A-level and GCSE results to be decided by teachers
25/02/2021 | news | education | 919
A combination of mock exams, coursework and essays will be used to decide grades in England this year.
1
25/02/2021 10:51:45 5 9
bbc
Potential employers wont fancy this plan much...if there are any employers left.
68
25/02/2021 11:12:20 4 1
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Certainly when I am recruiting in future I won't be looking at GCSE / A level results from last year or this year. I will need to see solid degree result and evidence of time well spent - volunteering or sports for example. I am sure I won't be the only recruiter in that position.
2
25/02/2021 10:52:32 9 19
bbc
THIS GUY SHOULD BE SACKED! JAB THE TEACHERS NOT MP'S LORDS AND BANKERS! YOU ARE RUN BY CLOWNS!
81
25/02/2021 11:14:01 4 1
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Are bankers being vaccinated as a priority? I’m unaware of that policy. Where can I find it?
112
25/02/2021 11:19:11 1 0
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Turn your caps lock off!!
3
25/02/2021 10:53:08 73 22
bbc
I hear lots of moaning but no alternative options being put forward.
Erm, repeat the year and actually sit the fu*king exams! Removed
37
25/02/2021 11:05:33 15 6
bbc
Yep. It's always the way with the general public's perception of the teaching profession.
60
25/02/2021 11:10:44 5 14
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Repeat the year. Simple
151
25/02/2021 11:26:33 8 9
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Perhaps if the Teaching Unions had made a workable proposal it would have helped.
158
25/02/2021 11:09:29 10 6
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Continue with exams
322
25/02/2021 11:47:35 1 8
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just policing theres alot of corruption in teaching
457
25/02/2021 12:26:33 1 0
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Involve those who professionally mark student work every year in moderating the standard.
460
25/02/2021 12:27:02 1 2
bbc
Work through the summer for 2021 and 2022, delay the new academic year to january, and then catch up to start the 2022 academic year in sep 2022.

Sit the exams as normal but in Sep 2021. Results and university starting by Jan 2022.

Not all teachers are Saints; every pupil deserves a fair chance at independent, and impartial scoring.
513
Ken
25/02/2021 12:38:09 2 1
bbc
Exams!
575
Ben
25/02/2021 12:51:53 1 1
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Just do the exams. They're going to be sat in the same classrooms as each other in the build up to the exams anyway. At least in an exam hall, you HAVE to distance the children from each other. Plus, they could wear masks and take a pre-exam one-off lateral-flow test.
592
VoR
25/02/2021 12:58:52 0 0
bbc
Alternative would be to sit the exams, and then be required to explain/justify your performance. I had a bad set of exams once but when I explained the circumstances (which did relate to being poor and having to work while studying to cover my living costs, since significant loans weren't an option back then), it didn't hold me back at all.
4
25/02/2021 10:53:10 17 31
bbc
A* for Cressida and Tarquin

C+ for Shannon and Tyler
A* for Latifa and Leroy

C+ for Chloe and William

SORTED
Removed
9
25/02/2021 10:55:54 5 5
bbc
So same as normal then.
44
25/02/2021 11:07:20 2 2
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What about Clytemnestra & Agamemnon; not to mention Poppy & Billy?
496
25/02/2021 12:15:25 0 0
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D- for local lad Gav
5
25/02/2021 10:53:18 123 38
bbc
How many teachers will give extra grades to the less deserving to meet targets ??
31
25/02/2021 11:03:41 75 40
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How many teachers will penalise the troublemakers?
35
25/02/2021 11:04:59 40 12
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Less than the amount of people in the general public who are self proclaimed experts on the teaching profession, despite having no such qualifications, experience, personal qualities or the wherewithal to be an effective member of the profession, but will still moan and whinge like they know it all without any shred of a better solution.
55
25/02/2021 11:09:43 23 1
bbc
How are these grades in any way comparable to those of us who did exams in previous years.

Exams are a way of standardising assessment, without standardisation these grades mean nothing
109
25/02/2021 11:18:44 13 5
bbc
Given how badly disrupted A-Level tuition has been, students will not be of the required standard for degree level nor had the correct preparation. I'd suggest universities do a 4 year degree with foundation year with the first year fully government funded to compensate.
147
25/02/2021 11:25:52 5 6
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All coursework etc should be anonymised with Candidate numbers instead. That way there's no favouritism or discrimination.
190
25/02/2021 11:34:12 3 2
bbc
What would be the point? Their bosses would know what had happened for performance management purposes so would discount these grades and there are no league tables again this year.
Also, schools will have internal systems for moderation as most did last year.
263
Jd
25/02/2021 11:44:28 1 0
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If they do and get away with it the schools leadership need to be fired.
301
25/02/2021 11:51:52 5 1
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That isn't how it works. We have to provide evidence that the student is working at the grade we are assessing them at, in the form of their class work! We don't get to just bump up grades. I bet you also think teachers work 9-3 and have 13 weeks off paid a year.
321
25/02/2021 11:47:09 2 6
bbc
if they are friends with their parents. they will give the good grades
417
25/02/2021 12:17:56 1 3
bbc
How many people are going to trust the teachers professional judgement from many years of experience to get it right? Not to falsely inflate the results so that next years targets are unachievable or to depress the results to make next years results better in comparison. No just trust us to be able to honestly and fairly with significant evidence make a best informed judgement.
512
25/02/2021 12:38:00 2 1
bbc
You utter fool.

The world does not work in the way you think.

Teachers are independent professionals.
692
25/02/2021 13:30:01 1 2
bbc
A teacher I know nearly left the profession a few years back when she was instructed to weight her marks according to postcode. She wouldn't. It's not just the teaching staff that you need to worry about.
732
25/02/2021 13:41:54 1 0
bbc
Doubt it - but they will give the benefit of the doubt which amounts to the same thing. That's not any more unreasonable than exams where good pupils can do badly.
782
25/02/2021 14:06:13 1 0
bbc
I am sure that last year some grades were deliberately inflated but then there was no process in place to audit grades. Teachers have been giving grades in KS1 and KS2 accurately for years and it works because there is a rigourous standardisation process and schools are randomly moderated. The possibility of scrutiny ensures that all schools submit data that is as accurate as possible. It works!
883
Jim
25/02/2021 20:34:43 0 0
bbc
I'm old enough to remember my O levels in the '70's didn't use your name. We had a number. The examiner would have no idea who you were, your gender or possible ethnic origin.
6
25/02/2021 10:53:42 118 17
bbc
This is where I'd hope my kid were Teacher's Pet.
57
25/02/2021 11:10:01 34 27
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The best lesson a parent can give their child.
211
25/02/2021 11:37:42 10 0
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Wise man once said it is not about what you know or who you know

Life is about knowing low people in high places. That's how you get ahead in life
250
Jd
25/02/2021 11:43:38 5 6
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Nice idea but it does not work.. Heads of department and school will challenge any that stand out and ask for proof.
286
25/02/2021 11:48:20 7 6
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Do you think teachers have zero integrity?
318
25/02/2021 11:45:03 6 1
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or you donated money to the school
553
Ben
25/02/2021 12:47:34 6 0
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I wonder what the price would be for my child to get top marks at A-level. Hypothetically of course.
830
25/02/2021 15:11:37 1 0
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And don't forget that learning to brown nose is a valuable skill if you aspire to enter politics.
836
Jim
25/02/2021 15:36:20 1 0
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One of my friends told their child that for this year they had to be extra pleasant in class, ensure all coursework was brilliant for this year etc etc as they thought exams would go to teacher assessment.

Easier for the teacher to grade up if they have a genuinely positive opinion of you.
7
25/02/2021 10:53:54 7 8
bbc
I think after last year, teachers will be more accurate and sensible with predictions. After all, last year they couldn't have known all the predicted grades would actually be used!

