Roadmap: Can we avoid an economic long Covid?
23/02/2021 | news | business | 734
The cautious lifting of restrictions will also push back the economic rebound further into spring.
Is it time for China to pay reparations? Removed
10
23/02/2021 03:14:25 7 9
bbc
For what?
China - hey world, there's a nasty virus here.
WHO - you're right - it's REALLY bad - WORLD LOOK OUT!
UK/EU/US - huh? Naw - its only a problem for POOR countries - we're all so awesome we're going to ignore your warnings, do nothing and let the virus spread through our populations.
11
23/02/2021 03:15:53 1 7
bbc
Is it time for the UK to pay reparations to India?
24
23/02/2021 06:35:51 3 0
bbc
Did America pay the world "reparations" for the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic !!! NOPE...

It isn't a country that's to blame when NATURE unleashes a virus on the world...

So why not write or try and email Mother Nature with your complaint and see if she is willing to cough up...
2
23/02/2021 00:30:06 107 47
bbc
Don't say it too loudly or the BBC will remove your comment, but the pound is surging against the dollar and euro and over 1000 business's have applied to do business in the City.
If Boris does not the squander the initiative then the country looks like it's heading for boom time but if he gets it's wrong and keeps business locked down then it all would have been for nothing.
9
23/02/2021 03:12:16 60 116
bbc
Lol - the £ is surging because the markets currently believe that the UK's economy will bounce back sooner due to the vaccine success - however that remains to be seen. If a vaccine resistant strain takes hold here (quite likely given that we're sending kids back to school en masse so early), then we're back to square one and the £ will plunge again.
13
23/02/2021 03:18:50 28 26
bbc
Don't say it too loudly, but you're missing the point. Firms are applying to open offices in the UK and other firms are opening offices in Europe. None of these offices will make extra money, just add to costs. Making financial products more expensive for everyone. Brexit, the gift that keeps on taking.
15
23/02/2021 03:21:43 30 26
bbc
And is the pound surging past its value in June 2016?

No.

It's still 12% below that figure.

Surging.

Lol.
75
23/02/2021 08:12:08 27 17
bbc
EU firms are duplicating costs by having to set up in the UK. This is due to extra Brexit paperwork. You'll end up paying for this in higher prices or lower wages.
90
23/02/2021 08:35:20 21 2
bbc
If you're using the £ as a plimsoll line for the UK economy going forward, them I'm afraid you could drown. It's far more complicated than that.
99
23/02/2021 08:39:26 17 9
bbc
I produce stuff in the UK for the UK market, competing with mostly EU imports. the £ at E1.20 is fine for me. We don't want a return to E1.40 that makes imports artificially too cheap.
Hardly surging. Against the Euro it is around 1.15 euro whereas before the idiotic vote it was closer to 1.30 euro. But then you Brexthick supporters will grab any positives you can because they are so few and far between. Removed
162
23/02/2021 09:22:00 5 7
bbc
Booming, In that case he will give any profits made to his chums. If he cocks it up it will be someone else's fault
197
23/02/2021 09:59:38 12 6
bbc
It is funny the BBC did not allow comments on the 1000 EU businesses opening up offices in London
252
23/02/2021 10:36:54 1 0
bbc
I'll agree with you on the pound, but do you have a source on the jobs news as this sounds like pure speculation
318
23/02/2021 11:27:22 4 5
bbc
I recall when sterling was doing badly as Covid started immediately post-Brexit last year that we were told that a cheap pound is good for business. Now it would appear a strong pound is good for business. I do wish these right-wing flag-waving commentators could be consistent.

Anyone old enough to remember boom and bust will be keeping their powder dry.
341
23/02/2021 12:03:32 1 1
bbc
Don't you feel sorry for all those Brexiteers that were short selling sterling due to its massive crash when we left on 1 January 2021 - This is an Ironic Comment - Fluctuations in the £ are to do with economic market fluctuations rather than a political decision whether the UK is part of the EU or not.
348
23/02/2021 12:13:58 3 5
bbc
The GBP has been in freefall for as long as I can remember. My first foreign holiday was during 1970. I drove through Switzerland. The exchange rate was 10 Swiss Francs to the Pound. Now it will soon be ONE. In another 50 years, if it falls at the same rate it will be £10 for one Swiss Franc. A Mickey Mouse currency.
402
23/02/2021 13:03:44 2 3
bbc
New businesses is to deal with tax - again no new business. Like all the trade deals - mimic EU deals - still no new business. Fisheries - less business and 3 major companies folded so far.
We will open first but in our excitement we will let a stronger virus back in.
Brexit is and always will be a mistake of treason and treachery. It will make the UK weaker and less safe in the world.
444
23/02/2021 13:47:47 2 5
bbc
You’re right..since Brexit the pound is on its way to becoming one of the strongest currencies in the world and was being undermined all along by remoaners and the BBC. There needs to be retribution against the BBC for the damage they did to the National interest but that is another matter.
469
23/02/2021 14:15:48 4 2
bbc
I would have thought by now that the wild currency speculation swings that are commonplace would have registered with most people and be taken as an indicator of not very much.

