Under-25s hit worst as unemployment rises again
23/02/2021 | news | business | 1,107
UK unemployment has risen to 5.1% - its highest level in almost five years, official figures show.
1
23/02/2021 14:06:01 58 17
bbc
Considering the global pandemic and domestic lockdown 5.1% isn’t too bad.

Buried in the article there is some cause for optimism

“In January 2021, 83,000 more people were in payrolled employment when compared with the previous month.”

And yesterdays article, 50% of firms are planning new hires

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56149661
So you are completly ignoring the fact that many jobs are being kept alive purely because of furlough and will completly disappear in April
256
23/02/2021 15:07:09 3 3
bbc
And the 6M on furlough?

They are all going back to their jobs by June 21st are they?

I hope you're right but I suspect you aren't.
277
23/02/2021 15:12:48 1 2
bbc
Yeah not too bad . . . . . unless you're unemployed, then the % is irrelevant.
546
23/02/2021 16:06:57 1 1
bbc
I hope there are a tonne more new jobs coming with high wages and tax breaks for those of us that have supported all those people out there that the government provide a BIG FAT ZERO to. I would need to earn double my salary for the next year to cover support I have been giving to family where the state has failed to.
24/02/2021 09:08:47 0 0
bbc
Not buried in the article but somehow missing is that employment of the under 25s is running at about 15%, one in six with no job or hope...after furlough will it be one in five?
2
23/02/2021 14:06:49 13 25
bbc
Those young people who thought COVID didn't effect them are now reaping the rewards of ignoring restrictions!
17
23/02/2021 14:12:46 1 0
bbc
they all need to be vaccinated ...hopefully covid vaccination will be done at schools soon
20
23/02/2021 14:14:26 4 5
bbc
Young people lost their jobs at the expense of protecting boomer's lives. The lockdown was neccessary as the death rate is so high for 55+. The bill for furloguh will be paid for young people for years to come as well.
21
23/02/2021 14:14:45 2 2
bbc
Don't tar young people with that brush; the middle aged and older were just as represented in the swathes of beachgoers and Jubilee street partiers.

Many who are now suffering will have followed the rules, and many who ignored the rules are likely the kind of people who haven't learned personal responsibility because the Bank of Mum and Dad prop them up regardless.
26
23/02/2021 14:15:53 0 4
bbc
Well said Sir
27
23/02/2021 14:15:57 0 1
bbc
Schadenfreude. Arc angel Graham for president of the world!
243
23/02/2021 15:04:32 1 1
bbc
Pathetic old fool.
3
23/02/2021 14:07:15 102 9
bbc
The Bank of England went about its Monetary Policy to try and save/create jobs, but it seems without food for thought on what jobs we’d have. In this case an increasing gig economy and zero-hour contracts, neither of which represent a healthy economy overall.

As we recover, investment must be made for a more sustainable, innovative and diverse economy, with creating quality jobs at the heart.
50
23/02/2021 14:23:07 50 3
bbc
Bank of England do not have the power to change labour laws or fiscal policies. Those policies are under the judisdiction of the current government. Vote for one that you think will deliver the type growth you mentioned
74
23/02/2021 14:29:13 7 6
bbc
Agreed, what we need is more S.T.E.M. investment and less social science / gender studies. Maybe then we can start producing products instead of buying them in.
234
23/02/2021 15:02:40 9 7
bbc
The BoE is an arm of the Government and does what it is told to do. The gig and ZH economy were deliberately fostered by the Tories to mask unemployment by removing people from the figures even if they worked as little as 1 hour a week (true).

The media (inc the BBC) played their part by failing to report the numbers of under employed there were. It was deliberate propaganda by omission!
338
23/02/2021 15:24:34 9 2
bbc
It the zero hours contracts and gig economy is a Tory policy
602
23/02/2021 16:24:36 2 0
bbc
Zero hour contracts were around under Labour who didn't have an issue with them back then.
24/02/2021 09:26:00 0 0
bbc
Employers stopped investing in training under Thatcher. This needs to be put right urgently. Investment in training up skilled staff is essential. Schools may have let us down, but it is up to employers to find the right people to train up. There are enough young people out there who are prepared to invest their time, not grads expecting instant access to senior positions.
4
23/02/2021 14:08:06 82 36
bbc
A lot of younger people live at home or can return home

The middle aged have to deal with the bills and losing their jobs and they have no one to fall back on

IR35 + Covid = loss of everything

The young have years to get back on track
28
23/02/2021 14:17:35 46 35
bbc
Yes but also the bill of furlough will be paid by the younger generation for years to come. Bare in mind the middle aged had free University back then and housing ladder was much easier to get on back then. Oh and btw I eat lot of avocados.
130
23/02/2021 14:43:25 12 12
bbc
You want to live at home when you're 25 do you? They all move back home then boomers start having a go at them for not being independent. It's pathetic.
299
23/02/2021 15:18:52 9 14
bbc
I can't believe the dismissive attitude shown towards young people in some of these comments. They have had a year or more of their lives completely trashed with all their basic freedoms removed, and now face the prospect of unemployment too. Yet there's been no compassion for them through this pandemic - they have just been seen as pesky disease carriers to be scorned at, shut in and sent home.
363
23/02/2021 15:28:53 1 1
bbc
Who is going to buy your house?
531
Meh
23/02/2021 16:03:19 2 1
bbc
Haha yeh it’s because none of them can afford to buy their own home! Imagine not being able to even get onto the housing ladder until you’re in your thirties!
550
23/02/2021 16:07:42 1 1
bbc
Back on track ?? what track? Housing market locks them out, zero hours contracts in jobs that shouldn't be giving them no protection from loosing wages and companies expecting experience but only hiring school leavers so they don't have to pay. Give me a break
955
23/02/2021 20:52:19 0 0
bbc
I agree, many younger people can do their jobs as cashiers and the like from their apartment. They dive into the few pounds they have hidden away for tough times.
5
23/02/2021 14:09:59 10 15
bbc
This lost generation will be the longest lasting tragedy of Covid-19.

They will suffer lost opportunities and careers will go unexplored and unfulfilled.

A real tragedy.
24
23/02/2021 14:14:57 10 1
bbc
Unemployment is at 5.1% but as is often the case it is higher for younger people. Hopefully things will improve over the next 12 months

In the early 90s it was 11% and many of us complained on the effect it was having on the young. However the govt of the time had different priorities...

Just be grateful times have changed
40
23/02/2021 14:19:54 2 0
bbc
Compare today's snowflakes with what the young had to deal with in WWI and WWII.
That was tragedy
6
23/02/2021 14:10:33 209 24
bbc
What the hell is a social media analyst?!
15
23/02/2021 14:12:00 213 18
bbc
Someone who plays around on fakebook all day.
19
23/02/2021 14:14:23 22 7
bbc
Exactly
39
23/02/2021 14:19:54 42 7
bbc
Non-essential worker in its purest form.
53
23/02/2021 14:23:35 25 6
bbc
A social media analyst is someone who gets paid more than an engineer.
72
23/02/2021 14:28:28 14 25
bbc
You heard of facebook and the likes? Facebook accounts for 8% of internet traffic alone and therefore you would have analyst from investment banks/ retail/ police analysising data/ information? Welcome to 21 century
114
23/02/2021 14:39:54 15 3
bbc
Small step away from being the next PM..
154
23/02/2021 14:48:45 10 19
bbc
Someone who finds a smart way to be adaptable in a terrible situation so they can put food on the table. I know, the youth of today!
175
23/02/2021 14:51:58 15 3
bbc
A data analyst who works solely on data from social media
Removed
190
23/02/2021 14:54:39 8 8
bbc
Seems fairly self explanatory. And a huge part of modern business. Are you old, facetious or both?
269
23/02/2021 15:11:20 6 1
bbc
A politician , its how they set public policy by reacting to whatever is trending ;)
343
23/02/2021 15:25:33 7 0
bbc
Second best career after hairdresser - apparently!
418
23/02/2021 15:39:59 7 1
bbc
Regardless of how ridiculous you find it, social media is where the money is. I don't like it either, but it ain't gonna chance unless we all see it for what it is.

The fact that there's so much money in it should tell us all we need to know - the more we use it the more we are putting into rich people's pockets.
483
23/02/2021 15:49:03 3 2
bbc
90% of the BBC it would appear
512
Meh
23/02/2021 15:59:40 1 0
bbc
They may be talking about marketing analysts. How do you think any of these social media companies make money? They run ads, and they make a TON of money from it.

As a result, we have analysts who analyse audience behaviour, incoming revenue and costs to streamline brand advertising.
599
23/02/2021 16:17:18 3 0
bbc
The sort of people that my company gets lots of emails from every day who think that they can somehow improve my business. Which they can't.
623
Sam
23/02/2021 16:29:43 3 0
bbc
Ironic posing this question in the public comments section of a website.
655
23/02/2021 16:38:41 3 0
bbc
Wow not hard to spot the boomers is it, pretending like social media isn't big business

I'm really not that into social media myself but it's stupid to believe in 2021 that successful businesses don't utilise it extensively
24/02/2021 10:12:22 0 0
bbc
If you don't know, then they're doing their job right
24/02/2021 22:11:16 0 0
bbc
Some who when failing at their job can just buy likes and uprates.
Well they would be wouldn't they.

By definition youngsters are likely to be the least experienced staff and as a result the first out the door when redundancies are in the air.