They know we're all watching...
77
25/02/2021 11:01:23 1 0
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Last year teachers thought grades were going to be reviewed by exam boards.
156
25/02/2021 11:06:44 1 0
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This year it is even more difficult to assess grades after long periods of online learning and online assessments. Cheating is rampant, everyone knows it, but few can prove it. As a teacher, you know if you want to follow the rules strictly, your students will be penalized, because other teachers may be giving students the free pass.
4
25/02/2021 10:53:10 17 31
bbc
A* for Cressida and Tarquin

C+ for Shannon and Tyler
A* for Latifa and Leroy

C+ for Chloe and William

SORTED
Removed
4
25/02/2021 10:53:10 17 31
bbc
A* for Cressida and Tarquin

C+ for Shannon and Tyler
9
25/02/2021 10:55:54 5 5
bbc
So same as normal then.
17
25/02/2021 10:58:59 3 16
bbc
Pretty much.
10
25/02/2021 10:53:26 280 59
bbc
I think exam results should be decided by HYS know-it-alls.

They clearly know much more than teachers.
61
25/02/2021 11:10:45 83 33
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Best comment in this section!
63
25/02/2021 11:11:00 32 3
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Agreed. And some seem to have missed their true calling and decided not to go into education.
144
25/02/2021 11:25:20 14 41
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Compared with teachers, HYS posters are objective and neutral!
215
25/02/2021 11:38:11 4 5
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Self certification is the way forward.

_____________________
218
25/02/2021 11:39:03 4 19
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I assume you don't think that teachers can be HYS people? or are you cleverer than everybody else?
222
25/02/2021 11:39:47 17 14
bbc
They should be decided by completely independent people who have no knowledge of the candidate - that is the only way you can have a fair, open, honest and transparent system. Sorry, but other factors are always going to get in the way when the prrson deciding the grade knows the individual concerned.
228
25/02/2021 11:21:16 4 0
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Thank you miss
230
25/02/2021 11:22:33 1 4
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Law suits will be absolutely huge
244
25/02/2021 11:27:56 8 3
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I am one of the first to slate teaching unions for the way they have portrayed teachers in this pandemic. This however is very different and too subjective and not fair on teachers.
257
25/02/2021 11:44:08 6 9
bbc
I wouldn't be the worst choice.

- My assessment would be 'blind' I don't know the pupils or their families
- My assessment would be objective, I have no stake in the school doing well.

The same result could be achieved by teachers from different schools doing the assessments but no-one seems to have thought of that....
Removed
316
25/02/2021 11:54:32 4 9
bbc
Teachers certainly know how to inflate the grades of their pupils.
380
25/02/2021 12:09:27 9 0
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Yes - and the Teacher Haters could be results moderators as they are all so experienced .... what a marvellous idea.........
389
25/02/2021 12:10:40 2 3
bbc
I'm just glad the government have dealt with the moral panic over teacher professionalism. Now there is an extended appeal period for pupils and parents to complain about their massively inflated grades.
416
25/02/2021 12:17:37 0 4
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school donations and corruption
537
25/02/2021 12:44:51 2 0
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They'd just rate everything U/F and write "in my day.." in red biro.
540
VoR
25/02/2021 12:45:09 2 0
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Statistics show that teachers, in aggregate, predict that their students will perform better than they actually do.

When I looked after a couple of schools, the senior leadership were aware of this.

Personally, I think it doesn't really matter how they grade exams this year. Those making use of the grades will likely allow for the circumstances (including how grades were set) when interpreting.
546
DG
25/02/2021 12:46:24 1 4
bbc
Quite right. I live next door to two teaches at the back and two to the side and I have to be honest in saying that the pupils they teach have not missed anything during school closures.
561
25/02/2021 12:49:41 1 5
bbc
Correct.
Teachers are only required to read a script.
Knowledge is not essential.
570
25/02/2021 12:51:08 1 2
bbc
Teachers messed it up last time by unrealistically inflating grades.

They must keep the same average ratios of grades from the last 5 years and spread this over the year's cohort.

This will prevent grade inflation (in a time when expectedly they would go down) but also allow the teachers to decide who has done well and those who haven't as they have the first-hand experience.
598
Pam
25/02/2021 12:59:55 2 0
bbc
Great comment
So suck if all the opinionated ignoramuses in here!
606
25/02/2021 13:02:42 5 3
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You have to remember many people on HYS have failed their exams , have no jobs, lots of spare time and can think of nothing better to do than come on HYS and discredit teachers.
655
25/02/2021 13:15:24 0 1
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People other than teachers do know things strangely

It's not hard to spot those who don't understand stuff on HYS

And giggle a bit
662
25/02/2021 13:16:49 1 2
bbc
You mean people like me who will be employing 2/3 young people this year...?
Maybe you want to chat about the 20 somethings I've had to get rid off for being completely useless?
693
25/02/2021 13:30:19 5 0
bbc
Yes, you can see the usual right-wing suspects with their negative horrible anti-teachers, anti-everyone comments. They carry so much pent-up bile within themselves.
747
Ron
25/02/2021 13:45:28 0 1
bbc
Good luck to everyone, you'll need it!
What I do know is my daughter received a grade 5 English GCSE last year, appealed with no sucess as the school was judge and jury. Couldn't get in the college she wanted, couldn't get on the subjects she wanted.
Took English exam in November got a grade 9 which was useless because college places and subjects already sorted.
Her self esteem was quite good.
801
FH
25/02/2021 14:26:16 0 2
bbc
What is HYS?
11
25/02/2021 10:56:41 123 10
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Most secondary schools are now Academies (businesses). The product they are selling is successful students. The well paid Board of Directors will be pressurising their employees (teachers) to promote the product.
189
25/02/2021 11:33:59 57 30
bbc
A way around this would be for teachers from different schools (not in the same area) to make the assessment.

This way assessment there would be no favouritism to pupils and no pressure from the school
300
25/02/2021 11:51:20 14 0
bbc
There will definitely be grade inflation, for a variety of reasons. One is the fact with no exams, no pupil will have a "bad exam" (e.g. due to stress, illness etc.), and hence the average grades will be higher than normal.
302
25/02/2021 11:52:03 13 0
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We should abolish league tables with immediate effect; this will help reduce schools over inflating pupil attainment.
320
25/02/2021 11:46:44 7 3
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school i went to the teacher favouritism was towards parents that donated money to the school
569
VoR
25/02/2021 12:51:05 7 0
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Having been Chair of Directors of an Academy that covered 2 schools (now more, I believe), I can tell you that none of the Directors (lawyers, actuaries, compliance specialists etc) were paid anything and I can't even remember anyone even claiming any expenses. The lead Head (equivalent of a Group CEO, in a 2 company group), was well remunerated, but not by default. (S)he earnt/deserved it.
582
VoR
25/02/2021 12:54:54 5 2
bbc
Also, the Academy model did allow us to make a number of improvements relative to when we previously fell under the local authority (when I was also Chair). We got better products/services at lower cost, despite not being able to negotiate at scale, and as part of the exercise we were able to significantly strengthen the governing body/Board of Directors.
639
25/02/2021 13:12:31 1 0
bbc
I can tell you as a director on the board of a large multi academy trust that not one Director on the board of any academy is paid a penny for their time. It isn't allowed. Given the amount of work we do on behalf of the children we ought to get paid but every one of us does it on a voluntary basis. No one benefits from artificially inflated grades, it only attracts scrutiny and critisism.
718
25/02/2021 13:38:01 4 0
bbc
You don't know how Academies work - The board is not paid at all, they are volunteers. Being an Academy (in a basic nutshell) just means the schools can spend the money on what is best for the children and not where the local authority tells them to, there are strict rules on spend too.

I'm an auditor of Academies - I've seen the actual bank statements and payroll so believe me, you are wrong!
12
25/02/2021 10:57:03 37 9
bbc
Hope that Universities will follow suit andinflate their entry requirements accordingly but I'm not holding my breath. They need the fees.
Going to University used to be a privilege to those who academically deserved it. Now it seems like it's going to be the realm of those who are polite to teacher and "try hard" in class.
20
Ben
25/02/2021 10:59:28 11 5
bbc
They have done this for years creating a system based on dishonesty. Standard offers are usually far in excess of what’s actually needed to get into a course.

I don’t blame universities, but this isn’t school teachers fault either.
199
25/02/2021 11:15:45 3 1
bbc
Going to Uni is a rite of passage and a social beano for too many teenagers now, that bus has left already.
346
25/02/2021 11:55:51 1 2
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Majority of British people don't go to university.. That why the country has to import in highly skilled people
13
Ben
25/02/2021 10:57:18 13 5
bbc
Unpopular but true - one in four exam results in a typical year are wrong, usually only by one grade.