I presume you refer to this article: https://www.cityam.com/over-1000-eu-financial-firms-planning-to-open-uk-offices-after-brexit/

I'd also suggest that is hardly an indicator of a booming economy.

More like propaganda!
508
23/02/2021 15:33:28 2 3
bbc
What rubbish.

Sterling is still way below where it was per-referendum.

Jobs and capital have been fleeing the country since, a trend that is continuing. Even Rees-Moggs own investment company advised their customers to move their capital out of the UK!

We've made it a lot hard to do business across Europe.

Brexit will be wrecking our economy long after Covid has become just a bad memory.
558
23/02/2021 17:08:36 2 1
bbc
Your thinking is so short - it exposes how the £ has been shorted n those off shore fund managers are the ones making the money - a registered business is not a business just an address to trade by. The CV19 mess shows how sad the UK economy is, low industrial base with over emphasis on financials n coffee shops, pubs, retail for mass employment. No easy return will mean no real investment
561
23/02/2021 17:21:09 3 2
bbc
"Don't say it too loudly or the BBC will remove your comment..."

Massively childish.
570
23/02/2021 17:51:16 2 0
bbc
Good News on the City front but the rise in the £ is probably far more to do with the fact we are likely to have a sustainable route out of lockdown before Europe & the US, which will draw investment in.

Whether the UK's Business growth or market diversity is sustainable into what will be heavily competing world markets post covid is another issue altogether.
3
23/02/2021 00:36:22 3 14
bbc
everyone is stacked with debt - about time these debtors paid the cost. i hope this country sinks in debt as it is what it deserves.
5
23/02/2021 01:01:13 10 3
bbc
I bet you’re popular at parties. All western economies are debt laden, Covid has accelerated the money printing in a race to the bottom. Where it ends who knows? My money is on decade long stagflation
as I can’t see a hyperinflationary situation occurring even though it should.
14
23/02/2021 03:18:58 0 3
bbc
If the UK "sinks in debt", all that will result is the £ will devalue, pushing up the cost of everything we import. At the end of the day, the losers will be the poorest who will struggle even harder to feed their families and keep their homes warm.

As always, the rich and powerful will be unaffected.
21
23/02/2021 06:25:29 1 0
bbc
"Everyone" !!! Nope... I don't have any debt, never have had and never will...

... and NO I aint some rich guy or born with a silver spoon in my mouth, just a "Working class" person who's always worked hard for everything I have and never lived outside of my means...

Work, hard, Play Hard & Save hard is my motto as you never know what the future holds for you...
4
23/02/2021 01:00:39 5 9
bbc
A third of the country is working from home, on full pay, and being forced to save. They can afford houses that are ten times the average income.

The rest can't afford rent, food or heating. This inequality will eventually end badly.

When furlough ends, unemployment will rocket, and the economy will teeter on collapse. Then all it takes is a spark, and the people who have nothing to lose riot
3
23/02/2021 00:36:22 3 14
bbc
everyone is stacked with debt - about time these debtors paid the cost. i hope this country sinks in debt as it is what it deserves.
5
23/02/2021 01:01:13 10 3
bbc
I bet you’re popular at parties. All western economies are debt laden, Covid has accelerated the money printing in a race to the bottom. Where it ends who knows? My money is on decade long stagflation
as I can’t see a hyperinflationary situation occurring even though it should.
12
23/02/2021 03:17:31 0 4
bbc
It's all relative. Interest rates on debt will stay ultra low and as long as nations' economies appear to be rebounding, the markets will forgive and forget. If however one nation flags behind the rest, that debt will quickly become a BIG problem.

How will the UK fare?? Who knows - but Brexit certainly won't help our chances.
6
23/02/2021 01:44:22 6 9
bbc
Key will be developing a new different normality that works better. Best of all to come out of this is the demise of commuting and switching to home working wherever possible. Also the shoving out of business daft shops in high streets and hopefully catastrophic fall out to landlords.