Please stop this young vs old, women vs men, straight vs gays, black vs white narrative BBC. It really does lower your organisation in the minds of so many of us.
Removed
83
23/02/2021 14:30:58 12 6
bbc
When companies get rid of older workers because they're most expensive, the BBC retiree commentariat are aghast. But getting rid of young people is all ok apparently.
84
23/02/2021 14:31:12 6 0
bbc
Yes it’s obvious news but there is no BBC narrative FFS. ITS CALLED REPORTING.
112
23/02/2021 14:39:39 0 1
bbc
Also less likely to follow covid rules.
120
23/02/2021 14:41:12 0 1
bbc
Well said Ahmed.
135
23/02/2021 14:44:43 2 1
bbc
The BBC report the facts, what conclusions you jump to are of your own imagination. Are you saying the facts presented are not true?

But it's worth pointing out that it's usually Tories and the far-right that use pleb v pleb blame games to distract from their political aims and policies.
8
23/02/2021 14:08:39 275 28
bbc
Our organisation is struggling to recruit young engineers with skills in electronics and firmware programming. We don't need any more social media analysts, whatever that is.
54
23/02/2021 14:23:41 197 41
bbc
Spot on too many young people with stars in the eyes not wanting to work in the industrial sector
56
23/02/2021 14:24:10 20 18
bbc
But who'll update Facebook / Instagram with all the news / selfies about your organisation ?
111
23/02/2021 14:39:32 45 2
bbc
You should consider on the job training. Apprenticeships in the UK almost died out under Thatcherism Meantime the German economy, underpinned by a massive apprenticeship system has motored past the UK by a country mile
139
23/02/2021 14:41:18 16 7
bbc
Theres the lesson for the young Do what you have to do to get a good job
Dont just fall out of school and take any job that comes along
148
23/02/2021 14:47:33 18 6
bbc
Unlike back in the day where you could just get an apprenticeship and your average person could get a start in engineering; you now need multiple A's to go to university and study engineering. Most are not aware of what engineering jobs there are because there is no link to the schools. Maybe your organisation isn't trying hard enough to the next gen and recruit engineers.
152
23/02/2021 14:47:48 39 4
bbc
When a country is known for making money out of money rather than manufacturing items, the future looks less than rosey for engineering in its many formats.
There are many reasons for this but one is that an “engineer” wears overalls, is covered in oil, has a flat cap and whippet and reads tabloids plus is a militant union agitator ????
The perception of an engineer in this country needs changing
163
23/02/2021 14:50:09 32 6
bbc
The organisation should provide an apprenticeship which shows a clear path of progression through the company.

Typical of many companies/industries in the UK:

They moan about a lack of talent, but don't want to spend the time or money creating them. Just nick em off another company, pay them peanuts, watch em bugger off 12 months later.

Classic British short-termism.
168
23/02/2021 14:50:58 15 17
bbc
Please enlighten us and tells us what organisation you work for?

It seems to me that, rather like blaming the poor for being poor, you're blaming the unemployed for being unemployed... in a pandemic when lots have lost their jobs.
170
23/02/2021 14:51:28 14 17
bbc
If you don't know what it is, how do you know you don't need them? Ridiculous "oh I find the modern world sooo confusing so I'll ridicule it" comment.
191
23/02/2021 14:54:52 6 2
bbc
Do you mean "cheap"? I thought age discrimination in recruitment was a thing now.
247
23/02/2021 15:05:31 6 5
bbc
Sounds like your organisation needs to find ways to be more competetive on the recruitment front.
287
23/02/2021 15:15:26 6 2
bbc
Of the people that did an engineering degree, most are now working in non-engineering sectors because they pay more. There was once a time when engineers earned significant sums of money, but that time has passed. Hence my peers joining hedge funds, banks, and pension funds. Follow the money, friend.
292
23/02/2021 15:17:10 6 2
bbc
Perhaps set up an apprentership then and help train a few young people up with these skills. Seems a big ask to expect a young person to be largely skilled in electronics and firmware programming straight from school... were you?
499
Meh
23/02/2021 15:56:50 5 3
bbc
Sounds like you’ve got a chip on your shoulder.. social media has been without a doubt the fastest growing platform for any business to grow and advertise in the last decade. So actually, yes we do need social media analysts.

If you don’t like it, stay off the internet.
532
23/02/2021 16:03:37 6 1
bbc
What you need is a social media analyst to analyse LinkedIn to help you find the best candidate at the best price.
560
23/02/2021 16:09:30 4 0
bbc
Perhaps you should think of actually training someone !
561
23/02/2021 16:09:38 0 0
bbc
I think you've put your finger on half the problem.
595
23/02/2021 16:23:18 1 3
bbc
It may be surprising, but not every organisation is the same as yours, plenty of jobs here in social media...

https://uk.indeed.com/Social-Media-Analyst-jobs
604
23/02/2021 16:24:43 2 2
bbc
"We don't need any more social media analysts, whatever that is."

If you dont know what one is how do you know if you dont need one?

If you had someone with the skills at reading trends on social media, with a head for numbers statistics and human psychology (of which is required). Your organisation wouldn't be struggling?

And as for those laughing at the 'non' job? well ignorance is bliss.
624
23/02/2021 16:29:47 4 0
bbc
Ok, some advice for your company: When people with "skills in electronics and firmware programming" apply for a job with your company, hire them.

Don't reject them because they failed to recite the correct cliche when you asked them on the interview for (in)competence KHG5484 (you know what I mean).
700
23/02/2021 16:51:20 5 0
bbc
If your organisation is not investing proper apprenticeships, where young people learn 'by doing' alongside older (yes older!) more experienced engineers, then it deserves to struggle recruiting. The problem with a lot of companies these days is that they view training as a company overhead (not an investment), someone else's responsibility, and if they do train at all only lip service is paid
728
23/02/2021 16:57:53 2 0
bbc
How many go to uni for the "experience" rather than get a degree that will be useful. We need the degrees that are really useful, like engineering, medical, not the non media studies and other mickey mouse ones. The only people who should go to uni are those who have true ability. Industry complain about lack of skills, so lets start degrees that industry want. Or is uni only there to make money.
823
23/02/2021 17:34:49 2 0
bbc
Such a predictable comment on this subject, there's always one trying to claim all young people want to be influencers or whatever. Maybe the issue is the low wages or poor conditions. I was job hunting in around 2009 time, I saw one job £13k I think as basic IT support, required night working too, was on the job centre adverts every week for months - no doubt blaming young people too.
24/02/2021 07:15:46 0 0
bbc
Have you tried training taking on apprentisies ???
9
23/02/2021 14:11:58 290 30
bbc
The young are usually hardest hit by any economic downturn.

Those of us born in the early 1960s were hit hard in the early 80.

And again late 80s early 90s when interest rates were high - my mortgage was most my take home pay for years - I was wiped out.

But if you are financially destroyed in your youth - it is possible to recover and put it behind you.
119
23/02/2021 14:39:39 118 14
bbc
Hard but true
155
23/02/2021 14:48:58 32 64
bbc
How much debt did graduates come out of university with then? None. That's got to help. Far more careers require degree level training now. At least there's decent apprentice opportunities now, oh now wait, that was back then.

How about getting on the housing ladder. Oh no, sorry, you had that easier too.

Things are much different now.
184
Bob
23/02/2021 14:53:54 24 8
bbc
Whilst it may have been particularly tough for you personally, understand you were not the typical case. The fact is that wage to house price ratio and also housing spend as a proportion of income (so this caters for int rates) have been hovering at record levels for the past few years now.

Indeed many argue it is those low rates that is driving the price rises making is those ratios so high.
But with the fools folly that is Brexit, its has sadly become far harder for our youths to recover and put things behind them
192
23/02/2021 14:54:54 14 67
bbc
Only a OaP could say this,no doubt booking their sage holiday
202
23/02/2021 14:57:02 33 6
bbc
So true - yet for many, that very valid point is inadmissible as evidence.

Why?

Largely because it doesn't fit with their worldview - and was a long time ago; before they were born, so they weren't around to witness it.
273
23/02/2021 15:12:15 11 33
bbc
I wonder what the average pay rise was in the late 80s and early 90s to help you get ahead of the debt, I believe it was about 7.5%+ per year? These days the average pay rise % is less then the state pension % increase! Throw in £40-£50k of student loans, house prices in even the most affordable area of country (Stoke apparently) at 5x the local wage and over 8x local wage for half the country!
325
23/02/2021 15:23:32 8 23
bbc
Remind me how much your mortgage was and how much your deposit was?
332
23/02/2021 15:24:09 30 7
bbc
Many 20-somethings I know prefer to live with their parents so they can drive a new/new-ish car, have gym and golf club memberships, holidays in Ibiza, the latest phones and gadgets, cool-looking clothes and trainers etc. I'm not sure it's true they can't afford a house, they just prefer to spend their money on other things. When I bought my first house (in my 20's) I could afford little else.
362
23/02/2021 15:28:45 4 19
bbc
The problem with the "high interest rates on my mortgage in the 80s" narrative is that it fails to mention that the inflation rate, especially for houses, was also very high- so although you were paying a lot, the bank was also eating a big chunk of your debt, making you much better off in the long-term.
390
23/02/2021 15:33:55 3 13
bbc
It may have been possible once, but not now. Greed and selfishness, and pulling up the ladders of opportunity have seen to that. Living costs more. Anyone who's okay with others going through that isn't okay in the head, frankly.
493
23/02/2021 15:55:31 4 0
bbc
Don't forget those of us who graduated between 2011 and 2013 who got hit by the most recent recession. I was one of these people and it was horrible
581
23/02/2021 16:18:44 0 0
bbc
Just as long as you're not suggesting we use that as a reason not to help people hardest hit by the economic impact from the pandemic. Because that would be far too convenient an excuse and rather selfish. In practice, society will pay for this in taxes, which is as it should be.
731
23/02/2021 16:58:47 1 0
bbc
I was there too, in 1981 at 21years old i was one of 4 million unemployed, when uk population 55 million. Things will pick up, its tough but dont give up.
10
23/02/2021 14:12:31 98 19
bbc
Stop sticking the retirement pension age up, encourage those who wish to retire with a realistic and sensible state pension age? With earlier access to private pensions.