All examiners (pretty much) are or were teachers.

If your child was a borderline (most students are in most subjects) do you want their teachers to err on the side of optimism or to give them a lower grade? The answer to this explains grade inflation in 2020 and 2021.
67
25/02/2021 11:12:01 3 29
bbc
"All examiners (pretty much) are or were teachers" I think you mean "All examiners, (pretty much) are or were FAILED teachers" Can also substitute examiners for Ofsted inspectors.
152
Bob
25/02/2021 11:27:06 1 0
bbc
Actually it is the inverse of what you say with 1 in 4 correct, not incorrect. And that's based on final predictions, if you go back even earlier, which is what caused a lot of the mess last year, as many students didn't receive their final predicted grades, they're even more inaccurate.

And as you say, they inaccuracy almost always is an over-prediction, not under.
352
25/02/2021 11:54:02 0 1
bbc
doesnt matter if you get bad grades...drug dealers make more money than most jobs
14
25/02/2021 10:57:28 5 8
bbc
Great idea!

Except for the good kids that the teacher(s) just do not like.

And dont tell me that doent happen cos I was on the wrong end of spite from a couple of teachers and uni lecturers during my time in education.

Just another example of Gormless Gavins incompetence in post, like so many other ministers in this paliament of fools!
18
25/02/2021 10:59:04 7 6
bbc
Maybe your attitude stank then, too?
Judging by your grammar, spelling mistakes and obvious chip on your shoulder; perhaps your teachers and lecturers were right. I suspect most Teachers, Parents and pupils, will welcome this logical move. Removed
165
25/02/2021 11:28:40 1 0
bbc
All coursework etc should be anonymised with Candidate numbers instead. That way there's no favouritism or discrimination.
15
Bob
25/02/2021 10:57:54 52 10
bbc
Given that catch-up is deemed to be required, and that's a view shared among all involved - government, teachers, pupils, we should in theory see a record fall in grades.

I suspect we won't.
49
25/02/2021 11:08:45 14 97
bbc
The holidays should be cancelled until the learning is actually completed to the required level.
No one has earned school holidays, not the kids or the teachers.
The teachers haven't bothered setting any work or doing zoom lessons and the kids don't bother logging on or engaging.
252
25/02/2021 11:30:00 23 5
bbc
why should we Bob? my 15 year old son (and the majority of his peers) has worked his socks off during lockdown doing live lessons 5 days a week and even extra higher level after school lessons as well - so why would this predict a record fall in grades?
338
25/02/2021 11:49:19 2 15
bbc
holidays so they bring covid back from abroad
855
25/02/2021 17:07:44 0 0
bbc
That depends on whether you assess the missed work or not. If there were 10 things to know but only 8 were taught then you can either assess ability on the 8 which would give a rise in grades (assuming easiest is taught first) or you asses all 10 in which case there would be a fall. The govt is assuming that assessment is on the 8.
16
25/02/2021 10:58:30 69 7
bbc
I can guarantee that if my old teachers had to decide my grades, they would have been completely different to the ones that I actually got!
50
25/02/2021 11:08:45 11 4
bbc
Did you get As and predicted Es or the other way round?
51
25/02/2021 11:08:54 3 0
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Which way?
494
25/02/2021 12:33:25 8 0
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My teachers predicted a grade lower than I actually achieved - for every subject. Probably because I never put my hand up haha
9
25/02/2021 10:55:54 5 5
bbc
So same as normal then.
17
25/02/2021 10:58:59 3 16
bbc
Pretty much.
14
25/02/2021 10:57:28 5 8
bbc
Great idea!

Except for the good kids that the teacher(s) just do not like.

And dont tell me that doent happen cos I was on the wrong end of spite from a couple of teachers and uni lecturers during my time in education.

Just another example of Gormless Gavins incompetence in post, like so many other ministers in this paliament of fools!
18
25/02/2021 10:59:04 7 6
bbc
Maybe your attitude stank then, too?
54
25/02/2021 11:09:30 1 4
bbc
No it didnt, unlike yours.
Another typical keyboard warrior with all the bravery to have a go from behind his computer.
Do have a nice day.
19
25/02/2021 10:59:20 3 3
bbc
Modular teaching keeps a running score of pupils' work. A final exam could still be used for final grade. GCSE should be abolished in favour of teacher assessed tests which can be used to assess suitability for starting Alevel courses. Few pupils leave compulsory education at 16. GCSE exams cost schools a lot of money and much too much pressure on pupils and parents.
12
25/02/2021 10:57:03 37 9
bbc
Hope that Universities will follow suit andinflate their entry requirements accordingly but I'm not holding my breath. They need the fees.
Going to University used to be a privilege to those who academically deserved it. Now it seems like it's going to be the realm of those who are polite to teacher and "try hard" in class.
20
Ben
25/02/2021 10:59:28 11 5
bbc
They have done this for years creating a system based on dishonesty. Standard offers are usually far in excess of what’s actually needed to get into a course.

I don’t blame universities, but this isn’t school teachers fault either.
32
25/02/2021 11:03:43 2 2
bbc
Then who's fault is it?
281
25/02/2021 11:47:02 5 0
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A lot of students entering science subjects need remedial teaching to make up for knowledge they have not attained particularly in maths.
21
25/02/2021 10:59:59 63 9
bbc
It will be like "Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland" where the Dodo, asked who has won the race in which everyone ran when they liked and left off when they liked, answers: “Everybody has won, and all must have prizes”.
224
25/02/2021 11:40:36 31 7
bbc
And whatever examination criteria they use does not alter the fact that swaths of the curriculum have not been properly taught to these neglected pupils.
337
25/02/2021 11:48:33 2 1
bbc
more like favouritism
795
25/02/2021 14:19:45 3 0
bbc
Another cohort of students will leave schools being simultaneously under- and over-qualified.

Underqualified because they haven't studied as much of the curriculum as they would have done in non-Covid times,

and

Overqualified because their grades will still come out high on average thanks to "best guess" grading (nobody will get seriously marked down if it makes the teaching look bad).
22
W 6
25/02/2021 11:01:21 2 2
bbc
I can't see it being any worse than the absolute shambles that was last summer (how Williamson is still in a job after that is beyond me) but one thing I'd like to see is how to ensure that the class of 2022 won't suffer compared to 2021. Naturally there'll be some grade inflation here and it'll take several years to even itself out. A long-term plan to avoid unfair comparison would be welcome.
491
25/02/2021 12:32:59 0 0
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(how Williamson is still in a job after that is beyond me) ...as former chief whip he knows where the 'bodies' are buried
23
25/02/2021 11:01:33 7 8
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Unions will push for performance related pay and all students will come out as A*. Sorted.
87
25/02/2021 11:15:19 4 1
bbc
What utter nonsense! Teachers already have performance related pay, but this does not depend just on examination results. Shame you did not research your rant, then you would not have been found out so easily.
99
25/02/2021 11:17:05 2 0
bbc
I hate Unions. They really pulled a fast one with the Bank I worked for 30 years. Had to pay me a tax-free lump sum of 66 weeks pay when I got voluntary redundancy. So I buggered off to Costa Rica did the old back pack lark for few months. Then, no don't laugh, two years ago I turned 60 got 50% of my final salary at the time of redundancy up-rated by inflation or 4% whichever the higher, forever!
24
25/02/2021 11:01:54 42 6
bbc
I only got one CSE and that was in woodwork so frankly I haven't got a clue how this should all be decided, so it's best I leave it to the regulars who I can see have an answer to everything on every subject. I learn a lot that way.
197
25/02/2021 11:12:31 68 2
bbc
I got metalwork and biology, so if anybody needs frog welding together, I'm your man
746
25/02/2021 13:44:54 0 0
bbc
I think you're probably overqualified for a place on Johnson's cabinet then!
865
25/02/2021 18:07:09 0 0
bbc
from your grammar I suspect you got a lot more than a CSE in woodwork!
25
25/02/2021 11:01:54 5 7
bbc
"GAV THE LAV" MORE BRAIN'S IN HALF A SHEEPS HEAD! LIKE HIS BOSS!
26
25/02/2021 11:02:19 8 8
bbc
Base the results on coursework, but only if done in school and not by parents.
48
25/02/2021 11:08:40 5 1
bbc
Most GCSE's and A Levels don't have coursework any more. The reason why they got rid of it was because students plagiarise off the internet en masse. If you have a time machine, we can go back to the 80's?! That will solve the problem...
196
25/02/2021 11:11:31 0 0
bbc
Exactly, otherwise it will favour the students with pushy parents.
365
25/02/2021 12:00:32 0 0
bbc
think parents have time to do others home work
14
25/02/2021 10:57:28 5 8
bbc
Great idea!