Life is home based. Those that serve that will flourish. Including the better parents moving to home educate.
7
23/02/2021 01:57:23 6 10
bbc
These muppets angling for permanent WFH and doing everything else remotely are part of the problem. There is a definite element of "broken window" to that.

"I'll support my local economy" is also nonsense, because the sort of people doing that will be living in suburbs, working all day and won't have time except for evenings and weekends, therefore nothing has changed from their commuter days.
8
23/02/2021 03:08:14 6 12
bbc
I guarantee that lockdown WILL be used again.

12 months on and we haven't learned one single lesson- decisions are still being made based upon absence of evidence of proven risk, rather than requiring evidence of absence of risk. It's basic stuff, but we're still getting it wrong.

Returning all kids en masse so early WILL trigger a third wave.
16
23/02/2021 03:44:28 4 1
bbc
This certainly would be the case if there were no vaccine.
It probably would have been the case if the vaccine rollout had gone as i expected - but beyond all expectations the rollout is going at a rate 3 times faster than predicted. This will significantly suppress any chance of a 3rd wave - at the very least long enough before we get 2nd booster jabs and the inevitable 3rd variant resistant jab
2
23/02/2021 00:30:06 107 47
bbc
Don't say it too loudly or the BBC will remove your comment, but the pound is surging against the dollar and euro and over 1000 business's have applied to do business in the City.
If Boris does not the squander the initiative then the country looks like it's heading for boom time but if he gets it's wrong and keeps business locked down then it all would have been for nothing.
9
23/02/2021 03:12:16 60 116
bbc
Lol - the £ is surging because the markets currently believe that the UK's economy will bounce back sooner due to the vaccine success - however that remains to be seen. If a vaccine resistant strain takes hold here (quite likely given that we're sending kids back to school en masse so early), then we're back to square one and the £ will plunge again.
106
23/02/2021 08:48:52 13 10
bbc
A vaccine-resistant strain is more likely to take hold here because we are failing to correctly quarantine visitors from countries where they are prolific because such visitors try to game the system for their own selfish benefit
243
23/02/2021 10:33:21 1 0
bbc
LOL - and wont you just love that if it does happen?
253
23/02/2021 10:37:57 5 3
bbc
Spot on, the Japanese found a variant with a mutation on the protein spike that the vaccine works on. If the vaccine turns out to be ineffective against this strain then we are back to square one
362
23/02/2021 12:33:39 4 1
bbc
Dont say it too loudly but you are not a virologist, there is no evidence of any vaccine resistant strain or evidence that children will produce one
425
23/02/2021 13:34:42 3 1
bbc
Do you even bother to read the scientific data. Yes there may be a vaccine resistant strain but a) it will very likely not be the dominant strain and b) vac can be tweaked to combat this. the £ is doing well because for once we are ahead of the game compared to most of the world. Just for once be pleased the is doing well on something. Or is that so hard to do?
446
23/02/2021 13:48:57 1 0
bbc
Pound is on the up as they think we'll have to raise interest rates because economy with expand quicker that EU/US, resulting in possible interest rate hikes.
530
23/02/2021 16:20:01 0 1
bbc
Totally agree. Heard on the news labour are suggesting that the easing is not quick enough, quick the opposite actually. Opening schools without the majority bring vaccinated is going to be a disaster. The last 3 months look like being for nothing. Lockdown 4is likely about may/June at this rate, certainly no holiday abroad this year
Is it time for China to pay reparations? Removed
10
23/02/2021 03:14:25 7 9
bbc
For what?
China - hey world, there's a nasty virus here.
WHO - you're right - it's REALLY bad - WORLD LOOK OUT!
UK/EU/US - huh? Naw - its only a problem for POOR countries - we're all so awesome we're going to ignore your warnings, do nothing and let the virus spread through our populations.
29
23/02/2021 07:06:54 3 0
bbc
There is always on person who cant see the wood for the trees... If you actually looked up the facts China's first deaths were in November 2019, they prevented medical professionals from reporting this to the WHO. In January the WHO stated that the virus wasnt transmitted human to human. Italy has since discovered they had cases in December 2019. The US stopped flights from China in Feb 2020
43
23/02/2021 07:27:17 1 0
bbc
For starters how about - 1) ignoring UN mandates on animal welfare 2) ignoring guidance on wet markets and the risk of a virus jumping from animals to humans 3) covering up the outbreak in the beginning by locking up doctors who made public statements, denying there was anything wrong when we could have stopped COVID and refusing to share vital information at the start of the pandemic
Removed
Is it time for China to pay reparations? Removed
11
23/02/2021 03:15:53 1 7
bbc
Is it time for the UK to pay reparations to India?
23
23/02/2021 06:37:46 1 4
bbc
Not just India, damages were made in North America, NZ, Australia, Africa, Mid-East.........AND most importantly for the UK IS

