housing debt, almost eliminate poverty, physical/mental health/NHS) and prepare our country for the future of our economy and lead to a fairer society... cost less in long run... but why isn’t it being seriously looked at?
148
25/02/2021 11:21:51 3 0
bbc
How does it cost less in the long run?
And where it has been trialled in other countries it has not been adopted, why is that?
13
25/02/2021 11:05:39 351 9
bbc
Weren’t supermarkets pretty much the only ones to prosper during Covid?. This is someway to repay the staff that kept going during all this. Awful way to treat staff.
23
25/02/2021 11:06:58 21 131
bbc
Can't see the shop floor workers being affected
179
xlr
25/02/2021 11:25:24 23 3
bbc
You can't?

Here's a scenario for you: you have permanent employees that you have to pay redundancy to and have a potential to launch unfair dismissal claims if the reason for redundancy isn't good enough or alternative employment is not offered.

And you have temps you can get rid of in a moment. No rights. No union membership.

Hmm, who is it going to be who takes the brunt of that...
306
Pip
25/02/2021 11:41:48 4 1
bbc
Just longer queue's at the checkouts................?
504
25/02/2021 12:14:07 3 0
bbc
Has at sainsburys.
532
25/02/2021 12:18:07 1 0
bbc
As those who were "forced" to be grocery shopping "online" return to in-store shopping to avoid the "minimum basket charge" AND "delivery charge" for every shop, the numbers of shop floor workers taken on for picking orders will be reduced. The fact that cuts could also affect two online-only stores where orders are picked highlights this for sure given that online-only stores = "growth".
762
25/02/2021 13:04:37 2 0
bbc
No they won't be beco they will allready be on bottom £ contract's while those of more lucrative ones will be let go and offered lessoney or less hours to 'keep a job"
25/02/2021 14:36:40 0 0
bbc
?????????
25/02/2021 15:27:10 2 0
bbc
Is that because you dont know what you are talking about?
That kind of culture spreads from top of the organisation very quickly, and its virtually impossible to reset to the original happy and profitable one..because CEOs dont understand workplace psychology...or its relationship to profit
26/02/2021 00:15:01 0 0
bbc
I can
24
25/02/2021 11:07:16 6 4
bbc
It's great that 1) our essential frontline workers are being respected cared for so well, and 2) the economy has been saved by the govt's decisions.

...Oh, wait...
25
25/02/2021 11:07:28 10 10
bbc
' Could ' put about 5000 jobs at risk .

Plans to create 4500 jobs .

Net loss circa 500 .

Hardly deserving of the headline is it ?
100
25/02/2021 11:15:44 2 1
bbc
COULD create - emphasis on the COULD. That is simple PR.
2
25/02/2021 11:02:10 109 5
bbc
They think they can run a Supermarket chain the same way they run Petrol Stations?? Outstanding service with no or very few staff.
26
25/02/2021 11:07:28 11 4
bbc
yep, same as when they introduced the self service tils, thinking there was no need to have til staff. I refuse to use a self service in my main shop, I have enough times when scanning a couple of things when I have to keep asking for the staff to pop across.
226
25/02/2021 11:31:34 13 0
bbc
I'm aware of one chain that did this in an area where many of the ethnically diverse residents do not speak English or have bank accounts.

The checkout staff are overworked and the automatic tills go unused.

As a visually-impaired person I cannot use automated tills.
.
27
25/02/2021 11:07:32 368 6
bbc
This is purely to do with the brothers to make a nice profit. Buy a business using cheap credit, then make it super efficient by redundancies etc. Then get a nice little profit. Nothing to do with covid. Purely to do with corporate restructuring to maximise your investment (not giving two hoots about loyal employees etc).
243
25/02/2021 11:33:47 62 227
bbc
Out of interest, what exactly are 'loyal employees'? Are these employees which turned down better offers elsewhere, or employees who - as is entirely human - were just happy to plod along, or maybe some other definition? Or was it perhaps just innocuous use of a trite phrase? And if the former, how many such employees do you reckon there are at ASDA?
358
25/02/2021 11:50:20 12 0
bbc
Best approach as a customer is to vote with your feet and use another company you feel better looks after their staff. Unfortunately I forsee allot more cost cutting in the future across just about every company.
447
25/02/2021 12:04:40 5 9
bbc
Yep, thats the way business works.
634
25/02/2021 12:36:56 1 0
bbc
So "make it efficient" rather than "employ people just for the sake of it. That you don't need. Just because."
708
25/02/2021 12:54:21 3 1
bbc
Sadly from my experience employees are anything but loyal in the main more like mercenaries
722
25/02/2021 12:56:14 4 0
bbc
Let’s not forget the government’s role in this by (1) having no legislation to prevent such things happening (2) by legislating low limits on the redundancy entitlements of employees, making such practices financially viable (3) getting the tax payer to pay unemployment benefits instead of levying a charge on companies which make people redundant.
836
25/02/2021 13:17:11 3 1
bbc
You mean businesses are supposed to make a profit! There's a new idea to run with! Maybe we should nationalise the company involved so we can stop that silly behaviour.
28
25/02/2021 11:07:50 19 2
bbc
So what happens if shopping habits return to normal following the easing of lockdown measures?
109
25/02/2021 11:17:03 4 3
bbc
then the company will respond to that change when appropriate. Burying head in sand and waiting for "return" is no way to safeguard the future.
629
25/02/2021 12:35:18 0 0
bbc
they get rid of all agency labour and temporary staff.
29
25/02/2021 11:08:10 33 8
bbc
I like to feel the goods I buy like fruit and veg before I get them.
I can walk to 3 supermarkets easily from my home.
I pass 2 supermarkets on my way home from the school run.