Except for the good kids that the teacher(s) just do not like.

And dont tell me that doent happen cos I was on the wrong end of spite from a couple of teachers and uni lecturers during my time in education.

Just another example of Gormless Gavins incompetence in post, like so many other ministers in this paliament of fools!
Judging by your grammar, spelling mistakes and obvious chip on your shoulder; perhaps your teachers and lecturers were right. I suspect most Teachers, Parents and pupils, will welcome this logical move. Removed
Love people like you. You know NOTHING about me but thunk you have the right to insult.
I do not have a chip on my shoulder. I am merely stating a fact. But then you know that and a just an idiot who likes to snipe from behind the safety of a computer.
Have a lovely day.
Removed
28
Ben
25/02/2021 11:02:52 3 6
bbc
It was obvious to most teachers last August that we’d be using CAGs in 2021.

The maelstrom that will now ensue is entirely the fault of a Minister who stuck his fingers in his ears whilst screaming ‘exams, exams, exams’.
42
25/02/2021 11:07:07 2 0
bbc
He did give a "cast iron guarantee" It must have rusted
29
25/02/2021 11:02:52 14 13
bbc
Oh great! Teachers favourite pupils get good grades and fraudulently get into university, AGAIN!
Completely unacceptable and basis, repeat the year and actually sit the exams, don't just make grades up!
33
25/02/2021 11:04:17 8 2
bbc
Potential for all kinds of 'abuse'.
43
25/02/2021 11:07:19 6 0
bbc
You’re advocating all students who are due to take exams this year be held back for a year?
45
25/02/2021 11:07:58 6 2
bbc
That's right. Because teachers behave in childish ways like that. Don't judge them by your low standards. And do you have any concept of the logistics involved in everyone repeating a year.

I do agree in one sense. Like last year the pupils who will get the biggest benefit from this will be those at private schools and who are, in terms of this government, the 'favourite' pupils.
160
25/02/2021 11:10:41 2 3
bbc
I agree, as an ex-teacher i cannot see why it is not possible for all students, right across the age range, to repeat their last year.
198
25/02/2021 11:14:15 0 1
bbc
what factual information is that assessment made upon? Have you studied the historic grades achieved by teacher's 'favourites' under exam conditions? How exactly do schools repeat the full academic year ? Where do the teachers needed come from? What about those students taking their exams next year who have missed 25% of their learning for those exams already, make them do another two terms?
30
25/02/2021 11:03:28 4 3
bbc
Well, this doesn't ring any safeguarding alarm bells.
40
25/02/2021 11:06:24 4 1
bbc
Safeguarding in what respect?
5
25/02/2021 10:53:18 123 38
bbc
How many teachers will give extra grades to the less deserving to meet targets ??
31
25/02/2021 11:03:41 75 40
bbc
How many teachers will penalise the troublemakers?
114
25/02/2021 11:19:23 8 7
bbc
and the problem with that is???
146
25/02/2021 11:25:37 3 2
bbc
All of them!
241
RM
25/02/2021 11:42:33 4 1
bbc
Great opportunity to get back at the troublesome pupils and level the playing field a little. Nor a PC comment of course but just reality.
310
25/02/2021 11:53:29 5 1
bbc
None. Because we are professionals. Students will be awarded the grades they deserve based on the work a student has produced. Every child will get the grade he or she deserves.
479
25/02/2021 12:29:58 2 1
bbc
Exactly. Through not fault of my own, I had grief from one of my teachers who had a vendetta running with my older brother; despite me acing his own end of year tests, he refused to put me up to the top set, which had lasting damage on my secondary education.

Not all teachers are Saints.
607
25/02/2021 13:03:48 0 0
bbc
The reality is the grades will go up, not penalizing "trouble makers". That is the fundamental problem.
733
25/02/2021 13:42:09 0 1
bbc
That would be good news!
847
25/02/2021 16:20:26 0 0
bbc
I left school at 15 as my teachers did not consider me to be suitable to take GCEs. Got a job in a factory. Ended up being a qualified mechanical engineering and a qualified civil engineer leading a team which included people with masters degrees. Along the way I obtained a mathematics degree with first class honours. Hope today’s teachers are better judges!
20
Ben
25/02/2021 10:59:28 11 5
bbc
They have done this for years creating a system based on dishonesty. Standard offers are usually far in excess of what’s actually needed to get into a course.

I don’t blame universities, but this isn’t school teachers fault either.
32
25/02/2021 11:03:43 2 2
bbc
Then who's fault is it?
776
Ben
25/02/2021 14:02:59 0 0
bbc
It's systemic which is why it'll be changed.

Unis place an inflated value on their courses - i.e. you 'need' AAA to get an offer. So schools predict AAA knowing the student will get BBB and still get in.

Successive Govts, (both colours) have bottled it re the solution. Although I'm no Tory, I actually think that this lot might solve the problem and if they do, well done them.
29
25/02/2021 11:02:52 14 13
bbc
Oh great! Teachers favourite pupils get good grades and fraudulently get into university, AGAIN!
Completely unacceptable and basis, repeat the year and actually sit the exams, don't just make grades up!
33
25/02/2021 11:04:17 8 2
bbc
Potential for all kinds of 'abuse'.
3
25/02/2021 10:53:08 73 22
bbc
I hear lots of moaning but no alternative options being put forward.
Erm, repeat the year and actually sit the fu*king exams! Removed
59
25/02/2021 11:10:20 2 4
bbc
Wee Scot - So last year's students were supposed to sit this year's non existent exams then? Well done...
74
25/02/2021 11:13:08 11 1
bbc
And how do we accommodate all the children moving into the next stream of education? This years cohort leaving, enables the physical space and teaching capacity to bring the next year up.
229
25/02/2021 11:22:28 6 0
bbc
and where will the kids go? I'm going to assume this is only exam classes and not the whole system, because that would be mad. Where are you going to find enough qualified people to teach them? or buildings to teach in? Note that its a struggle to get enough teachers as is, and to retain them, oh and you need to do all this by September for the new school year.
5
25/02/2021 10:53:18 123 38
bbc
How many teachers will give extra grades to the less deserving to meet targets ??
35
25/02/2021 11:04:59 40 12
bbc
Less than the amount of people in the general public who are self proclaimed experts on the teaching profession, despite having no such qualifications, experience, personal qualities or the wherewithal to be an effective member of the profession, but will still moan and whinge like they know it all without any shred of a better solution.
398
25/02/2021 12:13:03 3 3
bbc
Presumably these proclaimed experts are people who went to school and saw how often a child who asked for clarity on an edict was classed as a trouble maker rather than inquisitive because it either caused more work or exposed deficiency
36
25/02/2021 11:05:27 2 2
bbc
If grades in general are above expectation and there is a process to review individual grades to confirm the results then I don't have a problem. If grades are up and there is no review then I, personally, will positively discriminate against those job applicants in future.
167
25/02/2021 11:29:14 2 0
bbc
There was a review process in Scotland last year, result was most grades were too high so we're moderated down as was usual. A few whingers complained, the media including the BBC picked it up and ran with it, result the Scottish Government folded and the moderation was removed! Last year and this year's results/qualifications are not worth the paper they are printed on.
3
25/02/2021 10:53:08 73 22
bbc
I hear lots of moaning but no alternative options being put forward.
37
25/02/2021 11:05:33 15 6
bbc
Yep. It's always the way with the general public's perception of the teaching profession.
38
25/02/2021 11:05:37 3 4
bbc
Teacher grades do not and can not take into account random events that can affect grades such as pet dying, family issues, revising the wrong topic, panic attack etc. Of course the grades are going to be high, you can't factor in randomness.
39
25/02/2021 11:05:49 2 7
bbc
Nobody noticed the exam results day has changed from July https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-55675074
To August 10 and 12
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-56157413