CHINA - supposed the next re-rising superpower in the 21st century

My suggestion is time to make a good economic tie with China after UK messed up with EU and USA
45
23/02/2021 07:29:22 3 0
bbc
Only if the pay is back for railroads, sanitation, healthcare, education and cricket.
5
23/02/2021 01:01:13 10 3
bbc
I bet you’re popular at parties. All western economies are debt laden, Covid has accelerated the money printing in a race to the bottom. Where it ends who knows? My money is on decade long stagflation
as I can’t see a hyperinflationary situation occurring even though it should.
12
23/02/2021 03:17:31 0 4
bbc
It's all relative. Interest rates on debt will stay ultra low and as long as nations' economies appear to be rebounding, the markets will forgive and forget. If however one nation flags behind the rest, that debt will quickly become a BIG problem.

How will the UK fare?? Who knows - but Brexit certainly won't help our chances.
2
23/02/2021 00:30:06 107 47
bbc
Don't say it too loudly or the BBC will remove your comment, but the pound is surging against the dollar and euro and over 1000 business's have applied to do business in the City.
If Boris does not the squander the initiative then the country looks like it's heading for boom time but if he gets it's wrong and keeps business locked down then it all would have been for nothing.
13
23/02/2021 03:18:50 28 26
bbc
Don't say it too loudly, but you're missing the point. Firms are applying to open offices in the UK and other firms are opening offices in Europe. None of these offices will make extra money, just add to costs. Making financial products more expensive for everyone. Brexit, the gift that keeps on taking.
3
23/02/2021 00:36:22 3 14
bbc
everyone is stacked with debt - about time these debtors paid the cost. i hope this country sinks in debt as it is what it deserves.
14
23/02/2021 03:18:58 0 3
bbc
If the UK "sinks in debt", all that will result is the £ will devalue, pushing up the cost of everything we import. At the end of the day, the losers will be the poorest who will struggle even harder to feed their families and keep their homes warm.

As always, the rich and powerful will be unaffected.
2
23/02/2021 00:30:06 107 47
bbc
Don't say it too loudly or the BBC will remove your comment, but the pound is surging against the dollar and euro and over 1000 business's have applied to do business in the City.
If Boris does not the squander the initiative then the country looks like it's heading for boom time but if he gets it's wrong and keeps business locked down then it all would have been for nothing.
15
23/02/2021 03:21:43 30 26
bbc
And is the pound surging past its value in June 2016?

No.

It's still 12% below that figure.

Surging.

Lol.
193
23/02/2021 09:52:30 7 4
bbc
You can only work from the position you find yourself in.

The only thing LoL-worthy here is your myopic negativity.
317
23/02/2021 11:26:59 2 3
bbc
Shhh, don't tell them the truth, it will shatter all their delusions, i mean illusions
428
23/02/2021 13:36:23 2 0
bbc
But in June 16 as you conveniently omit to say it was vastly over priced in the expectation of a remain vote. It rose about 15% in less than a week so June 16 is not a marker to compare by.
8
23/02/2021 03:08:14 6 12
bbc
I guarantee that lockdown WILL be used again.

12 months on and we haven't learned one single lesson- decisions are still being made based upon absence of evidence of proven risk, rather than requiring evidence of absence of risk. It's basic stuff, but we're still getting it wrong.

