Heathrow passenger numbers fall to 1970s' levels
24/02/2021 | news | business | 1,068
Covid "devastated" air travel in 2020, the UK's largest airport says, as it sinks to a £2bn loss.
1
24/02/2021 10:19:06 82 17
bbc
Back to the days when only the wealthy could afford international travel then.

Quite right – we can’t have the plebs going abroad – that will never do !
51
24/02/2021 10:29:29 76 23
bbc
But expecting to fly to the Caribbean every year for a holiday as well as flying to a ski resort and a couple of city breaks - is wholly unrealistic and anti-social.

Yes, there are people who live like this and they aren't millionaires.
70
24/02/2021 10:31:36 9 8
bbc
A comment intended to divide and cause resentment. I feel sorry for your outlook on life.
Are you expecting international flight tickets as part of benefits claims?
The fact more people can now fly is a sign that for the majority, standard of living has improved.
132
24/02/2021 10:29:14 2 2
bbc
Don't forget your vaccine passport. The wealthy will be able to pay for all booster jabs / testing etc as well.
243
24/02/2021 10:57:33 1 1
bbc
Well, only to Spain.
447
24/02/2021 11:34:29 1 2
bbc
But Boris and his mates want us flying everywhere, asap..... bringing back the next variants that will see us shutdown again come October -
456
24/02/2021 11:36:01 1 1
bbc
Will there be a return of donkeys and sombreros?
2
24/02/2021 10:19:31 12 14
bbc
Greta will be incredibly pleased.
3
24/02/2021 10:20:08 19 15
bbc
Well, we are told to fly less to help the environment - can't have it both ways. I wish everything else was like it was during the 1970s.
6
24/02/2021 10:21:43 11 5
bbc
be careful what you wish for!!
14
24/02/2021 10:23:38 6 3
bbc
high unemployment, loads of strikes, not much in the shops, 3 day week, power cuts etc etc sure you still want the 70's back??
18
24/02/2021 10:24:32 6 3
bbc
Heavens no. It was awful. Three day week, national strikes, rubbish on the streets, raging inflation oh, and Jimmy Saville.
144
24/02/2021 10:34:04 1 2
bbc
What? Like Aircraft Hijacking's !!
4
24/02/2021 10:20:21 112 26
bbc
Good job too for the environment. See what David Attenborough has to say about the state of the planet,
28
24/02/2021 10:22:50 80 28
bbc
Exactly why we need to stop trucking goods three times around Europe as part of the single market.
155
Bob
24/02/2021 10:43:39 10 18
bbc
Ahh yes David who travels around the world interfering with nature. 'oh we never intervene when we see something bad happen' - Ironic when the cameras being there are the problem.
171
24/02/2021 10:46:26 19 6
bbc
You’re referring to a man that spent his whole life flying to almost every country in the world and further flying internally in each country making his documentaries. I adore the man but you have a very weak point here as his carbon footprint is immense!
251
24/02/2021 10:58:45 15 7
bbc
Ah yes, David "do as I say not as I do."

Now stay in your cave, pay your taxes and watch my programmes while I travel the world and preach your responsibilities to you.
400
24/02/2021 11:15:23 5 3
bbc
Attenborough and crew have probably done more Air Miles than anyone and by disturbing places in the Amazon and Borneo has threatened indigineous tribes with western cultures...
556
24/02/2021 11:58:04 2 2
bbc
Attenborough is the biggest hypocrite of all on this subject.
745
JGC
24/02/2021 13:13:06 0 0
bbc
Man who spends his life travelling to every corner of the world lectures others on how they should not be allowed to do the same.
5
24/02/2021 10:21:35 151 15
bbc
If one good thing comes out of C19, it's that nature is getting a slight reprieve.
266
24/02/2021 11:02:01 37 34
bbc
!970's level is still too high a level.
3
24/02/2021 10:20:08 19 15
bbc
Well, we are told to fly less to help the environment - can't have it both ways. I wish everything else was like it was during the 1970s.
6
24/02/2021 10:21:43 11 5
bbc
be careful what you wish for!!
15
24/02/2021 10:23:41 10 4
bbc
Why, I had 15% interest on my savings in those days. And roads had fewer pot holes. And we had Concorde.
31
24/02/2021 10:26:42 6 3
bbc
3 day week, militant unions, going to the IMF as a basket case,,,maybe not...but on the other hand no H&S culture, no virtue signaling professionals, no # rubbish, no 'influencers', no social media....actually you may have convinced me :-)!
7
24/02/2021 10:21:54 5 5
bbc
Remember it well, worrying about the sun melting the wax on the wings.
8
24/02/2021 10:22:07 228 63
bbc
Excellent news - now, if we can just get it back to 1930's levels, the planet might have a chance!
69
24/02/2021 10:31:30 160 22
bbc
Population numbers too!
142
24/02/2021 10:30:27 10 2
bbc
It needs population back to the "1930's levels" to achieve that !
185
24/02/2021 10:47:39 17 25
bbc
Wow!

Just because you cant afford to go on holiday and like to hug trees, it doesn't mean everyone else cant explore the world!
212
24/02/2021 10:52:09 9 21
bbc
ZZZZZZZZZZZZZ

Lets go back to the stone age or should we invade China and sterilize everyone in the name of the planet shall we?
258
24/02/2021 10:59:59 0 2
bbc
To give the planet a chance, I think you need a new compass.
399
Bob
24/02/2021 11:22:50 5 1
bbc
Passenger numbers might be down by percentages in the 80s and 90s range but aircraft movements are not down by anywhere near that.

In fact, cargo massively increased this year at Heathrow compared to last year.

Just because people aren't flying doesn't mean goods aren't either and a lot of passenger planes carry cargo.
462
24/02/2021 11:36:25 1 4
bbc
How apt that you mention the 1930's. The Nationalist Socialist German Workers party was indeed very popular at this time.

Judging by suggestions from some here a newer version is alive and well.

They say history repeats itself....

Now pass me that book on hydrocarbons and my lighter please...
523
24/02/2021 11:50:48 0 2
bbc
With covid I think the planet is already doing it for itself.
613
24/02/2021 12:11:56 0 0
bbc
What about 1930's levels of poverty, healthcare and...oh, yes...the Great Depression.
Give us that back and we are still just as subject to the cycles of natural climate change that have always happened. The human race would be poorer, sicker and fewer in number...
Wars over the reduced resources produced could throw in a new level of dystopia...but the carbon emissions would be down. ??
882
24/02/2021 15:17:08 0 2
bbc
You might be happy going to bognor or blackpool on holiday , millions wont be. Idiotic statements like that ,you can keep between you and your equally minded stupid friends, if you have any...
9
24/02/2021 10:22:19 252 27
bbc
Amazing isn't it, they want to ban our wood burning stoves and yet at the same time they want us flying everywhere! I do wish that they would make up their low carbon minds!
23
24/02/2021 10:25:55 53 81
bbc
I thought the wood burning stoves were a local emissions issue, not a global CO2 one.
73
Pip
24/02/2021 10:32:16 4 12
bbc
There low carbon minds, hide a lot of hot air I afraid, shame we can't find some use for it...............?
127
24/02/2021 10:39:47 8 9
bbc
Did "they" want Stanley Johnson to visit Greece during a global pandemic?
256
24/02/2021 10:59:35 9 21
bbc
How else would you suggest people get to the likes of Australia? Should we go back to sailing everywhere?