A major U turn
30
25/02/2021 11:03:28 4 3
bbc
Well, this doesn't ring any safeguarding alarm bells.
40
25/02/2021 11:06:24 4 1
bbc
Safeguarding in what respect?
180
25/02/2021 11:31:49 0 0
bbc
In the respect that teachers will invaribly grade unfairly, a trouble maker kid will grade less than a bookworm kid. with external exams this is removed and only knowledge is determined, whilst uni does do its own with checks from another lecturer, Its still safe guarded by the very fact that at uni your knowledge isn't tested but your reason. you can still get full points if your answer is wrong
41
25/02/2021 11:06:37 13 11
bbc
I wonder how many teachers will be pressured into giving little Johnny high grades because his parents will cause trouble if not, or because his parents have bunged a few brown envelopes around, or perhaps worse teachers could be "leaned on" by less savoury characters. Dangerous road to go down imo, and far from open, transparent, and fair.
75
25/02/2021 11:13:12 11 7
bbc
Are you actually accusing schools and teachers of accepting bribes, and parents of criminal Intimidation? That’s a serious accusation. If you have hard evidence, let’s have it. If not, then withdraw it.
345
25/02/2021 11:54:50 0 0
bbc
usually the parents donate to school for favouritism or the local gangsters parents has word with the teacher
490
25/02/2021 12:32:54 2 0
bbc
making serious allegations without any evidence is also a very dangerous road to go down.
28
Ben
25/02/2021 11:02:52 3 6
bbc
It was obvious to most teachers last August that we’d be using CAGs in 2021.

The maelstrom that will now ensue is entirely the fault of a Minister who stuck his fingers in his ears whilst screaming ‘exams, exams, exams’.
42
25/02/2021 11:07:07 2 0
bbc
He did give a "cast iron guarantee" It must have rusted
29
25/02/2021 11:02:52 14 13
bbc
Oh great! Teachers favourite pupils get good grades and fraudulently get into university, AGAIN!
Completely unacceptable and basis, repeat the year and actually sit the exams, don't just make grades up!
43
25/02/2021 11:07:19 6 0
bbc
You’re advocating all students who are due to take exams this year be held back for a year?
65
25/02/2021 11:11:19 4 4
bbc
Yes absolutely! Dental students in Scotland have to repeat a year because of covid, the school kids are no different.
4
25/02/2021 10:53:10 17 31
bbc
A* for Cressida and Tarquin

C+ for Shannon and Tyler
44
25/02/2021 11:07:20 2 2
bbc
What about Clytemnestra & Agamemnon; not to mention Poppy & Billy?
78
25/02/2021 11:13:35 1 14
bbc
Antigone "Tiggy" Doublé-Barrelle

&

Spike ?
29
25/02/2021 11:02:52 14 13
bbc
Oh great! Teachers favourite pupils get good grades and fraudulently get into university, AGAIN!
Completely unacceptable and basis, repeat the year and actually sit the exams, don't just make grades up!
45
25/02/2021 11:07:58 6 2
bbc
That's right. Because teachers behave in childish ways like that. Don't judge them by your low standards. And do you have any concept of the logistics involved in everyone repeating a year.

I do agree in one sense. Like last year the pupils who will get the biggest benefit from this will be those at private schools and who are, in terms of this government, the 'favourite' pupils.
80
25/02/2021 11:14:00 4 3
bbc
Oh yes they do! Trust me, I had family that taught fir over 30 years and they were witness to appalling quality of new teachers coming through in the last 5 years!
You'd better believe bribes and teachers pets will get grades they do not deserve!
Judging by your grammar, spelling mistakes and obvious chip on your shoulder; perhaps your teachers and lecturers were right. I suspect most Teachers, Parents and pupils, will welcome this logical move. Removed
Love people like you. You know NOTHING about me but thunk you have the right to insult.
I do not have a chip on my shoulder. I am merely stating a fact. But then you know that and a just an idiot who likes to snipe from behind the safety of a computer.
Have a lovely day.
Removed
47
25/02/2021 11:08:07 36 10
bbc
I had ability and got good grades in my exams but my classroom work was terrible, I wouldn’t of had fair treatment and I’m sure there will be many now in the same position. But to be honest school teaches you very little about the real world and you start to learn when you begin working. Grades aren’t everything and university is definitely overrated for the average person.
66
25/02/2021 11:11:47 15 8
bbc
So you’re saying that you didn’t bother in class but did for exams. This year’s kids already know that won’t work with this stopgap system. So I don’t see what point you’re making about 2021.
97
25/02/2021 11:16:54 4 7
bbc
‘Have had’. School didn’t leave you with the ability to speak your own language so I guess your point is valid.
183
25/02/2021 11:32:53 4 5
bbc
Says the person who can't tell the difference between of and have.
351
25/02/2021 11:52:27 2 5
bbc
its really about if your parents are rich and if you managed to get educated at private school

its not about grades more about connections with elite
459
Fox
25/02/2021 12:26:58 2 4
bbc
Wouldn't have not 'wouldn't of'. School clearly taught you very little. University is not over-rated for the average person
Did you “of” the ability to understand basic English? Removed
857
25/02/2021 17:24:20 0 0
bbc
I take it English wasn't one of your good grades!
26
25/02/2021 11:02:19 8 8
bbc
Base the results on coursework, but only if done in school and not by parents.
48
25/02/2021 11:08:40 5 1
bbc
Most GCSE's and A Levels don't have coursework any more. The reason why they got rid of it was because students plagiarise off the internet en masse. If you have a time machine, we can go back to the 80's?! That will solve the problem...
15
Bob
25/02/2021 10:57:54 52 10
bbc
Given that catch-up is deemed to be required, and that's a view shared among all involved - government, teachers, pupils, we should in theory see a record fall in grades.

I suspect we won't.
49
25/02/2021 11:08:45 14 97
bbc
The holidays should be cancelled until the learning is actually completed to the required level.
No one has earned school holidays, not the kids or the teachers.
The teachers haven't bothered setting any work or doing zoom lessons and the kids don't bother logging on or engaging.
118
25/02/2021 11:20:07 44 5
bbc
Not our experience, children online 8:50 until 3:45 everyday, teachers are there setting work, teaching and supporting them. State school. Not sure how much of your daily work is in online meetings, but from personal experience I can tell you that is incredibly hard and very tiring. The children, the teachers and the support staff that I have seen absolutely deserve their break.
140
25/02/2021 11:24:34 35 2
bbc
I don't know why you are claiming that the children are not working hard. I am a secondary teacher (writing this in my break time) and loads of my students have been absolutely great and done loads of work. Yes there are some students who haven't been able to access online learning (and a smaller group who can't be bothered), but they should not all be castigated.
205
25/02/2021 11:36:01 18 1
bbc
not true.
If the summer holidays were to be cancelled, then they should not have been doing online work for the last 6 weeks
246
25/02/2021 11:28:30 25 3
bbc
Yours might not have been. But my Child, and her Teachers, have been online every single day throughout this. Usual lesson timings, work set and even returned fully marked up to 9pm at night. I've even had a phone call on the single occasion my daughter was unable to log in for 1 lesson due to our Internet issues to ask where she was.
A small minority may not have earned it, but most have.
256
25/02/2021 11:32:20 8 3
bbc
no one has earned the school holidays??? go into nearly any secondary school staff room and say that and see if you are able to walk out :-)
also look at the knock on for if there school holidays are cut short - who is going to compensate the tourist industry that relies on the school holidays?
326
Rob
25/02/2021 11:56:09 16 3
bbc
Excuse me! My wife and lots of others have worked very hard to do the best they can for their students!
397
RPH
25/02/2021 12:12:54 4 0
bbc
Awh, big talk from the troll. Wonder what Little Scot is compensating for?
474
25/02/2021 12:29:08 2 1
bbc
What a completely ignorant comment you clearly have little idea of what's actually been going on. Go on now back beneath your bridge
555
25/02/2021 12:48:24 2 0
bbc
Your comment really shows complete ignorance, guess you spent very little time in school!
What an asinine response. Idiot. Removed
633
25/02/2021 13:10:56 1 0
bbc
Your evidence for this? Where I work, we set and monitored work remotely last lockdown, we taught every day last term and we have run a full programme of lessons remotely since January. We have never stopped teaching and students have never stopped learning. I appreciate this is not a universal experience, but for that reason, your frankly insulting suggestion would not work universally.
646
CEP
25/02/2021 13:14:01 0 0
bbc
Are you talking about Scotland?
743
25/02/2021 13:44:14 0 0
bbc
SOME teachers. Others have been working incredibly hard. Just a lazy comment (from someone who didn't do too well at school?).
768
25/02/2021 13:59:04 0 0
bbc
Another "expert" on the role teachers and school staff have played in this pandemic, unbelievable to see such ignorance being touted.
893
25/02/2021 23:04:47 0 0
bbc
Late to the party here, but if kids not bothering to logon, doesn't that imply work has been set?

