Summer catch-up schools planned for pupils in England
24/02/2021 | news | education | 2,510
A total of £700m will help ensure "no child is left behind" due to the pandemic, Boris Johnson says.
1
SML
24/02/2021 11:47:34 51 36
bbc
Just give everyone a break for gods sake.
163
24/02/2021 12:17:08 24 7
bbc
It isn’t compulsory. They have the choice, if you insist they must have a break you are denying the choice from those that want to attend
2
Bob
24/02/2021 11:48:47 17 17
bbc
My child was one of the 1 in 10 that never received work during the original first wave. That's improved now, but learning is still very limited and not remotely close to a proper 'working' day. Yet the unions keep making excuses of overworking pupils! This is about making up lost ground, not adding on extra hours!

Thankfully we've been able to pick up some of that slack - but others won't have.
36
24/02/2021 11:56:55 5 8
bbc
change school then, what excuses have the unions made
401
24/02/2021 12:53:15 1 4
bbc
So what have you done about it? there has been plenty of other learning opportunities available which broadly follow the curriculum. If no learning was available did you look into things like BBC bite sized?
3
24/02/2021 11:48:49 7 19
bbc
They really have put children to the bottom of the pile.
383
24/02/2021 12:39:27 2 2
bbc
Are you talking about teachers?
4
RSO
24/02/2021 11:48:55 27 24
bbc
Has anyone checked this will be ok with the unions?
13
24/02/2021 11:53:39 22 21
bbc
Yes, it's fine with the unions. You can stop stirring. How about you get with the programme of national unity for a change?
29
24/02/2021 11:55:42 7 3
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Unions said it would be a good start read the article for once
53
24/02/2021 11:59:36 5 5
bbc
Yes as long as hefty payments are planned, our 13 year old has had 20 minutes maximum from his school this lockdown and previously was told for maths one day, go play a game of chess!!

I fully agree a great number of teachers did and are still "putting in a shift" but sadly there are a large number doing next to nothing but hiding behind their union. I have seen some of the emails from them!
65
24/02/2021 12:01:30 3 2
bbc
I think is time parents had our own union.
180
24/02/2021 12:19:26 4 3
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The teacher unions have performed very badly in the crisis, but they have little power and governments override them regularly. The government might listen to the headteachers association but they ignore the classroom teachers unions.
5
24/02/2021 11:50:40 11 20
bbc
The last year has been topsy turvy for kids let them enjoy summer as is school can wait to restart after the holidays
21
24/02/2021 11:54:42 13 10
bbc
They have had plenty of time off. They surely don't need any more. Many will never recover from this and will be disadvantaged their whole lives.
60
24/02/2021 12:00:43 4 0
bbc
Really? They've had more 'holiday' than they could possibly hope for.
256
24/02/2021 12:33:30 4 0
bbc
Most of them can't wait to get back to school to see their friends. After all people have banging on about the damage to their mental health because they can't go to school.
6
DC
24/02/2021 11:52:09 57 12
bbc
I think I enjoyed school when i was that age. It was always sad leaving for holidays. You cant really underestimate the educational damage and physchological damage that not mixing with their own age is doing to children. If parents dont want to send their kids to summer schools that is their prerogative, but i see no harm in the option being there, both for parents and for children.
257
as
24/02/2021 12:33:32 49 0
bbc
Agree in principle, however I recall in my school days that whilst some teachers were brilliant and made learning a fun experience and encouraged curiosity. Others seemed to see their role as simply imparting information and lessons were sheer drugery. Pity the child who gets stuck with the latter through the hot summer months.
400
VoR
24/02/2021 12:53:04 5 0
bbc
Agreed. There seems to be an inherent assumption amongst many that school is some kind of trial, when in fact it can be engaging and comes with a social side for most.
628
24/02/2021 13:27:01 5 2
bbc
They are still mixing with children their own age. There's plenty of kids mingling on the street where I live and groups of kids on the park when I'm out.
24/02/2021 14:43:27 1 0
bbc
I completely agree. As a child, my holidays were, either going on a caravan holiday, or trying to study and then completely spiralling since I can't obsess over school. Fun cycle, isn't it!
7
24/02/2021 11:52:16 744 133
bbc
I'm waiting to hear how Parliament will sit over the summer to start to catch up on legislation they would have worked on if there hadn't been a Covid pandemic.

It would be shocking hypocrisy if MPs were planning to enjoy their summer holidays whilst requiring teachers and pupils who have worked hard over lockdown to continue through summer.
71
24/02/2021 12:02:51 159 54
bbc
Be fair they’ve only just returned from their half term break
133
24/02/2021 12:13:10 52 23
bbc
They aren’t requiring teachers and pupils to be in school over summer it will be voluntary. Many others have said Children’s education has suffered, so this gives some an opportunity to catch up if they want to
159
24/02/2021 12:16:36 81 41
bbc
Not sure Parliament are moaning about being the 'forgotten generation'.

Here's a solution to take responsibility for for your own, or your child's progression, but hey, it's always better to moan and blame, rather than do something.
184
24/02/2021 12:20:26 33 15
bbc
Really good idea, unfortunately not a snowball in hells chance.
225
24/02/2021 12:27:37 36 154
bbc
Sadly, teachers do not work in a real world. Where you have 4 to 5 weeks off a year, work an 8-hour day, if not more and then you may have to catch up at the weekend. Grow up and help get this country back on track. Teach our children a work ethic to be proud of.

Teachers have gone to school with children. Then college and universities with children. Now they work with children!
246
24/02/2021 12:31:50 67 15
bbc
They have been working though haven't they? Have you?
272
24/02/2021 12:34:56 25 2
bbc
I'd be happier with less time of politicians sitting. I don't think there's a direct relationship between the time they sit and the positive impact of their actions
315
24/02/2021 12:40:45 18 11
bbc
Who needs politicians?
While they've focused for four years on Brexit quickly followed by Covid, the country has quietly run itself.
344
24/02/2021 12:47:16 11 53
bbc
Finally, teachers are now facing uncertainty and can't make plans. Now perhaps they'll begin to understand and show a little consideration for how the rest of us have to live.
457
24/02/2021 13:01:18 14 5
bbc
MP's and work should not be used in the same sentence

Work implies something useful
464
JGC
24/02/2021 13:01:58 3 2
bbc
You make a good point.
641
24/02/2021 13:30:32 2 7
bbc
It’s purely to stop hardworking families from going on a deserved holiday and to raise the government coffers if they do
769
24/02/2021 13:53:51 1 2
bbc
Hypocrisy? Certainly,but shocking,to whom?
No one every criticises the asset managers, hedge fund analysists and other bankers...all working from home on mega bucks. Removed
32
24/02/2021 11:56:13 0 0
bbc
Envy is a sad thing.......
34
24/02/2021 11:56:37 0 2
bbc
Because they are still working and contributing to the wealth of this country. Despite Boris best efforts to destroy the city and an industry in which the UK leads the world via brexit.

Now Amsterdam has already overtaken London as a share trading market. Another brexit bonus.
54
24/02/2021 11:59:44 1 0
bbc
Relevance?
9
24/02/2021 11:52:45 6 6
bbc
Politicians are running around pontificating about education in denial of the real "elephant" charging about all around them. The Pandemic has now led to a complete lost year of classroom education for all who depend on the state sector. This lost classroom time can only be properly recovered once the state education leaving age is raised from 16 to 17 and this year "lost" to Covid is re-run..
10
24/02/2021 11:52:58 21 14
bbc
They need to bring in extra teachers to do this work. Many teachers have been working flat out all year to support their students in school with key worker kids and online. They need a break for the autumn term.
238
24/02/2021 12:30:22 4 8
bbc
And so have the NHS staff and other key workers without benefit of the school holidays taken during the pandemic. If they can manage without 6 weeks off surely the teachers can - or are they too selfish and don't care about the children's education?
11
24/02/2021 11:53:24 10 10
bbc
I certainly won’t be sending our kids to any summer school. Fortunately our schools have been brilliant with providing work and support, but it’s still tiring for teachers and kids. They still need a break over summer.
48
24/02/2021 11:58:58 4 3
bbc
Got the hols booked have you?
228
24/02/2021 12:28:51 3 1
bbc
Get real! Is the NHS closing for 6 weeks over the summer? Or the supermarkets or any of the key workers who have worked through the benefit of long school holidays going to have a 6 week holiday? No reason why teachers can't give up 2 or 3 weeks after all the time they've had off
12
24/02/2021 11:51:16 12 8
bbc
Good idea, also with so many losing out, maybe they should shorten the summer school holiday period.
124
24/02/2021 12:10:56 6 2
bbc
Maybe shorten the summer break, just have three weeks off in August, and give students as much support as we can. But first, we have to see the infection rate and new positives drop significantly, so maybe we’re all jumping the gun a bit here.
4
RSO
24/02/2021 11:48:55 27 24
bbc
Has anyone checked this will be ok with the unions?
13
24/02/2021 11:53:39 22 21
bbc
Yes, it's fine with the unions. You can stop stirring. How about you get with the programme of national unity for a change?
203
24/02/2021 12:23:18 3 3
bbc
National unity, your having a laugh, this Country has never been more divided since the civil war.
276
24/02/2021 12:35:47 3 1
bbc
National unity? Haven't noticed the unions or Labour joining in with that this year. Was there one special day when it DID happen and I missed it?
499
24/02/2021 13:08:31 1 3
bbc
How about the unions "get with" children needing to be at school and catching up on what they've been made to forfeit, thanks in part to the unions?
14
24/02/2021 11:53:41 373 35
bbc
the kids that really need this extra help won't attend. The kids that don't need the support will, this won't solve anything it will just widen the gap between the underprivileged and middle classes.
Let it happen. Post Brexit Britain will need factory fodder as we have to learn to make things again. Harsh but true! Removed
59
24/02/2021 12:00:36 47 4
bbc
Correct. And whose fault is that? The children, or their parents?
62
24/02/2021 12:01:21 75 5
bbc
By underprivileged do you mean parents that will not be bothered??
90
24/02/2021 12:06:15 25 6
bbc
True, they should have just made everyone repeat the year.