This will create work for the young..
88
23/02/2021 14:31:41 87 1
bbc
Private pensions are accessible from the age of 55, which is reasonable, however many can’t afford to access at that age as your pension will need to last for 30 years, possibly longer
157
23/02/2021 14:49:19 7 8
bbc
really good idea, you have a lot of older people especially women. who would love to retire, let them do so at 60 on the basic pension, creating jobs for younger people
187
23/02/2021 14:54:08 9 0
bbc
You can retire earlier than 55 if you can afford it. An old school friend retired in his late forties, he made a large amount in computer software in London. My mortgage ends when I am 67, when I get my state pension...hooray. So looks like I'll be working for a few more years. Before you ask, I took my first mortgage at 29, been slowly moving up the property chain, finally a three bed semi...
344
23/02/2021 15:25:42 3 8
bbc
You assume pensioners saved anything from the windfall of cheap housing. Unfortunately they didn’t
669
23/02/2021 16:43:01 3 1
bbc
Spot on. Older colleagues of mine want to be able to retire soon. Younger people want and need jobs. Everybody wins.
11
23/02/2021 14:09:11 11 7
bbc
Quite remarkable to have unemployment as low as 5% and wage growth. Any comparision to other major industrial countries would be good to benchmark against?
49
23/02/2021 14:22:31 15 6
bbc
Don't be silly, this is the BBC.

Unemployment in Greece is over 18% and the EU average is over 8% ... obviously showing those figures would paint the UK position in a better light - hence they won't be mentioned in a BBC article.

Love to know how many jobs have been created in the media over the last year or so ... given that they report 24 x 7 on Covid related news / speculation.
77
23/02/2021 14:29:39 3 0
bbc
5% is high, that means 1 in 20 haven’t got a job and have all the problems that arise because of that. The sad thing is that it is going to increase as furlough is masking a lot of job losses
116
23/02/2021 14:40:15 1 0
bbc
There is no real wage growth. The majority of jobs lost are low paid. See if you can remember from your CSE maths what happens when you remove the lowest numbers from a group you're averaging.
12
23/02/2021 14:09:50 25 22
bbc
I'm sure that the millionaire socialist Sir Keir Starmer would have a plan, just ask him what he would have done but please wait 18 months.
36
23/02/2021 14:19:35 29 6
bbc
Keir Starmer is about as close to a Socialist as Idi Amin was to a humanitarian.
45
23/02/2021 14:21:02 4 7
bbc
Do not forget the 'Oxford educated toff' in Sir Hindights' CV
271
23/02/2021 15:11:47 5 0
bbc
Please do explain why a socialist cannot be a millionaire?
This should be interesting, assuming you can actually answer the question .
355
23/02/2021 15:27:56 3 2
bbc
Obviously like many people you don't understand what socialism is, you are probably brainwashed to think it communism. Socialism rewards people who make a contribution to society with their skills or actions, not a problem with someone selling their skills in a socialist society. The best way to be informed about political ideologies and the impact it has on society is to go to the library.
13
23/02/2021 14:10:08 19 18
bbc
I see Dodds and Labour are totally out of tune with the majority and business as ever.
76
23/02/2021 14:29:23 2 6
bbc
Who is Dodds?
266
23/02/2021 15:10:15 2 1
bbc
With those blinkers and myopia, how can you see?
How does seeing show you how “out of touch” YOU believe the “majority and business “ are.
It’s a pretty neat trick, especially as you haven’t heard anyone or asked everyone.
Or
It’s a typical RWA post, failing as usual, based on dogma, ignorance and no evidence to back up the assertions.
14
23/02/2021 14:11:08 12 22
bbc
Under 25s don't want work anyway. All they're bothered about is sitting around in onesies, eating pot noodles and telling everyone on farcebook how great / bored / wonderful / bad / lovely etc they are.
32
H1
23/02/2021 14:18:55 6 7
bbc
Haha okay, boomer.
34
23/02/2021 14:18:58 3 4
bbc
Keep your ignorant ageist nonsense to yourself.
41
23/02/2021 14:19:56 5 3
bbc
You've never met anyone under 25 have you?
66
23/02/2021 14:27:16 6 0
bbc
What a stupid comment! The u25s are no different from any other age group. There are people in all age groups that are lazy, but the truth is most people aren’t snd want to do their best for themselves and their families
6
23/02/2021 14:10:33 209 24
bbc
What the hell is a social media analyst?!
15
23/02/2021 14:12:00 213 18
bbc
Someone who plays around on fakebook all day.
172
23/02/2021 14:51:33 31 2
bbc
On BBC radio 1 they have a correspondent who's job it is to update on "celebrity gossip". This girl gets paid god knows what to do a 5 minute segment having a chat with the presenter telling us what Kim Kardashian posted on the weekend. It's unbelievable.
310
PH
23/02/2021 15:21:02 0 2
bbc
You beat to that reply ;-)
486
23/02/2021 15:54:19 3 0
bbc
Like us, you mean?
622
23/02/2021 16:29:25 1 0
bbc
and hopes to get paid for doing it.
16
23/02/2021 14:12:11 8 9
bbc
Since joining the EU..... British business has been favour cheap east european labour....slavery
52
23/02/2021 14:23:26 5 7
bbc
Actually growing bigger, by combining our own technology and expertise with theirs labour force.

And giving the eastern Europeans far better wages than they would earn in their own country.

Of course many also moved to the regime of China, but this doesn't bother you because "ooooh! Nigel Fara-a-ge" forgot to tell you.
2
23/02/2021 14:06:49 13 25
bbc
Those young people who thought COVID didn't effect them are now reaping the rewards of ignoring restrictions!
17
23/02/2021 14:12:46 1 0
bbc
they all need to be vaccinated ...hopefully covid vaccination will be done at schools soon
18
23/02/2021 14:14:22 14 13
bbc
Its doubly unfair, as its the younger ones who will be paying for all this pandemic for their whole working lives.....
38
BFM
23/02/2021 14:19:41 1 4
bbc
No Sunac needs to make sure that doesn't happen.
97
23/02/2021 14:34:03 3 3
bbc
On top of the state pensions the current crop of retirees didn't want to pay enough to fund.
166
23/02/2021 14:50:34 3 1
bbc
Just like the older ones who paid for WW II
345
23/02/2021 15:26:21 1 0
bbc
As many of us did after the last war. So many condemn our generation because they think ‘we had it all’. Well to buy a house the interest rates were 15%. There was no credit and higher income tax rates were 95%. If you don’t believe me, look it up. 1960’s through to the late 80’s.
6
23/02/2021 14:10:33 209 24
bbc
What the hell is a social media analyst?!
19
23/02/2021 14:14:23 22 7
bbc
Exactly
2
23/02/2021 14:06:49 13 25
bbc
Those young people who thought COVID didn't effect them are now reaping the rewards of ignoring restrictions!
20
23/02/2021 14:14:26 4 5
bbc
Young people lost their jobs at the expense of protecting boomer's lives. The lockdown was neccessary as the death rate is so high for 55+. The bill for furloguh will be paid for young people for years to come as well.
64
23/02/2021 14:26:02 3 0
bbc
No, young people lost their jobs because they tend to have less experience and are in those jobs which have suffered because of the pandemic. As for paying, welcome to the real world, elder generations were paying for WWII until 2006. In my case that was most of my working life.
2
23/02/2021 14:06:49 13 25
bbc
Those young people who thought COVID didn't effect them are now reaping the rewards of ignoring restrictions!
21
23/02/2021 14:14:45 2 2
bbc
Don't tar young people with that brush; the middle aged and older were just as represented in the swathes of beachgoers and Jubilee street partiers.

Many who are now suffering will have followed the rules, and many who ignored the rules are likely the kind of people who haven't learned personal responsibility because the Bank of Mum and Dad prop them up regardless.
59
23/02/2021 14:24:22 0 0
bbc
Beachgoing and streets are outdoors - therefore safe
Clubs, raves etc are indoors therefore much higher risk
Removed
23
23/02/2021 14:14:56 10 14
bbc
Yet another good reason for removing restrictions quickly.

Extreme caution simply penalises the young!
60
23/02/2021 14:24:33 9 1
bbc
Not if we end up back with high death and case figures.
It would cause even more problems.
117
VoR
23/02/2021 14:40:46 0 0
bbc
Not all the young would want more people to die in order to accommodate the life they'd ideally be having right now.
5
23/02/2021 14:09:59 10 15
bbc
This lost generation will be the longest lasting tragedy of Covid-19.

They will suffer lost opportunities and careers will go unexplored and unfulfilled.

A real tragedy.
24
23/02/2021 14:14:57 10 1
bbc
Unemployment is at 5.1% but as is often the case it is higher for younger people. Hopefully things will improve over the next 12 months

In the early 90s it was 11% and many of us complained on the effect it was having on the young. However the govt of the time had different priorities...

Just be grateful times have changed
99
23/02/2021 14:34:25 2 0
bbc
I remember the early 80s when it was 1in 10 as UB40 told us, the problem was it wasn’t spread equally across the country
25
23/02/2021 14:15:48 13 16
bbc
It's going to get worse. Furlough has masked the whole issue. And it's not just the young. I feel for everyone struggling.