You can't throw lazy jibes both ways.
16
25/02/2021 10:58:30 69 7
bbc
I can guarantee that if my old teachers had to decide my grades, they would have been completely different to the ones that I actually got!
50
25/02/2021 11:08:45 11 4
bbc
Did you get As and predicted Es or the other way round?
62
25/02/2021 11:10:50 24 1
bbc
Passed all exams with flying colours but I was no teachers pet.Lol.
16
25/02/2021 10:58:30 69 7
bbc
I can guarantee that if my old teachers had to decide my grades, they would have been completely different to the ones that I actually got!
51
25/02/2021 11:08:54 3 0
bbc
Which way?
52
25/02/2021 11:09:15 2 1
bbc
must be worth a bonus?
53
25/02/2021 11:09:21 31 12
bbc
I woz no good at englis but I wuz teachers pet so ipast and now im gointobea priminister.
83
25/02/2021 11:14:27 5 16
bbc
Chase your dreams.
347
25/02/2021 11:56:10 1 1
bbc
went to Eton?
756
25/02/2021 13:48:58 0 0
bbc
Get back to work Boris, you have a pandemic to fight.
804
25/02/2021 14:31:30 0 0
bbc
Afternoon Boris!
18
25/02/2021 10:59:04 7 6
bbc
Maybe your attitude stank then, too?
54
25/02/2021 11:09:30 1 4
bbc
No it didnt, unlike yours.
Another typical keyboard warrior with all the bravery to have a go from behind his computer.
Do have a nice day.
5
25/02/2021 10:53:18 123 38
bbc
How many teachers will give extra grades to the less deserving to meet targets ??
55
25/02/2021 11:09:43 23 1
bbc
How are these grades in any way comparable to those of us who did exams in previous years.

Exams are a way of standardising assessment, without standardisation these grades mean nothing
105
25/02/2021 11:17:41 10 0
bbc
Spot on.

Last year proved you can't standardise predicted grades as you would exam boundries without everyone crying foul.

We therefore got grades that don't mean anywhere near as much which in the long run helps nobody.
173
25/02/2021 11:30:04 3 1
bbc
Only really an issue for those finishing their education at this level.
Anyone going on to another stage is competing only against this years students for places, and the final stage is the only one anyone cares about in the long run.
273
Jd
25/02/2021 11:46:02 1 0
bbc
Oh please... Last year was 5% higher than the previous year and that's within the margin or error. Teachers have been told by leadership to prove marks as they can be contested... Zero point getting them wrong or making them better as it will come back on everyone in the school.
56
25/02/2021 11:09:59 5 3
bbc
So much projection here from people who haven’t a clue how it’s actually done. There is no way in which *one* teacher picks a figure out of the air. It’s based on class tests, in-school exams, continuous assessment, and checked by superiors all the way up the line. Admittedly those kids who try hardest do usually do best, but perhaps all these moaners can think of a reason why that might be.
6
25/02/2021 10:53:42 118 17
bbc
This is where I'd hope my kid were Teacher's Pet.
57
25/02/2021 11:10:01 34 27
bbc
The best lesson a parent can give their child.
842
25/02/2021 15:48:51 0 1
bbc
What a surprising comment from you - not.
58
25/02/2021 11:10:15 1 1
bbc
Grading students is clearly made more difficult by covid disruption and exams won't work.

The real question is whether this is an improvement over the complete shambles experienced last year.

Time will tell - but confidence is low!
Erm, repeat the year and actually sit the fu*king exams! Removed
59
25/02/2021 11:10:20 2 4
bbc
Wee Scot - So last year's students were supposed to sit this year's non existent exams then? Well done...
3
25/02/2021 10:53:08 73 22
bbc
I hear lots of moaning but no alternative options being put forward.
60
25/02/2021 11:10:44 5 14
bbc
Repeat the year. Simple
237
25/02/2021 11:41:38 8 1
bbc
So all the children working hard to overcome the limitations of online learning are told all their efforts for the last 12 months count for 0?
Children who are 5 cannot start school because all the existing school children are repeating a year?
All the universities will have no student intake, so will lose a third of their income in the next academic year.
Simple?
455
25/02/2021 12:26:16 6 2
bbc
"Repeat the year. Simple"

Simple? So is that everyone in all age groups? And if so what about those who are due to start school? Do we end up with an extra age group of children in schools for a year (how will they all fit in the building?)? Do we shift the whole of schooling from ages 5-18 to 6-19? Forever or for how long?

You see, it isn't "simple". That's why you don't work in education.
612
25/02/2021 13:05:12 1 0
bbc
No space in the schools for an extra year group and all the universities will go out of business when the gap reaches them. Must try harder. D-
10
25/02/2021 10:53:26 280 59
bbc
I think exam results should be decided by HYS know-it-alls.

They clearly know much more than teachers.
61
25/02/2021 11:10:45 83 33
bbc
Best comment in this section!
576
25/02/2021 12:52:42 2 1
bbc
I do know that last year's students with 3 months less learning were 12% smarter
50
25/02/2021 11:08:45 11 4
bbc
Did you get As and predicted Es or the other way round?
62
25/02/2021 11:10:50 24 1
bbc
Passed all exams with flying colours but I was no teachers pet.Lol.
339
25/02/2021 11:50:17 4 11
bbc
over in Britain if you donate money to the school as a parent ...teachers become bribed
10
25/02/2021 10:53:26 280 59
bbc
I think exam results should be decided by HYS know-it-alls.

They clearly know much more than teachers.
63
25/02/2021 11:11:00 32 3
bbc
Agreed. And some seem to have missed their true calling and decided not to go into education.
64
25/02/2021 11:11:08 2 2
bbc
Let's hope teachers know what they are doing. Last year, friend's daughter got poor grades in four subjects as three teachers were newly qualified and the other didn't give anyone anything above a C.
86
25/02/2021 11:15:17 2 2
bbc
teachers didn't decide last year, it was the exam boards, the dfe and Boris's 'algorithm' that decided. Teachers are better placed to decide than Williamson et al, even new teachers
142
25/02/2021 11:25:00 0 0
bbc
Anecdotal evidence is no evidence!
433
25/02/2021 12:08:08 0 0
bbc
thats good. they should give below C more often
43
25/02/2021 11:07:19 6 0
bbc
You’re advocating all students who are due to take exams this year be held back for a year?
65
25/02/2021 11:11:19 4 4
bbc
Yes absolutely! Dental students in Scotland have to repeat a year because of covid, the school kids are no different.
192
25/02/2021 11:34:22 0 1
bbc
The difference is it costs to educate secondary students, where having university students repeat a year is a cash flow bonus
235
25/02/2021 11:41:14 0 1
bbc
A cohort of dental students in Scotland, is fundamentally different to holding back an entire cohort across the UK. How do we deal with the new intake and the years that would move up.
47
25/02/2021 11:08:07 36 10
bbc
I had ability and got good grades in my exams but my classroom work was terrible, I wouldn’t of had fair treatment and I’m sure there will be many now in the same position. But to be honest school teaches you very little about the real world and you start to learn when you begin working. Grades aren’t everything and university is definitely overrated for the average person.
66
25/02/2021 11:11:47 15 8
bbc
So you’re saying that you didn’t bother in class but did for exams. This year’s kids already know that won’t work with this stopgap system. So I don’t see what point you’re making about 2021.
162
25/02/2021 11:27:27 4 3
bbc
I hated school and never bothered in class but had ability and retained the information I needed for the exams, there was a mutual dislike between myself and a few teachers I had so in that case you will never get the grade you deserve with this system. Sit the exams as normal and for any struggling students hold them back a year, one size does not fit all.
487
25/02/2021 12:32:20 0 1
bbc
Surely they have only just found out and now only have until May to impress the teacher.
13
Ben
25/02/2021 10:57:18 13 5
bbc
Unpopular but true - one in four exam results in a typical year are wrong, usually only by one grade.