Online food shopping is not for me, it has no advantage for me.
Change for change sake is not progress.
78
25/02/2021 11:13:44 16 1
bbc
"change for change sake"? Err, ask your fellow school run people, the world is changing, not everyone moves, but when they do, the world of retailing must reflect that, which is exactly what is happening.

I too prefer to shop in person, but many of my neighbours don't and moved online even before the pandemic required them to "shield" due to their age.
115
25/02/2021 11:17:41 5 0
bbc
I hope you aren’t groping all the food and putting it back in these dangerous COVID times!?
150
25/02/2021 11:22:26 5 0
bbc
Not certain how your feeling fruit and veg fits with Covid surely you should only touch what you are buying not spreading your germs and virus's all over
869
25/02/2021 13:25:37 0 0
bbc
You are very fortunate to have the choice. Me also-living in rural community.

Perhaps move to small scale, even in large conurbations, to move away from Corporate giants and give the customer what they actually want/need-perhaps.

Can we not have the dog wagging the tail, rather than it is [allegedly] at present?!
30
25/02/2021 11:08:21 104 4
bbc
Consulting with workers over a major restructuring of the business...

We want to reduce expenses, vastly increase profits and get our current workers to do way more for the exact same amount.

Gotcha.
729
25/02/2021 12:58:09 14 5
bbc
My local ASDA shop has installed new massive self service checkouts, so now they don't need as much workers as they used to in the past.
25/02/2021 20:26:56 0 0
bbc
Once bosses were allowed to stop overtime enhancements, over 30 years ago, your average worker was on the slippery slope to having to do more for no more money or leave. Thatcher made sure union strength was weakened so workers were totally exposed to the whims of employers.
31
25/02/2021 11:08:27 5 2
bbc
Shameful, and completely disappointed. Asda is never a company who contribute positively to the already very fragile business ecosystem.
9
25/02/2021 11:03:56 929 23
bbc
Well, that didn't take long, did it? Who could have predicted the recent debt-funded sale would result in job losses?
32
25/02/2021 11:08:35 40 5
bbc
Couldn't have put it better.
33
25/02/2021 11:08:37 113 1
bbc
Of course its nothing to do with the new owners purchasing Asda worth over 6 billion pounds for 780 million and then lumping the rest onto Asda as debt!!
844
25/02/2021 13:18:50 11 0
bbc
Of course not!

We can ALL see that-can't we?
25/02/2021 16:53:56 1 0
bbc
I'm not seeking to defend Asda's plans for its workers. But purchasing the £6.8bn Asda for £780m cash and £6.02bn debt is no different from Joe Public buying a house with a deposit of 11.5% and a mortgage of 88.5%, and no-one thinks that is despicable.
34
25/02/2021 11:08:42 8 4
bbc
This was to be expected as the business needs to pay down it's debts and reward the shareholders for taking risks with other people's money. That is the PE model.
35
25/02/2021 11:08:48 81 3
bbc
I think a lot more customers in the past year have realised the potential savings by obtaining elements within their regular shop elsewhere - and former owners the US Walton family saw the writing on the wall. If Aldi and Lidl start offering reliable home deliveries anytime soon, Asda will then feel an even bigger hit.
255
01
25/02/2021 11:12:24 55 8
bbc
I've saved a fortune by shopping locally as less impulse purchases and waste. I doubt I'll ever go to a big supermarket again, too time consuming, too many kids and too stressful.
725
25/02/2021 12:57:03 2 2
bbc
I can't see Aldi and Lidl offering home deliveries. You can never find the same product two weeks running on their shelves.