On a separate note, in 3 years we will have 3 different ways in which kids will have been tested or received grades. The whole point of exams is to provide a STANDARDISED assessment over the years for everyone. To me there is no longer any standardisation
104
DSA
24/02/2021 12:08:48 67 2
bbc
Not underprivileged, but kids from families that don't care about their kid's education.
128
24/02/2021 12:11:49 37 1
bbc
Sure - but should the kids that want it, not have it because some kids and/or parents can't be bothered?

Can't just hold people back to avoid widening gaps, at that point the gap will become an international gap more than a domestic gap.
149
24/02/2021 12:15:14 29 4
bbc
So what’s your solution? At least the Government are trying to help, if people choose not to avail themselves of the opportunity that is their choice. The same point applies to the vaccine, it will be offered, but some will always refuse
253
24/02/2021 12:32:59 14 0
bbc
Well that's their own choice, and will need to understand that poor decisions have consequences.
326
24/02/2021 12:44:22 6 1
bbc
I totaly agree. The one's who need the support will only be able to use it if it is provided in school time by small group or individual tuition. I used to supply that support and know how this transfromed the performance of these pupils. Retired now and in the high risk group but I suspect there are many retired teachers who would come nack and do this work offered a reasonable return.
436
24/02/2021 12:59:19 2 0
bbc
Jimmyp - or won't be able to attend? Not all parents are good at the job. Pushy parents take evertying going. The last tutor idea from Johnson required schools to pay a lot of the cost - so poor school - no spare cash - no help. Why not target the tuition where it's needed. Most teachers will know
481
24/02/2021 13:04:41 7 0
bbc
Well you'd think the 'under priveleged' would jump at the chance. Perhaps you are really referring to the feckless who are bringing up their childrento be the same. In which case there is a lot more to that problem isn't there?
661
24/02/2021 13:34:06 1 1
bbc
They are being given the choice. The gap has already been widened by the pandemic.
753
24/02/2021 13:52:31 4 0
bbc
Nothing to do with class, it's to do with parenting.
879
24/02/2021 14:11:11 3 0
bbc
Kids not accepting support, or having parents that dont access it, are not underpriviliged. If kids dont attend school its not because of social imparity, its a matter of choice, poor decision making and parenting. You have to accept that some of the less well-off in this country choose not to work or aspire, and pass this on to their kids.
932
24/02/2021 14:25:10 0 0
bbc
Cynical tosh.
954
24/02/2021 14:29:21 3 0
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Stereotyping underprivileged kids by stating they won't attend isn't very kind.

Poor parenting doesn't just belong to the underprivileged and hard working, ambitious children are not just the middle-class.

Shame on you!
978
24/02/2021 14:32:44 0 1
bbc
Still, probably, kids should get all the help that they can help. I think that maybe it'd be ideal if there was some kind of assesment, 40 questions. Then they could be sorted into ability bands and the people who got the lowest scores and generally need help in schoolwork could go to summer school.
24/02/2021 15:02:09 2 0
bbc
If it is optional and decreed by the school by invite to those that obviously need the support you will probably be talking 1 or 2 classes at most.
So you would need a skeleton amount of staff on a rota basis, probably a total of 1 week for each teacher at most.
Diddums to teachers and unions if they can't manage that.
24/02/2021 15:09:57 3 0
bbc
isn't that down to parenting? The attendance I mean not the "class". An "underprivileged" child's parents would surely want them to attend, if not why not?
15
24/02/2021 11:54:09 22 21
bbc
Both my children are teachers - they will honestly say that they are not overworked and tired this last year. In fact my daughter says she has been bored so much now taht she has done all of her decorating and feeling of a job well done. So please no nonsense about teachers suffering from burn out if dont get all of their 14 weeks holiday a year
33
24/02/2021 11:56:36 27 12
bbc
Sounds like your daughter isn't doing her job then.
35
24/02/2021 11:56:48 5 2
bbc
Just because these two didn't work doesn't mean that many thousands did.
40
24/02/2021 11:57:27 14 4
bbc
If your children were teachers you'd know they don't get 14 weeks holiday a year. Lies!
84
24/02/2021 12:05:15 13 5
bbc
I call BS. I can hear the exhaustion in the voices of my children's teachers during on-line lessons.

They've had to relearn the way they teach from scratch.

Even before live lessons there was written feedback.
334
24/02/2021 12:45:34 5 1
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i have two as well - flat out all week 8.00 til 6.00 and working all day Sunday too to make sure they deliver the mix of on -line and in-school lessons
16
24/02/2021 11:54:13 16 11
bbc
Interesting moral decision for the masses. Your child's education or 2 weeks in benidorm.

Hmmm, I could put money on the way that will go.
28
24/02/2021 11:55:31 10 12
bbc
If only everyone was as great as you, we'd be fine eh?
94
24/02/2021 12:07:26 2 1
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I doubt we’ll be able to, unless our rate really drops to under 1,000 a day by then. BoJo doesn’t control the spread - we do. We are doing better, but we still have a long way to go. Look what happened last year. Off we went, and cases shot up.
Have we learned our lesson?
Social distancing etc. will still be required, and I would rather holiday in England, and help the economy.
17
24/02/2021 11:54:23 4 3
bbc
I wonder what rate they are going to pay people to work through their holidays?
18
24/02/2021 11:54:25 6 6
bbc
Hiring extra TAs who could support the children who'd missed some learning is the way to go. The normal structure of school is still there but there's extra support for those who need it.
19
24/02/2021 11:54:35 10 5
bbc
As with the rest of life, there are winners and there are losers. Teachers and parents need to accept this. The kids cannot be forced to make up for lost education, if they don’t want to.

Equally, the teachers cannot make the time for additional lessons. Their spare time will be taken up grading pupils as fairly as possible, in lieu of written exams.
37
24/02/2021 11:56:58 5 3
bbc
You're right, it needs to be completely optional so teachers workload is still fair and those children/parents who don't need or want it aren't forced into accepting extra lessons or help.
20
24/02/2021 11:54:39 0 3
bbc
Why make life more complicated than, it is now for Parents, teachers and most importantly students. The key is to get normality back upon the summer break,school return.
5
24/02/2021 11:50:40 11 20
bbc
The last year has been topsy turvy for kids let them enjoy summer as is school can wait to restart after the holidays
21
24/02/2021 11:54:42 13 10
bbc
They have had plenty of time off. They surely don't need any more. Many will never recover from this and will be disadvantaged their whole lives.
22
24/02/2021 11:54:44 56 20
bbc
Who is going to teach these kids , I cant see teachers giving up annual leave. .
116
24/02/2021 12:09:59 42 24
bbc
Actually most teachers and their unions seem to be broadly supportive of some kind of extra schooling. Because they still believe education is about teaching kids things they'll need to know in adulthood. But to the government, the purpose of education is to stratify society even further than the class system allows. As long as there are exams, or a temporary substitute for exams, then job done.
178
24/02/2021 12:19:18 13 0
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It isn’t compulsory, and some teachers will especially as they will be paid to do it. As in all businesses if overtime is offered some do it snd some don’t
187
24/02/2021 12:20:55 22 0
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My wife had to carry on teaching all through the pandemic last Easter as the school remained open for vulnerable children so she has already lost annual leave.
191
24/02/2021 12:21:44 2 24
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What about ordinary working people then, they don’t have a six weeks Summer break. 5 minutes back at school and they’re all on holiday again.
423
24/02/2021 12:47:48 10 0
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I don't think it has to be the traditional teachers that run this, there's so many freelance educators that would be willing to take up the work.
I'm a s/e music teacher: 1 year of no income support, reduced hours/zero over lockdowns & had my fun with warehouse night shifts. This is a good opportunity to continue our passions, gain relevant experience/diversify (& earn a bit of cash!)
23
24/02/2021 11:54:45 14 10
bbc
Don’t worry no one will want summer schools. Never forget in the UK, farcical holidays preferably polluting disease spreading foreign ones, are the most important thing in sad lives.
210
24/02/2021 12:24:27 2 0
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A silly comment, plenty of children will be happy to spend a couple of weeks more in school if it helps them. I agree some won’t but that is always the case. Sensible to give people the opportunity
336
24/02/2021 12:45:45 1 0
bbc
I've read this three times, and still for the life of me can't understand the second sentence. Perhaps summer schools have been needed for longer than we thought.
24
24/02/2021 11:54:58 5 7
bbc
Government winging strategy they know the unions won’t back so they can continue their divisive tactics. They can then blame unions for Johnson and williamson severe lack of leadership
188
24/02/2021 12:20:59 2 2
bbc
It's not the government's fault if the whinging, labour controlled unions want to block helping our children catch up on their education. Surely even Labour can see that's a priority after the fuss they made over exams? Or do they just like to be difficult to try and gain political points? And failing miserably
25
24/02/2021 11:55:19 6 8
bbc
So working indoors, in a relatively small room with 30 other people, where social distancing is virtually impossible is complying with covid regulations now?

(The above is a description of a classroom).
42
24/02/2021 11:57:36 1 2
bbc
If it is...you may as well open everything
58
24/02/2021 12:00:28 0 0
bbc
Be able to have all the windows open during the summer though so well ventilated
66
Rob
24/02/2021 12:01:31 1 0
bbc
Schools have been exempted from most things since the start. All your required to have is a bottle of hand sanitiser in the classroom, your door open and facemasks in the corridors.
154
24/02/2021 12:15:53 1 0
bbc
You may not have noticed or been able to comprehend but summer schools will be after social restrictions have been lifted. Hope teachers are better educated than you or it will be a complete waste of time anyway
24/02/2021 16:39:43 0 0
bbc
...so you don’t agree that getting all pupils back to school should be a priority? PHE are well aware that resuming full education will increase the infection rate (bearing in mind that 99%+ children are not badly affected by COVID, and that staff are no more vulnerable than other workers), which is why other sectors are being held back - we need to get education back on track ASAP, despite COVID.
25/02/2021 07:11:11 0 0
bbc
It’s better than a supermarket where you come into close contact with thousands of people over a week. Also most offices aren’t covid secure from what I’ve seen
26
24/02/2021 11:55:25 11 10
bbc
Glad money is being spent helping the many children that have missed out, particularly those from poorer backgrounds or with full-time working parents.

Also happy extra lessons will be optional as important to note that some kids have been fortunate enough to still go to school.