Get real
289
24/02/2021 11:05:13 0 8
bbc
one might even say their low intelligence minds are the issue..
310
T
24/02/2021 11:08:30 12 11
bbc
You're conflating two separate issues. Wood burning stoves emit dangerous particulate matter akin to diesel (worse actually), that puts vulnerable people at risk. The argument for not using them is not primarily down to CO2 emmissions.
631
24/02/2021 12:15:27 1 0
bbc
Its all horse trading . Building the 3rd runway means no vehicles , no wood burning stoves etc
845
24/02/2021 14:37:34 0 0
bbc
I think the undeniable inconsistency and contradiction might be something to do with the pots of lovely cash to be made on the back of spewing aero-engine fumes across our atmosphere, whereas the wood-burning stove market tends not to offer such a huge trough of cash for governments to encourage and exploit.
850
24/02/2021 14:40:20 0 0
bbc
But then again, steam powerred planes never really took off!
25/02/2021 12:38:25 0 0
bbc
they want people to fly and pollute and spread covid
10
24/02/2021 10:22:51 109 21
bbc
Good - does that mean we can now 100% stop the daft idea of building a not needed run way over the M25 to satisfy a market that no longer exists?
20
24/02/2021 10:25:05 43 104
bbc
Things will bounce back and just like HS2, the extra LHR runway will be needed.
50
24/02/2021 10:29:17 10 8
bbc
The 3rd runway wouldn’t be ready for use for another 15 years, seeing as you can see into the future can I have this weeks lottery numbers please.
11
24/02/2021 10:23:09 5 5
bbc
And others news. The popes a Catholic.
52
24/02/2021 10:29:32 4 2
bbc
Are the media not supposed to report these things because they are already 'known' or obvious? You make no sense whatsever.
86
24/02/2021 10:33:37 1 1
bbc
popes isnt!!!
12
24/02/2021 10:23:29 384 19
bbc
"The London airport has built a £15bn debt pile in the past decade while paying its shareholders several billion pounds in dividends."

Sums up modern business - line your pockets then get the plebs to pick up the bill when the cash runs out.
25
24/02/2021 10:26:06 178 9
bbc
Yes - I was just about to repost this quote myself. Says it all really. The modern business model in a nutshell.
137
24/02/2021 10:41:08 20 7
bbc
Deregulate shareholders' right to be protected by law.
173
24/02/2021 10:46:29 48 3
bbc
Privatisation for profit and socialisation of debt might seem to be "fair and reasonable" to those extracting the profits, not so much to the taxpayer who ends up bailing them out.
178
24/02/2021 10:47:36 44 3
bbc
Everything that's wrong with the UK in one sentence.
200
24/02/2021 10:49:16 17 2
bbc
And yet people do nothing about it (including those on this forum)
201
24/02/2021 10:49:22 16 3
bbc
It Leo says in the article that they have enough cash to stay in business until 2023, so unlike most businesses they’ve got contingencies and aren’t begging the taxpayer for cash.
209
24/02/2021 10:50:56 20 4
bbc
They have enough savings to last for another two years with most of their income/work/business pulled from under them.

Do you?
261
24/02/2021 11:01:01 16 3
bbc
Simple business model that all businesses are run on. You don't have to be a finance genius to know how business works. Similar to real world

2 years of available cash to cover running costs and expenses means they are in a ridiculously healthy position and not in any position for anyone needing to worry about bailing them out.

Debt is not a bad thing and is cheaper than shareholders returns!
312
24/02/2021 11:08:53 17 3
bbc
BT has a £20 billion debt pile .. and tries to fiddle its Pensioners ... with CPI rises and its customers with CPI + 3.9% rises. Its time for a UK awakening ... These Companies have not been working for UK Citizens. They are mining them.
342
Bob
24/02/2021 11:14:54 7 3
bbc
Not all debt is bad. Especially in times of low interest rates.

Being able to service the debt is all that matters.
346
col
24/02/2021 11:15:26 5 1
bbc
Your pensions own a lot of the shares, they are also profiting a lot from the lenders that hold that £15bn of debt.

for the record at the end of 2019 the company had about £800m more assets than liabilities and was making a profit. The dividend return was high, but no dividends will now be paid till at least 2022. Shareholders have money invested for zero return now. hardly theft is it?
411
24/02/2021 11:24:43 2 5
bbc
The reason is that people are sucked into being happy to support greedy capitalism.
443
24/02/2021 11:33:58 5 1
bbc
You do realise that equity and debt are just two ways of funding a business.

Each has their own cost.

When the balance shifts, you shift which form of funding you use.

If you don't allow business to take on debt to fund new investment, while paying dividends from the returns on previous investments, there's no incentive then to invest any futher.
469
24/02/2021 11:38:35 2 2
bbc
It's the way the country is run too.
560
24/02/2021 11:58:07 2 0
bbc
Judging by the scramble to book a holiday the plebs are more than willing to pay ??
963
24/02/2021 17:55:28 0 0
bbc
The infrastructure remains the banks will just take ownership and refloat at some future date

The only people who lose are the shareholders and they lose everything

I'm taking it you don't really understand business
25/02/2021 12:37:53 0 0
bbc
18 million people flew to UK during the pandemic
13
24/02/2021 10:23:32 45 2
bbc
So if the airlines are outraged then I assume they will not take advantage of the pent up demand by raising their prices when restrictions are lifted.
3
24/02/2021 10:20:08 19 15
bbc
Well, we are told to fly less to help the environment - can't have it both ways. I wish everything else was like it was during the 1970s.
14
24/02/2021 10:23:38 6 3
bbc
high unemployment, loads of strikes, not much in the shops, 3 day week, power cuts etc etc sure you still want the 70's back??
6
24/02/2021 10:21:43 11 5
bbc
be careful what you wish for!!
15
24/02/2021 10:23:41 10 4
bbc
Why, I had 15% interest on my savings in those days. And roads had fewer pot holes. And we had Concorde.
49
24/02/2021 10:29:07 3 9
bbc
roads had fewer cars and I believe Concord eventually crashed, not that many could actually afford to fly on it in the first place! And if you had 15% interest on your savings today imagine what the eyewatering interest rate would be on your mortgage!! Although I suspect you're probably retired on a nice pension and don't have a mortgage! In which case take the rose tinted specs off!!
359
24/02/2021 11:17:36 0 2
bbc
All of those thing crashed.
16
24/02/2021 10:24:01 89 15
bbc
I suppose its a forlorn hope that this will see the third runway plan dead and buried for good?
17
24/02/2021 10:24:20 136 12
bbc
It does beg the question do we need a third runway.

Heathrow's entire business model is built on increasing passenger numbers in the decades ahead. But will business travel ever return to pre-pandemic levels?
66
24/02/2021 10:31:22 123 10
bbc
Nope - many (who are not workaholic types who hate their family life) will see no further business travel as a bonus - loose lots of personal time, airports full of people pushing and shoving, long haul horrid flights (as most of us don't get to travel BC/FC!), jet lag, long days, fly back days later to do it all again..much prefer a 2 hour teams meeting - all done - next.
726
24/02/2021 12:59:45 5 0
bbc
This also undermines the case for HS2.
794
24/02/2021 13:50:54 2 0
bbc
it is an outdated model, that's why A380 production is being stopped, people want to travel point to point (not Hub and spoke). All new wide body jets (A350 / 777) can fly long distances from regional airports.
932
24/02/2021 16:24:34 1 0
bbc
The way global warming is going people won't need to travel abroad for the sun - Rhyl here we come (if we can breath the air by then)
991
24/02/2021 20:06:07 0 0
bbc
Lockdowns are unsustainable.
As they are eased, travel of all types will quickly increase.
It may take 3 years to reach pre-Covid levels
but it is fantasy to assume that current levels will persist.
If a post-Brexit UK is to survive, let alone prosper, our businessmen must get out there and the tourists must flood in.
We need good airports and other modern infrastructure.
3
24/02/2021 10:20:08 19 15
bbc
Well, we are told to fly less to help the environment - can't have it both ways. I wish everything else was like it was during the 1970s.
18
24/02/2021 10:24:32 6 3
bbc
Heavens no. It was awful. Three day week, national strikes, rubbish on the streets, raging inflation oh, and Jimmy Saville.
34
24/02/2021 10:27:23 6 2
bbc
GPs would do house visits routinely - even if you you had a cold or a stomach ache. House visits were the norm.
58
24/02/2021 10:30:11 6 2
bbc
Don’t forget Pans People....
19
SP
24/02/2021 10:24:36 6 15
bbc
For me growth of Heathrow in UK is directly related to growth of UK as a global player and its the symbol of Cosmopolitan culture of London

A smaller Heathrow is the sign of we are becoming inward looking insular nation

I love to see Heathrow again as busiest Airport in the world making London as most happening place in the world again
39
24/02/2021 10:28:03 5 5
bbc
Well said, and it’s another reason the travel industry and particularly the airlines need certainty and government help (as has happened elsewhere in Europe) without them our connectivity to the world will gibe with the likes of Ryanair and WIZZ and firmly put up the “ U.K. is closed for business” signs.
124
24/02/2021 10:38:57 0 3
bbc
Clsoe Heathrow down.
639
24/02/2021 12:17:35 0 0
bbc
I guess the anti-Heathrow types are insular brexit voters who hate foreigners?
10
24/02/2021 10:22:51 109 21
bbc
Good - does that mean we can now 100% stop the daft idea of building a not needed run way over the M25 to satisfy a market that no longer exists?
20
24/02/2021 10:25:05 43 104
bbc
Things will bounce back and just like HS2, the extra LHR runway will be needed.
120
24/02/2021 10:38:31 16 5
bbc
HS2 is going to cost £102bn and will take minutes off a train journey to the midlands from London in 2035.
274
24/02/2021 11:03:34 4 3
bbc
But we don't need any bouce-back.
506
24/02/2021 11:46:50 9 3
bbc
HS2 should be a dead duck. There was never any business case for it and we've proven for the past year there is no need to travel for meetings or even office based work in general
786
24/02/2021 13:42:02 1 1
bbc
Even in Europe covid is here to stay. Low uptake will guarantee it.