Unless you are prepared to pay for what they choose to give you, of whatever quality and not for what you want, it wouldn't work. In other words - back to the 1970s.
25/02/2021 17:33:13 0 0
bbc
I suspect that the Walton family saw the writing on the wall and jettisoned a doomed part of the business. I feel for the colleagues and the section leaders who have just had jobs and progression pulled from under them.
36
25/02/2021 11:08:55 459 4
bbc
headline should be "debt funded Asda buyout by petrol brothers leads to 5,000 job losses"
158
25/02/2021 11:23:07 41 226
bbc
500 job losses not 5,000
37
25/02/2021 11:09:30 214 1
bbc
Billions in debt - That's ASDA price!!
224
25/02/2021 11:31:28 56 23
bbc
I’m hoping something positive may come of it.
The abolition of those chavvy adverts where some clown slaps their backside to the jungle of imaginary coins in a virtual cashless society.
38
25/02/2021 11:09:33 40 3
bbc
These 2 brothers are very ruthless. Goes to show when they bought most of the houses in the area they live in Blackburn only to mock them down then rebuild for all there family to move in.
860
25/02/2021 13:23:04 3 5
bbc
Wow!
Shocking.
How did they getaway with that.

Mmmm- let me think. Same way as contracts are awarded to old boys network [allegedly].

Everything in the public arena SHOULD be publicly accountable and the public, being within a Democratic state, should demand NOTHING less!
39
25/02/2021 11:09:38 21 4
bbc
Picking online orders in a normal store is not great, you get two or three in the same aisle and then everyone gets 'stuck' and you may as well go and get something else, except you are supposed to go one-way. If they don't want separate stores at least get most done before main shopping hours.
898
25/02/2021 13:33:16 2 0
bbc
If shopping online is the New Norm. Stores as they are will have to go.

Might make sense to have a large hub to service community needs?

I think it is called progress?
40
25/02/2021 11:09:47 1 1
bbc
I suggest Asda takes another look at its available delivery and C&C slots before making these wholesale changes. Take up has fallen through the floor since the lockdown exit plan was announced.
152
25/02/2021 11:22:40 0 0
bbc
I think all the supermarkets are the same - all booked up as soon as the slots appear.
41
Jim
25/02/2021 11:09:48 28 3
bbc
Purchasing companies through debt that is then placed onto the company is obscene

Well ran companies then have to find efficiencies (redundancy), new owners dont care for the staff.

Move to online will decimate retail jobs. Yes, there will be jobs created in packing & delivery, but how soon before that is all automated? It might cost a few more pence, but i prefer to shop & keep people employed
20
25/02/2021 11:06:31 22 23
bbc
headline: 5000 jobs at risk.. article: 5000 (lower skilled) jobs COULD be at risk.. company plans to create 4500 (higher skilled) jobs.. worst case is loss of 500 lower skilled jobs but 1000s higher skilled jobs.. but pos creating more jobs anyway

But instead of saying ASDA is actually showing initiative to protect jobs long term by adapting to the times.. we get sensationalised hyperbole
42
Jay
25/02/2021 11:09:52 4 7
bbc
Spot on!
43
25/02/2021 11:09:58 7 6
bbc
The Asda near me has about 20 self scan tills staffed by 2 people,get the shopper to do the work and buy the product?
65
25/02/2021 11:12:57 6 2
bbc
Where possible, I never use them. If supermarkets struggled to make a profit, I'd understand.
90
25/02/2021 11:15:08 2 0
bbc
We can resist this by only using tills with real people working earning wages (and paying taxes), same applies to banks etc
165
25/02/2021 11:23:58 1 0
bbc
How do they pick which shoppers take deliveries, stack the shelves etc.?

And do those shoppers get some discount for that?
You try manning 20 tills whilst having morons click their fingers, wave their arms in the air and shout and youll see how difficult it is. The tills are called Self Scan for a reason you muppet Removed
44
25/02/2021 11:10:04 2 29
bbc
ASDA is owned by Walmart. What do you expect?
51
25/02/2021 11:11:26 14 1
bbc
Not any more.
54
Jim
25/02/2021 11:11:31 4 1
bbc
no, its been sold
57
25/02/2021 11:11:55 2 1
bbc
They bought Asda back then?
58
Kev
25/02/2021 11:12:01 3 1
bbc
66
25/02/2021 11:13:00 4 1
bbc
Asda isn't owned by Wal-Mart
67
25/02/2021 11:13:04 3 1
bbc
Sadly you're behind the times - Walmart sold it for two Comics and a Lucky Bag!
70
25/02/2021 11:13:11 1 1
bbc
I expect to be up to date with events, sadly you are not. Check who now owns Asda.
73
25/02/2021 11:13:20 3 1
bbc
where have you been recently?! Walmart only remain a minority shareholder. Majority shareholder are a major forecourt operator funded by huge debt.
These changes are nothing compared to what is coming!
77
25/02/2021 11:13:44 2 0
bbc
Not any more
81
25/02/2021 11:14:03 2 0
bbc
Try and keep up.........
86
25/02/2021 11:14:42 3 0
bbc
No it doesn't. The Issa brothers own Asda. This is touted as an efficiency drive, aka asset stripping.
89
25/02/2021 11:14:52 1 0
bbc
Not any more. It was recently sold the the British Issa brothers.
199
25/02/2021 11:28:10 0 0
bbc
Where have you been hiding, bpmkent?
254
25/02/2021 11:12:14 0 0
bbc
It isn’t
325
25/02/2021 11:30:43 1 1
bbc
Quite clearly an ironic comment. Not sure why so many people have been upset by it.
350
25/02/2021 11:49:00 0 0
bbc
Who is voting down a matter of fact, not opinion on the ownership of ASDA
45
25/02/2021 11:10:05 219 8
bbc
Well done Issa brothers. Come in and ruin 5000 people’s livelihoods. The same ones who have worked solidly and under tough conditions over the last year while risking them selves. As for creating 4500 jobs, order pickers and drivers paid bottom rate vs 1000 management jobs. Asda has gone down hill store wise already lately. This will only fuel this further.
467
25/02/2021 12:07:44 123 2
bbc
It went down hill when Associated Dairies (who started it) sold it to Walmart!
663
25/02/2021 12:44:05 8 9
bbc
Let me ask you a question. If you could run a business with zero staff would you not do it? ASDA has reduced the amount of employees it needs by using technology like self service checkouts.
824
25/02/2021 13:15:01 0 0
bbc
I'm a little concerned/worried.