Returning all kids en masse so early WILL trigger a third wave.
16
23/02/2021 03:44:28 4 1
bbc
This certainly would be the case if there were no vaccine.
It probably would have been the case if the vaccine rollout had gone as i expected - but beyond all expectations the rollout is going at a rate 3 times faster than predicted. This will significantly suppress any chance of a 3rd wave - at the very least long enough before we get 2nd booster jabs and the inevitable 3rd variant resistant jab
17
23/02/2021 03:59:01 49 18
bbc
Our economy just needs to adapt to the new reality, just as other economies do. The sooner it does that, the better off we will be. Looking at current rise the value of the pound, it seems the market believes we are already on the right track. We should remain positive and take whatever opportunities that present themselves. I think we'll be just fine.
63
23/02/2021 08:04:24 34 63
bbc
Simplistic and meaningless platitudes. Do you write Bojo's speeches?
97
23/02/2021 08:36:08 9 7
bbc
The economy will recover much faster if we BUY BRITISH!
109
23/02/2021 08:52:20 5 6
bbc
Rubbish! what about the approx 6 million UK people currently on the Furlough Scheme? Will they get their jobs back? What opportunities are you offering them at the end of this crisis?
477
23/02/2021 14:28:08 1 3
bbc
Put some meat on the bone to prove your bland propaganda please!
18
23/02/2021 04:47:07 0 19
bbc
bbc you liars only you and the tory party think for one second being offered a jab by a certain date is the same as being given the jab by that date its not!! The fact is we dont have enough capacity to give everyone the full vaccine 130M jabs 14 feb 2,320,419 jabs given at that rate it needs 56 weeks but of course long before 56 weeks the vulnerable will need a new vaccine just like flu you liars
19
23/02/2021 06:16:36 5 6
bbc
Last year to see results from lockdowns/restrictions they said 2 - 3 weeks, now apparently to see effect 5 - 6 weeks, way over cautious and will cost us dearly. They said vaccine of top 4 groups will give us freedom but that has changed as well, you cannot trust these people with anything, they even at illegally and no action taken, what a crock of dirt.
20
23/02/2021 06:19:56 19 17
bbc
I get that all businesses want to get back to "normal" and indeed NEED to do so but lessons from the disaster of last year should be learnt with the disastrous "Eat Out To Help Out" and the idiocy of allowing people to go off on foreign holidays last summer only led to further lockdowns...

Each time business pushes to rush things in this crisis then it only come back to bite them in the end...
168
23/02/2021 09:29:17 10 8
bbc
I think it's clear that, thanks to the success of UK governmental policies - most notably the early vaccine development support, funding, approval, procurement and rollout - the UK is much better placed economically than any EU country, and probably the US as well. Great foresight and leadership by all concerned.

Hence, the FTSE 250 and Pound are roaring ahead.
3
23/02/2021 00:36:22 3 14
bbc
everyone is stacked with debt - about time these debtors paid the cost. i hope this country sinks in debt as it is what it deserves.
21
23/02/2021 06:25:29 1 0
bbc
"Everyone" !!! Nope... I don't have any debt, never have had and never will...

... and NO I aint some rich guy or born with a silver spoon in my mouth, just a "Working class" person who's always worked hard for everything I have and never lived outside of my means...

Work, hard, Play Hard & Save hard is my motto as you never know what the future holds for you...
22
23/02/2021 06:29:19 22 14
bbc
Realistically: the UK was going to have to make big structural changes to hit its climate commitments anyway.

I sincerely hope the Chancellor doesn't squander the opportunity. We need to invest and build back greener after lockdown is over. Fingers crossed for a budget that supports job creation in sustainable businesses.
30
23/02/2021 07:08:14 22 27
bbc
Green new deal...see what happened to Texas... Renewables dont cut it
192
23/02/2021 09:47:06 5 8
bbc
You can "go green" all you want, heck even if you could magically reduce all industrial and man made pollution tomorrow it WONT stop the earth getting warmer or climate change...

The only reason we are here today is due to the simple fact that we live in an era of global warming which if it hadn't happened then the last great ice would never have ended...

It's the natural cycle of the planet...
344
Ian
23/02/2021 12:10:02 4 1
bbc
cutting the population is the only way to deal with climate change. The rest is tinkering. The world's poulation has doubled in 50 years - and economic growth is unsustainable when there are finite resources. We already need 3 Earths to give everyone living today a western lifestyle!
424
23/02/2021 13:33:19 3 1
bbc
I think you will find that the UK is doing OK in the renewable field.We are world leaders in off shore wind power and have just commissioned another massive offshore farm.Read about the work being undertaken by Faraday Inst and battery research by others,in particular solid state.Follow the work on the offshore production of hydrogen and the millions being poured into renewable energy storage.
472
23/02/2021 14:17:12 3 2
bbc
if only the rest of the world was hitting its climate commitments it would be a lot better for our kids
11
23/02/2021 03:15:53 1 7
bbc
Is it time for the UK to pay reparations to India?
23
23/02/2021 06:37:46 1 4
bbc
Not just India, damages were made in North America, NZ, Australia, Africa, Mid-East.........AND most importantly for the UK IS

CHINA - supposed the next re-rising superpower in the 21st century

My suggestion is time to make a good economic tie with China after UK messed up with EU and USA
38
23/02/2021 07:20:23 2 0
bbc
Nation of counterfeiters plus the they are committing genocide. no thanks
Is it time for China to pay reparations? Removed
24
23/02/2021 06:35:51 3 0
bbc
Did America pay the world "reparations" for the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic !!! NOPE...