Now up to teachers to dip into their rather large holidays & help out (getting renumerated appropriately of course).
147
Rob
24/02/2021 12:15:03 9 1
bbc
If you work a five day week over the year that would equate to 260 days. Out of that your entitled to take 28 days from that so thats 232 days. Your also entitled to another 8 days as bank holidays unless your employer is mean and has rolled them in. thats 224 days. A teacher legally has to work 195 days a year minimum. You cannot mark or plan in a lesson so that all happens outside of work time.
27
24/02/2021 11:55:25 437 76
bbc
The bright ones with good parents will work hard and catch up anyway - probably overtake in fact. The lazy ones with the thick parents will slip behind as those parents cry 'give 'em a break'. The world's a tough place and achieving success is not easy. Dumb parents hold back the kids with potential. A beach somewhere will be higher priority.
56
24/02/2021 11:59:55 102 16
bbc
They will already be way ahead if they have such parents. Far better than in schools held back by the other group. Any sense good parents will learn from this. Stop propping up school stats.
176
24/02/2021 12:19:12 25 18
bbc
After everything many of these kids have had to endure over the last year, I hope many of them can get to a beach this summer.
232
24/02/2021 12:29:49 36 44
bbc
The bright ones with RICH parents WITH TIME TO BAKE SOURDOUGH AND LEARN ANOTHER LANGUAGE WILL catch up anyway - probably overtake in fact. The DISADVANTAGED ones with the HARD WORKING parents will slip behind... there fixed it for you.. And what about the bright kids from broken homes, how do they fit into your very tidy world view?
233
Pip
24/02/2021 12:29:59 19 19
bbc
What a wonderful society we are becoming, don't trip over your halo................?
241
24/02/2021 12:31:00 38 5
bbc
its nowhere near that simple. There are lots of bright children and diligent parents who are struggling to balance work, home and their childrens home schooling. It is really tough for everyone concerned. There are also lots of children struggling with mental health as a result of lockdown and home schooling. Many hard working, diligent people are suffering right now. Many people judge too easily.
319
VoR
24/02/2021 12:42:05 40 3
bbc
Agreed. Having overseen schools in a deprived area, the biggest problem is the subset of parents who don't buy into the concept of schooling at all, and actively hinder their child's education. You can see kids perform well and then start to get dragged back by their parents. And you do see said kids come in and tell you about the holiday they had while their parent had reported them sick.
417
24/02/2021 12:55:46 19 25
bbc
Your comment is moronic .
532
24/02/2021 13:13:03 17 16
bbc
What about the as you term them thick children with as you call them good parents? And the as you term them bright children with as you call them lazy parents? Sweeping generalisation in your comment. Tiresome and unwarranted.
600
24/02/2021 13:22:22 20 6
bbc
My thoughts exactly....their immediate priorities will be, 'Stuff that, what about our summer holiday?'.
714
24/02/2021 13:46:54 12 12
bbc
That's a pretty cruel statement, no child should rely on their parents for academic learning, practical life lessons yes but not schooling, that should be left to the professionals who are trained in the most modern teaching methods and know how to deal with difficult situations.
818
24/02/2021 14:00:49 9 13
bbc
Absolutely awful reply. Can certainly see you're not a teacher. So under your sweeping generalisation, the 'lazy' ones with 'thick parents' can go hang in your view? Maybe reconsider this:
Lazy ones = kids with ASD, SEMH and can't help being less able; kids from broken homes who's only stability is to be in school.
Thick parents = single mums that may have been victims of DA, sexual violence?
913
24/02/2021 14:21:34 7 6
bbc
I am shocked that this comment received 217 likes. This comment is as lazy and ignorant as the people you seemingly describe. Can we see your evidence for this?
24/02/2021 14:44:47 2 1
bbc
Success is Me me me me are an Influencer with my face on pagebook website and 2.5Million "Likes".
Alternatively inane gossip about inane subject matter with same large number of hits.
The Human Race has got attention spell less than a goldfish but is captivated texting sexting and NO TIME for their babies / children.

This applies to MOST people nowadays.
YOUR observation will prove this true.
24/02/2021 15:35:27 7 3
bbc
wow I thought some of you others post must have been you on a bad day, but you really are an arrogant idiot. Why do lazy ones have to have thick parents? Can the have learning difficulties, or maybe they can't afford the tech to learn from home so fell behind. Think before you post.
24/02/2021 16:00:51 3 2
bbc
Simplistics and judgementism work really well for you,.don't they. A very neat world without any disadvantage or advantage, reward always matching effort.... Presumably there isnt any crime either.
Which other works of fiction are you responsible for?
24/02/2021 16:04:53 1 0
bbc
To be honest those with parents who can probably have achieved mountains more useful learning this year than they would have in school. Most parents are able to provide better education, better motivation and buy sensible science experiments, maths books and even reading books for them. I mean, has anyone looked at 'chip and kipper' reading books and 'peter & jane' and decided which is best?
24/02/2021 16:06:14 1 1
bbc
to be fair it does'nt appear to have held back the clown.
24/02/2021 16:06:18 2 1
bbc
so the kids have to suffer because the could not choose their parents .what a pathetic view
stu
24/02/2021 16:21:28 4 2
bbc
at the end of the day the sucessful ones will always be the ones that try the hardest. regardless of the left droning on about being fair to the disadvantaged.. it wont make any difference.
My boss cant spell for toffee and his maths isnt great either. but he slugged away for 25 years to build a company and now he's loaded. we didnt stop throughout Covid and no one had to be furloughed
24/02/2021 16:21:46 4 1
bbc
It didn't take the Tory Bot distraction propaganda to appear did it?!

As usual, they are on the front foot in laying any blame onto parents, teachers etc.

Pity we haven't got a competent government like Australia, NZ, S Korea, Japan or Vietnam have got. They have been able to get on with life because they didn't adopt a stupid herd immunity policy.

Economy was the focus & Tories messed that up!
NP
24/02/2021 16:27:43 1 1
bbc
Can not agree more!! The plant will grow as good as the care, otherwise jungle rule.
24/02/2021 16:32:11 0 0
bbc
unless the kids want to be lifeguards
24/02/2021 16:36:39 2 2
bbc
Don't knock the thick parents, they provide us with bin men and van drivers.
24/02/2021 16:44:52 0 0
bbc
In my third year at college I had to repeat a year after suffering near fatal injuries in an accident 6 months in. As a result I started getting better grades than previously and was able to help my new colleages. Overall it was a rewarding experience. Heli-skiing is dangerous but can be rewarding...
24/02/2021 16:45:02 2 0
bbc
Just another holier than thou rude fool shame your parents never taught you any manners parental fail
Ed
24/02/2021 16:46:36 1 0
bbc
A very dumb comment from a, obviously, thick person...Besford!
24/02/2021 16:59:43 0 0
bbc
Sounds about right. Not been easy but we kept up with 7 and 9 year olds workload. Teacher phoned to say eldest has near enough kept to a greater depth standard
24/02/2021 17:06:18 1 0
bbc
To be fair Besford, your lack of education hasn’t prevented you being able to post disparaging comments on the BBC.
CA
24/02/2021 17:34:15 0 0
bbc
Parents will balance social, mental, emotional and academic needs. For many kids, parents and teachers normal summer break to recharge and normalise will be more effective.

Catching up can be done September onwards in a more normal school way.

The world is a tough place but kids can break.

Good parents have emotionally affected kids as well as bad. Talk to parents of child suicides.
24/02/2021 18:09:07 0 0
bbc
It's not the kids fault if the parent is lazy. Attack the parent but not the child.
24/02/2021 18:42:49 0 0
bbc
And so does the CORRUPT BRITISH CLASS SYSTEM.
16
24/02/2021 11:54:13 16 11
bbc
Interesting moral decision for the masses. Your child's education or 2 weeks in benidorm.

Hmmm, I could put money on the way that will go.
28
24/02/2021 11:55:31 10 12
bbc
If only everyone was as great as you, we'd be fine eh?
196
24/02/2021 12:22:41 0 0
bbc
True
4
RSO
24/02/2021 11:48:55 27 24
bbc
Has anyone checked this will be ok with the unions?
29
24/02/2021 11:55:42 7 3
bbc
Unions said it would be a good start read the article for once
242
Bob
24/02/2021 12:31:07 2 0
bbc
Not really - they said the money was a good start and then proceeded to give an excuse for why it can't be done 'overwhelming pupils'!
30
24/02/2021 11:55:47 29 11
bbc
£6000 will allow a primary school to hire a single supply teacher for 30 children for half a term.

They spent more on Eat Out to Help Out.
126
24/02/2021 12:11:12 14 21
bbc
Why would they need a supply teacher - what's wrong with the ones they've already got?
31
24/02/2021 11:54:11 68 46
bbc
The majority of teachers are doing their absolute best in these troubled time...Total madness from the left wing unions trying to stop the schools opening...
43
24/02/2021 11:57:39 14 75
bbc
I'm glad you didn't say ALL teachers and the majority should be replaced with minority.
where does it say they are trying to stop the opening of schools more lies from you as usual Removed
198
24/02/2021 12:22:46 8 2
bbc
Can you please share your evidence for this statement. Personally, I've just spent the morning supervising a class of key worker's children in school, whilst simultaneously teaching my lessons online to the children at home (it's break time now, before you make any more idiotic comments). Just like every single other teacher in my school (majority), or other colleagues I know of.
288
Pip
24/02/2021 12:36:54 1 3
bbc
You started well, then got typically side tracked...........?
362
24/02/2021 12:49:15 1 1
bbc
Really? So who are you saying you don't mind dying.
373
VoR
24/02/2021 12:50:59 3 0
bbc
I'm not a fan of unions in the education system. I've seen them make their withdrawal of objections to things be contingent on whether we kept funding them (even though we were going to keep funding them anyway), which clearly shows they don't manage conflicts of interest properly. However, in this case, I think the unions have valid concerns that haven't yet been properly addressed.
25/02/2021 07:14:22 0 0
bbc
But they aren’t and that’s the perception of the public esp parents. They need to demonstrate what they are doing and stop whinging. Mind you all they did was whinge pre covid so nothing new
No one every criticises the asset managers, hedge fund analysists and other bankers...all working from home on mega bucks. Removed
32
24/02/2021 11:56:13 0 0
bbc
Envy is a sad thing.......
15
24/02/2021 11:54:09 22 21
bbc
Both my children are teachers - they will honestly say that they are not overworked and tired this last year. In fact my daughter says she has been bored so much now taht she has done all of her decorating and feeling of a job well done. So please no nonsense about teachers suffering from burn out if dont get all of their 14 weeks holiday a year
33
24/02/2021 11:56:36 27 12
bbc
Sounds like your daughter isn't doing her job then.
218
24/02/2021 12:25:37 3 8
bbc
She isn't the only teacher who hasn't been working hard, lots of them haven't. Either because it wasn't required or because some of them saw as an opportunity for skiving. Believe me I KNOW about it. They get plenty of holidays anyway why can't they give 2 or 3 weeks for the good of the children? Not a lot to ask after what NHS and other key works have given all through without a break?
25/02/2021 07:02:52 0 0
bbc
Sound like your daughter is mother honest teacher - that’s two I’ve found so far!! Hurry! Tell your daughter thank you for her honesty and not treading the line on this issue
No one every criticises the asset managers, hedge fund analysists and other bankers...all working from home on mega bucks. Removed
34
24/02/2021 11:56:37 0 2
bbc
Because they are still working and contributing to the wealth of this country. Despite Boris best efforts to destroy the city and an industry in which the UK leads the world via brexit.