They, or someone came seem to add up, or account realistically for job losses/gains.

Cosmos help us all!!!!
25/02/2021 14:11:17 1 0
bbc
Are you suggesting too many chiefs not enough Indians? There's a novel idea!
46
25/02/2021 11:10:07 173 14
bbc
Asda make £Billions during the pandemic and reward their frontline workers with the sack. They should be receiving a huge bonus and nothing for the management.

If this is how Asda behaves, bring on the windfall tax and take ALL their excess profits.
112
25/02/2021 11:17:14 177 2
bbc
Having worked for them I can tell you this is the Asda way.
Year on year they would shout about how well they had done then at wage rise negotiations the money had gone! But the bonuses the top brass got were fabulous!
455
25/02/2021 12:05:59 3 2
bbc
"reward their frontline workers with the sack"
"bring on the windfall tax and take ALL their excess profits."
I'm sure that will help.
512
25/02/2021 12:15:32 1 3
bbc
Not ASDA's fault - down to the NEW BILLIONAIRE OWNERS - the management of ASDA is still the same!
714
25/02/2021 12:55:27 3 2
bbc
Supermarkets are implementing technology like self service checkouts specially Asda , so now they need less workers. If you could run efficiently a supermarket with zero staff, I am sure you would do it?
25/02/2021 17:02:43 1 0
bbc
I wonder how you know they made £billions. Tesco the biggest supermarket company did not make £1b during the pandemic, most of the extra profit was use up by added expenses due to the pandemic which has not ended yet.
47
25/02/2021 11:11:16 6 1
bbc
This is nothing compared to the changes that will be coming. With so many forecourts run by the new owners and the move towards EVs Asda will undergo major change. Could be a rebranding of forecourts, the introduction of Asda 'Locals' and ways to engage motorists while they charge their cars. EVs take far longer to 'fill up' than current cars - Asda car parks will be used....
258
SAM
25/02/2021 11:34:59 2 0
bbc
Yeah, reading about EVs recently and one article said it took 7 hours to charge up - who's gonna stand around in a garage all that time! LOL
48
25/02/2021 11:11:19 0 2
bbc
Still, could be worse...
49
25/02/2021 11:11:20 45 5
bbc
Thanks for your hard work, made us a boat load of cash. Heres your reward... a P45!

Your welcome!
50
25/02/2021 11:11:22 2 2
bbc
Asda, with its high shelving has always struck me as the ideal place to catch Covid.
80
25/02/2021 11:13:59 9 2
bbc
It’s more the clientele and the lack of adherence to the wearing of face masks an social distancing that bothers me.
44
25/02/2021 11:10:04 2 29
bbc
ASDA is owned by Walmart. What do you expect?
51
25/02/2021 11:11:26 14 1
bbc
Not any more.
52
25/02/2021 11:11:27 31 2
bbc
Even more shameful behaviour from this abhorrent company. Shifting all their employees to worse T&Cs under the threat of the sack wasn't enough for them. Making record revenues in light of the pandemic also wasn't enough for them.

What is enough for them exactly?
75
25/02/2021 11:13:33 12 5
bbc
There is no such thing as enough in capitalism
143
25/02/2021 11:21:02 1 1
bbc
Giving £5m to build a new mosque do not forget...
53
25/02/2021 11:11:29 9 2
bbc
Store fulfilment doesn't work and will come back to bite them
147
25/02/2021 11:21:42 1 3
bbc
Actually have to disagree, it can work and has been in hundreds of tesco and sainsburys stores accross the uk during the pandemic
44
25/02/2021 11:10:04 2 29
bbc
ASDA is owned by Walmart. What do you expect?
54
Jim
25/02/2021 11:11:31 4 1
bbc
no, its been sold
55
25/02/2021 11:11:39 32 5
bbc
So they buy it with loans and then strip out the staff that helped build the business.