It isn't a country that's to blame when NATURE unleashes a virus on the world...

So why not write or try and email Mother Nature with your complaint and see if she is willing to cough up...
Roadmap: Can we avoid an economic Long Covid?

= lol, what?? economic Long Covid ? Mr Islam?

Poor Brits
Removed
26
23/02/2021 06:51:00 7 7
bbc
extend stamp duty holiday, house moves will increase furniture and DIY sales.
short term VAT and Excise Duty cut, stimulate retail and hospitality spending.
Demand in retail and hospitality will create jobs. House moves will raise demand
for trades people. Local Community projects can be given grants, make change a
force for good and growth.
32
23/02/2021 07:09:16 10 3
bbc
The stamp duty holiday resulted in a huge housing price bubble and pushed prices to ever higher levels. It was not needed last time and should be scrapped in order to let the market return to its natural level.
Retail sales will rebound quickly once people have their freedom returned - it would be better to wait and see how the recovery happens before splurging cash on artificial stimulus.
27
23/02/2021 06:52:17 49 21
bbc
There is a genuinely optimistic outlook after the covid lockdowns but still the doom mongers want to cling to their vision of Armageddon.

Business will be different but there is a bright world of opportunity on the horizon.
105
23/02/2021 08:41:10 49 15
bbc
Support local firms. Particularly ones that try to be as British as possible and work with other British firms. I am not bothered about firms that just import and distribute stuff. They should try and find UK sources for their wares.
384
23/02/2021 12:49:24 2 5
bbc
Waffle.
476
23/02/2021 14:27:03 3 4
bbc
Can I have the evidence to back up your claims please?!

Your statement is the sort of empty rhetoric that we get from Tory HQ. At least if you are going to make these banal statements put some meat on the bone!
28
23/02/2021 07:02:14 9 11
bbc
The economy will take years to recover and the debt may never be repaid in a generation. By then hopefully the BBC will be long done.
10
23/02/2021 03:14:25 7 9
bbc
For what?
China - hey world, there's a nasty virus here.
WHO - you're right - it's REALLY bad - WORLD LOOK OUT!
UK/EU/US - huh? Naw - its only a problem for POOR countries - we're all so awesome we're going to ignore your warnings, do nothing and let the virus spread through our populations.
29
23/02/2021 07:06:54 3 0
bbc
There is always on person who cant see the wood for the trees... If you actually looked up the facts China's first deaths were in November 2019, they prevented medical professionals from reporting this to the WHO. In January the WHO stated that the virus wasnt transmitted human to human. Italy has since discovered they had cases in December 2019. The US stopped flights from China in Feb 2020
22
23/02/2021 06:29:19 22 14
bbc
Realistically: the UK was going to have to make big structural changes to hit its climate commitments anyway.

I sincerely hope the Chancellor doesn't squander the opportunity. We need to invest and build back greener after lockdown is over. Fingers crossed for a budget that supports job creation in sustainable businesses.
30
23/02/2021 07:08:14 22 27
bbc
Green new deal...see what happened to Texas... Renewables dont cut it
84
23/02/2021 08:21:00 12 2
bbc
Gas and a nuclear plants also went offline as well as wind turbines, the problem was systems that lacked resilience to predictable cold weather not the source of energy. On top of that Texas is the only state not connected to the winder US grid and its grid operator does not have a capacity market (providers paid to be on standby). Renewables aren't the problem, cost cutting costing lives is.
283
23/02/2021 11:01:49 6 2
bbc
That's fake news, spouted by the vested interests of the fossil fuel industry according to the Texas Energy Authority

https://eu.statesman.com/story/news/politics/politifact/2021/02/19/texas-power-outage-energy-grid-wind-renewable-energy-greg-abbott-fact-check/4500251001/
585
23/02/2021 18:26:25 3 0
bbc
Texas went pearshaped because it went off the National grid. It refused to connect to the US Grid so had zero back up.

The renewables were also not the problem, they contribute only a small %.

it was the Gas Fired power stations that went down like ninepins due to penny pinching. In fact the windmills were back in commission first.

Lack of investment in cold weather contingency planning.
683
24/02/2021 12:10:57 0 0
bbc
Checkout the Financial Times "Wind power is not to blame for Texas blackout" for a balanced story. Or the bbc story https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-56085733 .

Seems the natural gas supply failures were key. The only renewable source for that is politicians.
31
23/02/2021 07:05:33 23 13
bbc
"But at that point, with the vaccine rolled out everywhere, the blunt instrument of a lockdown will not be used again."