Now Amsterdam has already overtaken London as a share trading market. Another brexit bonus.
15
24/02/2021 11:54:09 22 21
bbc
Both my children are teachers - they will honestly say that they are not overworked and tired this last year. In fact my daughter says she has been bored so much now taht she has done all of her decorating and feeling of a job well done. So please no nonsense about teachers suffering from burn out if dont get all of their 14 weeks holiday a year
35
24/02/2021 11:56:48 5 2
bbc
Just because these two didn't work doesn't mean that many thousands did.
2
Bob
24/02/2021 11:48:47 17 17
bbc
My child was one of the 1 in 10 that never received work during the original first wave. That's improved now, but learning is still very limited and not remotely close to a proper 'working' day. Yet the unions keep making excuses of overworking pupils! This is about making up lost ground, not adding on extra hours!

Thankfully we've been able to pick up some of that slack - but others won't have.
36
24/02/2021 11:56:55 5 8
bbc
change school then, what excuses have the unions made
237
Bob
24/02/2021 12:30:15 2 6
bbc
They're in this article and the ones before it. They repeatedly say that extra hours, reduced holidays or working during the holiday periods will lead to overworked and overwhelmed pupils.

Hogwash if they've had the life of Riley for the past year. Teachers, maybe. Pupils, not!
294
24/02/2021 12:37:56 4 1
bbc
And how would they change school? There is no choice nowadays as to where your child goes to school. And the remark is irrelevant to the discussion since it is about all children catching up on missed education
306
24/02/2021 12:39:59 4 3
bbc
think there has been selective reading for whilst many teachers have done their job, albeit limited - no homework = no marking, all bought about by union directives.

And I have had them read to me by a union member, far too many done very little.
551
24/02/2021 13:14:54 2 1
bbc
That's far too glib. You can't change schools like you'd change a sweater. The local authority will have impediments to that, plus other schols might not have free places.
19
24/02/2021 11:54:35 10 5
bbc
As with the rest of life, there are winners and there are losers. Teachers and parents need to accept this. The kids cannot be forced to make up for lost education, if they don’t want to.

Equally, the teachers cannot make the time for additional lessons. Their spare time will be taken up grading pupils as fairly as possible, in lieu of written exams.
37
24/02/2021 11:56:58 5 3
bbc
You're right, it needs to be completely optional so teachers workload is still fair and those children/parents who don't need or want it aren't forced into accepting extra lessons or help.
38
24/02/2021 11:57:16 2 2
bbc
Lmao. The European summer tourist countries won't be happy with this. They require our monies badly. All holidays cancelled for this year. I wonder if this is covered by insurance, holiday company. Cannot now go on holiday due to kids have to do overtime !! ??
39
24/02/2021 11:57:26 72 26
bbc
If everyone is in the same boat, who do they need to catch up with?
194
24/02/2021 12:22:03 65 6
bbc
Not quite. Some kids have had parents at home who can support their learning, space to work quietly, laptops with a good internet connection, stable home life, schools that have excelled with remote learning and financially secure households. Others have had a much tougher time. The pandemic experience with education has varied.
195
24/02/2021 12:22:20 8 0
bbc
Well they aren’t are they. Some pupils particularly in middle class home will have had access to computers and Wi-Fi, and have plenty of space to learn, others don’t have any of these facilities so suffer in comparison
258
Bob
24/02/2021 12:33:35 3 0
bbc
1 in 10 pupils did not have any contact from teachers and 4 in 10 had "little" contact during the first wave.

Does that sound like the same boat to you?
261
24/02/2021 12:33:55 6 0
bbc
Pupils who finished school in previous or later years.
560
24/02/2021 13:16:32 0 3
bbc
Well said
718
24/02/2021 13:47:38 0 1
bbc
It is what, not who. What being learning.
CA
24/02/2021 17:56:45 1 0
bbc
They aren't in the same place.

Depends on parents and kids emotional strength. Quality of teaching. Household income. Parents, working or furloughed.

Consider also kids of medical professionals. Imagine what it was like knowing mummy or daddy is caring for Covid patients and what could happen to them, where would kids minds be focussed...

VERY Big boat, massively different experiences.
24/02/2021 18:10:33 1 0
bbc
once they are an adult they are judged against everyone else, not just people their age..
15
24/02/2021 11:54:09 22 21
bbc
Both my children are teachers - they will honestly say that they are not overworked and tired this last year. In fact my daughter says she has been bored so much now taht she has done all of her decorating and feeling of a job well done. So please no nonsense about teachers suffering from burn out if dont get all of their 14 weeks holiday a year
40
24/02/2021 11:57:27 14 4
bbc
If your children were teachers you'd know they don't get 14 weeks holiday a year. Lies!
68
24/02/2021 12:02:30 4 6
bbc
Both have contracts to work 180 days a year as do the vast majority of teachers
41
24/02/2021 11:57:29 7 10
bbc
Jingoistic twaddle from a shallow opportunist who helped take us out of the EU despite his belief it was a mistake because he put personal gain above his nation and his own integrity . BoJo and Trump make me wonder if democracy can actually work.
It would only work if 52% of the electorate weren't thick as... Removed
25
24/02/2021 11:55:19 6 8
bbc
So working indoors, in a relatively small room with 30 other people, where social distancing is virtually impossible is complying with covid regulations now?

(The above is a description of a classroom).
42
24/02/2021 11:57:36 1 2
bbc
If it is...you may as well open everything
31
24/02/2021 11:54:11 68 46
bbc
The majority of teachers are doing their absolute best in these troubled time...Total madness from the left wing unions trying to stop the schools opening...
43
24/02/2021 11:57:39 14 75
bbc
I'm glad you didn't say ALL teachers and the majority should be replaced with minority.
91
24/02/2021 12:06:52 19 2
bbc
And your proof of this is? Thought not, another right wing Daily fail reader.
44
24/02/2021 11:58:03 1 9
bbc
On one hand schools say kids need to catch up but whatever is suggested seems to be not possible. No working through holidays/weekends/longer hours just complain about the situation.

Schools have been open for essential workers children so limited face to face and some online, surely teachers haven't been so hard worked they can't see the need to help?
61
24/02/2021 12:00:57 11 1
bbc
Well I've been sat on my laptop every day during this lockdown delivering 5 remote lessons per day to my usual classes as per my timetable for the past 6 weeks and will do so for the next 2 before I return to face-to-face teaching. Plus continuing to hold remote staff meetings, virtual parents evenings, etc. When am I due a break if I'm then forced to teach over the summer?
97
Rob
24/02/2021 12:07:47 2 1
bbc
Remote teaching of a large class of mixed ability is far less efficient in terms of direct student interaction, so teachers like my wife are having to work harder to get even close to the same level of educational coverage let alone actual outcomes. You'll likely find that most teachers and head teachers are entirely aware that problems abound even with the extra efforts already going in.
121
24/02/2021 12:10:47 0 1
bbc
On the one hand, schools are not saying that. On the other hand, Steve is giving his opinion on why they have said things they haven't said.

Back in the real world, all that children really need is time, and they will learn the things they have not been learning during this period away from school. I'm sure the fiddly detail of when and how won't be something you'll want to worry about, Steve.
45
24/02/2021 11:58:28 3 8
bbc
Give teachers free holidays in Benidorm then at the last minute tell them they have to teach 40 Essex kids for a fortnight in the hotel.
14
24/02/2021 11:53:41 373 35
bbc
the kids that really need this extra help won't attend. The kids that don't need the support will, this won't solve anything it will just widen the gap between the underprivileged and middle classes.
Let it happen. Post Brexit Britain will need factory fodder as we have to learn to make things again. Harsh but true! Removed
131
24/02/2021 12:12:46 32 1
bbc
Is their something wrong in making things?
145
24/02/2021 12:14:52 39 4
bbc
It would be a good thing to expand our manufacturing capability, but the jobs will be at the high level and hi-tec end. Production workers of the future will need to be trained up and skilled, not factory fodder.
193
24/02/2021 12:21:58 31 3
bbc
We do need to learn to make things again and move manufacturing back from China but we won’t do it by producing uneducated “factory fodder”. We will need a well and appropriately educated skilled workforce to achieve this.
255
24/02/2021 12:33:26 4 1
bbc
True that we need to start making stuff again, but it won't involve many people. Automation, 3d printing, robots etc. are the way of the manufacturing world today, with just the odd person involved.
274
24/02/2021 12:35:20 2 2
bbc
Never a true word said in jest.
323
24/02/2021 12:42:51 7 0
bbc
Also to pick fruit and veg!
735
24/02/2021 13:49:37 3 1
bbc
'Factory fodder' is that how you describe people who use their hands for a living, absolute disgrace.
744
24/02/2021 13:51:00 0 1
bbc
Quite right - and what about three year olds going up chimneys - about time that tradition was reintroduced - all this mommy coddling of the unwashed poor! Maybe repurposing department stores as poorhouses! It's all far far too lenient right now!
905
24/02/2021 14:19:39 1 0
bbc
Post Brexit Britain needs to compete in well educated, high skilled, high tech manufacturing. Unskilled manufacturing is virtually a thing of the past. The low skilled undereducated are now consigned to retail and fruit picking.
909
24/02/2021 14:20:10 0 0
bbc
And there is the Farage thinking - digraceful.
936
24/02/2021 14:25:30 0 0
bbc
You are a disgrace.
962
24/02/2021 14:30:20 1 1
bbc
very pompous reply, working in a factory does not make you fodder. Many people who work in factories are very skilled. typical view of idiots!!
24/02/2021 14:39:17 0 0
bbc
People just have not got a clue.