The only way it will be eradicated is if nature chooses to do itself.

In UK SPI-M forecast uptake leaves over 10m unvacc. Europe even more vacc sceptic.

So traveller isolation and at personal cost tests to fly and release means travel will be a rich mans luxury for at least this year.

And the planet will thank us for it.
21
24/02/2021 10:25:15 287 31
bbc
So no need to build a 3rd runway then.
89
24/02/2021 10:33:57 22 62
bbc
(facepalm)
170
24/02/2021 10:45:58 5 17
bbc
Pity. Boris gets away with it again.
282
24/02/2021 11:04:22 11 11
bbc
Spot on. 2nd runway needed @ Gatwick first if adding extra runways in order to have some competition unless tories want to drop the competition is good mantra once they their get backhanders....
339
24/02/2021 11:14:26 13 9
bbc
No need for a 2nd one at this rate. Many airports will close as a result of reduced passenger number, some will never travel abroad again, or at least not for a few years
375
24/02/2021 11:03:03 15 18
bbc
I hope that there is a £100 per flight tax after covid to help the economy recover.
425
Bob
24/02/2021 11:29:59 12 2
bbc
Might want to check out the other article from earlier in the week about people rushing to book holidays and booking numbers going through the roof.

Not to mention that airplane movements aren't down anywhere near the level that passenger numbers are down, with cargo plane movements actually increasing at Heathrow (presumably as they took advantage of empty pax plane slots).
528
24/02/2021 11:52:19 7 3
bbc
Too many humans = more runways, more planes, more cars etc etc.
Less humans = less planes = less runways = smaller airports.
531
24/02/2021 11:52:40 7 6
bbc
Replace it with the Thames Estuary platform that the Foster Report binned.
Excellent rail links to Europe.
See Kansai (Osaka) and Chep Lap Kok (Hong-Kong)
620
24/02/2021 12:13:49 3 0
bbc
wish ...but we all know its nothing to do with the amount of traffic
704
24/02/2021 12:41:58 2 1
bbc
Get rid of the second runway too!
837
24/02/2021 14:31:01 0 0
bbc
That is thinking in the past, the 2020 past. You need to think into the future.

Air travel is vital to a thriving future economy. And that third runway WILL be needed to reduce wasteful congestion.
22
DMT
24/02/2021 10:25:35 41 8
bbc
And quite right too as well for this particular year or two. Bearing in mind what’s happened worldwide, and is still happening, flying around the world just cannot be justified, not when we have things like telephones and E mails . Can’t actually believe the the Japanese Olympics is going ahead either, but I guess that’s another subject ( although linked ! )
328
sw
24/02/2021 11:12:24 8 4
bbc
Japanese government in favour of the Olympics, Japanese people not in favour. Very few vaccinations done in Japan, R number kept low with restricted access to the country.
540
24/02/2021 11:55:15 3 3
bbc
An e-mail/call is no substitute for seeing a dying relative/new born grandchild. Nor for experiencing the wedding/funeral of a loved one. And nor for seeing first hand the products/manufacturing processes to be assessed when setting up a trade deal.

As for the Olympics, would you feel differently if you were an elite athlete who has trained all your life (and perhaps missed Rio due to injury)?
9
24/02/2021 10:22:19 252 27
bbc
Amazing isn't it, they want to ban our wood burning stoves and yet at the same time they want us flying everywhere! I do wish that they would make up their low carbon minds!
23
24/02/2021 10:25:55 53 81
bbc
I thought the wood burning stoves were a local emissions issue, not a global CO2 one.
77
24/02/2021 10:32:30 32 7
bbc
Correct wood burners more an issue of local emissions such as particulates and such. As a means of heating they’re arguably carbon neutral
141
Bob
24/02/2021 10:41:48 4 2
bbc
Don't let the facts get in the way of the point.
203
24/02/2021 10:50:02 25 10
bbc
The wood-burning stoves 'thing' is another EU 'initiative' passed with a quick show of hands by metropolitan politicians based in Brussels.

The practicalities and traditions of people living in the countryside mean nothing to them.

Behold my virtue signal.
415
24/02/2021 11:27:54 3 2
bbc
Some bright spark has worked out that wood burning stoves are as pollutant as the old coal fires especially if using wet or damp wood.
441
24/02/2021 11:33:33 2 3
bbc
Yes, the CO2 from wood burning is confined to the county the wood was burned in, by rule of the Council. It gets fined if it drifts elsewhere.
493
VoR
24/02/2021 11:43:18 2 3
bbc
Burning wood releases CO2 which contributes to global warming, so that's a global issue.

The local issue is around the fine particulate matter which isn't healthy for you.
494
24/02/2021 11:43:19 2 3
bbc
Yeah - the smoke never goes beyond your garden!
546
24/02/2021 11:56:06 4 0
bbc
Particulates are a local issue.
CO2 is a global issue.

Improper use or combustion of wet/unseasoned fuel causes higher levels of PM. If the fuel is dried sufficiently, wood buners that are DEFRA approved are actually very efficient producing much lower PM levels.

In terms of CO2, using a wood burner to heat a home is no worse than a gas boiler and if using wood as the fuel - carbon neutral.
813
24/02/2021 14:12:35 0 1
bbc
There are more wood burning stoves worldwide than any other form of heating and cooking.

Enough 'local' = global
909
24/02/2021 15:38:08 0 0
bbc
You thought wrong!
24
24/02/2021 10:25:58 3 4
bbc
> several billion pounds in dividends

Worth remembering if/when it comes to public financial assistance, tax breaks or whatever way they want to claw back money.

Saying that, the economy seems to have been fairly resilient to date outwith retail.

One thing for sure is people will be going to holiday in droves when they have the opportunity to, either here or abroad.
116
24/02/2021 10:37:42 3 2
bbc
Don't pay those greedy shareholders a penny.
12
24/02/2021 10:23:29 384 19
bbc
"The London airport has built a £15bn debt pile in the past decade while paying its shareholders several billion pounds in dividends."

Sums up modern business - line your pockets then get the plebs to pick up the bill when the cash runs out.
25
24/02/2021 10:26:06 178 9
bbc
Yes - I was just about to repost this quote myself. Says it all really. The modern business model in a nutshell.
263
24/02/2021 11:01:46 2 3
bbc
You beat me to it. No need now to add my comment.
435
24/02/2021 11:32:46 7 1
bbc
But it's not the business model for the vast number of businesses, only those that are "too big to fail" and can't be easily dispensed with (e.g. banks, key infrastructural airports).

The vast majority of businesses - SMEs - do NOT fall into this category and nor do they have the "luxury" of conducting themselves like this. Most of them pay masses of tax and generate most of the UK's wealth.
26
24/02/2021 10:20:42 57 8
bbc
Well, no need for the third runway then .....
218
24/02/2021 10:52:45 22 5
bbc
You say that as if there ever was ?
27
24/02/2021 10:22:04 4 7
bbc
Vaccine passports will not help Heathrow recover
4
24/02/2021 10:20:21 112 26
bbc
Good job too for the environment. See what David Attenborough has to say about the state of the planet,
28
24/02/2021 10:22:50 80 28
bbc
Exactly why we need to stop trucking goods three times around Europe as part of the single market.
61
24/02/2021 10:30:25 8 17
bbc
yawn......
157
24/02/2021 10:44:01 13 7
bbc
Instead, you'll be flying them in from Singapore. Way to go...
159
24/02/2021 10:38:33 8 5
bbc
but do it with the wider world instead...
192
24/02/2021 10:45:51 0 4
bbc
LOL
225
24/02/2021 10:53:50 6 11
bbc
So trucking them from deforested Brazil is better or flying them from India is better?