That doesn't take into account the number of 'Blunt Instruments' in the cabinet
262
23/02/2021 10:45:13 12 18
bbc
Nor the re introduction of Tiers, also blunt instruments killing our kids futures to protect the elderly and glutinous.
26
23/02/2021 06:51:00 7 7
bbc
extend stamp duty holiday, house moves will increase furniture and DIY sales.
short term VAT and Excise Duty cut, stimulate retail and hospitality spending.
Demand in retail and hospitality will create jobs. House moves will raise demand
for trades people. Local Community projects can be given grants, make change a
force for good and growth.
32
23/02/2021 07:09:16 10 3
bbc
The stamp duty holiday resulted in a huge housing price bubble and pushed prices to ever higher levels. It was not needed last time and should be scrapped in order to let the market return to its natural level.
Retail sales will rebound quickly once people have their freedom returned - it would be better to wait and see how the recovery happens before splurging cash on artificial stimulus.
33
23/02/2021 07:12:38 63 15
bbc
Why do politicians still think we need four different approaches to the UK pandemic? England and Wales for instance share a 160 mile long border with large centres of population on either side and many thousands travelling in each direction every day. Children have to cross borders to go to school daily. Does anyone really think that covid respects political variations? Hardly scientific.
73
23/02/2021 08:10:31 27 87
bbc
Health is a devolved matter.

It's hypocritical for English nationalists to want to deny rights to self-determination to other nationalists.
161
23/02/2021 09:18:59 8 13
bbc
To put it simply, Health is devolved between the 4 nations, the other 3 know that the clown doesn't care what they think and doesn't listen to them, so they will do their own thing and ignore him.
174
23/02/2021 09:35:46 17 8
bbc
Because Queen Nic is simply incapable of doing anything UK. As usual she leads from behind, waiting to hear the English plan before, a day later, saying "I wouldn't do that" before doing the same thing with some tartan side dressing.
382
23/02/2021 12:48:25 2 1
bbc
Fool - of course the virus respects borders which is why scientists in Scotland have allowed golf courses to remain open . And in England Boris listened to some left of centre civil servant who closed golf courses in England .All makes perfect sense .
685
24/02/2021 12:12:38 0 0
bbc
Because Sturgeon and Drakeford are petty little dictators
34
23/02/2021 07:16:11 5 3
bbc
Question has to be how many anti-vaxers will there be that will either catch or spread the virus,. not enough data yet to prove the effectiveness of the vaccine. Fingers crossed the vaccine will reduce the affects of the virus on the majority only time will tell if annual boosters are needed or not. I see the holiday craving are rushing to book time will tell if life can get back to normal.
121
23/02/2021 09:00:56 5 2
bbc
No doubt the anti-vaxxers will obtain fake Covid passports to enable them to travel abroad.
35
23/02/2021 07:17:39 2 4
bbc
We could have avoided COVID being as bad as it was in the UK for Sure, Economic recovery means putting Money back in to the hands of people. The Lemon was squeezed prior to covid. New oppourtunities can be created for everyone without handing out contracts for the boys in the Boris circle.
36
23/02/2021 07:17:49 9 15
bbc
USA has MASSIVE debts and a decline in manufacturing but it will be fine as it still has resources to export

EU also has MASSIVE debts and a decline in manufacturing but it has a closer tie with other nations across the Euro-Asia Continent, this also applies to Africa

BUT

UK a floating island at corner has MASSIVE debts and almost zero manufacturing capability, AND has zero resources

THINK!
39
23/02/2021 07:21:15 4 6
bbc
But we have gyms and Weatherspoons....
48
23/02/2021 07:36:33 6 2
bbc
"UK .... has MASSIVE debts"

So does every other country.

"and almost zero manufacturing capability"

Completely and uttewrly wrong.

"AND has zero resources"

Again, completely and utterly wrong.

"THINK!"

You said it.
37
DG
23/02/2021 07:20:12 21 14
bbc
Companies should rely more on British products rather than buying cheap, and in some cases, fake products from China.

the public should also check where the product is made and stop buying Chinese products which may have been made by slave labour.
82
23/02/2021 08:20:09 17 7
bbc
You are delusional. We do not have the capacity to manufacture competitively. It would take several years to gear up to manufacture more.
Either workers would have to accept massive wage cuts and suffer lack of employment protection or the consumer expect huge price rises. Good luck with that.
139
23/02/2021 09:02:28 2 2
bbc
Kinda hard if not impossible for companies or consumers to do when 53% of goods sold in the UK HAVE to be imported because we don't make or manufacture them in the first place.