The Conservatives have annihilated this country, and I was a lifelong voter of theirs.
I use the word 'was'.
30
23/02/2021 14:18:12 10 8
bbc
So you died then?
481
23/02/2021 15:53:07 0 0
bbc
Do you think it would have been better under labour?
2
23/02/2021 14:06:49 13 25
bbc
Those young people who thought COVID didn't effect them are now reaping the rewards of ignoring restrictions!
26
23/02/2021 14:15:53 0 4
bbc
Well said Sir
2
23/02/2021 14:06:49 13 25
bbc
Those young people who thought COVID didn't effect them are now reaping the rewards of ignoring restrictions!
27
23/02/2021 14:15:57 0 1
bbc
Schadenfreude. Arc angel Graham for president of the world!
4
23/02/2021 14:08:06 82 36
bbc
A lot of younger people live at home or can return home

The middle aged have to deal with the bills and losing their jobs and they have no one to fall back on

IR35 + Covid = loss of everything

The young have years to get back on track
28
23/02/2021 14:17:35 46 35
bbc
Yes but also the bill of furlough will be paid by the younger generation for years to come. Bare in mind the middle aged had free University back then and housing ladder was much easier to get on back then. Oh and btw I eat lot of avocados.
103
23/02/2021 14:35:20 30 12
bbc
The furlough bill WILL be paid out of pensions as it is the ONLY known pot of real money.

Boomers, very insulting

1970’s mass strikes
1980’s mass unemployment, aids
1990’s mass drug problems

Free university, for the few not the many

My first mortgage was 50% of my wage at 15%

Sorry if that reality does not chime with your narrative

I didn’t know what an avocado was until the mid 2000’s
153
23/02/2021 14:48:02 24 2
bbc
Ok we didn’t pay fees at university but there were fewer of us so we tended to get good jobs and pay a lot of tax. Meanwhile others became apprentices, learnt a trade while being paid and also got reasonably paid jobs. No need for Polish plumbers and electricians if there were enough trained here.
164
23/02/2021 14:50:22 17 4
bbc
Just like the post war generations were left to pay back the debt inherited after WWII. Sadly many of our youth these days have been seduced into thinking the way forward is more debt not less.
212
23/02/2021 14:58:10 9 1
bbc
Remember that not all of us oldies were able to buy property, even when the prices were within the reach of most. There was always the low pay of the hospitality sector and therefore there are some in retirement who are still renting, at extortionate prices making landlords richer and the country poorer (as help is needed with these rents). I never owned property, but my kids do so its worth it.
298
23/02/2021 15:18:46 15 0
bbc
Years ago, 95% started work at 15 or 16 years old, very few went to University. Let's face it, most Uni courses are absolutely useless, few prepare the students for a proper job.
634
23/02/2021 16:25:46 0 0
bbc
Erm... We still do have free University!

Thing is though, free or paid no one forces anyone to go to University, that is a choice people make.

Also no one forces anyone to get on the "housing ladder", again that is a choice.

Mind you if selfish people hadn't bought up almost all the council houses they lived in then perhaps their kids might have found it easier to find somewhere to live now...
29
23/02/2021 14:17:56 5 12
bbc
Shame these young people will be restricted to England,Scotland and Wales in their pursuit of work.Cheers empty vessels.
61
23/02/2021 14:24:58 1 4
bbc
They voted for this
85
23/02/2021 14:31:18 2 1
bbc
So how did I work in Australia (along with a lot of other British people)?
208
23/02/2021 14:57:57 4 0
bbc
there are opportunities all over the world to work including Europe. The vote hasn't stopped anyone going anywhere so stop being so insular.
25
23/02/2021 14:15:48 13 16
bbc
It's going to get worse. Furlough has masked the whole issue. And it's not just the young. I feel for everyone struggling.

The Conservatives have annihilated this country, and I was a lifelong voter of theirs.
I use the word 'was'.
30
23/02/2021 14:18:12 10 8
bbc
So you died then?
141
23/02/2021 14:45:46 0 0
bbc
As far as their vote count is.
31
23/02/2021 14:18:49 9 9
bbc
Despite Brexit, despite the pandemic, still the lowest unemployment in Europe.

Obviously there are plenty of people furloughed, though still getting paid and many will have jobs to go back to in a couple of months. True figures will become apparent in the summer.

#betteroffout
55
23/02/2021 14:23:51 4 1
bbc
The true figures will as you say become apparent in the summer, the problem is that they will be much higher than they are now, the article even says this will happen
109
VoR
23/02/2021 14:38:05 2 0
bbc
Switzerland is lower. And the employment is better.
14
23/02/2021 14:11:08 12 22
bbc
Under 25s don't want work anyway. All they're bothered about is sitting around in onesies, eating pot noodles and telling everyone on farcebook how great / bored / wonderful / bad / lovely etc they are.
32
H1
23/02/2021 14:18:55 6 7
bbc
Haha okay, boomer.
87
23/02/2021 14:28:26 2 1
bbc
Funny you should ssy that, I used to work in a munitions facility.
33
BFM
23/02/2021 14:18:56 59 51
bbc
The intergenerational unfairness has now become extreme. We cannot leave young people with Uni debts, unemployment and to pay for the coronavirus issue. I'm 67 have ended up with more than I need. Its time for a wealth tax aimed at the haves.
63
23/02/2021 14:25:52 76 19
bbc
I agreed with you, until the hypocritical last sentence. So basically what you're saying is "it's not right but they should take it from others than myself".

There's nothing wrong with wealth as long as it's honestly acquired. Prosperity is not a crime.
93
23/02/2021 14:32:44 26 1
bbc
By the haves do you mean, people who have worked for 40 or 50 years and saved some of their income, or people who have inherited wealth, exploited workers, avoided taxes?
106
VoR
23/02/2021 14:37:08 4 3
bbc
Those studying science etc will still be quids in, and now have greater access to uni, so that's a net positive. The scandal is all those being convinced that their uni course drives higher earnings when it doesn't; that costs either them or the taxpayer a bomb, and is nothing short of fraud.
197
23/02/2021 14:55:46 9 13
bbc
NO! Young people who took sensible degrees have no problem finding jobs. It is those who did toilet paper degrees who will have problems, and rightly so. If you do something like "Forensic Science and Flower Arranging" from one of the "John Major" universities then you deserve to be unemployed and poor!
198
23/02/2021 14:56:26 14 4
bbc
Please feel free to give your 'wealth' away. I've worked 40+ years to get what I have and it is now set to look after me as I grow older.

I could only wish that some-one was willing to pay off my debts when younger.
218
Bob
23/02/2021 14:58:44 10 5
bbc
Why can't we leave people with a uni debt? It is an optional service that costs money to run. Either you make it mandatory and raise money through taxation or you make people who want the service pay for it.

As it stands the repayment method is about as fair as it could possibly get.
223
23/02/2021 14:59:28 1 11
bbc
So so true sir,we must stop this OAP thing unless they are receiving less then 20,000, for couple. We can't afford to pay these people
250
23/02/2021 15:05:58 5 6
bbc
I couldn't agree more. Children, young people, and families have been absolutely walloped by lockdowns and they will pay for it financially and emotionally for years to come. Economic and social policy should now focus on redressing the generational divide to restore the well being and future prospects for the younger generation that has been sacrificed to protect the over 50's.
360
23/02/2021 15:28:36 4 1
bbc
Top 10% of earners already pay 90% of the tax in this country, how about you pay more?
14
23/02/2021 14:11:08 12 22
bbc
Under 25s don't want work anyway. All they're bothered about is sitting around in onesies, eating pot noodles and telling everyone on farcebook how great / bored / wonderful / bad / lovely etc they are.
34
23/02/2021 14:18:58 3 4
bbc
Keep your ignorant ageist nonsense to yourself.
86
23/02/2021 14:27:34 1 2
bbc
No.
35
23/02/2021 14:19:18 106 17
bbc
Socialism for the rich and corporations, capitalism for the rest of us.
We need to take back our economy from the 1%. Close the loopholes and invest the taxes they avoid paying in automation and AI to provide the young with a future worth fighting for.
67
23/02/2021 14:27:31 79 113
bbc
Well you voted for brexit so giving the rich even easier access to getting richer, many illegally. EU was cracking down on banks and black money - City is the worst in the world for black economy.
349
23/02/2021 15:27:04 6 19
bbc
The top 10 percent of earners in the UK already pay 90% of the tax (google it if you dont believe me), you seem to have bought the hollywood "them rich, they haz all the monies and dont pay their tax wot rotter they all are" lie. I suspect you did vote for brexit just as squeezy states, why you ask? because you clearly dont get reality, obvs.
373
23/02/2021 15:30:39 10 1
bbc
If you don't automate if you don't use AI the rest of the world will and what would be the prospects of anyone in this country? Turning back the clock to provide jobs is like being a modern day Luddite
647
23/02/2021 16:36:08 0 0
bbc
Automation and AI will simply do jobs the young could do. The only sectors where it won't is hospitality and the care sector as it now.
12
23/02/2021 14:09:50 25 22
bbc
I'm sure that the millionaire socialist Sir Keir Starmer would have a plan, just ask him what he would have done but please wait 18 months.
36
23/02/2021 14:19:35 29 6
bbc
Keir Starmer is about as close to a Socialist as Idi Amin was to a humanitarian.
37
23/02/2021 14:19:38 10 3
bbc
While the young will have lost more in the short term through fill-in 'McJobs', they are also far more likely to take up new better permanent jobs as normality returns.