Post Brexit Britain will still be outsourced to China Japan Korea EU et al.
Britain has not enough natural resources to feed itself.
Intelectual power and money "creation" {in reality DEBT} is the forte and we have exported bundles of that as our Universities distribute education knowlege.
This strength only works until China et al builds their own Universities.
24/02/2021 15:05:40 0 0
bbc
Brexit Britain will suffer from a shortage of low skilled labour so factories will have to invest in technology and stop relying on cheap labour, thus fueling productivity, wage growth and therefore increased tax for the government, which can be redeployed into the NHS etc.
01
24/02/2021 15:17:57 0 0
bbc
Perhaps we should make lie detectors and Boris can be the first to test it.
47
24/02/2021 11:58:55 166 48
bbc
It's good to want to make sure this generations of pupils are caught up after this ordeal, but I do worry about the teachers. We as a society undervalue teachers (both figuratively and literally in terms of pay), whilst expecting a lot from them. And now we're essentially telling teachers to work through their holiday, something that many teachers do now anyway, for mandatory summer school now.
96
24/02/2021 12:07:29 96 213
bbc
It will only be reducing their holiday time to the same as everybody else.
182
24/02/2021 12:20:06 6 2
bbc
No we are not, it isn’t compulsory. Some will want to do it, others won’t
231
24/02/2021 12:29:40 30 11
bbc
Oh, don't worry about us! I worry more for the neck-throbbing commentators of Britain's social media pages. What would they do if they didn't have teachers to vent their collective spleen against? It must have been a tough few months for them not being able to go into a school to make verbal and physical threats face-to-face and threatening to 'sue' because their kid had to do homework! :-)
249
24/02/2021 12:32:04 21 40
bbc
Lots of people have worked through holidays. Why are teachers so special?
How about doctors and nurses who have been working non stop for a year now, I'd love to say let's give them all 6 weeks off over the summer, but that's not possible.

It's one year, suck it up and work a bit extra for ONE year.
339
VoR
24/02/2021 12:45:57 8 22
bbc
Teachers are not as badly paid as people seem to believe. (I've overseen two schools and work in financial services. The starting pay of teachers and those entering highly skilled financial services (FS) jobs is comparable (barring a few outliers), and both allow progression to very high salaries for a few. In FS I'd say more progress to higher salaries, but entry is a bit harder.
24/02/2021 14:42:29 2 6
bbc
In Scotland, based on working hours and inc. benefits, a teachers hourly rate is comparable to someone earning circa £64k/annum (inc. benefits). There is no requirement to receive a promotion to reach this level.

I'm afraid i can't agree with them being undervalued in terms of pay, all other proffessionals would require several promotions to reach that level, if in fact they ever did.
11
24/02/2021 11:53:24 10 10
bbc
I certainly won’t be sending our kids to any summer school. Fortunately our schools have been brilliant with providing work and support, but it’s still tiring for teachers and kids. They still need a break over summer.
48
24/02/2021 11:58:58 4 3
bbc
Got the hols booked have you?
89
24/02/2021 12:06:12 1 0
bbc
Nope, we are actually planning on doing stuff as a family while giving the kids a proper chance to recharge. We have no intention of leaving the country.
49
24/02/2021 11:59:01 33 29
bbc
I'm a qualified accountant

I have a Natural sciences degree from Cambridge

I use no maths (almost) I learnt after the age of 7 - the use of brackets in excel being the exception and some algebraic manipulation

I do however use coding skills I learnt doing Computer studies at GCSE level

Almost all of what is taught at school is really of no real world use and kids know that - they aren't stupid
72
24/02/2021 12:02:54 35 19
bbc
I fail to see what your personal achievements as grand as they are, have to do with it to be honest.
81
24/02/2021 12:04:37 6 4
bbc
Actually many of them ARE stupid and they need basic 'sums' just to be able to go shopping! I suspect your schooling didn't include mixing with the thick ones or meeting their parents.
83
24/02/2021 12:05:00 5 2
bbc
It would be fascinating if jobs could asses what they would need to teach directly to a child after say junior school in order to be able to do the job. A year would probably cover it for most. As you say tiny fractions taught by compulsion in schools is ever used again. Now before some jump, by all means learn about other stuff for a hobby or quiz team worth.
189
24/02/2021 12:21:18 10 1
bbc
Well done James. It's a good job all children are going to become accountants when they leave school then, isn't it?
204
24/02/2021 12:23:28 8 0
bbc
Schools also about learning to socialize, form relationships and mix successfully in the world. Kids can`t do that stuck at home.
223
24/02/2021 12:26:40 11 0
bbc
You could have done with catch-up lessons in sentence punctuation, James. You can have that lesson for free. It's my job. Such things were still considered useful in my time at Oxford. Perhaps things are different at Cambridge. ;-)
393
24/02/2021 12:52:23 2 0
bbc
Having taught aspects of the Natural science degree at Cambridge you would need to be highly competent at high school maths before being admitted. There is no way you would have passed part 1 without demonstrating advanced maths skills across multiple modules.
569
24/02/2021 13:18:26 1 0
bbc
If all of what is taught at school is really of no real world use, then what to make of your studying for a Natural Sciences degree to become an accountant? Does that make you stupid? Or privileged in a way that blinds you to the importance of education post age 7?
780
24/02/2021 13:55:16 1 0
bbc
and yet you are writing, using vocabulary and grammer taught from the age of 5
50
24/02/2021 11:59:06 0 0
bbc
My goodness! How many years have those children in the photo been fast-tracked in order to represent secondary school pupils engaging eagerly with a catch-up lesson! Let them finish Year 2 first! :-)
51
24/02/2021 11:59:29 14 9
bbc
This is such an important program and very welcomed. Summer catch-up classes are an absolute must and schools will know best who needs this and how to organise them and reward teachers who make themselves available. An absolute must
52
24/02/2021 11:59:29 9 23
bbc
Don't think the teacher's will fancy extra hours and summer schooling it may ruin their holiday plans. No other profession except politics get one quarter of the year off. Let's wait and see what their union come up with, probably exhaustion, wonder what the NHS staff will make of that?
63
24/02/2021 12:01:26 6 3
bbc
If it's so easy why not become a teacher?
67
24/02/2021 12:02:17 1 0
bbc
They don't get a quarter of the year off.
75
24/02/2021 12:02:17 2 0
bbc
you obviously not a teacher
93
Dea
24/02/2021 12:07:02 3 1
bbc
First of all ; you could always become s teacher! But before you apply you need to know we DON'T get paid for the summer holiday!!!!!! Our pay is divided into 13 equal payslips- but we only get 5.2 weeks of paid holiday per year ( like most professions!)
129
24/02/2021 12:11:54 3 0
bbc
Teachers have a contract as presumably you do - just imagine if someone said you can't have a holiday this year what would you think.? Enough teachers are likely to leave the profession this year without forcing more out.
199
24/02/2021 12:22:50 1 0
bbc
No other profession doesn't get paid for a quarter of the year. Ah, I see that you didn't know that. Those 'free holidays' you rant about? They're free - to you. You don't pay a penny for any minute of them. As for the rest you extrapolate from your fantasy world: no, I'm not exhausted; yes, I'd happily help catch-ups for free... but you irritate me so much I might change my mind for your kids!:-)
4
RSO
24/02/2021 11:48:55 27 24
bbc
Has anyone checked this will be ok with the unions?
53
24/02/2021 11:59:36 5 5
bbc
Yes as long as hefty payments are planned, our 13 year old has had 20 minutes maximum from his school this lockdown and previously was told for maths one day, go play a game of chess!!

I fully agree a great number of teachers did and are still "putting in a shift" but sadly there are a large number doing next to nothing but hiding behind their union. I have seen some of the emails from them!
No one every criticises the asset managers, hedge fund analysists and other bankers...all working from home on mega bucks. Removed
54
24/02/2021 11:59:44 1 0
bbc
Relevance?
31
24/02/2021 11:54:11 68 46
bbc
The majority of teachers are doing their absolute best in these troubled time...Total madness from the left wing unions trying to stop the schools opening...
55
bbc
where does it say they are trying to stop the opening of schools more lies from you as usual Removed
27
24/02/2021 11:55:25 437 76
bbc
The bright ones with good parents will work hard and catch up anyway - probably overtake in fact. The lazy ones with the thick parents will slip behind as those parents cry 'give 'em a break'. The world's a tough place and achieving success is not easy. Dumb parents hold back the kids with potential. A beach somewhere will be higher priority.
56
24/02/2021 11:59:55 102 16
bbc
They will already be way ahead if they have such parents. Far better than in schools held back by the other group. Any sense good parents will learn from this. Stop propping up school stats.
57
24/02/2021 12:00:26 3 4
bbc
Here we go....the cures for the cure are even more stupid than the original cure!

??????
25
24/02/2021 11:55:19 6 8
bbc
So working indoors, in a relatively small room with 30 other people, where social distancing is virtually impossible is complying with covid regulations now?

(The above is a description of a classroom).
58
24/02/2021 12:00:28 0 0
bbc
Be able to have all the windows open during the summer though so well ventilated
79
24/02/2021 12:03:57 1 0
bbc
Better if they had filtered air conditioning like the house of commons and less people in the room so they could be more spaced out.
14
24/02/2021 11:53:41 373 35
bbc
the kids that really need this extra help won't attend. The kids that don't need the support will, this won't solve anything it will just widen the gap between the underprivileged and middle classes.
59
24/02/2021 12:00:36 47 4
bbc
Correct. And whose fault is that? The children, or their parents?
479
24/02/2021 13:04:34 1 0
bbc
The grandparents.
5
24/02/2021 11:50:40 11 20
bbc
The last year has been topsy turvy for kids let them enjoy summer as is school can wait to restart after the holidays
60
24/02/2021 12:00:43 4 0
bbc
Really? They've had more 'holiday' than they could possibly hope for.
108
24/02/2021 12:09:02 1 3
bbc
not a holiday a lockdown for most
44
24/02/2021 11:58:03 1 9
bbc
On one hand schools say kids need to catch up but whatever is suggested seems to be not possible. No working through holidays/weekends/longer hours just complain about the situation.