Shameful... not shopping there again.
56
25/02/2021 11:11:53 5 4
bbc
Everyone one seems so surprised and shocked!
It's been going on for years, companies have to alter the way they work as times change. More online and home delivery so less people in store. Automated tills in store so less staff required.
We all want cheaper groceries, that means cutting costs and running things lean. Then paying producers less.
The good thing is at least the jobs are being offset.
220
SAM
25/02/2021 11:31:10 1 0
bbc
You cannot get speedy online delivery! Try booking a delivery for tomorrow/next day/even next week - you can't. Shoppers don't order 2-3 weeks ahead! I order what I need when I need it. Easier to visit the supermarket and get it that day. I'm also not averse to handing over a fully laden trolley and telling them to put it back when I'm dissatisfied with their service ... done it before!
44
25/02/2021 11:10:04 2 29
bbc
ASDA is owned by Walmart. What do you expect?
57
25/02/2021 11:11:55 2 1
bbc
They bought Asda back then?
44
25/02/2021 11:10:04 2 29
bbc
ASDA is owned by Walmart. What do you expect?
58
Kev
25/02/2021 11:12:01 3 1
bbc
59
25/02/2021 11:12:02 5 18
bbc
ANOTHER BREXIT BONUS

All the people being made redundant at Ellesmere Port won't be able to get jobs in supermarkets

Looks like we wiill all be on zero hours slavery

And God forbid you refuse your boss sex
(The good old days)
76
25/02/2021 11:13:41 12 5
bbc
What a plonker! ^^
133
25/02/2021 11:19:55 0 0
bbc
Thats not Brexit that is a change in the car industry and car makers demanding cash (Its usually called blackmail) for keeping the factory open. Let them close it and lets reopen it as a new UK vehicle plant with UK inventions being used to create cars (or whatever they will be called) only others copy.
349
25/02/2021 11:48:49 1 0
bbc
Nothing to do with Brexit
60
Bob
25/02/2021 11:12:10 12 3
bbc
There's a distinct whiff of dodgyness about this ASDA deal, and some of the other deals done by this group and/or TDR.
20
25/02/2021 11:06:31 22 23
bbc
headline: 5000 jobs at risk.. article: 5000 (lower skilled) jobs COULD be at risk.. company plans to create 4500 (higher skilled) jobs.. worst case is loss of 500 lower skilled jobs but 1000s higher skilled jobs.. but pos creating more jobs anyway

But instead of saying ASDA is actually showing initiative to protect jobs long term by adapting to the times.. we get sensationalised hyperbole
61
25/02/2021 11:12:14 2 3
bbc
Actually not reported here is that a number of those losing jobs would move over to the on-line push.
Asda are "hoping" their plans would result in a net 1500 gain.
Not sure where you got the notion these jobs would all be highly skilled.
62
25/02/2021 11:12:17 24 15
bbc
Classic click bait headline.....

The real headline should be!

"Asda creating more online jobs but cut 500 management roles"

Believable
Broadcaster
Certainly not!
79
25/02/2021 11:13:54 12 4
bbc
4500 jobs on bottom rate vs 1100 management jobs and many other support roles. When you’re on the side of the rich you should take a look in the mirror.
123
25/02/2021 11:18:56 0 3
bbc
Wow they are cutting more than 500 management jobs, wake up before commenting please
173
SAM
25/02/2021 11:25:05 6 0
bbc
Not management roles being cut. I was in Asda last week bemoaning lack of checkouts open when so many staff around (Sainsburys exactly the same), but was told that they are cutting out half the checkouts in April anyway. Not all of us want that. Some elderly customers like the checkouts to have a natter -
sometimes its their only social contact for the day.
63
25/02/2021 11:12:48 209 12
bbc
I don't know about anyone else but it drives me mad that supermarkets like Asda are now clogged up with staff picking online orders, especially in these days of social distancing. Separate dedicated warehouses for online sales surely make more sense and have to be more efficient. I hate shopping and want to be in, find what I need quickly and on my way. I don't want an obstacle course.
116
25/02/2021 11:17:53 91 3
bbc
Couldn't agree more!
131
25/02/2021 11:19:37 4 16
bbc
Its the future, get used to it
198
25/02/2021 11:28:06 11 0
bbc
That’s never going to happen with the current owners in charge. Shoe string expenditure and billionaire profits will be their goal
212
25/02/2021 11:29:33 8 1
bbc
How could it be more efficient? Would you build one next to each store or have only a few with lorries driving hundreds of miles to make deliveries?
313
25/02/2021 11:28:33 12 0
bbc
I totally agree! There are more staff parking there large trailers diagonally across the aisles than any other shoppers on my local Asda.
475
25/02/2021 12:09:12 2 11
bbc
I dont care, I order online.
536
25/02/2021 12:18:31 5 6
bbc
Buy online then
742
25/02/2021 13:00:17 8 9
bbc
Ocado have online only warehouses so you know everything you buy hasn't been sitting on a shelf for weeks being pawed and coughed on by pensioners.
894
25/02/2021 13:31:38 3 0
bbc
Totally agree..and they dont social distance from ordinary shoppers either
907
25/02/2021 13:36:45 2 0
bbc
Agree, but look on the bright side: those order-pickers are removing all the just-in-date goods off the shelves for the online customers, leaving the long-dated goods for the rest of us!??
25/02/2021 14:27:27 0 0
bbc
don't think you understand retail efficiency.
Ocardo has taken decades to make a profit using the business model you promote. In contrast Sainsburys made profits from the get go using a "deliver from existing supermarkets network" model.
64
25/02/2021 11:12:56 15 8
bbc
Net loss of about 500 jobs. New owners will always look at the way a business is run and make the changes needed to make them more cost effective. Maybe people haven't noticed that Asda has been on a slippery slope ever since Aldi and Lidl came to prominence, this move is obviously needed to turn the business round.
108
NP
25/02/2021 11:16:57 3 3
bbc
It is not as simple, new jobs will be in more like warehouse, delivery and loading. Their job profile will be different and pay grade. Only who are willing to accept change in contract, pay will able to move and capable of doing as well. Rest will be change of guard.