The end to zombie companies and negative value zombie jobs.
47
23/02/2021 14:22:24 10 4
bbc
You have lost all sense of reality. Where do you think these jobs are going to come from, the reality is that things are going to get a lot worse. We have another year group leaving school and university in June
18
23/02/2021 14:14:22 14 13
bbc
Its doubly unfair, as its the younger ones who will be paying for all this pandemic for their whole working lives.....
38
BFM
23/02/2021 14:19:41 1 4
bbc
No Sunac needs to make sure that doesn't happen.
6
23/02/2021 14:10:33 209 24
bbc
What the hell is a social media analyst?!
39
23/02/2021 14:19:54 42 7
bbc
Non-essential worker in its purest form.
386
23/02/2021 15:33:08 5 1
bbc
Worker??????
421
23/02/2021 15:40:48 5 2
bbc
Yet here you are on a comment forum, thinking you're so much better than everyone else no doubt...
5
23/02/2021 14:09:59 10 15
bbc
This lost generation will be the longest lasting tragedy of Covid-19.

They will suffer lost opportunities and careers will go unexplored and unfulfilled.

A real tragedy.
40
23/02/2021 14:19:54 2 0
bbc
Compare today's snowflakes with what the young had to deal with in WWI and WWII.
That was tragedy
179
23/02/2021 14:52:13 0 2
bbc
Yeah, and the black death, the Great Fire, when the Romans invaded. Sheesh, the youth of today.
14
23/02/2021 14:11:08 12 22
bbc
Under 25s don't want work anyway. All they're bothered about is sitting around in onesies, eating pot noodles and telling everyone on farcebook how great / bored / wonderful / bad / lovely etc they are.
41
23/02/2021 14:19:56 5 3
bbc
You've never met anyone under 25 have you?
80
23/02/2021 14:27:09 4 1
bbc
Yes... me, 31 years ago. Boy, I love winding you lot up, it's sòoo easy!
42
23/02/2021 14:20:16 110 9
bbc
During the last crisis I was out of work for 3.5 years. So I know how it feels. My advice to those affected is:

While it feels desperate now, you will get through and you will bounce back. And you have 60 or so years ahead to do everything you want to do, and a bit more.
205
23/02/2021 14:57:15 52 4
bbc
I actually really needed to read this. Thank you.
What a message. "Once you're old you'll have enough money to enjoy life even though you'll be too old to enjoy it"
551
23/02/2021 16:07:47 8 1
bbc
You are correct, Mr Tebbit wasn't liked but he was right; people need to get on their bike and go out and find work. Ive had to find minimum wage work this lockdown with people less than half my age, very scary but people need to do what they have to do.
43
23/02/2021 14:20:27 4 6
bbc
With all this debt about, Inflation cannot be far behind either - especially with all the extra costs brought in by Brexit since last month.
58
23/02/2021 14:24:21 7 7
bbc
So just why did you vote for brexit???
44
23/02/2021 14:20:39 19 7
bbc
The 5.1% figure is meaningless with so many still on furlough.

A peak of 7.8% later this year seems overly optimistic, given the damage already done to the economy last year and in Q1 this year.

Next weeks budget must provide decent support for those who lose their jobs because of the pandemic.
161
23/02/2021 14:49:56 12 5
bbc
There's already support it's called UC. Any support is like the furlough money and Self Employed support etc has to be paid for by someone. Really time for Rishi to say how it will be paid back - and by who I'd suggest 5p on Income Tax is fairest, those in work benefited from the support so they should pay.
403
23/02/2021 15:36:32 4 0
bbc
Actually there are a lot of people ready to spend money now, think of all the people wanting haircuts! In all seriousness opening up over the next few months should give the economy a boost relative to where we would have been at this point without COVID (less money spent overall but more per unit time as restrictions lift while people spend what they saved and get out again).
12
23/02/2021 14:09:50 25 22
bbc
I'm sure that the millionaire socialist Sir Keir Starmer would have a plan, just ask him what he would have done but please wait 18 months.
45
23/02/2021 14:21:02 4 7
bbc
Do not forget the 'Oxford educated toff' in Sir Hindights' CV
46
23/02/2021 14:21:56 25 12
bbc
We had amazingly rich Women like Cherrie Blair, telling us Women has it worse. And that was in the same breath as saying more Men are dying. Guess our lives are worth less that we thought.
***At least we have a non gendered Headline this time. *****
95
VoR
23/02/2021 14:33:20 21 4
bbc
Life is swings and roundabouts. I did feel sorry for the cohort of men though who paid extra their whole working lives for life insurance and car insurance, but when they came to buy an annuity, ended up having to subsidise the longer (on average) lives of women.
372
23/02/2021 15:30:37 0 3
bbc
Yawn.
37
23/02/2021 14:19:38 10 3
bbc
While the young will have lost more in the short term through fill-in 'McJobs', they are also far more likely to take up new better permanent jobs as normality returns.

The end to zombie companies and negative value zombie jobs.
47
23/02/2021 14:22:24 10 4
bbc
You have lost all sense of reality. Where do you think these jobs are going to come from, the reality is that things are going to get a lot worse. We have another year group leaving school and university in June
48
23/02/2021 14:22:24 35 29
bbc
Why?? I read that farms do not have enough people to pick the daffodils. If they were willing to travel from easetrn europe to do this then why can't the UK young do the work???
1 Benefits too good
2 Do not like hard work
3 Too lazy
62
23/02/2021 14:25:33 32 14
bbc
Or perhaps living nowhere near daffodil farms, so not worth them travelling miles to pick daffs for next to nothing.
Removed
108
FT
23/02/2021 14:37:57 15 4
bbc
Because they want a career not slave labour.
136
23/02/2021 14:44:59 10 3
bbc
Ask the farmers. They're the ones hiring Eastern Europeans so they can pay less than minimum wage. Hiring British people doesn't allow them to do that and you can't put then all up in cramped caravans can you. Stop blaming the workers and start looking at the employers.
158
23/02/2021 14:49:30 7 6
bbc
Right wing ignorance personified. You must be so proud, especially of your myopia and designer blinkers.
215
Ed
23/02/2021 14:58:20 2 1
bbc
Why don't you pick daffodils?
264
23/02/2021 15:09:46 4 1
bbc
Maybe the exchange rate has something to do with it.....if your costs are related to Eastern Europe, then low paid work might seem better paid than it does to the UK young?
378
23/02/2021 15:31:11 5 2
bbc
Benefits are not too good but kids are too lazy because they were brought up by lazy ineffectual parents
11
23/02/2021 14:09:11 11 7
bbc
Quite remarkable to have unemployment as low as 5% and wage growth. Any comparision to other major industrial countries would be good to benchmark against?
49
23/02/2021 14:22:31 15 6
bbc
Don't be silly, this is the BBC.

Unemployment in Greece is over 18% and the EU average is over 8% ... obviously showing those figures would paint the UK position in a better light - hence they won't be mentioned in a BBC article.

Love to know how many jobs have been created in the media over the last year or so ... given that they report 24 x 7 on Covid related news / speculation.
283
23/02/2021 15:14:40 3 2
bbc
It’s obvious you voted Brexit but you still have a fascination for the EU countries. why?
You should ONLY be interested in the U.K. and ignore what happens elsewhere or would that be HYPOCRISY?
3
23/02/2021 14:07:15 102 9
bbc
The Bank of England went about its Monetary Policy to try and save/create jobs, but it seems without food for thought on what jobs we’d have. In this case an increasing gig economy and zero-hour contracts, neither of which represent a healthy economy overall.

As we recover, investment must be made for a more sustainable, innovative and diverse economy, with creating quality jobs at the heart.
50
23/02/2021 14:23:07 50 3
bbc
Bank of England do not have the power to change labour laws or fiscal policies. Those policies are under the judisdiction of the current government. Vote for one that you think will deliver the type growth you mentioned
424
23/02/2021 15:41:32 2 3
bbc
You reckon a Labour government would deliver that type of growth? I don't.
917
23/02/2021 20:04:46 2 0
bbc
They're not as independent / removed as you think.
51
23/02/2021 14:23:10 15 16
bbc
Are we going to look back one day and think "what the hell did we do"? The stats suggest that only a small percentage of the population have died from Covid, and I mean actually died because of Covid, not that they had it in their system.
70
23/02/2021 14:28:15 14 7
bbc
The figures show at least 120,000 have died as a result of Covid.
71
23/02/2021 14:28:27 2 1
bbc
Well open up then and off on holiday
73
23/02/2021 14:28:33 10 4
bbc
"Only a small percentage" for two reasons:

a) Because restrictions were imposed.
b) Because the NHS was not overwhelmed, and hence it was able to save thousands more.

If there were no restrictions then people would die like flies.
89
VoR
23/02/2021 14:32:02 8 2
bbc
The 120k who have died would be a much higher figure had we not done what we did.

Secondly, long covid appears to affect about 1 in 10 cases. Not all of those would be very long term issues, but if even 1 in ten ends up suffering disability to some degree, that's a mammoth issue for the nation and likely far more detrimental.
96
23/02/2021 14:33:29 5 1
bbc
What percentage of the population would have died without the lockdowns? I suspect considerably more than have.
Then there’s the people who haven’t died, but spent months in hospital and will spend years living with the after effects of covid.
142
23/02/2021 14:45:54 4 2
bbc
That must be the reason why it's a global pandemic: Nobody dies & it's only old people who get it & - very rarely - do not survive.

It's just a flu, right? Not my experience from March to July & beyond... or my relative's who got it a week earlier, is still not fully recovered &, actually, nearly died.
We must be the exception to the rule. Or maybe it's because we're not British.
16
23/02/2021 14:12:11 8 9
bbc
Since joining the EU..... British business has been favour cheap east european labour....slavery
52
23/02/2021 14:23:26 5 7
bbc
Actually growing bigger, by combining our own technology and expertise with theirs labour force.