Oh 8u663r this! Who trucks goods 3 times around Europe fur fax sake?

Too much contents of septic tanks in certain rags.
252
24/02/2021 10:58:47 5 8
bbc
Yes, let's fly them from America or South Africa instead - idiotic comment
253
24/02/2021 10:59:17 4 1
bbc
Europe? Have you watched snooker on tv lately. The bottled water they're drinking has Chinese labels!
29
rl
24/02/2021 10:26:30 13 5
bbc
Whilst aviation is currently a carbon-intensive industry, people should not forget the role it plays in distributing wealth and eliminating poverty (trade, tourism etc.) which brings its own environmental benefits in the longer term. This downturn could also set back initiatives which will make the industry lower carbon in the future. We should want aviation to succeed.
84
24/02/2021 10:33:16 3 7
bbc
There is a lot of evidence that tourism distorts and damages local economies on top of the environmental damage.
370
sw
24/02/2021 11:18:32 0 1
bbc
No.
30
24/02/2021 10:26:38 8 7
bbc
Don't try and build back so you just recreate the Climate Change problem you were trying to solve. We do have to change industries to achieve the carbon goals and this is quite a big carbon creator.
80
24/02/2021 10:33:00 3 3
bbc
Hope you don’t go into any building that uses concrete.... far larger contribution to carbon emissions than aviation
6
24/02/2021 10:21:43 11 5
bbc
be careful what you wish for!!
31
24/02/2021 10:26:42 6 3
bbc
3 day week, militant unions, going to the IMF as a basket case,,,maybe not...but on the other hand no H&S culture, no virtue signaling professionals, no # rubbish, no 'influencers', no social media....actually you may have convinced me :-)!
93
24/02/2021 10:34:40 1 3
bbc
And we had Mrs Thatcher with her magic handbag. She also reduced pollution caused by coal-burning.
32
24/02/2021 10:27:21 8 9
bbc
Flights booked for September, see you soon LHR.
107
Bob
24/02/2021 10:36:30 0 1
bbc
Go on let yourself go.
33
24/02/2021 10:27:23 13 7
bbc
Is this not good news? If one good thing has come out of Covid it is that people have seen there is no need for so much international travel for business or holidays.
96
24/02/2021 10:35:24 2 10
bbc
It seems like there's no need for schools or universities under this new 'essential activity only' mindset that HMG has imposed on us.
217
24/02/2021 10:52:43 0 1
bbc
Really?...as soon as folk can travel for sea, sun and sand ...they will
18
24/02/2021 10:24:32 6 3
bbc
Heavens no. It was awful. Three day week, national strikes, rubbish on the streets, raging inflation oh, and Jimmy Saville.
34
24/02/2021 10:27:23 6 2
bbc
GPs would do house visits routinely - even if you you had a cold or a stomach ache. House visits were the norm.
377
24/02/2021 11:19:31 0 1
bbc
As Measles, Mumps and Rubella were still common, that was just as well. If you were really lucky you got to meet Jimmy Saville or Rolf Harris in hospital too... Halcion days indeed. Not.
35
24/02/2021 10:27:49 7 4
bbc
Why is this a headline? It's obvious. Nobody is flying anywhere but they will once enough countries are vaccinated. Non story.
36
24/02/2021 10:27:55 11 2
bbc
Does anyone remember inflight smoking?

Blows millennials mind when you tell them that you were able to smoke on a plane which carries about 18 metric tonnes of fuel.
65
24/02/2021 10:30:56 1 3
bbc
oops meant 18 THOUSAND. :-)
824
24/02/2021 14:20:19 1 0
bbc
As a non smoker, I still think smoking should be allowed on planes - so all the smokers can sit is the crap noisy and tail wagging seats in the back!
37
24/02/2021 10:27:58 3 9
bbc
Doesn't zero carbon mean Heathrow would have to close in the next few years anyway? Along with all the other airports...
59
24/02/2021 10:30:13 5 2
bbc
zero carbon doesn't mean not producing carbon .. it means offsetting it. What's more, planes not using fossil fuels are being developed. Learn about topic before you comment.
97
Bob
24/02/2021 10:35:38 0 1
bbc
No.
38
24/02/2021 10:28:03 2 9
bbc
The economy is created by the government. Taxes, laws etc. - all the government.

Some of the economy was shut down by the government.

If businesses suffer, the government which shut them down , should pay.

After all it can print money. An economy is supposed to work for the people, not punish the people.
63
24/02/2021 10:30:38 4 2
bbc
You do realise that 'the government' doesn't have any money of its own? It is all our money, taxpayers' money. Even the stuff that they print has to be repaid eventually.
74
24/02/2021 10:32:17 3 2
bbc
WOW Total IGNORANCE personified!!!
103
24/02/2021 10:36:08 1 2
bbc
You are in favour of the UK tax payers bailing out sovereign investment funds?

You think the people earning minimum wage should help to prop up billion pound investments by wealthy oil rich countries?

Have you thought about this?
175
24/02/2021 10:46:42 0 1
bbc
The government has plenty of money.. only problem is it’s all in our pockets and our future earnings

So yes.. let “the government “ pay for everything....

Classic way of getting yours and my money transferred to wealthy businesses, CEOs and shareholders
19
SP
24/02/2021 10:24:36 6 15
bbc
For me growth of Heathrow in UK is directly related to growth of UK as a global player and its the symbol of Cosmopolitan culture of London

A smaller Heathrow is the sign of we are becoming inward looking insular nation

I love to see Heathrow again as busiest Airport in the world making London as most happening place in the world again
39
24/02/2021 10:28:03 5 5
bbc
Well said, and it’s another reason the travel industry and particularly the airlines need certainty and government help (as has happened elsewhere in Europe) without them our connectivity to the world will gibe with the likes of Ryanair and WIZZ and firmly put up the “ U.K. is closed for business” signs.
40
24/02/2021 10:28:07 1 1
bbc
Enough money to last until 2023.....interesting
Ya know what I mean ?
154
24/02/2021 10:43:13 2 2
bbc
Yeah.. £15bn of debt and they’ve got enough cash to last til 2023?
If they owed me £15 bn I’d be foreclosing on their £4bn cash

Isn’t that insolvency in anyone’s books but of those in the elite asset stripping mega rich club?
41
24/02/2021 10:28:08 8 9
bbc
Cue everyone saying we don't need expansion...

Reality check - as soon as international travel is open again, its going to explode (along with global air freight since the EU are being difficult now)

That's already been proven with international holiday bookings up 400%
60
24/02/2021 10:30:19 2 7
bbc
That is people's hopes, not what will happen.
78
24/02/2021 10:32:38 1 4
bbc
'Reality check - as soon as international travel is open again, its going to explode (along with global air freight since the EU are being difficult now)'

Same import/export rules as always - just applicable as we are outside the EU.
You've just been duped by Gove and Bojo is all.
92
24/02/2021 10:34:21 1 3
bbc
400% on what? Last week? Last year ? Pre covid?

EU just living with the rules Johnson agreed to
42
24/02/2021 10:27:04 3 18
bbc
The 'climate' brigade have got their way then? (despite the Freezing weather just a couple of weeks ago!!)
75
24/02/2021 10:32:20 5 1
bbc
Cold weather = no problem? You must be a sharp chap. Nurse.......
76
24/02/2021 10:32:21 5 2
bbc
Freezing weather is a feature of a normal winter. The mild, wet winters and vicious storms we have now are a symptom of climate change.
87
24/02/2021 10:33:40 4 2
bbc
Do your own research. There is a difference between weather and climate.
129
24/02/2021 10:39:54 1 1
bbc
And the 19 degrees and massive flooding and 70mph winds in Scotland over this last week 19-25 February!!?
148
24/02/2021 10:42:12 1 2
bbc
The climate "brigade"?