Schools have been open for essential workers children so limited face to face and some online, surely teachers haven't been so hard worked they can't see the need to help?
61
24/02/2021 12:00:57 11 1
bbc
Well I've been sat on my laptop every day during this lockdown delivering 5 remote lessons per day to my usual classes as per my timetable for the past 6 weeks and will do so for the next 2 before I return to face-to-face teaching. Plus continuing to hold remote staff meetings, virtual parents evenings, etc. When am I due a break if I'm then forced to teach over the summer?
98
24/02/2021 12:07:49 0 3
bbc
But still enough time to be reviewing a BBC HYS and make comments, not convinced you are a teacher, sound to talented ??
112
24/02/2021 12:09:28 0 3
bbc
And lots of people have continued to work 8 hour days through the whole pandemic and will only be getting 2 weeks holiday in the summer; why should you be different?
152
24/02/2021 12:15:32 0 2
bbc
I suppose you could become a nurse in the Covid wards if you want an easier profession? No sitting on laptops and you will have to commute to work on long shifts but I’m sure it will cure the work shy tendencies.
25/02/2021 07:15:34 0 0
bbc
What did you do in last lockdown. Jack all judging by what my kids got
14
24/02/2021 11:53:41 373 35
bbc
the kids that really need this extra help won't attend. The kids that don't need the support will, this won't solve anything it will just widen the gap between the underprivileged and middle classes.
62
24/02/2021 12:01:21 75 5
bbc
By underprivileged do you mean parents that will not be bothered??
52
24/02/2021 11:59:29 9 23
bbc
Don't think the teacher's will fancy extra hours and summer schooling it may ruin their holiday plans. No other profession except politics get one quarter of the year off. Let's wait and see what their union come up with, probably exhaustion, wonder what the NHS staff will make of that?
63
24/02/2021 12:01:26 6 3
bbc
If it's so easy why not become a teacher?
825
24/02/2021 14:02:13 0 0
bbc
Because I retired Burt 9 years ago aged 49. ????
64
24/02/2021 12:01:28 1 6
bbc
Summer schools???? who are going to teach in summer schools then?? supposed it is a season for holiday
4
RSO
24/02/2021 11:48:55 27 24
bbc
Has anyone checked this will be ok with the unions?
65
24/02/2021 12:01:30 3 2
bbc
I think is time parents had our own union.
73
24/02/2021 12:03:14 1 1
bbc
it's*
25
24/02/2021 11:55:19 6 8
bbc
So working indoors, in a relatively small room with 30 other people, where social distancing is virtually impossible is complying with covid regulations now?

(The above is a description of a classroom).
66
Rob
24/02/2021 12:01:31 1 0
bbc
Schools have been exempted from most things since the start. All your required to have is a bottle of hand sanitiser in the classroom, your door open and facemasks in the corridors.
52
24/02/2021 11:59:29 9 23
bbc
Don't think the teacher's will fancy extra hours and summer schooling it may ruin their holiday plans. No other profession except politics get one quarter of the year off. Let's wait and see what their union come up with, probably exhaustion, wonder what the NHS staff will make of that?
67
24/02/2021 12:02:17 1 0
bbc
They don't get a quarter of the year off.
85
24/02/2021 12:05:18 0 2
bbc
yes they do - 13 weeks holiday equals quarter of a year according to the maths I did at school. Were yours different?
40
24/02/2021 11:57:27 14 4
bbc
If your children were teachers you'd know they don't get 14 weeks holiday a year. Lies!
68
24/02/2021 12:02:30 4 6
bbc
Both have contracts to work 180 days a year as do the vast majority of teachers
219
Rob
24/02/2021 12:25:54 3 1
bbc
Wrong on both legal and practical levels. UK State school government pay and conditions for teachers dictate minimum (not maximum), para 51.2 for 2020, 195 days a year, noting para 51.7 that "a teacher must work such reasonable additional hours as may be necessary to enable the effective discharge of the teacher’s professional duties".
69
24/02/2021 12:02:37 7 6
bbc
Summer schooling a must for every child. Our children have lost so much as it is. Happy for this to happen.
95
24/02/2021 12:07:28 4 2
bbc
Entirely parental fault then. It is, was, only your responsibility to educate your children. No one else’s.
100
24/02/2021 12:08:21 1 1
bbc
What have they lost? The chance to memorise facts that a politician feels they should know? What have they gained - independence, the ability to prioritise tasks, self-motivation, IT skills and resilience - all skills valued by employers. They should have their holiday and society should see the gains rather than losses.
70
24/02/2021 12:02:48 22 7
bbc
Be careful what you ask for ... as the saying goes.
For so long now we have heard 'get children back to school' and I agree. But just watch, now that it is proposed to catch up using summer holidays, there will be a new angle 'you can't deprive them of a holiday'!
7
24/02/2021 11:52:16 744 133
bbc
I'm waiting to hear how Parliament will sit over the summer to start to catch up on legislation they would have worked on if there hadn't been a Covid pandemic.

It would be shocking hypocrisy if MPs were planning to enjoy their summer holidays whilst requiring teachers and pupils who have worked hard over lockdown to continue through summer.
71
24/02/2021 12:02:51 159 54
bbc
Be fair they’ve only just returned from their half term break
435
24/02/2021 12:59:01 32 9
bbc
If you think that you are living in cloud cuckoo land. Many teachers and schools routinely work throughout holiday periods.
543
24/02/2021 13:06:19 8 5
bbc
You really do not have the faintest clue do you !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
49
24/02/2021 11:59:01 33 29
bbc
I'm a qualified accountant

I have a Natural sciences degree from Cambridge

I use no maths (almost) I learnt after the age of 7 - the use of brackets in excel being the exception and some algebraic manipulation

I do however use coding skills I learnt doing Computer studies at GCSE level

Almost all of what is taught at school is really of no real world use and kids know that - they aren't stupid
72
24/02/2021 12:02:54 35 19
bbc
I fail to see what your personal achievements as grand as they are, have to do with it to be honest.
321
Pip
24/02/2021 12:42:36 1 0
bbc
And that's part of the problem, it's about what they are taught to be fully equipped for the workplace as well as a broader education, which is what he's saying in effect............?
65
24/02/2021 12:01:30 3 2
bbc
I think is time parents had our own union.
73
24/02/2021 12:03:14 1 1
bbc
it's*
74
24/02/2021 12:01:19 3 4
bbc
Good ideas to help kids catch up abound but the money ISN'T enough - it's nowhere near the "help out and eat out" nonsense of last year and OUR kids will never ever catch up with THEIR kids go ask the headmasters at Eton and Harrow what THEY think - WE'RE an irrelevance!
52
24/02/2021 11:59:29 9 23
bbc
Don't think the teacher's will fancy extra hours and summer schooling it may ruin their holiday plans. No other profession except politics get one quarter of the year off. Let's wait and see what their union come up with, probably exhaustion, wonder what the NHS staff will make of that?
75
24/02/2021 12:02:17 2 0
bbc
you obviously not a teacher
76
24/02/2021 12:03:31 6 4
bbc
And in three here come the unions to say 'absolutely not plausible' then in the next breath 'the govt must do something to help kids catch up'...………………...won't be waiting long!
158
24/02/2021 12:16:19 0 0
bbc
Surely the Gov can invent a time machine, that would solve the problem!
160
24/02/2021 12:16:40 1 0
bbc
With you inventing things that people haven't said and reasons why they shouldn't say them, it would seem pointless for them to bother.
77
W 6
24/02/2021 12:03:41 9 18
bbc
My support of the teaching unions has worn very thin by now. For what it's worth I am apprehensive about year groups going back at once, but I might have had more sympathy with the unions if they hadn't been screeching for the schools to remain closed this past year. As for burnout, come off it. Kids have had their educations interrupted for 12 months, and the teachers still get a tonne of holiday
102
24/02/2021 12:08:41 3 4
bbc
They've kept you safe...Do you think the Govt would have?? You'd have been thrown to the wolves like shop workers etc who didn't have a strong Union to protect them.
130
24/02/2021 12:12:33 3 0
bbc
And you know this because... you are a teacher? married to one? try the job, loads of vacancies. It is the union's job to stick up for their members??? Look at the latest ONS report (which isn't in the news), teachers are in the top 5 most at risk professions, ahead of healthcare! They are being told to go to work with risks, no PPE and having NOT been vaccinated. Why so much hate for teachers???
148
RPH
24/02/2021 12:15:08 2 0
bbc
Can't you think af ANYTHING more original than 'teachers get lots of holiday? Come on, at least be original in your teacher-bashing.
155
24/02/2021 12:15:55 5 0
bbc
As a teacher, I've done everything asked of me in this pandemic. I've taught in school and online at the same time, interacted with 100s of children with no more protection than an open window, worked holidays and half terms visiting homes to deliver resources, phoned and counselled parents. Comments like this make me feel an absolute sucker and would make me think twice about doing it again.
78
24/02/2021 12:03:49 125 31
bbc
No to summer school! My two (aged 12 & 15) have worked so hard during lockdown & have had great reports from their schools. They need time to relax over Summer, you can't open everything up, then expect children to go into school! Mental health recovery should be the priority rather than forcing them to sit at desks. They are tired like the rest of us but have gained life skills through this time.
123
24/02/2021 12:10:54 52 3
bbc
There will be a massive divide amongst children (like mine and yours) who have worked every school day since last March and those who've missed a lot.