And giving the eastern Europeans far better wages than they would earn in their own country.

Of course many also moved to the regime of China, but this doesn't bother you because "ooooh! Nigel Fara-a-ge" forgot to tell you.
6
23/02/2021 14:10:33 209 24
bbc
What the hell is a social media analyst?!
53
23/02/2021 14:23:35 25 6
bbc
A social media analyst is someone who gets paid more than an engineer.
125
23/02/2021 14:42:29 17 3
bbc
I hope not! I have friends with engineering degrees and they would be very upset.
739
23/02/2021 17:01:51 0 1
bbc
Depressing but probably true
8
23/02/2021 14:08:39 275 28
bbc
Our organisation is struggling to recruit young engineers with skills in electronics and firmware programming. We don't need any more social media analysts, whatever that is.
54
23/02/2021 14:23:41 197 41
bbc
Spot on too many young people with stars in the eyes not wanting to work in the industrial sector
123
23/02/2021 14:41:59 20 1
bbc
Be fair, she had already trained as a hairdresser. That is still a trade.
181
23/02/2021 14:52:40 7 6
bbc
That's just repeating the nonsense and stereotyping. Sort of rubbish I hear down the pub.
196
23/02/2021 14:55:46 9 10
bbc
It must be OAP day with such silly comments
204
23/02/2021 14:57:13 7 6
bbc
Stars in their eyes? Social media analyst. You seem to be confusing someone who works in the analysis of social media data with celebrity. What nonsense.
211
23/02/2021 14:58:10 9 1
bbc
It'd be great if we had an education sector that did anything more than just coach to pass exams, because league tables.
296
23/02/2021 15:18:31 4 1
bbc
That is because the industrial sector is looked down upon by politicians. In recent years youngsters have been pushed towards subjects like Ancient History. To meet targets schools encourage students to opt for passive classroom based subjects that quite frankly are boring.
331
23/02/2021 15:24:08 3 3
bbc
Too busy watching itv and reading the sun, thinking they can be an influencer
456
23/02/2021 15:47:08 2 0
bbc
I completely agree with your point. A question though needs to be asked of the industrial sector - what is it doing to encourage more young people to go and work in it?
485
23/02/2021 15:54:03 4 0
bbc
Aye, but until it's glammed up a bit and we discourage the notion that you can prosper without some measure of hard work - a more accurate perception of "intrinsic value" - this will remain the case.

Engineering (which does not mean being a technician, mechanic, plumber etc.) is even less respected than science (immunology excepted), which has a hard enough job getting its due recognition.
534
23/02/2021 16:04:04 1 1
bbc
You mean too many schools telling students any work that involves physical activity isn't worth doing, that's all we ever heard at out school
915
23/02/2021 20:02:50 1 0
bbc
I don't blame them.
I did for ten years and it was c**p.
31
23/02/2021 14:18:49 9 9
bbc
Despite Brexit, despite the pandemic, still the lowest unemployment in Europe.

Obviously there are plenty of people furloughed, though still getting paid and many will have jobs to go back to in a couple of months. True figures will become apparent in the summer.

#betteroffout
55
23/02/2021 14:23:51 4 1
bbc
The true figures will as you say become apparent in the summer, the problem is that they will be much higher than they are now, the article even says this will happen
8
23/02/2021 14:08:39 275 28
bbc
Our organisation is struggling to recruit young engineers with skills in electronics and firmware programming. We don't need any more social media analysts, whatever that is.
56
23/02/2021 14:24:10 20 18
bbc
But who'll update Facebook / Instagram with all the news / selfies about your organisation ?
82
23/02/2021 14:30:46 33 1
bbc
Every time I see an organisation daft enough to post on Facebook they get more comments complaining about their service than anything else. I saw one from John Lewis the other day, 75% of the comments were negative. Same with Plusnet, Netflix, etc. Beats me why they think it is a good idea to use social media.
57
23/02/2021 14:24:19 4 12
bbc
wow a whole 5%

In 80's North East it was between 15%-20% not a dime spent. Now a lot of youngsters by the time finished school, uni, gap year etc. that most of the under 25 age took up. £400,000,000,000+ spent because effects Tory voters to save Barmaids, Waiters & Hairdressers.

Lets not forget Property Developers, HTB, Holiday Lets / 2nd Homes and Stamp Duty tax breaks for the Tory Faithful.
43
23/02/2021 14:20:27 4 6
bbc
With all this debt about, Inflation cannot be far behind either - especially with all the extra costs brought in by Brexit since last month.
58
23/02/2021 14:24:21 7 7
bbc
So just why did you vote for brexit???
133
23/02/2021 14:44:07 5 3
bbc
To ensure jobs would got to British youngsters

Covid wasn’t on the ballot
21
23/02/2021 14:14:45 2 2
bbc
Don't tar young people with that brush; the middle aged and older were just as represented in the swathes of beachgoers and Jubilee street partiers.

Many who are now suffering will have followed the rules, and many who ignored the rules are likely the kind of people who haven't learned personal responsibility because the Bank of Mum and Dad prop them up regardless.
59
23/02/2021 14:24:22 0 0
bbc
Beachgoing and streets are outdoors - therefore safe
Clubs, raves etc are indoors therefore much higher risk
23
23/02/2021 14:14:56 10 14
bbc
Yet another good reason for removing restrictions quickly.

Extreme caution simply penalises the young!
60
23/02/2021 14:24:33 9 1
bbc
Not if we end up back with high death and case figures.
It would cause even more problems.
29
23/02/2021 14:17:56 5 12
bbc
Shame these young people will be restricted to England,Scotland and Wales in their pursuit of work.Cheers empty vessels.
61
23/02/2021 14:24:58 1 4
bbc
They voted for this
101
23/02/2021 14:34:38 1 1
bbc
No they didn't. Younger people mainly voted to remain. Furthermore, the vote was only in favour of Brexit by a very small margin. There are millions of people, like myself, who voted remain.
48
23/02/2021 14:22:24 35 29
bbc
Why?? I read that farms do not have enough people to pick the daffodils. If they were willing to travel from easetrn europe to do this then why can't the UK young do the work???
1 Benefits too good
2 Do not like hard work
3 Too lazy
62
23/02/2021 14:25:33 32 14
bbc
Or perhaps living nowhere near daffodil farms, so not worth them travelling miles to pick daffs for next to nothing.
33
BFM
23/02/2021 14:18:56 59 51
bbc
The intergenerational unfairness has now become extreme. We cannot leave young people with Uni debts, unemployment and to pay for the coronavirus issue. I'm 67 have ended up with more than I need. Its time for a wealth tax aimed at the haves.
63
23/02/2021 14:25:52 76 19
bbc
I agreed with you, until the hypocritical last sentence. So basically what you're saying is "it's not right but they should take it from others than myself".

There's nothing wrong with wealth as long as it's honestly acquired. Prosperity is not a crime.
92
23/02/2021 14:32:32 14 13
bbc
Society provides the environment which allows prosperity. There's nothing wrong with expecting those who have gained most from its benefits to pay the most back.
180
23/02/2021 14:52:19 15 2
bbc
Given his penultimate sentence said they had more than they needed I think you can imply he considers himself part of the 'haves'. So no hypocrisy.
259
MVS
23/02/2021 15:07:55 2 2
bbc
And there was me following the BBC news for the past 5 years convinced that prosperity is a crime!
353
23/02/2021 15:27:48 1 8
bbc
It’s rarely honestly acquired and never fairly taxed
939
23/02/2021 20:36:38 0 0
bbc
Where did he say anything like that ?
20
23/02/2021 14:14:26 4 5
bbc
Young people lost their jobs at the expense of protecting boomer's lives. The lockdown was neccessary as the death rate is so high for 55+. The bill for furloguh will be paid for young people for years to come as well.
64
23/02/2021 14:26:02 3 0
bbc
No, young people lost their jobs because they tend to have less experience and are in those jobs which have suffered because of the pandemic. As for paying, welcome to the real world, elder generations were paying for WWII until 2006. In my case that was most of my working life.
221
23/02/2021 14:59:04 0 2
bbc
Total BS. Whilst war debt was paid down, non-war debt was taken on in its stead. You didn't pay it down. You borrowed money from future generations so they could pay it for you.
65
23/02/2021 14:27:06 14 12
bbc
@squeezy

Why?? I read that farms do not have enough people to pick the daffodils. If they were willing to travel from easetrn europe to do this then why can't the UK young do the work???
1 Benefits too good
2 Do not like hard work
3 Too lazy

=======

None of the above. Farmers want complete control of the workers and the power to overcharge them for poor quality overcrowded accomodation.
78
23/02/2021 14:29:46 3 1
bbc
Surely not in the UK??
14
23/02/2021 14:11:08 12 22
bbc
Under 25s don't want work anyway. All they're bothered about is sitting around in onesies, eating pot noodles and telling everyone on farcebook how great / bored / wonderful / bad / lovely etc they are.
66
23/02/2021 14:27:16 6 0
bbc
What a stupid comment! The u25s are no different from any other age group. There are people in all age groups that are lazy, but the truth is most people aren’t snd want to do their best for themselves and their families
35
23/02/2021 14:19:18 106 17
bbc
Socialism for the rich and corporations, capitalism for the rest of us.
We need to take back our economy from the 1%. Close the loopholes and invest the taxes they avoid paying in automation and AI to provide the young with a future worth fighting for.
67
23/02/2021 14:27:31 79 113
bbc
Well you voted for brexit so giving the rich even easier access to getting richer, many illegally. EU was cracking down on banks and black money - City is the worst in the world for black economy.
113
23/02/2021 14:39:45 29 3
bbc
I did not vote for Brexit. Weird assumption.
290
23/02/2021 15:16:09 20 7
bbc
EU cracking down on banks and black money? Is that why Deutsche Bank so unstable and why the EU refuse to class Luxembourg as a tax haven?
340
23/02/2021 15:24:52 24 6
bbc
"EU was cracking down on banks and black money" !!!!!!