All examiners (pretty much) are or were teachers.

If your child was a borderline (most students are in most subjects) do you want their teachers to err on the side of optimism or to give them a lower grade? The answer to this explains grade inflation in 2020 and 2021.
67
25/02/2021 11:12:01 3 29
bbc
"All examiners (pretty much) are or were teachers" I think you mean "All examiners, (pretty much) are or were FAILED teachers" Can also substitute examiners for Ofsted inspectors.
124
25/02/2021 11:21:02 11 0
bbc
Almost all the examiners (except those employed full time by the exam board) are currently serving teachers and I don't know why you are asserting that they are failed teachers.
232
JR
25/02/2021 11:24:30 9 0
bbc
In my experience examiners are teachers who are hoping to get a better understanding of how work is marked. They then use their experience of marking to improve the advice they give to their students. The pay is rubbish and the hours of marking long.
299
25/02/2021 11:50:53 1 1
bbc
And you know this"fact" how?
Morgan, the g is silent
308
25/02/2021 11:53:22 4 0
bbc
Some of my schoolteachers had a job marking exams over the summer holidays. I think they use practising teachers more than "failed" ones.
1
25/02/2021 10:51:45 5 9
bbc
Potential employers wont fancy this plan much...if there are any employers left.
68
25/02/2021 11:12:20 4 1
bbc
Certainly when I am recruiting in future I won't be looking at GCSE / A level results from last year or this year. I will need to see solid degree result and evidence of time well spent - volunteering or sports for example. I am sure I won't be the only recruiter in that position.
69
PS
25/02/2021 11:12:28 2 6
bbc
Here we go, moaning about a decision because it doesn’t suit your opinion. So bored with too many people knowing best but not offering a solution. Yawn!
70
25/02/2021 11:12:29 31 5
bbc
What ever methods are use someone has to complain and think they know better. Fact is this just put more workload on teachers who are sinking as it is.
716
25/02/2021 13:37:30 4 0
bbc
They asked for it. If in doubt use the experts. This way there is no blame aimed at the government. Only teachers.
730
25/02/2021 13:40:34 1 0
bbc
This year’s Uni intake will be so far behind work wise, that judging them will prove almost impossible. Those who don’t own a laptop will be particularly badly hit.
71
25/02/2021 11:12:34 7 9
bbc
Will teachers desks be big enough to take all the apples they'll be getting? Will they be driving new cars, taking flash holidays or wearing Rolex watches in the more affluent areas? :) I'm afraid there will be corruption, or at least attempted corruption. That's life.
138
25/02/2021 11:23:55 0 0
bbc
Are you saying that teachers are corruptable?

You don’t hold them in high regard, do you.
139
25/02/2021 11:24:04 0 0
bbc
Corruption as modelled by the current Government?
164
25/02/2021 11:28:33 0 0
bbc
Happens all the time everywhere including schools!
72
25/02/2021 11:12:53 9 3
bbc
Exam results do not full represent a childs capability or capacity to deliver amazing achievements further into adulthood. Time for a complete educational overhaul?
127
25/02/2021 11:21:23 1 5
bbc
No...........
129
25/02/2021 11:21:51 1 0
bbc
Don't think there is an answer to that reality. Exams are very limited & fit only some people that fit that mould. Sadly those that happen to be good at them then get to dominate so regard their parameters as defining. Education needs and it is inevitable that it has to change to educate individuals and be available all of life, via every means that can be offered, schooling should be closed down.
392
25/02/2021 12:04:35 1 1
bbc
average plasterer makes more money than the average scientist
73
25/02/2021 11:13:04 0 4
bbc
As a nation our children have four extra years of compulsory schooling when compared with our more successful competitors. The pandemic has brought about a life changing set of circumstances. It might be prudent to raise the school leaving age from 18 to 19 or even 20 for the next few years. That would be a far more sensible way forward. We have been delaying 'adulthood' for many years now anyway.
Erm, repeat the year and actually sit the fu*king exams! Removed
74
25/02/2021 11:13:08 11 1
bbc
And how do we accommodate all the children moving into the next stream of education? This years cohort leaving, enables the physical space and teaching capacity to bring the next year up.
41
25/02/2021 11:06:37 13 11
bbc
I wonder how many teachers will be pressured into giving little Johnny high grades because his parents will cause trouble if not, or because his parents have bunged a few brown envelopes around, or perhaps worse teachers could be "leaned on" by less savoury characters. Dangerous road to go down imo, and far from open, transparent, and fair.
75
25/02/2021 11:13:12 11 7
bbc
Are you actually accusing schools and teachers of accepting bribes, and parents of criminal Intimidation? That’s a serious accusation. If you have hard evidence, let’s have it. If not, then withdraw it.
161
25/02/2021 11:27:24 4 4
bbc
Actually it does happen!!
279
25/02/2021 11:46:51 3 1
bbc
What I'm saying is that this system is clearly open to abuse.

Are you saying that some parents never cause fuss even when it's not in the least warranted? Are you saying that some parents won't question a lower than expected grade for their little angel when he is clearly the brightest pupil in the whole school? Or that parents who donate large sums don't expect something in return?
76
25/02/2021 11:01:06 33 15
bbc
Everybody needs to chill out a bit.
The bright kids will ultimately succeed. The less so will also find their level
You do not get given an engineering or medical degree just because your lefty teacher said you were wonderful
93
25/02/2021 11:16:33 13 14
bbc
The lowest level is the government minister for education who must have been given very high grades by his lefty teacher.
113
25/02/2021 11:19:14 4 4
bbc
The problem with "bright" is some students are dumb by mock standards. I will use myself as an example. I got for the most part Ds and Cs in mocks. in proper tests these became C's B's and a few A's. I am smart, hell I have a Masters in Chemistry but I can not handle fake exams and coursework which I am always super low on as Coursework is just not a challange. Those are the kids that will suffer
134
25/02/2021 11:23:16 3 5
bbc
"Lefty Teacher". Check with conservative central office most teachers vote tory. Sorry to spoil your day.
350
25/02/2021 11:51:24 0 4
bbc
never knew gcse meant you have a engineering or medical degree
643
25/02/2021 13:13:21 3 1
bbc
sadly university grades also inflated
7
25/02/2021 10:53:54 7 8
bbc
I think after last year, teachers will be more accurate and sensible with predictions. After all, last year they couldn't have known all the predicted grades would actually be used!

They know we're all watching...
77
25/02/2021 11:01:23 1 0
bbc
Last year teachers thought grades were going to be reviewed by exam boards.
44
25/02/2021 11:07:20 2 2
bbc
What about Clytemnestra & Agamemnon; not to mention Poppy & Billy?
78
25/02/2021 11:13:35 1 14
bbc
Antigone "Tiggy" Doublé-Barrelle

&

Spike ?
123
25/02/2021 11:21:01 0 14
bbc
Only "Anglican" names are on topic, apparently.
79
25/02/2021 11:13:36 2 5
bbc
Joining in the trend to identify new victim groups.
What about all the children who left school before covid with no qualifications.
Particularly those from the already identified groups.
Will they be able to get their grades (or lack of) revised to bring them in line with the covid adjusted children or will they be pushed even further to the back of the job queues.
45
25/02/2021 11:07:58 6 2
bbc
That's right. Because teachers behave in childish ways like that. Don't judge them by your low standards. And do you have any concept of the logistics involved in everyone repeating a year.