Any plan needs to take that into consideration because the gulf will be huge.
140
24/02/2021 12:09:55 4 7
bbc
huh? the life skills we need begin in school classrooms, fields and playgrounds
146
24/02/2021 12:14:56 11 0
bbc
I'm sure some that have been well supported and studied have continued to do well. Unfortunately some haven't had the support and have fallen behind, think the idea is that these will be the ones the assistance is aimed at but will the parents and teachers support this plan?
222
24/02/2021 12:26:15 10 4
bbc
I believe this is NOT due to be compulsory? "Schools will have the OPTION......pupils who most need it"
Perhaps your children could teach you to read something thoroughly before commenting upon it.
305
24/02/2021 12:39:40 8 0
bbc
It isn’t compulsory! If you feel they have done well then good for you and them. This option is for those who feel they have slipped behind and want the extra help!
975
24/02/2021 14:32:58 7 1
bbc
I think the extra funding should go towards more fun stuff in the holidays.... forest school days, pro footballers visiting school and training, art / craft sessions etc etc. The academic stuff can surely be caught up over time, what my kids have been missing (8 and 10) is FUN. Good, sociable, outdoors fun!
24/02/2021 16:43:16 0 0
bbc
You can't open the pubs and expect your kids to go to school? Am I missing something here?
58
24/02/2021 12:00:28 0 0
bbc
Be able to have all the windows open during the summer though so well ventilated
79
24/02/2021 12:03:57 1 0
bbc
Better if they had filtered air conditioning like the house of commons and less people in the room so they could be more spaced out.
164
24/02/2021 12:17:18 1 0
bbc
No need - restrictions are being lifted in June and by end of July all adults will have been vaccinated
80
24/02/2021 12:03:57 389 123
bbc
As a retired teacher, I am so sick of hearing how long we had for holidays. In reality, I would spend probably no more than 3 weeks a year on holiday and the rest of the breaks catching up with my knowledge in the subject and preparing lessons for the next term. During the teaching year time was taken up marking books, tests and assignments and attending meetings 55 hours a week!
86
24/02/2021 12:05:47 243 259
bbc
Just like a lot of others who work then!
134
24/02/2021 12:13:15 32 10
bbc
Used to live next door to a teacher who, every time I spoke to him during summer holiday, said he had prep work to do before starting back and then eventually admitted he ended up doing it when the school went back. He was a science teacher though so maybe things were different for them but don't know why.
270
24/02/2021 12:34:33 47 105
bbc
Oh you poor thing........and a lovely pension to put up with as well!
278
24/02/2021 12:36:00 28 41
bbc
how on earth did you manage?
318
24/02/2021 12:41:56 51 79
bbc
I know loads of teachers and that is not what I see apart from the year leaders. Most of them do the next term's / year stuff a day or so before term starts and on the "Inset" day set aside for training that inevitably happens on day 1 of start of term.

Be a soldier paid a lot less than teachers on a 6 month tour of Afghan and then complain about the number of working hours and the danger.
343
24/02/2021 12:46:49 33 73
bbc
Yep, but once you have produced the material, while on teaching practice during your year at University, then you only had to tweak the content if the curriculum changed. So no, not working in your holiday of 13 weeks.
346
24/02/2021 12:47:19 59 13
bbc
Here here! As I was a primary teacher my own children would often have to endure my going to places and collecting stuff to use in school during our family holidays in Cornwall or Wales so even then I was never really on holiday. Good teachers don't switch off.
442
24/02/2021 12:59:52 13 23
bbc
Same as pretty much every other proffessional does then?
489
24/02/2021 13:07:01 16 20
bbc
Rubbish. My family are all teachers. They have no understanding of the gig economy, or competition, or shifting deadlines, or job insecurity. And the holidays- they always have holidays. Try a few years having none.
493
24/02/2021 13:07:27 8 25
bbc
Teachers work hard and get a lot of stress, but at least they do get paid very well for it.
494
24/02/2021 13:07:43 12 29
bbc
As far as I'm aware teaches only actually teach for 80% of their working week and 20% is untouchable preparation etc time. Most teachers I know disappear on first day of summer hols and return on the last day.
549
24/02/2021 13:14:39 17 6
bbc
Try being a director of a small company.

I haven't had a phone or email free holiday for years. Always 'on'.

And before you start, no my salary isn't huge, no my pension isn't 'cast iron', drive an average car. Doing OK but nowhere near head teacher pay levels.
592
24/02/2021 13:11:22 14 5
bbc
Sad to say many have no idea of the work involved in teaching, little time after school to themselves, working unpaid for the weekend and during term breaks is normal.
655
24/02/2021 13:32:17 10 11
bbc
Your either lying or.... well, just lying. I'm a teacher, I have been for 32 years. My friends are mostly teachers. When the kids are off, we are off. The only time we go in is during the final week of summer break. Thats for 1 maybe 2 days. Thats all. The public know this. They are not stupid.
680
24/02/2021 13:39:15 13 3
bbc
why are the people moaning on this thread not teachers? it sounds like a cushy job, surely everyone in the right mind would train as a teacher, there are plenty of vacancies going...
945
24/02/2021 14:27:40 6 5
bbc
Stop moaning and do something else......teachers always like a good drip about how much they have to do, no-one ever forced anyone to be a teacher....
956
24/02/2021 14:29:42 4 1
bbc
Teachers do have massive holidays, there's no denying that.

The job earns a pittance though so I'm not jealous.
24/02/2021 15:01:32 5 2
bbc
As a self employed skilled professional who has received zero support I am sick of hearing how difficult life is for teachers. My two kids both in exam cohorts have had to chase the school for appropriate work and guidance. All we have had from the school is constant emails telling us what we already know. Some of their teachers have been excellent, some have been absolutely appaling.
24/02/2021 15:02:34 2 0
bbc
If it is optional and decreed by the school by invite to those that obviously need the support you will probably be talking 1 or 2 classes at most.
So you would need a skeleton amount of staff on a rota basis, probably a total of 1 week for each teacher at most.
Diddums to teachers and unions if they can't manage that.
24/02/2021 15:04:01 4 2
bbc
What were teachers doing for the several weeks of lockdown 1? No on line lessons and voluntary rota at my local schools with the majority on full pay in their gardens.
Can they not make that time up?
49
24/02/2021 11:59:01 33 29
bbc
I'm a qualified accountant

I have a Natural sciences degree from Cambridge

I use no maths (almost) I learnt after the age of 7 - the use of brackets in excel being the exception and some algebraic manipulation

I do however use coding skills I learnt doing Computer studies at GCSE level

Almost all of what is taught at school is really of no real world use and kids know that - they aren't stupid
81
24/02/2021 12:04:37 6 4
bbc
Actually many of them ARE stupid and they need basic 'sums' just to be able to go shopping! I suspect your schooling didn't include mixing with the thick ones or meeting their parents.
82
24/02/2021 12:04:53 10 10
bbc
Listening in to my daughter's online lessons 60~70% is about racism and the slave trade!

Nothing like driving divisions in society!

Oh and BTW, I'm mixed race before you woke monsters start making allegations!
109
24/02/2021 12:09:09 1 1
bbc
Your daughter doesn't have lessons in maths and science and grammar or music or languages? I'd be complaining to the school that the curriculum wasn't being met if 70% of their timetable was *any* specific subject,
114
24/02/2021 12:09:45 0 0
bbc
Schooling is how the west does Chinese style 're-education' camps. Suckered in by free childcare. It is 'freedom'.
118
24/02/2021 12:10:10 1 0
bbc
Talk is cheap, you can claim to be anything you want on HYS.
127
RPH
24/02/2021 12:11:20 1 0
bbc
And I'm guessing if they removed racism and slave trade from the curriculum you would object to that as well.....
139
24/02/2021 12:06:44 1 0
bbc
Good. She'll be far more aware and educated on the matter than others then
142
24/02/2021 12:14:35 1 0
bbc
Would her history topic happen to be The Slave Trade? Then it might be a rather good idea to have lessons about the Slave Trade. It might also help her not to have an adult whining behind her moaning that all her lessons are rubbish while she's trying to study. There's plenty of daytime TV for you to watch while she learns. Incidentally, don't bring race into a discussion when it isn't a factor.
208
24/02/2021 12:24:06 1 0
bbc
What subject was this? History? And how old is she? Your remarks need a bit more content!
Don’t forget all footballers still kneel at the beginning of every match, so provided the lessons are about abolishing racism and the slave trade, at least she is getting a good lesson!
262
24/02/2021 12:13:39 1 0
bbc
can't have it both ways btw David Olusoga's contributions are the best on these matters particularly regarding the Windrush and the British Nationality act of that time
49
24/02/2021 11:59:01 33 29
bbc
I'm a qualified accountant

I have a Natural sciences degree from Cambridge

I use no maths (almost) I learnt after the age of 7 - the use of brackets in excel being the exception and some algebraic manipulation

I do however use coding skills I learnt doing Computer studies at GCSE level

Almost all of what is taught at school is really of no real world use and kids know that - they aren't stupid
83
24/02/2021 12:05:00 5 2
bbc
It would be fascinating if jobs could asses what they would need to teach directly to a child after say junior school in order to be able to do the job. A year would probably cover it for most. As you say tiny fractions taught by compulsion in schools is ever used again. Now before some jump, by all means learn about other stuff for a hobby or quiz team worth.
265
24/02/2021 12:17:39 1 1
bbc
"Asses"?
15
24/02/2021 11:54:09 22 21
bbc
Both my children are teachers - they will honestly say that they are not overworked and tired this last year. In fact my daughter says she has been bored so much now taht she has done all of her decorating and feeling of a job well done. So please no nonsense about teachers suffering from burn out if dont get all of their 14 weeks holiday a year
84
24/02/2021 12:05:15 13 5
bbc
I call BS. I can hear the exhaustion in the voices of my children's teachers during on-line lessons.

They've had to relearn the way they teach from scratch.