What like in Luxembourg and Ireland???!!!

EU the biggest dodgers of the lot.
387
23/02/2021 15:33:21 10 0
bbc
EU don't even obey their own rules in the Greek crisis they funnelled money through the IMF to transfer to Greece so it could make a loan repayment read Adults in the room.
438
23/02/2021 15:44:01 9 9
bbc
The corrupt and crumbling EU is not going to increase the prosperity of its peoples. We are well out.
498
23/02/2021 15:56:38 7 2
bbc
How can you enact anti capitalist economic polices when tied to the most neo-liberal institution in the world.
The problem with Brexit was the spin put on it, you can spin it to the right and the left - it is short term thinking to be against Brexit because the Tories are in, Labour can now enact something resembling socialism should they get in, you cannot do this in the EU.
633
23/02/2021 16:25:40 3 2
bbc
The rich were anti Brexit, because it has cut off their supply of cheap labour!
821
23/02/2021 17:34:10 4 3
bbc
That’s complete rubbish....City is the most regulated industry in the world. EU turning a blind eye to tax havens like Ireland and Luxembourg.
995
23/02/2021 23:45:28 2 0
bbc
EU cracking down on corruption??! Hahahahahahahahahahahahahhahahahahaha.
68
23/02/2021 14:27:34 45 34
bbc
The problem is that when Johnson pledged to 'level up' the country after brexit I thought he meant Britain!
With companies having to relocate to Holland, hire workers there, and side step hefty import / export costs, it turns out he's starting by leveling up Holland and parts of the EU first ha ha.
75
23/02/2021 14:29:16 19 25
bbc
Yes and you voted for this... well done
446
23/02/2021 15:45:50 0 3
bbc
Complete rubbish.
Removed
51
23/02/2021 14:23:10 15 16
bbc
Are we going to look back one day and think "what the hell did we do"? The stats suggest that only a small percentage of the population have died from Covid, and I mean actually died because of Covid, not that they had it in their system.
70
23/02/2021 14:28:15 14 7
bbc
The figures show at least 120,000 have died as a result of Covid.
150
23/02/2021 14:47:41 2 2
bbc
No, within 28 days of a postive covid test and from any cause. Given 40% of infections happen in hopsital, you can see why that figure is a problem.
160
23/02/2021 14:49:50 1 0
bbc
Within 28 days of a positive test. Not the best way to measure deaths solely from Covid-19.
638
23/02/2021 16:33:53 1 0
bbc
Less than 0.2% of the UK population.....and how many more have suffered in other ways because of this? The real cost will be felt in 10 years time. I’m all for protecting the vulnerable, and having some restrictions etc but full lockdown?
51
23/02/2021 14:23:10 15 16
bbc
Are we going to look back one day and think "what the hell did we do"? The stats suggest that only a small percentage of the population have died from Covid, and I mean actually died because of Covid, not that they had it in their system.
71
23/02/2021 14:28:27 2 1
bbc
Well open up then and off on holiday
6
23/02/2021 14:10:33 209 24
bbc
What the hell is a social media analyst?!
72
23/02/2021 14:28:28 14 25
bbc
You heard of facebook and the likes? Facebook accounts for 8% of internet traffic alone and therefore you would have analyst from investment banks/ retail/ police analysising data/ information? Welcome to 21 century
145
23/02/2021 14:46:39 33 5
bbc
The 21st Century where people can't compose a sentence that makes any sense or indeed spell.
381
23/02/2021 15:32:11 4 0
bbc
Where do they think the general public spend their time openly expressing their opinions on business, politics and the like?

Social media is a great way to keep a finger on the pulse of nations and movements, identify consumer/pop culture trends, see political shifts...

That people question the value of this shows they don't even realise Brexit was won using social media propaganda tools.
51
23/02/2021 14:23:10 15 16
bbc
Are we going to look back one day and think "what the hell did we do"? The stats suggest that only a small percentage of the population have died from Covid, and I mean actually died because of Covid, not that they had it in their system.
73
23/02/2021 14:28:33 10 4
bbc
"Only a small percentage" for two reasons:

a) Because restrictions were imposed.
b) Because the NHS was not overwhelmed, and hence it was able to save thousands more.

If there were no restrictions then people would die like flies.
3
23/02/2021 14:07:15 102 9
bbc
The Bank of England went about its Monetary Policy to try and save/create jobs, but it seems without food for thought on what jobs we’d have. In this case an increasing gig economy and zero-hour contracts, neither of which represent a healthy economy overall.

As we recover, investment must be made for a more sustainable, innovative and diverse economy, with creating quality jobs at the heart.
74
23/02/2021 14:29:13 7 6
bbc
Agreed, what we need is more S.T.E.M. investment and less social science / gender studies. Maybe then we can start producing products instead of buying them in.
201
23/02/2021 14:56:34 5 6
bbc
A rather lazy comment continuing the stereotyping theme.
68
23/02/2021 14:27:34 45 34
bbc
The problem is that when Johnson pledged to 'level up' the country after brexit I thought he meant Britain!
With companies having to relocate to Holland, hire workers there, and side step hefty import / export costs, it turns out he's starting by leveling up Holland and parts of the EU first ha ha.
75
23/02/2021 14:29:16 19 25
bbc
Yes and you voted for this... well done
380
23/02/2021 15:31:56 0 0
bbc
By level up he meant provide busses for OAPs and superfast broadband so everyone could watch netflix at the same time - jobs are still firmly for the private sector to provide.
452
23/02/2021 15:46:30 2 3
bbc
Whatever the topic, Remoaners find a way to complain.
13
23/02/2021 14:10:08 19 18
bbc
I see Dodds and Labour are totally out of tune with the majority and business as ever.
76
23/02/2021 14:29:23 2 6
bbc
Who is Dodds?
131
23/02/2021 14:44:00 1 0
bbc
Dodds is the Shadow Chancellor
282
23/02/2021 15:11:52 2 2
bbc
I hope that is sarcasm, albeit her ineptness does render her insignificant and invisible to most
11
23/02/2021 14:09:11 11 7
bbc
Quite remarkable to have unemployment as low as 5% and wage growth. Any comparision to other major industrial countries would be good to benchmark against?
77
23/02/2021 14:29:39 3 0
bbc
5% is high, that means 1 in 20 haven’t got a job and have all the problems that arise because of that. The sad thing is that it is going to increase as furlough is masking a lot of job losses
65
23/02/2021 14:27:06 14 12
bbc
@squeezy

Why?? I read that farms do not have enough people to pick the daffodils. If they were willing to travel from easetrn europe to do this then why can't the UK young do the work???
1 Benefits too good
2 Do not like hard work
3 Too lazy

=======

None of the above. Farmers want complete control of the workers and the power to overcharge them for poor quality overcrowded accomodation.
78
23/02/2021 14:29:46 3 1
bbc
Surely not in the UK??
48
23/02/2021 14:22:24 35 29
bbc
Why?? I read that farms do not have enough people to pick the daffodils. If they were willing to travel from easetrn europe to do this then why can't the UK young do the work???
1 Benefits too good
2 Do not like hard work
3 Too lazy
Removed
41
23/02/2021 14:19:56 5 3
bbc
You've never met anyone under 25 have you?
80
23/02/2021 14:27:09 4 1
bbc
Yes... me, 31 years ago. Boy, I love winding you lot up, it's sòoo easy!
105
23/02/2021 14:35:40 0 3
bbc
It's not even winding up sadly. It's rather boring, droll, and very unoriginal humour.
81
23/02/2021 14:30:16 41 2
bbc
Whatever happened to the 'contract between the generations'?
128
23/02/2021 14:43:19 47 2
bbc
Like all Ponzi schemes they eventually go bust.
233
23/02/2021 15:02:13 10 12
bbc
It was reneged on by the old who pulled up the ladder behind them.
263
MVS
23/02/2021 15:09:41 6 6
bbc
You mean old school families with grandparents and parents actually still married and supporting each other and the next generation? I thought those sorts of families had been outlawed in the UK.
284
23/02/2021 15:14:44 7 9
bbc
The older generation contracted out their debt to the current one.
351
23/02/2021 15:27:13 6 4
bbc
generation me decided they needed more
389
23/02/2021 15:33:47 5 8
bbc
Thats gone. Now its about pulling up the drawbridge and resenting the youth
479
23/02/2021 15:52:35 4 2
bbc
Thatcher. In her own words: "There's no such thing as society."
921
23/02/2021 20:16:36 0 0
bbc
What?!
56
23/02/2021 14:24:10 20 18
bbc
But who'll update Facebook / Instagram with all the news / selfies about your organisation ?
82
23/02/2021 14:30:46 33 1
bbc
Every time I see an organisation daft enough to post on Facebook they get more comments complaining about their service than anything else. I saw one from John Lewis the other day, 75% of the comments were negative. Same with Plusnet, Netflix, etc. Beats me why they think it is a good idea to use social media.
258
23/02/2021 15:07:51 3 3
bbc
You listed some of the largest and most successful companies in the world as an example of businesses that supposedly don't know what they're doing, odd. Clearly they're doing something right, and social media has no doubt been a big part of their advertising strategy.
Well they would be wouldn't they.

By definition youngsters are likely to be the least experienced staff and as a result the first out the door when redundancies are in the air.