You mean all the world's environmental scientists except those taking money from fossil fuel firms? Climate is changing, it always has and always will. What is undeniable is that we have affected the rate of change, changes that took thousands of years naturally through history have happened in 150. The earth was on the cooling part of the cycle which we have reversed.
43
24/02/2021 10:27:06 7 3
bbc
Piers will be first in the queue for his foreign holiday
365
sw
24/02/2021 11:17:50 2 1
bbc
Along with Stanley.
44
SP
24/02/2021 10:28:29 8 24
bbc
Tree huggers will be happy to see the decline of Heathrow

True lovers of UK , who want a global UK want a stronger, busier , bigger Heathrow
68
24/02/2021 10:31:26 14 5
bbc
A strong contender for dumb post of the day!
82
24/02/2021 10:33:09 3 1
bbc
Heathrow isn’t owned by anything to do with the British people. That’s kinda embarrassing isn’t it ?
113
24/02/2021 10:37:28 2 1
bbc
As do the future virus communities of the world
How can their endeavours survive without stronger busier bigger international travel systems!!?
45
24/02/2021 10:28:30 196 11
bbc
I couldnt give a tuppeny damn. Here's why..........

Heathrow is owned by FGP Topco Limited, owned and led by Ferrovial S.A. (25.00%), Qatar Investment Authority (20.00%), Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec (CDPQ) (12.62%), GIC (11.20%), Alinda Capital Partners of the United States (11.18%), China Investment Corporation (10.00%) and Universities Superannuation Scheme (USS) (10.00%).
115
24/02/2021 10:37:41 32 72
bbc
Even if the owners are all offshore tax havens, still generates revenue/tax from passengers, flights, staff wages etc
145
24/02/2021 10:42:03 7 11
bbc
You should care because should it fail then who picks up the bill?
179
24/02/2021 10:40:57 7 6
bbc
A lot of businesses in the UK are foreign owned.
518
24/02/2021 11:49:55 1 1
bbc
Who employ people providing jobs directly and indirectly. You should start caring.
649
24/02/2021 12:20:13 0 1
bbc
So Sovereign Wealth Funds, infrastructure companies/investors, employee pension schemes are the majority shareholders?

Sounds a pretty strong shareholder base who will be looking for long term gains not just short term asset stripping.
689
24/02/2021 12:34:59 1 1
bbc
Hope it goes bust then.
921
24/02/2021 16:00:16 1 0
bbc
I'm sure the 114k PAYE employees you're proposing to kick out of a job because the company is foreign owned won't make a difference to the UK finances either. Not like they spend anything in the wider UK economy or pay £Ms in tax?
928
BZ
24/02/2021 16:11:53 0 0
bbc
Yes but what about the people who work there and their families and their spending etc
931
24/02/2021 16:22:33 0 0
bbc
So its a typical British company then!
46
24/02/2021 10:28:36 34 16
bbc
Aviation makes up 2% of emissions https://www.atag.org/facts-figures.html

I'm not saying it's not worth keeping in check, but it is also not the biggest challenge in reducing CO2.

Aviation brings growth and with that growth we are more likely to achieve a low carbon world. If our airports don't thrive, the growth will move elsewhere and we'll be poorer with the CO2 still floating around.
167
24/02/2021 10:45:13 13 9
bbc
That 2% is not the whole story. Few of the worlds population fly. With other pollutants other than CO2 the figure is more towards 5%. One person on one flight can be responsible for the production of around 80% of the CO2 pollutants that some non-flyers take to produce in one year.

Also economic growth within some areas is damaging for the planet. Time to make some alternative choices.
182
24/02/2021 10:43:11 0 4
bbc
a link to an industry blog as your evidence... if our airports don't thrive we are only a couple of hours away from other large airports.
227
24/02/2021 10:54:21 6 2
bbc
You wont last long here with your rationalism and evidence based approach...
489
Bob
24/02/2021 11:42:44 0 1
bbc
Which means that as airplane movements are not down anywhere near the amount passengers levels are down, given the need to move cargo still exists, any reduction in CO2 from fewer passenger journeys is lost from population increases.
47
24/02/2021 10:28:40 63 18
bbc
Anyone who thinks this is anything but good news is unable to see the damage we do to the world.
81
Bob
24/02/2021 10:33:04 16 35
bbc
I bet you love travelling the world though.
298
24/02/2021 11:06:37 2 1
bbc
It's actually both.
The good - reduced polution inc noise
The bad - when the bubble bursts who will pick up the tab. Clue - remember 2008
48
24/02/2021 10:28:46 5 3
bbc
Passenger numbers would have fallen to 1960's level if the Government had not waited until February 2021 to implement a quarantine policy for all arrivals...
15
24/02/2021 10:23:41 10 4
bbc
Why, I had 15% interest on my savings in those days. And roads had fewer pot holes. And we had Concorde.
49
24/02/2021 10:29:07 3 9
bbc
roads had fewer cars and I believe Concord eventually crashed, not that many could actually afford to fly on it in the first place! And if you had 15% interest on your savings today imagine what the eyewatering interest rate would be on your mortgage!! Although I suspect you're probably retired on a nice pension and don't have a mortgage! In which case take the rose tinted specs off!!
237
24/02/2021 10:56:22 2 1
bbc
The Concorde that crashed did so from metal that had fallen from a standard TWA plane that had been thrown up into Concorde's fuel tank.
10
24/02/2021 10:22:51 109 21
bbc
Good - does that mean we can now 100% stop the daft idea of building a not needed run way over the M25 to satisfy a market that no longer exists?
50
24/02/2021 10:29:17 10 8
bbc
The 3rd runway wouldn’t be ready for use for another 15 years, seeing as you can see into the future can I have this weeks lottery numbers please.
133
24/02/2021 10:40:11 8 2
bbc
3, 5 7,21, 23, 29
1
24/02/2021 10:19:06 82 17
bbc
Back to the days when only the wealthy could afford international travel then.

Quite right – we can’t have the plebs going abroad – that will never do !
51
24/02/2021 10:29:29 76 23
bbc
But expecting to fly to the Caribbean every year for a holiday as well as flying to a ski resort and a couple of city breaks - is wholly unrealistic and anti-social.

Yes, there are people who live like this and they aren't millionaires.
91
W 6
24/02/2021 10:34:21 10 5
bbc
What they spend their money on has absolutely nothing to do with you, millionaire or not!
135
24/02/2021 10:40:42 1 9
bbc
Only the torie elites plan those holidays
160
24/02/2021 10:38:49 11 2
bbc
I need a pay-rise then. I regulatory had three holidays a year (usually including a ski holiday) and am many many hundreds of thousand of pounds off being a Millionaire. I did however, decide not to have children. Horrible smell, expensive noisy, polluting things.
222
24/02/2021 10:53:42 2 2
bbc
I mean....me...kind of! I took 20 flights in 2019 (no Carribbean or ski resorts but hey!).

I don't think that's unrealistic, it's just utilising the fact that flying and travel has basically opened up to everybody, and people in my generation can just go on Ryanair and book a return flight for £30.
314
24/02/2021 11:09:14 3 5
bbc
No wonder this planet is in a state. What's wrong with Cornwall, Norfolk, Wales, Scotland etc, etc. What's in a city anyway? It's all marketing. There are bars and the like close to home. Support your own local economy. When you travel abroad your financila support goes to economies far from home. Money wasted.
458
24/02/2021 11:36:14 1 1
bbc
not millionaires? such as the people on the deportation flights
889
DP
24/02/2021 15:19:50 0 0
bbc
Really??? I work long days and save money and part of that is so I can have "anti- social" holidays once or twice a year somewhere nice.. live in the 1950's if you wish
11
24/02/2021 10:23:09 5 5
bbc
And others news. The popes a Catholic.
52
24/02/2021 10:29:32 4 2
bbc
Are the media not supposed to report these things because they are already 'known' or obvious? You make no sense whatsever.
53
24/02/2021 10:29:36 19 3
bbc
Ban on travel to lots of places. Airport loses money. Whoever would have thought it.
164
24/02/2021 10:44:47 6 8
bbc
Next you'll be telling me that providing free houses for single mothers creates a massive increase in the number of single mothers.
54
Pip
24/02/2021 10:29:37 11 1
bbc
You just can't write this stuff, and when lockdown stops, let me guess.............?
55
24/02/2021 10:29:40 4 2
bbc
Looks like that additional runway will be right back to the benefits case study stage. Roll a 6 to start.
56
24/02/2021 10:29:58 4 4
bbc
Like it or not Heathrow meets the demand of the travelling public. I think the 3rd runway should be scrapped, but wait and see the massess flying off on holiday when the first opportunitiy arises. A societal issue and not Heathrow's fault.
95
24/02/2021 10:35:00 1 4
bbc
I disagree - Its located in the wrong place, is so big its horrible to get round, T5 is truly disgusting terminal (or should I say large cow shed?), and when it was busy is without doubt in the top 5 worst terminals in the world...anyone south of the M4 is far better served from Gatwick.
57
24/02/2021 10:30:02 102 7
bbc
"Everyone should stop flying around the world, well, everyone apart from me that is, obviously !" said some very important people.
156
24/02/2021 10:43:51 21 9
bbc
You are David Attenborough and I claim my 'National Treasure' clock-plate of Tutenkamun.
875
24/02/2021 15:08:36 1 1
bbc
Where's Bono and his hat occupying a 1st class British Airways seat when you need him, huh...