Even before live lessons there was written feedback.
67
24/02/2021 12:02:17 1 0
bbc
They don't get a quarter of the year off.
85
24/02/2021 12:05:18 0 2
bbc
yes they do - 13 weeks holiday equals quarter of a year according to the maths I did at school. Were yours different?
153
24/02/2021 12:15:44 1 0
bbc
Children get 13 weeks off. Teachers work large part of that. My daughter a teacher Since last summer break. (That she worked large part of) She had no break. When kids not in school she working so hard planning home schooling and making class rooms/school safe for pupils attending. Add to that testing planning over Christmas. That was cancelled after one day
166
RPH
24/02/2021 12:17:28 5 0
bbc
But that 12 weeks is unpaid. And they work at least half of it. But hey, don't let facts interfere with a bit of snide teacher-bashing.
202
24/02/2021 12:23:13 1 0
bbc
It's 13 weeks where they don't have to be directed by the head teacher to be in school. That is not the same as 13 weeks of holiday. Teachers I know, do marking, admin, cpd, writing new resources and assessments during 'holidays'.
80
24/02/2021 12:03:57 389 123
bbc
As a retired teacher, I am so sick of hearing how long we had for holidays. In reality, I would spend probably no more than 3 weeks a year on holiday and the rest of the breaks catching up with my knowledge in the subject and preparing lessons for the next term. During the teaching year time was taken up marking books, tests and assignments and attending meetings 55 hours a week!
86
24/02/2021 12:05:47 243 259
bbc
Just like a lot of others who work then!
122
24/02/2021 12:10:48 59 35
bbc
Not really.
135
RPH
24/02/2021 12:13:22 78 23
bbc
Maybe, but did you have a continuous barrage of posts claiming that you had 12 weeks holiday and worked 9-3? Maybe you should comment on that was actually written, rather than something you could think of a 'clever' comment for...
894
24/02/2021 14:16:27 1 1
bbc
What IS your problem?
24/02/2021 14:52:45 1 1
bbc
'Just like a lot of others who work then!'

I think that's his point. It's not less than everybody else, which is what's insinuated by those that don't know.
24/02/2021 15:10:28 5 3
bbc
Funny how the people who claim teachers have it easy don't want to do the job though, isn't it...
87
24/02/2021 12:05:47 7 10
bbc
Making kids go to school during the summer holidays is only going to be further detrimental to their mental health . Bojo and his selfish lot are only concerned about themselves.
322
24/02/2021 12:42:50 0 0
bbc
Not aware anyone is suggesting no holidays but remember this, days are long gone when kids went round the corner to school with their mates, they are spread far and wide now so bored as we got for many a little more schooling and socialising amongst it will benefit them more than a playstation in the bedroom.
41
24/02/2021 11:57:29 7 10
bbc
Jingoistic twaddle from a shallow opportunist who helped take us out of the EU despite his belief it was a mistake because he put personal gain above his nation and his own integrity . BoJo and Trump make me wonder if democracy can actually work.
It would only work if 52% of the electorate weren't thick as... Removed
48
24/02/2021 11:58:58 4 3
bbc
Got the hols booked have you?
89
24/02/2021 12:06:12 1 0
bbc
Nope, we are actually planning on doing stuff as a family while giving the kids a proper chance to recharge. We have no intention of leaving the country.
366
24/02/2021 12:49:52 2 0
bbc
Don't recall any suggestion of leaving the country!
So your taking six weeks off work as well, sounds lucky you have the holiday to devote entirely to your children - they certainly are one step ahead of the pack!!
Hmmm
14
24/02/2021 11:53:41 373 35
bbc
the kids that really need this extra help won't attend. The kids that don't need the support will, this won't solve anything it will just widen the gap between the underprivileged and middle classes.
90
24/02/2021 12:06:15 25 6
bbc
True, they should have just made everyone repeat the year.

On a separate note, in 3 years we will have 3 different ways in which kids will have been tested or received grades. The whole point of exams is to provide a STANDARDISED assessment over the years for everyone. To me there is no longer any standardisation
830
24/02/2021 14:03:48 1 0
bbc
Teacher assessed grades were a shambles last year. Our youngest daughter was given a grade 6 by one of her teachers despite the fact that she’d achieved an 8 in her mock exam. So she studied hard and taught herself 2 modules that weren’t covered before her school was shut. She sat the exam in November and achieved a grade 9 (an A* in old money). She did all of this alongside her college work.
24/02/2021 14:55:31 0 0
bbc
A ridiculous statement. How can there possibly be any standardisation in exam grades when there is no consistency in learning conditions. Thats kind of the point in Reviewing assessment criteria.
43
24/02/2021 11:57:39 14 75
bbc
I'm glad you didn't say ALL teachers and the majority should be replaced with minority.
91
24/02/2021 12:06:52 19 2
bbc
And your proof of this is? Thought not, another right wing Daily fail reader.
92
24/02/2021 12:06:57 1 1
bbc
Filtered air conditioning, less people so that there can be more spacing between people...just like the House of Commons that's what's needed.
52
24/02/2021 11:59:29 9 23
bbc
Don't think the teacher's will fancy extra hours and summer schooling it may ruin their holiday plans. No other profession except politics get one quarter of the year off. Let's wait and see what their union come up with, probably exhaustion, wonder what the NHS staff will make of that?
93
Dea
24/02/2021 12:07:02 3 1
bbc
First of all ; you could always become s teacher! But before you apply you need to know we DON'T get paid for the summer holiday!!!!!! Our pay is divided into 13 equal payslips- but we only get 5.2 weeks of paid holiday per year ( like most professions!)
16
24/02/2021 11:54:13 16 11
bbc
Interesting moral decision for the masses. Your child's education or 2 weeks in benidorm.

Hmmm, I could put money on the way that will go.
94
24/02/2021 12:07:26 2 1
bbc
I doubt we’ll be able to, unless our rate really drops to under 1,000 a day by then. BoJo doesn’t control the spread - we do. We are doing better, but we still have a long way to go. Look what happened last year. Off we went, and cases shot up.
Have we learned our lesson?
Social distancing etc. will still be required, and I would rather holiday in England, and help the economy.
69
24/02/2021 12:02:37 7 6
bbc
Summer schooling a must for every child. Our children have lost so much as it is. Happy for this to happen.
95
24/02/2021 12:07:28 4 2
bbc
Entirely parental fault then. It is, was, only your responsibility to educate your children. No one else’s.
47
24/02/2021 11:58:55 166 48
bbc
It's good to want to make sure this generations of pupils are caught up after this ordeal, but I do worry about the teachers. We as a society undervalue teachers (both figuratively and literally in terms of pay), whilst expecting a lot from them. And now we're essentially telling teachers to work through their holiday, something that many teachers do now anyway, for mandatory summer school now.
96
24/02/2021 12:07:29 96 213
bbc
It will only be reducing their holiday time to the same as everybody else.
251
24/02/2021 12:32:26 47 12
bbc
We're contracted to work 39 weeks but our salary is split over the year. It wouldn't be reducing our holiday as our holiday is statutory. It would be reducing our pay
281
24/02/2021 12:36:47 32 12
bbc
But nearly everyone else has flexibility with their holdays. Teachers have fixed dates. (I suppose parents do now, too, unless Grandma & Granddad can help out.) Teachers face the peak period costs while others can find off-peak bargains.
341
24/02/2021 12:46:15 28 6
bbc
The difference being that you are paid for all of your annual holidays. Teachers are not. You're welcome to pay us for our time if you want us to work in that time. Or, I suppose... you could just show some gratitude and I'd work happily doing catch-up lessons for free! Now, will you be able to summon enough will to over come your pride and bile to say just one nice thing about teachers? ;-)
354
24/02/2021 12:48:25 21 4
bbc
Are you that daft. Maybe you should try teaching if you think like that. It'll be a big shock when you're working 8am to 10pm and still not able to get the amount you need to done.
456
24/02/2021 13:01:11 16 3
bbc
bed2 - obviously not spoken to many teachers. I'm sorry bed2 but this concept of weeks and weeks of holiday does not reflect what actually happens. Next you'll be saying they work 9-4 only?
500
as
24/02/2021 13:08:47 20 0
bbc
Observing the effort put in by my grand children's teachers, who in my view are doing a sterling job in difficult circumstances, I'm staggered by the bile poured out by some denigrating their work.
Could this venom not be better directed towards M.P.s, bankers and the like who recieve relatively massive benefits from doing very little.
24/02/2021 14:39:08 3 0
bbc
Teachers still need more time to plan lessons and generally relax after dealing with children.

Disclaimer: I am a child so I still have an uneducated opinion, not ever having taught anyone myself.
24/02/2021 14:39:31 1 1
bbc
goodness, lets all race to the bottom shall we?
24/02/2021 16:06:47 2 0
bbc
I took part in a workplace survey as a teacher which showed that I worked the equivalent of forty-seven 43-hour weeks a year - the work is just spread out differently.
24/02/2021 17:30:36 0 0
bbc
Bit slow were we ?
24/02/2021 17:47:01 1 0
bbc
Sadly you just don't have a clue what teachers do to provide education for our kids. Perhaps you should spend some time doing research before you make crass comments.
44
24/02/2021 11:58:03 1 9
bbc
On one hand schools say kids need to catch up but whatever is suggested seems to be not possible. No working through holidays/weekends/longer hours just complain about the situation.

Schools have been open for essential workers children so limited face to face and some online, surely teachers haven't been so hard worked they can't see the need to help?
97
Rob
24/02/2021 12:07:47 2 1
bbc
Remote teaching of a large class of mixed ability is far less efficient in terms of direct student interaction, so teachers like my wife are having to work harder to get even close to the same level of educational coverage let alone actual outcomes. You'll likely find that most teachers and head teachers are entirely aware that problems abound even with the extra efforts already going in.
61
24/02/2021 12:00:57 11 1
bbc
Well I've been sat on my laptop every day during this lockdown delivering 5 remote lessons per day to my usual classes as per my timetable for the past 6 weeks and will do so for the next 2 before I return to face-to-face teaching. Plus continuing to hold remote staff meetings, virtual parents evenings, etc. When am I due a break if I'm then forced to teach over the summer?
98
24/02/2021 12:07:49 0 3
bbc
But still enough time to be reviewing a BBC HYS and make comments, not convinced you are a teacher, sound to talented ??
99
24/02/2021 12:08:08 62 9
bbc
I tend to think 'catch up' doesn't work.

Whether kids in school, those in employment missing work due to sickness, whatever.

Trying to 'catch up' just causes stress.

Re-planning for the changed situation is far better.
403
VoR
24/02/2021 12:54:00 5 2
bbc
Re-planning can involve catch up.
69
24/02/2021 12:02:37 7 6
bbc
Summer schooling a must for every child. Our children have lost so much as it is. Happy for this to happen.
100
24/02/2021 12:08:21 1 1
bbc
What have they lost? The chance to memorise facts that a politician feels they should know? What have they gained - independence, the ability to prioritise tasks, self-motivation, IT skills and resilience - all skills valued by employers. They should have their holiday and society should see the gains rather than losses.
234
24/02/2021 12:29:59 1 0
bbc
and how many have just played on their playstation?

Britain already lags behind a lot of the world on basic 3R's.