Please stop this young vs old, women vs men, straight vs gays, black vs white narrative BBC. It really does lower your organisation in the minds of so many of us.
Removed
83
23/02/2021 14:30:58 12 6
bbc
When companies get rid of older workers because they're most expensive, the BBC retiree commentariat are aghast. But getting rid of young people is all ok apparently.
Well they would be wouldn't they.

By definition youngsters are likely to be the least experienced staff and as a result the first out the door when redundancies are in the air.

Please stop this young vs old, women vs men, straight vs gays, black vs white narrative BBC. It really does lower your organisation in the minds of so many of us.
Removed
84
23/02/2021 14:31:12 6 0
bbc
Yes it’s obvious news but there is no BBC narrative FFS. ITS CALLED REPORTING.
129
23/02/2021 14:43:24 0 2
bbc
You are both right and wrong.
This is indeed reporting of the news BUT not all aspects receive equal weight or prominence so there is a narrative to not only this but the vast majority of the BBC output. This is no different from nearly all other media outlets but just the fact that others will concentrate on different aspect implies the BBC is providing it's own take (narrative) on it.
29
23/02/2021 14:17:56 5 12
bbc
Shame these young people will be restricted to England,Scotland and Wales in their pursuit of work.Cheers empty vessels.
85
23/02/2021 14:31:18 2 1
bbc
So how did I work in Australia (along with a lot of other British people)?
34
23/02/2021 14:18:58 3 4
bbc
Keep your ignorant ageist nonsense to yourself.
86
23/02/2021 14:27:34 1 2
bbc
No.
32
H1
23/02/2021 14:18:55 6 7
bbc
Haha okay, boomer.
87
23/02/2021 14:28:26 2 1
bbc
Funny you should ssy that, I used to work in a munitions facility.
182
H1
23/02/2021 14:53:02 1 1
bbc
Hahaha I enjoyed that. Thanks, Baz.
10
23/02/2021 14:12:31 98 19
bbc
Stop sticking the retirement pension age up, encourage those who wish to retire with a realistic and sensible state pension age? With earlier access to private pensions.

This will create work for the young..
88
23/02/2021 14:31:41 87 1
bbc
Private pensions are accessible from the age of 55, which is reasonable, however many can’t afford to access at that age as your pension will need to last for 30 years, possibly longer
107
23/02/2021 14:37:37 8 3
bbc
Your 55 age David is going up, then it will go up again after that no doubt?
167
23/02/2021 14:50:47 14 8
bbc
This is the age of gold plated pension too. The younger generations (less than 40 years old ) don't have those, have student loans (graduate tax) and are looking to try and get on the housing market. Oh how depressing!
321
23/02/2021 15:22:41 1 2
bbc
Actually there is a link between private pension access and the state pension age, its set at 10 years and the Tories promised to raise it to 62 to maintain that 10 year gap. They didnt justify why there needs to be a link, sure you shouldnt be able to retire at 20 (as you could retire every few years to draw pensions that were not taxed) but making it 62?
51
23/02/2021 14:23:10 15 16
bbc
Are we going to look back one day and think "what the hell did we do"? The stats suggest that only a small percentage of the population have died from Covid, and I mean actually died because of Covid, not that they had it in their system.
89
VoR
23/02/2021 14:32:02 8 2
bbc
The 120k who have died would be a much higher figure had we not done what we did.

Secondly, long covid appears to affect about 1 in 10 cases. Not all of those would be very long term issues, but if even 1 in ten ends up suffering disability to some degree, that's a mammoth issue for the nation and likely far more detrimental.
90
23/02/2021 14:32:30 11 3
bbc
Unemployment rate in Greece reached 28% in 2013 and over 50% for younger people. That was with everything open.

5.1% in the UK right now is amazing, all things considered. Roughly the same as it was from 2001-2007 and lower than it has been for most years since 2007.

Surely the more important figure was how pay increases have vastly out performed inflation. Very good news.
126
NJD
23/02/2021 14:42:37 6 3
bbc
Not when furlough ends expect unemployment to double
91
23/02/2021 14:29:19 122 12
bbc
Its not just the young ones finding it hard but also the over 50's who have lost there jobs and employers do not want them as they are too old.
102
23/02/2021 14:34:47 72 40
bbc
their not there
246
23/02/2021 15:03:50 8 13
bbc
you've kind of missed the point... everyone's been impacted by the pandemic but young people have lost far more jobs relative to those over 50 and other age groups
359
PH
23/02/2021 15:28:18 8 3
bbc
They could always get a job at Wetherspoons, sorry I meant Tesco. Oh quick swipe at Tim what’s his face there! Actually supermarkets are one of the few industries that don’t discriminate due to age. Unlike some companies who do but give a load of B&S to justify their discrimination!
510
23/02/2021 15:58:48 1 4
bbc
Under 35 get support, 50 and over get some support, 35 to 50 get nothing.
516
Meh
23/02/2021 16:00:50 1 2
bbc
But as the article says, it’s mostly not them, but the young who are becoming unemployed.
577
23/02/2021 16:16:40 2 1
bbc
Exactly. Employers want people who are fully trained, aged 25 to 30.
663
23/02/2021 16:41:18 0 2
bbc
A lot of over 50's don't move as quick and more set in their way, sad but true fact. Not all but a big chunk.
24/02/2021 07:24:45 0 0
bbc
Employers only want cheap flex workers with no obglations whatsever from the modern slave industry zero hours no rights or pension buildup just working as disposable items
63
23/02/2021 14:25:52 76 19
bbc
I agreed with you, until the hypocritical last sentence. So basically what you're saying is "it's not right but they should take it from others than myself".

There's nothing wrong with wealth as long as it's honestly acquired. Prosperity is not a crime.
92
23/02/2021 14:32:32 14 13
bbc
Society provides the environment which allows prosperity. There's nothing wrong with expecting those who have gained most from its benefits to pay the most back.
171
23/02/2021 14:51:32 4 1
bbc
They do.
33
BFM
23/02/2021 14:18:56 59 51
bbc
The intergenerational unfairness has now become extreme. We cannot leave young people with Uni debts, unemployment and to pay for the coronavirus issue. I'm 67 have ended up with more than I need. Its time for a wealth tax aimed at the haves.
93
23/02/2021 14:32:44 26 1
bbc
By the haves do you mean, people who have worked for 40 or 50 years and saved some of their income, or people who have inherited wealth, exploited workers, avoided taxes?
94
23/02/2021 14:33:02 9 6
bbc
A lot of these 'unemployed' seem to be tradesmen just doing jobs for cash in hand, no questions asked. No tax paid, no cares taken about covid, just pure profiteering.
162
Bob
23/02/2021 14:50:08 2 0
bbc
Except the definition of unemployed is that you're looking for work. Those people wouldn't be.
46
23/02/2021 14:21:56 25 12
bbc
We had amazingly rich Women like Cherrie Blair, telling us Women has it worse. And that was in the same breath as saying more Men are dying. Guess our lives are worth less that we thought.
***At least we have a non gendered Headline this time. *****
95
VoR
23/02/2021 14:33:20 21 4
bbc
Life is swings and roundabouts. I did feel sorry for the cohort of men though who paid extra their whole working lives for life insurance and car insurance, but when they came to buy an annuity, ended up having to subsidise the longer (on average) lives of women.
51
23/02/2021 14:23:10 15 16
bbc
Are we going to look back one day and think "what the hell did we do"? The stats suggest that only a small percentage of the population have died from Covid, and I mean actually died because of Covid, not that they had it in their system.
96
23/02/2021 14:33:29 5 1
bbc
What percentage of the population would have died without the lockdowns? I suspect considerably more than have.
Then there’s the people who haven’t died, but spent months in hospital and will spend years living with the after effects of covid.
18
23/02/2021 14:14:22 14 13
bbc
Its doubly unfair, as its the younger ones who will be paying for all this pandemic for their whole working lives.....
97
23/02/2021 14:34:03 3 3
bbc
On top of the state pensions the current crop of retirees didn't want to pay enough to fund.
98
23/02/2021 14:34:08 6 9
bbc
Retire all over 55s and give their jobs to the under 25s, the only decent thing to do
124
23/02/2021 14:42:03 4 0
bbc
I retired at 50 so I have done my bit.

You are welcome.
140
23/02/2021 14:45:39 6 0
bbc
better still how about teaming the under 25's up with those over 55 so they can learn the trades.
think it's called apprenticeship training something the over 55's did and lots of under 55's too.
But as it means working and taking time and money by both employers and under 25's I doubt there will be much uptake
225
23/02/2021 15:00:25 2 0
bbc
& who's going to pay for it?
In Belgium "early retirement" on a voluntary basis & exploited to cover up/rationalise redundancies was the norm for decades. Until they realised the social system was cracking. Panic ensued (& still raging through political parties of all colours) & age of retirement is rising depending your age.
Want that for your country too?
285
23/02/2021 15:15:22 3 0
bbc
How?
24
23/02/2021 14:14:57 10 1
bbc
Unemployment is at 5.1% but as is often the case it is higher for younger people. Hopefully things will improve over the next 12 months

In the early 90s it was 11% and many of us complained on the effect it was having on the young. However the govt of the time had different priorities...

Just be grateful times have changed
99
23/02/2021 14:34:25 2 0
bbc
I remember the early 80s when it was 1in 10 as UB40 told us, the problem was it wasn’t spread equally across the country
100
W 6
23/02/2021 14:34:29 4 2
bbc
A great shame, but not entirely surprising and same as it ever was when there is a downturn. This time however I hope there is an effort to thank young people who (mostly) willingly gave up at least one of what should be the best years of their lives. Huge planning reform and a housebuilding push would be a great place to start so 20somethings aren't paying half their wages to live in an HMO.