... Makes me laugh all these comments here from people saying we should be reducing air traffic to 1930s levels. Probably the self same people buying their mung beans with thousands of food-miles, and booking Easyjet flights all through the summer.

Rank hypocrisy.
18
24/02/2021 10:24:32 6 3
bbc
Heavens no. It was awful. Three day week, national strikes, rubbish on the streets, raging inflation oh, and Jimmy Saville.
58
24/02/2021 10:30:11 6 2
bbc
Don’t forget Pans People....
37
24/02/2021 10:27:58 3 9
bbc
Doesn't zero carbon mean Heathrow would have to close in the next few years anyway? Along with all the other airports...
59
24/02/2021 10:30:13 5 2
bbc
zero carbon doesn't mean not producing carbon .. it means offsetting it. What's more, planes not using fossil fuels are being developed. Learn about topic before you comment.
41
24/02/2021 10:28:08 8 9
bbc
Cue everyone saying we don't need expansion...

Reality check - as soon as international travel is open again, its going to explode (along with global air freight since the EU are being difficult now)

That's already been proven with international holiday bookings up 400%
60
24/02/2021 10:30:19 2 7
bbc
That is people's hopes, not what will happen.
94
Bob
24/02/2021 10:34:53 0 3
bbc
It not happening is your hope?
or can you predict the future too?
28
24/02/2021 10:22:50 80 28
bbc
Exactly why we need to stop trucking goods three times around Europe as part of the single market.
61
24/02/2021 10:30:25 8 17
bbc
yawn......
62
24/02/2021 10:30:35 13 4
bbc
Never flown from Heathrow but accompanied someone who has.
Would never consider it. Terrible to get to, too spread out and too many ill mannered people.
Much prefer local airport to Schipol or Frankfurt. Manchester for some direct flights. Savings can be considerable as well if you know where to look.
152
24/02/2021 10:43:05 2 6
bbc
What you mean is that you live convenient to a local airport with connections to/from Schipol or Frankfurt.

I used to do the same when I lived in Scotland.

But as I've got older and can now afford to fly direct instead of scrabbling around for the last 10% on flights (and an extra three hours travel in each direction), I prefer the direct option.

Plus I now live much closer to LGW and LHR.
174
24/02/2021 10:46:33 3 1
bbc
absolutely true. I once went to Heathrow T1 to pick up a friend drove in to collect him when he rang me, stopped to be accosted by a TW who was most abusive, rude and belittling. I nearly lost my rag, my friend had jumped in the car by then so I drove away!
353
24/02/2021 11:16:31 1 1
bbc
Ahh! Schipol, wonderful airport and no chewing gum in the floor.
38
24/02/2021 10:28:03 2 9
bbc
The economy is created by the government. Taxes, laws etc. - all the government.

Some of the economy was shut down by the government.

If businesses suffer, the government which shut them down , should pay.

After all it can print money. An economy is supposed to work for the people, not punish the people.
63
24/02/2021 10:30:38 4 2
bbc
You do realise that 'the government' doesn't have any money of its own? It is all our money, taxpayers' money. Even the stuff that they print has to be repaid eventually.
110
24/02/2021 10:36:51 1 1
bbc
You do realize they they can pay the money back to the Bank of England whenever they want. And given they control the bank it can be anytime. The last of the debt for the Napoleonic wars was only paid back in 2015 when it was practically worthless. The economy is a system made by people. And they can make it however they want.
112
24/02/2021 10:37:17 1 1
bbc
No it's the governments money.
Once you have paid your dues it's not up to you how it is used. Your employer doesn't tell you how to spend your salary and if you gave a financial gift to someone as a present you wouldn't tell them how to spend it.
Then again perhaps you would!!!!
64
24/02/2021 10:30:38 9 1
bbc
As the article proves, cash is king. Heathrow is a big business with big cash reserves. Some would argue they have been prudent in their financial planning, others would complain that the little guy has to pick up the pieces. Sadly, both would be true. Who knows what will happen with passenger numbers in the future, all I know is we humans have short memories.
230
24/02/2021 10:54:50 0 2
bbc
Did you factor in debt that is over four times the amount of their cash reserves?
36
24/02/2021 10:27:55 11 2
bbc
Does anyone remember inflight smoking?

Blows millennials mind when you tell them that you were able to smoke on a plane which carries about 18 metric tonnes of fuel.
65
24/02/2021 10:30:56 1 3
bbc
oops meant 18 THOUSAND. :-)
648
24/02/2021 12:19:59 0 0
bbc
I highly doubt a plane carries 18 thousand tonnes of fuel :)
17
24/02/2021 10:24:20 136 12
bbc
It does beg the question do we need a third runway.

Heathrow's entire business model is built on increasing passenger numbers in the decades ahead. But will business travel ever return to pre-pandemic levels?
66
24/02/2021 10:31:22 123 10
bbc
Nope - many (who are not workaholic types who hate their family life) will see no further business travel as a bonus - loose lots of personal time, airports full of people pushing and shoving, long haul horrid flights (as most of us don't get to travel BC/FC!), jet lag, long days, fly back days later to do it all again..much prefer a 2 hour teams meeting - all done - next.
480
24/02/2021 11:40:12 7 1
bbc
And don't even get me started about running the "duty free" gauntlet where you get perfume samples shoved in your face!
513
24/02/2021 11:48:50 4 1
bbc
Absolutely correct I’m so glad I don’t have to suffer those one day business trips to Paris
67
24/02/2021 10:31:24 8 1
bbc
China will likely buy it
98
24/02/2021 10:35:40 5 1
bbc
From the Spanish company that currently owns it.
44
SP
24/02/2021 10:28:29 8 24
bbc
Tree huggers will be happy to see the decline of Heathrow

True lovers of UK , who want a global UK want a stronger, busier , bigger Heathrow
68
24/02/2021 10:31:26 14 5
bbc
A strong contender for dumb post of the day!
8
24/02/2021 10:22:07 228 63
bbc
Excellent news - now, if we can just get it back to 1930's levels, the planet might have a chance!
69
24/02/2021 10:31:30 160 22
bbc
Population numbers too!
119
24/02/2021 10:38:05 16 11
bbc
What we need is some kind of virus that would lower the population.....oh hang on..
121
24/02/2021 10:38:46 20 7
bbc
For population, I'd like 1430's numbers.
153
24/02/2021 10:43:09 18 27
bbc
The issue isn't population. It's consumption.
The richest 10% of the worlds population consume 50% of its resources. The poorest 50% get by on 20% of them. If we all consumed at their rate, there'd be enough planet to go round.

Which population should we reduce?
161
24/02/2021 10:44:36 15 23
bbc
If all those calling for population reduction threw themselves into the sea it would help everyone. Oh wait... thought not.
176
24/02/2021 10:46:45 10 16
bbc
So what do you propose to achieve this? Genocide?
226
24/02/2021 10:54:14 7 16
bbc
I'm not sure whether you're just conjuring an excuse for your inability to stop driving that 4x4 and flying, or advocating for genocide, eugenics or some sort of suicide pact.
460
24/02/2021 11:36:24 0 3
bbc
Good idea, any sugestions to make it happen?
577
24/02/2021 12:02:39 0 1
bbc
PinkCatsMum - is it fair to assume that you have children based on that name or is it just a joke avatar? Please confirm you did not have children before making that comment about reducing the population. Sacrifice starts at home.
806
24/02/2021 14:06:10 0 1
bbc
Also the modern economies are top heavy with the elderly, unsustainably so in fact. I wonder if mother nature could provide a solution to this dilemma?
1
24/02/2021 10:19:06 82 17
bbc
Back to the days when only the wealthy could afford international travel then.