End of the day employees count difference will be 50 for sure. Hard to understand business decision even after years in board rooms
43
25/02/2021 11:09:58 7 6
bbc
The Asda near me has about 20 self scan tills staffed by 2 people,get the shopper to do the work and buy the product?
65
25/02/2021 11:12:57 6 2
bbc
Where possible, I never use them. If supermarkets struggled to make a profit, I'd understand.
44
25/02/2021 11:10:04 2 29
bbc
ASDA is owned by Walmart. What do you expect?
66
25/02/2021 11:13:00 4 1
bbc
Asda isn't owned by Wal-Mart
44
25/02/2021 11:10:04 2 29
bbc
ASDA is owned by Walmart. What do you expect?
67
25/02/2021 11:13:04 3 1
bbc
Sadly you're behind the times - Walmart sold it for two Comics and a Lucky Bag!
68
25/02/2021 11:13:05 51 5
bbc
"Asda chief executive Roger Burnley said: "The pandemic has accelerated change across the retail sector"

Please allow me to translate that...

"Asda chief executive Roger Burnley said: "The pandemic has been a huge opportunity for us to cut jobs"

That's better!

There's always opportunity for vultures when they see a wounded creature.
104
25/02/2021 11:16:23 6 31
bbc
What are you on about. People affected are those dealing with physical cashflow... since lockdown millions have reverted to online.. ASDA is following standard business metrics. Get something better to do.
670
25/02/2021 12:45:53 5 0
bbc
I worked a few layers below Roger Burnley at Sainsburys - that translation sounds about right!
16
25/02/2021 11:05:54 19 2
bbc
The Asda slogan is ‘Save Money, live better’ (for the shareholders maybe)
69
25/02/2021 11:13:08 8 3
bbc
Private equity and 2 billionaires are the "shareholders"
44
25/02/2021 11:10:04 2 29
bbc
ASDA is owned by Walmart. What do you expect?
70
25/02/2021 11:13:11 1 1
bbc
I expect to be up to date with events, sadly you are not. Check who now owns Asda.
20
25/02/2021 11:06:31 22 23
bbc
headline: 5000 jobs at risk.. article: 5000 (lower skilled) jobs COULD be at risk.. company plans to create 4500 (higher skilled) jobs.. worst case is loss of 500 lower skilled jobs but 1000s higher skilled jobs.. but pos creating more jobs anyway

But instead of saying ASDA is actually showing initiative to protect jobs long term by adapting to the times.. we get sensationalised hyperbole
71
25/02/2021 11:13:11 2 3
bbc
In-store pickers are higher skilled jobs? Right...
176
25/02/2021 11:25:08 1 2
bbc
And delivery drivers who are people skilled in being able to drive.
20
25/02/2021 11:06:31 22 23
bbc
headline: 5000 jobs at risk.. article: 5000 (lower skilled) jobs COULD be at risk.. company plans to create 4500 (higher skilled) jobs.. worst case is loss of 500 lower skilled jobs but 1000s higher skilled jobs.. but pos creating more jobs anyway

But instead of saying ASDA is actually showing initiative to protect jobs long term by adapting to the times.. we get sensationalised hyperbole
72
25/02/2021 11:13:18 2 5
bbc
Typical BBC.
44
25/02/2021 11:10:04 2 29
bbc
ASDA is owned by Walmart. What do you expect?
73
25/02/2021 11:13:20 3 1
bbc
where have you been recently?! Walmart only remain a minority shareholder. Majority shareholder are a major forecourt operator funded by huge debt.
These changes are nothing compared to what is coming!
74
Bob
25/02/2021 11:13:23 7 4
bbc
Headline is missleading. 5000 at risk but 4500 being created.