I do agree in one sense. Like last year the pupils who will get the biggest benefit from this will be those at private schools and who are, in terms of this government, the 'favourite' pupils.
80
25/02/2021 11:14:00 4 3
bbc
Oh yes they do! Trust me, I had family that taught fir over 30 years and they were witness to appalling quality of new teachers coming through in the last 5 years!
You'd better believe bribes and teachers pets will get grades they do not deserve!
2
25/02/2021 10:52:32 9 19
bbc
THIS GUY SHOULD BE SACKED! JAB THE TEACHERS NOT MP'S LORDS AND BANKERS! YOU ARE RUN BY CLOWNS!
81
25/02/2021 11:14:01 4 1
bbc
Are bankers being vaccinated as a priority? I’m unaware of that policy. Where can I find it?
82
25/02/2021 11:14:15 3 4
bbc
This will never work, the luvvies will be two weeks into their summer long holidays, are they going to grade pupils from the poolside in Florida???
92
25/02/2021 11:16:00 3 0
bbc
Teachers are 'luvvies' now?

What happened to make you this way? Was it just how you were raised?
96
25/02/2021 11:16:48 1 0
bbc
read the facts first, grades will be awarded by mid-june. Any excuse to teacher bash - pathetic
130
25/02/2021 11:21:54 0 0
bbc
The grades have to be submitted before the holidays. Another rant without a factual basis!
Removed
53
25/02/2021 11:09:21 31 12
bbc
I woz no good at englis but I wuz teachers pet so ipast and now im gointobea priminister.
83
25/02/2021 11:14:27 5 16
bbc
Chase your dreams.
102
25/02/2021 11:17:28 1 0
bbc
That's what I'm doing.
84
25/02/2021 11:14:37 6 4
bbc
A Level teachers are asked to do this every year. They are called UCAS grades and the statistics show that they are spectacularly inaccurate.
115
25/02/2021 11:19:29 3 5
bbc
Thats because they grade based on who they like and don't, not actual ability!
122
25/02/2021 11:20:59 1 1
bbc
The basis for UCAS grades are not the same as CAG grades which are arrived at differently. Indeed last year, UCAS grades had already been submitted before Williamson came out with his omnishambles' which led to guidance on preparing CAGs. Check your facts before ranting!
297
25/02/2021 11:50:45 1 0
bbc
Teachers always err on the side of "optimism" for UCAS grades, especially as they're done so early in Y13. The thought process is generally something like " so looking at what they've done so far, if they work hard between now and the summer, what could they get if everything goes right on the day?"
85
25/02/2021 11:14:45 1 2
bbc
seems logical however this is unfair for students who are abysmal at mock exams, coursework, yet are excellent when it comes to proper tests. I have always gone up a grade or two compared to mocks. So kids who follow that style will be screwed out of uni/collage due to not being good in non pressure circumstances
110
25/02/2021 11:18:44 1 0
bbc
And equally pupils who should not be at uni will get a place!
116
25/02/2021 11:19:47 0 0
bbc
It’s simple. This time around, there are no mock exams. They all count towards the pupils’ final score.

All are now “proper” tests.
64
25/02/2021 11:11:08 2 2
bbc
Let's hope teachers know what they are doing. Last year, friend's daughter got poor grades in four subjects as three teachers were newly qualified and the other didn't give anyone anything above a C.
86
25/02/2021 11:15:17 2 2
bbc
teachers didn't decide last year, it was the exam boards, the dfe and Boris's 'algorithm' that decided. Teachers are better placed to decide than Williamson et al, even new teachers
23
25/02/2021 11:01:33 7 8
bbc
Unions will push for performance related pay and all students will come out as A*. Sorted.
87
25/02/2021 11:15:19 4 1
bbc
What utter nonsense! Teachers already have performance related pay, but this does not depend just on examination results. Shame you did not research your rant, then you would not have been found out so easily.
88
25/02/2021 11:04:45 3 2
bbc
Surely students are better qualified to decide exam results.
89
25/02/2021 11:15:24 2 2
bbc
cancel exams, but suggest tests to help. So, what is the difference??? Kids still sitting down being examined. Difference = let schools decide if they use these tests, passing the buck again. Senior Ofqal person resigns, perhaps senior govt minister in charge of education should do the same
90
25/02/2021 11:15:35 10 8
bbc
There is considerable historical research evidence that teachers do not mark fairly. They give high marks to those they think will get high marks, and low to those they don't, regardless of the actual test answers. Hence external exams, which are marked by another party and then moderated. These results will be worthless. Employers will look at when the grades were dated and discount 2020/21.
104
25/02/2021 11:17:36 2 3
bbc
I know I would! And indeed any grads 3 to 5 years after!
106
25/02/2021 11:17:54 2 2
bbc
Quote your historical evidence please.
107
25/02/2021 11:17:59 2 2
bbc
evidence base please, I've not seen this before.
176
25/02/2021 11:31:00 1 1
bbc
This is true! I know from my own personal experience!

Thankfully for me I changed schools and aced my exams
363
25/02/2021 11:58:34 1 1
bbc
They give high marks to one that they are friends with the parents of
91
25/02/2021 11:15:39 5 5
bbc
Going to be very little time to suck up to school teachers! Now we see why they are rushing back to open schools up. Helps teachers remember which are the ones they like! ??
101
25/02/2021 11:17:10 3 2
bbc
What Bosh!
82
25/02/2021 11:14:15 3 4
bbc
This will never work, the luvvies will be two weeks into their summer long holidays, are they going to grade pupils from the poolside in Florida???
92
25/02/2021 11:16:00 3 0
bbc
Teachers are 'luvvies' now?

What happened to make you this way? Was it just how you were raised?
76
25/02/2021 11:01:06 33 15
bbc
Everybody needs to chill out a bit.
The bright kids will ultimately succeed. The less so will also find their level
You do not get given an engineering or medical degree just because your lefty teacher said you were wonderful
93
25/02/2021 11:16:33 13 14
bbc
The lowest level is the government minister for education who must have been given very high grades by his lefty teacher.
94
25/02/2021 11:16:36 1 2
bbc
What good does it do any young people to be given qualifications that don't represent what they know, understand and can do? This solution will serve no-one, those without strings to pull especially . Yes, exams would be hard and students have missed out differentially, but long-term they would be fair.
95
25/02/2021 11:16:36 4 5
bbc
My son missed out on 1 exam last year, and was given a C, we believe because he never got on with the teacher, she basically just did not like him... the rest of his exams were as we expected, and A... so I am just not sure the teachers are the best people to be giving results, but what choice is there?
131
25/02/2021 11:22:07 2 2
bbc
My class teacher didn't like me and you are so right................
Removed
82
25/02/2021 11:14:15 3 4
bbc
This will never work, the luvvies will be two weeks into their summer long holidays, are they going to grade pupils from the poolside in Florida???
96
25/02/2021 11:16:48 1 0
bbc
read the facts first, grades will be awarded by mid-june. Any excuse to teacher bash - pathetic
47
25/02/2021 11:08:07 36 10
bbc
I had ability and got good grades in my exams but my classroom work was terrible, I wouldn’t of had fair treatment and I’m sure there will be many now in the same position. But to be honest school teaches you very little about the real world and you start to learn when you begin working. Grades aren’t everything and university is definitely overrated for the average person.
97
25/02/2021 11:16:54 4 7
bbc
‘Have had’. School didn’t leave you with the ability to speak your own language so I guess your point is valid.
98
25/02/2021 11:17:00 29 3
bbc
If there is a student who has a 40% chance of an A, 50% chance of B and 10% chance of C, what are teachers supposed to pick? Choose A and you've got grade inflation; B and you've got endless appeals/complaints on your hands.
23
25/02/2021 11:01:33 7 8
bbc
Unions will push for performance related pay and all students will come out as A*. Sorted.
99
25/02/2021 11:17:05 2 0
bbc
I hate Unions. They really pulled a fast one with the Bank I worked for 30 years. Had to pay me a tax-free lump sum of 66 weeks pay when I got voluntary redundancy. So I buggered off to Costa Rica did the old back pack lark for few months. Then, no don't laugh, two years ago I turned 60 got 50% of my final salary at the time of redundancy up-rated by inflation or 4% whichever the higher, forever!
100
25/02/2021 11:17:06 5 4
bbc
Look at the bitterness on here aimed the people educating your kids.

So many of you are tragic cases. I blame your parents.
133
25/02/2021 11:22:28 0 13
bbc
Makes a change from "the Tories" I suppose.