Quite right – we can’t have the plebs going abroad – that will never do !
70
24/02/2021 10:31:36 9 8
bbc
A comment intended to divide and cause resentment. I feel sorry for your outlook on life.
Are you expecting international flight tickets as part of benefits claims?
The fact more people can now fly is a sign that for the majority, standard of living has improved.
136
24/02/2021 10:41:01 5 3
bbc
Maybe you should trying looking up the word "sarcasm" as you seem to be struggling with the concept.
247
24/02/2021 10:58:31 5 3
bbc
Ah! The politics of envy, now reduced to the politics of spite.
950
24/02/2021 17:02:43 0 0
bbc
Yes it does, but its beyond what is sustainable so will eventually crash again as food becomes super expensive due to climate effects on farmers. I read today. that even micro chip production has been affected by a drought in Taiwan so car plants in the US are closed. Who'd have thought how complex the web of cause and effect really is.
71
SP
24/02/2021 10:31:52 7 11
bbc
For me growth of Heathrow in UK is directly related to growth of UK as a global player and its the symbol of Cosmopolitan culture of London

A smaller Heathrow is the sign of we are becoming inward looking insular nation
99
24/02/2021 10:36:00 1 3
bbc
Nothing to do with Covid then?

Brexit or not, people will still travel the world on holidays
128
24/02/2021 10:39:51 0 3
bbc
It's more the sign of a UK government that soiled it's pants over a poxy low-rent 'glowballl pandemeeeeeek' that has the bedwetters soiling themselves and 'solved' the 'problem' by completely destroying. the UK economy.

Still, if it saves just one life, eh?
72
24/02/2021 10:32:16 45 4
bbc
The problem here is whilst they built up huge debt they paid themselves huge dividends.

At best bad management at worse an abuse.

This unabashed capitalism is shameful and is one of the reasons we see so much inequality.

Late stage capitalism will ruin things for everyone apart from the elite 1%
191
24/02/2021 10:45:29 16 3
bbc
almost certainly an abuse.
340
24/02/2021 11:14:30 1 1
bbc
It was predicted. "As capitalism progresses more and more money will end up in the hands of fewer and fewer people."
He was rubbished and exiled.
By the same people who venerate a person who, it is written, said, "it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God"
The irony
9
24/02/2021 10:22:19 252 27
bbc
Amazing isn't it, they want to ban our wood burning stoves and yet at the same time they want us flying everywhere! I do wish that they would make up their low carbon minds!
73
Pip
24/02/2021 10:32:16 4 12
bbc
There low carbon minds, hide a lot of hot air I afraid, shame we can't find some use for it...............?
38
24/02/2021 10:28:03 2 9
bbc
The economy is created by the government. Taxes, laws etc. - all the government.

Some of the economy was shut down by the government.

If businesses suffer, the government which shut them down , should pay.

After all it can print money. An economy is supposed to work for the people, not punish the people.
74
24/02/2021 10:32:17 3 2
bbc
WOW Total IGNORANCE personified!!!
166
24/02/2021 10:45:06 1 1
bbc
For hundreds of years in feudal Britain a "normal economy" was an extremely rich elite aristocracy and monarchy lording it over serfs, slaves , young children employed in workhouse factories, etc..

Why? Because that was "normal" according to the elite.

But it was lies, all lies. The British people have been lied to for a very long time.

And it goes on today.
42
24/02/2021 10:27:04 3 18
bbc
The 'climate' brigade have got their way then? (despite the Freezing weather just a couple of weeks ago!!)
75
24/02/2021 10:32:20 5 1
bbc
Cold weather = no problem? You must be a sharp chap. Nurse.......
42
24/02/2021 10:27:04 3 18
bbc
The 'climate' brigade have got their way then? (despite the Freezing weather just a couple of weeks ago!!)
76
24/02/2021 10:32:21 5 2
bbc
Freezing weather is a feature of a normal winter. The mild, wet winters and vicious storms we have now are a symptom of climate change.
23
24/02/2021 10:25:55 53 81
bbc
I thought the wood burning stoves were a local emissions issue, not a global CO2 one.
77
24/02/2021 10:32:30 32 7
bbc
Correct wood burners more an issue of local emissions such as particulates and such. As a means of heating they’re arguably carbon neutral
183
sur
24/02/2021 10:43:29 21 13
bbc
Carbon neutral you say:

Tree = 100+ years absorbing carbon
Wood Burner = 1 hour to release the carbon
477
24/02/2021 11:39:53 3 6
bbc
'Carbon neutral' - you must be joking! A cut down tree can no longer absorb and lock away carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. It is vital that trees are not cut down but allowed to do their vital work of reducing overall atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. Not to mention the considerable energy consumed to manufacture a wood burners in the first place, irrespective of how fashionable they are.
532
24/02/2021 11:52:49 3 0
bbc
Depends on how the wood reaches the burner. But if harvested locally then as close to carbon neutral heating as anyone is likely to see.
41
24/02/2021 10:28:08 8 9
bbc
Cue everyone saying we don't need expansion...

Reality check - as soon as international travel is open again, its going to explode (along with global air freight since the EU are being difficult now)

That's already been proven with international holiday bookings up 400%
78
24/02/2021 10:32:38 1 4
bbc
'Reality check - as soon as international travel is open again, its going to explode (along with global air freight since the EU are being difficult now)'

Same import/export rules as always - just applicable as we are outside the EU.
You've just been duped by Gove and Bojo is all.
79
24/02/2021 10:32:48 8 1
bbc
I flew from Heathrow twice last summer and it was like a ghost town. When I fly this summer, I imagine a lot of it will be from Stansted/Luton.

Note that most of your Ryanair's/Wizz's don't even touch Heathrow because of the fees. Until the long haul/business market picks up again, Heathrow is going to be quiet.
111
24/02/2021 10:37:15 4 4
bbc
Hopefully never, Heathrow should diminish to help with air quality in London.
30
24/02/2021 10:26:38 8 7
bbc
Don't try and build back so you just recreate the Climate Change problem you were trying to solve. We do have to change industries to achieve the carbon goals and this is quite a big carbon creator.
80
24/02/2021 10:33:00 3 3
bbc
Hope you don’t go into any building that uses concrete.... far larger contribution to carbon emissions than aviation
324
24/02/2021 10:48:13 0 1
bbc
but also pays for it.
47
24/02/2021 10:28:40 63 18
bbc
Anyone who thinks this is anything but good news is unable to see the damage we do to the world.
81
Bob
24/02/2021 10:33:04 16 35
bbc
I bet you love travelling the world though.
454
24/02/2021 11:35:40 2 1
bbc
A grown up perspective, Bob is to appreciate that while unrestricted travel might be enjoyable, it needs to be forgone for the sake of the planet and our children.

Now repeat after me.....
25/02/2021 11:14:13 0 0
bbc
I'm hoping that I can become a full-time homeworker from now on and the flexibility to travel more using public transport while still being economically active.
44
SP
24/02/2021 10:28:29 8 24
bbc
Tree huggers will be happy to see the decline of Heathrow

True lovers of UK , who want a global UK want a stronger, busier , bigger Heathrow
82
24/02/2021 10:33:09 3 1
bbc
Heathrow isn’t owned by anything to do with the British people. That’s kinda embarrassing isn’t it ?
100
SP
24/02/2021 10:36:01 0 4
bbc
Who owns Airport hardly matters

As long as people are still considering UK as a nation worth to fly

UK having busiest Airport in the world is what matters most
83
24/02/2021 10:33:12 65 15
bbc
First class news.

Now let's see if it can be further cut to reduce pollution and reduce noise nuisance.
Not just to please tree-hugging onanists who never go anywhere then.... Removed
29
rl
24/02/2021 10:26:30 13 5
bbc
Whilst aviation is currently a carbon-intensive industry, people should not forget the role it plays in distributing wealth and eliminating poverty (trade, tourism etc.) which brings its own environmental benefits in the longer term. This downturn could also set back initiatives which will make the industry lower carbon in the future. We should want aviation to succeed.
84
24/02/2021 10:33:16 3 7
bbc
There is a lot of evidence that tourism distorts and damages local economies on top of the environmental damage.
371
rl
24/02/2021 11:19:00 0 1
bbc
In the short term, perhaps. But the low carbon initiatives that will bring benefit in the longer term require investment at source.
85
24/02/2021 10:33:21 13 1
bbc
We’re beginning to see it in all walks of life – price increases to both compensate and manage the higher running costs of a post Covid world – this is not news!