Times are changing no one is shocked by this.
88
NP
25/02/2021 11:14:45 0 2
bbc
Else won't you comment?
102
25/02/2021 11:15:59 2 0
bbc
BBC
139
25/02/2021 11:20:26 1 0
bbc
5000 jobs at risk but a plan to create 4500 jobs. Not an absolute but a hope.

Times have changed and things are never solid.

If you go into any supermarket today you will see reduced staff at front of house.
All shops will increase staff as and when requirements are known.
52
25/02/2021 11:11:27 31 2
bbc
Even more shameful behaviour from this abhorrent company. Shifting all their employees to worse T&Cs under the threat of the sack wasn't enough for them. Making record revenues in light of the pandemic also wasn't enough for them.

What is enough for them exactly?
75
25/02/2021 11:13:33 12 5
bbc
There is no such thing as enough in capitalism
25/02/2021 15:18:16 0 0
bbc
Capitalism is just freedom to buy what you want, where you want. If people shop more and more at places like Amazon , Ocado etc etc, this is what happens. You get what you deserve. The alternative is that you are dictated to, but from a single source with no choice, pay the price - again with no choice. Think being a consumer in China or Cuba or North Korea’s better ?
59
25/02/2021 11:12:02 5 18
bbc
ANOTHER BREXIT BONUS

All the people being made redundant at Ellesmere Port won't be able to get jobs in supermarkets

Looks like we wiill all be on zero hours slavery

And God forbid you refuse your boss sex
(The good old days)
76
25/02/2021 11:13:41 12 5
bbc
What a plonker! ^^
44
25/02/2021 11:10:04 2 29
bbc
ASDA is owned by Walmart. What do you expect?
77
25/02/2021 11:13:44 2 0
bbc
Not any more
29
25/02/2021 11:08:10 33 8
bbc
I like to feel the goods I buy like fruit and veg before I get them.
I can walk to 3 supermarkets easily from my home.
I pass 2 supermarkets on my way home from the school run.

Online food shopping is not for me, it has no advantage for me.
Change for change sake is not progress.
78
25/02/2021 11:13:44 16 1
bbc
"change for change sake"? Err, ask your fellow school run people, the world is changing, not everyone moves, but when they do, the world of retailing must reflect that, which is exactly what is happening.

I too prefer to shop in person, but many of my neighbours don't and moved online even before the pandemic required them to "shield" due to their age.
137
25/02/2021 11:20:23 1 2
bbc
True but its not for me.

As for talking to school runners. Im a dad and we just nod to each other, its mums who do the talking (and lots of it).

Lol
870
25/02/2021 13:26:11 0 0
bbc
Exactly!

Needs to change to fit.
955
25/02/2021 13:46:41 1 0
bbc
People have become lazier and fatter in case you hadn't noticed.
Just a walk if brisk enough is good for you.
62
25/02/2021 11:12:17 24 15
bbc
Classic click bait headline.....

The real headline should be!

"Asda creating more online jobs but cut 500 management roles"

Believable
Broadcaster
Certainly not!
79
25/02/2021 11:13:54 12 4
bbc
4500 jobs on bottom rate vs 1100 management jobs and many other support roles. When you’re on the side of the rich you should take a look in the mirror.
50
25/02/2021 11:11:22 2 2
bbc
Asda, with its high shelving has always struck me as the ideal place to catch Covid.
80
25/02/2021 11:13:59 9 2
bbc
It’s more the clientele and the lack of adherence to the wearing of face masks an social distancing that bothers me.
44
25/02/2021 11:10:04 2 29
bbc
ASDA is owned by Walmart. What do you expect?
81
25/02/2021 11:14:03 2 0
bbc
Try and keep up.........
82
sap
25/02/2021 11:14:06 1 1
bbc
Typical Rich Big Boys come in and Asda you knew jobs would be lost, always restructure when taken over
83
25/02/2021 11:14:19 4 1
bbc
Supermarkets have gained during the pandemic. If anything, they should be creating jobs, not lining their own pockets.
84
25/02/2021 11:14:25 8 2
bbc
Once the pandemic is over, people will mainly go back to shopping in supermarkets. Online ordering is frustrating because often substitutes are provided.
124
SAM
25/02/2021 11:19:08 4 2
bbc
You can select not to receive substitutes, but sometimes when I've done that I not received anything at all..to me the most frustrating is that when I ordered 10 very small tins of cat foot from Morrisons on line they applied their restrictions of essential products to this and reduced it to 3 tins - not even one days meals for my cats - of which I had 3 then.
85
25/02/2021 11:14:32 5 1
bbc
They’re buying on the cheap, to maximise their potential profits they’re initiating a so called restructuring before off loading the profitable sections, then they’ll walk away leaving just the embers of the business, shameful.
44
25/02/2021 11:10:04 2 29
bbc
ASDA is owned by Walmart. What do you expect?
86
25/02/2021 11:14:42 3 0
bbc
No it doesn't. The Issa brothers own Asda. This is touted as an efficiency drive, aka asset stripping.
87
25/02/2021 11:14:43 1 5
bbc
Absolutely no surprise.

Businesses need to continually evolve to be competitive - Covid is forcing change on all businesses if they want to survive.
74
Bob
25/02/2021 11:13:23 7 4
bbc
Headline is missleading. 5000 at risk but 4500 being created.

Times are changing no one is shocked by this.
88
NP
25/02/2021 11:14:45 0 2
bbc
Else won't you comment?
142
Bob
25/02/2021 11:21:00 2 0
bbc
Who's Else?
44
25/02/2021 11:10:04 2 29
bbc
ASDA is owned by Walmart. What do you expect?
89
25/02/2021 11:14:52 1 0
bbc
Not any more. It was recently sold the the British Issa brothers.
43
25/02/2021 11:09:58 7 6
bbc
The Asda near me has about 20 self scan tills staffed by 2 people,get the shopper to do the work and buy the product?
90
25/02/2021 11:15:08 2 0
bbc
We can resist this by only using tills with real people working earning wages (and paying taxes), same applies to banks etc
91
25/02/2021 11:15:11 8 1
bbc
What a disgrace, supermarkets have cleaned up over the last year , ASDA staff deserve some respect in challenging times , I wonder if the new jobs created will pay like for like ? Vote with your feet people plenty of other supermarkets out there.
92
PS
25/02/2021 11:15:12 11 1
bbc
Any, any, new Boss that sits in the chair will always want to change the systems etc they inherit. Are people really surprised? What will be interesting is to see how this so called restructuring effects the customers. Too often have we seen less staff on the shop floor leaving customers bewildered. ASDA is not a petrol garage!
93
25/02/2021 11:15:20 1 1
bbc
High levels of personal debt during a pandemic and/or a socio-economic schism.

Fatal.
94
25/02/2021 11:03:59 6 1
bbc
We’re all expendable. At the mercy of profits as per usual
95
25/02/2021 11:04:01 25 1
bbc
What a wonderful way for those of us who work for asda to find out
122
25/02/2021 11:18:44 1 21
bbc
If you haven't heard before, obviously you are not one of those affected.
271
01
25/02/2021 11:19:13 5 0
bbc
It's common practice to learn of one's redundancy in the media first. It saves cowardly managers doing it.
96
25/02/2021 11:05:30 3 3
bbc
Asda 'could' lose 5000 jobs but 'will' create 4500 more jobs due to change in our shopping patterns.
But the BBC could not resist the 'breaking news' headline
Surprised they didn't try to spin the story to include blaming it on Brexit as is norm
187
25/02/2021 11:26:55 1 0
bbc
Because the 4500 jobs are bottom dollar picking and driving jobs. The 5000 are mainly not. Wake up. Have compassion to your fellow man rather than the millionaires.
97
25/02/2021 11:06:36 27 2
bbc
Less checkouts at our local asda ... more self scan ... pass the work onto the shopper but not the price savings
186
25/02/2021 11:26:54 11 1
bbc
yep and the occasions I have had to use a self service (when only needing the odd item) and the red light goes up as the self service can't recognise the weight of a packet mix or anything light
879
25/02/2021 13:28:00 0 0
bbc
It is the way the world goes-progresses.
Job lost in on sector ca be made in another.

It does beg the question-do we as Humankind now need to work as much?

Maybe a re-think on everything, especially where the Planets needs is involved?
98
joe
25/02/2021 11:15:26 17 2
bbc
Asda high management.

Slapping all that extra dosh saved by job cuts in rear pocket. "Ching ching"

That's Asda profit!

For the few at the top.
99
25/02/2021 11:15:26 24 3
bbc
It is short sighted to assume those who currently shop on line will continue to do so. As an elderly family, we have had to shop on line but can't wait to get back to choosing our own stuff.
For example, we want to buy English tomatoes and British beef, but it can be impossible to specify. While the pickers do their best, I do prefer picking my own meat, veg etc. Looking forward to my second jab!
893
25/02/2021 13:31:33 2 3
bbc
Nice concept.

Does this mean you will only have tomatoes when in season?
Do you ever buy melons?

All well and good buying "British".

I would rather the world all work together in order to enhance the "richness'" and variety of things, but not at the expense of our beautiful home-this planet.
25
25/02/2021 11:07:28 10 10
bbc
' Could ' put about 5000 jobs at risk .

Plans to create 4500 jobs .

Net loss circa 500 .

Hardly deserving of the headline is it ?
100
25/02/2021 11:15:44 2 1
bbc
COULD create - emphasis on the COULD. That is simple PR.
183
25/02/2021 11:26:23 1 0
bbc
And the BBC also use COULD to describe the number of job losses, so what's your point because according to your logic the job loss figure is just PR too?