People are going pay more for less in the year(s) ahead and those that do go abroad are in for a very different holidaying experience.

So, please spare us the whinging if you do go - it will be busy, expensive and more restricted!
11
24/02/2021 10:23:09 5 5
bbc
And others news. The popes a Catholic.
86
24/02/2021 10:33:37 1 1
bbc
popes isnt!!!
42
24/02/2021 10:27:04 3 18
bbc
The 'climate' brigade have got their way then? (despite the Freezing weather just a couple of weeks ago!!)
87
24/02/2021 10:33:40 4 2
bbc
Do your own research. There is a difference between weather and climate.
88
24/02/2021 10:33:50 104 13
bbc
I wish the UK population would fall to 1970s levels.
118
SP
24/02/2021 10:38:03 24 62
bbc
Then economy also will fall to 1970s level. Its directly proportionate to population
140
24/02/2021 10:41:47 9 9
bbc
Are you volunteering ?
146
24/02/2021 10:42:08 23 1
bbc
Well I must admit this little Island is well over populated 68+ million now and still rising is too many and not sustainable.
158
24/02/2021 10:35:54 3 5
bbc
Population - Have you looked at the News today??? (That is the News the BBC doesn't/won't report !!)
220
24/02/2021 10:53:18 7 1
bbc
Here’s news! There’s a virus out there trying to do exactly that for you.. but we are spending a fortune trying to preserve our overpopulation ( and taxable wage cash cow population)
439
24/02/2021 11:33:10 2 1
bbc
And when nature tries to intervene, what happens?
We shut down the entire country to protect our population levels.
25/02/2021 07:43:42 0 0
bbc
Then you need to find a solution to our current problem of longevity, because that is how our population levelled itself
People died
21
24/02/2021 10:25:15 287 31
bbc
So no need to build a 3rd runway then.
89
24/02/2021 10:33:57 22 62
bbc
(facepalm)
90
24/02/2021 10:34:12 105 8
bbc
So without Covid.. the company built up £15 bn of debt while paying out billions of pounds in dividends to shareholders?

In a fair world those shareholders should be individually responsible for paying back that £15bn and redundancies if the firm goes down .
It’s seems that it’s just another way of putting ordinary folks money in the pockets of the rich
117
24/02/2021 10:37:48 11 30
bbc
You are quite right.

An all those public sector workers can reimburse them their pay too since it was paid out of taxes.

They were quite happy to take the money when we were paying taxes but now want to keep it all.

What selfish people, eh?
430
24/02/2021 11:30:53 2 3
bbc
Many of those shareholders will be pension funds.....
457
Bob
24/02/2021 11:36:05 5 2
bbc
You likely have a mortgage. That's a debt. Even if you've paid it off, you almost certainly did have one at some point.

Did you buy anyone gifts or presents whilst you held that mortgage? Oh you did?

You knew you could afford the repayment and the gift cost. Same for business.
547
24/02/2021 11:56:12 1 0
bbc
Do you have a mortgage? If so, why have you spent money on anything else instead of paying this debt off as quickly as possible? Is that what you're actually saying?

If the company can (and is) pay back the debt as per the terms negotiated with the lender, what exactly is the problem?

If the company, after it's debt repayments, is profitable, why shouldn't it pay out dividends?
553
24/02/2021 11:57:36 1 0
bbc
One of those situations where you won't hear the trolls shouting "Think how it would be if Corbyn was in charge!".
645
Bob
24/02/2021 12:19:18 0 0
bbc
Apple has billions upon billions in cash yet also has billions upon billions in debt.

You need to understand how debt works for businesses and why they use it.
51
24/02/2021 10:29:29 76 23
bbc
But expecting to fly to the Caribbean every year for a holiday as well as flying to a ski resort and a couple of city breaks - is wholly unrealistic and anti-social.

Yes, there are people who live like this and they aren't millionaires.
91
W 6
24/02/2021 10:34:21 10 5
bbc
What they spend their money on has absolutely nothing to do with you, millionaire or not!
184
24/02/2021 10:44:14 5 8
bbc
So you don;t mind if people spend their money on heroin and donating to terrorist groups? Of course it is our business what people spend their money on.
638
24/02/2021 12:17:34 2 0
bbc
We are on the verge of runaway global warming (permafrost melting and releasing methane, oceans beginning to release CO2). My survival and that of everyone else on this planet is at risk.

It is everything to do with other people how they spend their money when their actions are killing the planet we live on.
41
24/02/2021 10:28:08 8 9
bbc
Cue everyone saying we don't need expansion...

Reality check - as soon as international travel is open again, its going to explode (along with global air freight since the EU are being difficult now)

That's already been proven with international holiday bookings up 400%
92
24/02/2021 10:34:21 1 3
bbc
400% on what? Last week? Last year ? Pre covid?

EU just living with the rules Johnson agreed to
31
24/02/2021 10:26:42 6 3
bbc
3 day week, militant unions, going to the IMF as a basket case,,,maybe not...but on the other hand no H&S culture, no virtue signaling professionals, no # rubbish, no 'influencers', no social media....actually you may have convinced me :-)!
93
24/02/2021 10:34:40 1 3
bbc
And we had Mrs Thatcher with her magic handbag. She also reduced pollution caused by coal-burning.
134
24/02/2021 10:40:18 3 1
bbc
And increased unemployment and sold off industry so that we now have to import everything
382
24/02/2021 11:20:24 1 1
bbc
1980's
60
24/02/2021 10:30:19 2 7
bbc
That is people's hopes, not what will happen.
94
Bob
24/02/2021 10:34:53 0 3
bbc
It not happening is your hope?
or can you predict the future too?
56
24/02/2021 10:29:58 4 4
bbc
Like it or not Heathrow meets the demand of the travelling public. I think the 3rd runway should be scrapped, but wait and see the massess flying off on holiday when the first opportunitiy arises. A societal issue and not Heathrow's fault.
95
24/02/2021 10:35:00 1 4
bbc
I disagree - Its located in the wrong place, is so big its horrible to get round, T5 is truly disgusting terminal (or should I say large cow shed?), and when it was busy is without doubt in the top 5 worst terminals in the world...anyone south of the M4 is far better served from Gatwick.
33
24/02/2021 10:27:23 13 7
bbc
Is this not good news? If one good thing has come out of Covid it is that people have seen there is no need for so much international travel for business or holidays.
96
24/02/2021 10:35:24 2 10
bbc
It seems like there's no need for schools or universities under this new 'essential activity only' mindset that HMG has imposed on us.
194
24/02/2021 10:46:54 0 1
bbc
It must be very hard for your family.
37
24/02/2021 10:27:58 3 9
bbc
Doesn't zero carbon mean Heathrow would have to close in the next few years anyway? Along with all the other airports...
97
Bob
24/02/2021 10:35:38 0 1
bbc
No.
67
24/02/2021 10:31:24 8 1
bbc
China will likely buy it
98
24/02/2021 10:35:40 5 1
bbc
From the Spanish company that currently owns it.
71
SP
24/02/2021 10:31:52 7 11
bbc
For me growth of Heathrow in UK is directly related to growth of UK as a global player and its the symbol of Cosmopolitan culture of London

A smaller Heathrow is the sign of we are becoming inward looking insular nation
99
24/02/2021 10:36:00 1 3
bbc
Nothing to do with Covid then?

Brexit or not, people will still travel the world on holidays
122
Bob
24/02/2021 10:38:51 0 1
bbc
Why did you have to bring Brexit into this?

If anything leaving Europe to join the rest of the World means we are looking outwards.
82
24/02/2021 10:33:09 3 1
bbc
Heathrow isn’t owned by anything to do with the British people. That’s kinda embarrassing isn’t it ?
100
SP
24/02/2021 10:36:01 0 4
bbc
Who owns Airport hardly matters

As long as people are still considering UK as a nation worth to fly

UK having busiest Airport in the world is what matters most