You do realise that almost all of those big name high street clothing stores import more than 80% of the clothes they sell are from China and other far east manufacturers, same goes for the likes of Amazon, eBay etc...
256
Gaz
23/02/2021 10:38:47 1 0
bbc
Do you include slave labour in the UK where people are working but still have to visit food banks?
23
23/02/2021 06:37:46 1 4
bbc
Not just India, damages were made in North America, NZ, Australia, Africa, Mid-East.........AND most importantly for the UK IS

CHINA - supposed the next re-rising superpower in the 21st century

My suggestion is time to make a good economic tie with China after UK messed up with EU and USA
38
23/02/2021 07:20:23 2 0
bbc
Nation of counterfeiters plus the they are committing genocide. no thanks
36
23/02/2021 07:17:49 9 15
bbc
USA has MASSIVE debts and a decline in manufacturing but it will be fine as it still has resources to export

EU also has MASSIVE debts and a decline in manufacturing but it has a closer tie with other nations across the Euro-Asia Continent, this also applies to Africa

BUT

UK a floating island at corner has MASSIVE debts and almost zero manufacturing capability, AND has zero resources

THINK!
39
23/02/2021 07:21:15 4 6
bbc
But we have gyms and Weatherspoons....
44
23/02/2021 07:27:31 0 0
bbc
lol
40
cj
bbc
Doesn’t really matter what is said in these articles the vast majority of nasty little people will have negative comments no matter what the artcle.
Since lockdown these threads have just turned into opportunities to spout hate.
It’s amazing that so many people have great ideas on how to run the country and are experts..... can I ask why none of them have actually entered politics??
Removed
42
23/02/2021 07:26:11 9 15
bbc
Agreed, but I think bxxxit started all that..
49
23/02/2021 07:41:02 1 1
bbc
I’ve not entered politics because I can earn more in industry without getting death threats.
70
23/02/2021 08:09:50 1 2
bbc
Because politicians are psychopaths.

And we're not psychopaths.
Removed
41
23/02/2021 07:25:55 67 10
bbc
Economic activity will bounce back as restrictions ease, the appetite for normality is huge. Rebalancing the books however is a different matter. Inflation will rocket and politicians will publicly bemoan this but privately allow the national debt to be shrunk by inflation.
54
23/02/2021 07:50:33 44 49
bbc
Pandering to the appetite for normality is a terrible idea. Environmental degradation was and is the biggest problem we all face.
128
23/02/2021 09:04:14 2 3
bbc
Prepare for politicians accusing supermarkets of ‘price gouging’ and implementing price fixes that will end disastrously as history has shown us time and time again
376
23/02/2021 12:42:22 1 0
bbc
Correct!
411
23/02/2021 12:56:37 4 2
bbc
...and economic activity will plummet again when we're all taxed to the back teeth to pay for the last 12 months.

Most people have already maxed out their credit cards and loans... so when they see their "take home pay" go through the floor (assuming they're even still employed) it'll be time to close the shutters and tighten the belts.

Tough, tough times ahead...
Doesn’t really matter what is said in these articles the vast majority of nasty little people will have negative comments no matter what the artcle.
Since lockdown these threads have just turned into opportunities to spout hate.
It’s amazing that so many people have great ideas on how to run the country and are experts..... can I ask why none of them have actually entered politics??
Removed
42
23/02/2021 07:26:11 9 15
bbc
Agreed, but I think bxxxit started all that..
47
23/02/2021 07:35:07 3 0
bbc
No there's been nasty people on here long before that. It's a very vocal minority who have found consistent threads to post on
133
23/02/2021 09:05:45 1 0
bbc
It was lack of brxxit that started it....
10
23/02/2021 03:14:25 7 9
bbc
For what?
China - hey world, there's a nasty virus here.
WHO - you're right - it's REALLY bad - WORLD LOOK OUT!
UK/EU/US - huh? Naw - its only a problem for POOR countries - we're all so awesome we're going to ignore your warnings, do nothing and let the virus spread through our populations.
43
23/02/2021 07:27:17 1 0
bbc
For starters how about - 1) ignoring UN mandates on animal welfare 2) ignoring guidance on wet markets and the risk of a virus jumping from animals to humans 3) covering up the outbreak in the beginning by locking up doctors who made public statements, denying there was anything wrong when we could have stopped COVID and refusing to share vital information at the start of the pandemic
39
23/02/2021 07:21:15 4 6
bbc
But we have gyms and Weatherspoons....
44
23/02/2021 07:27:31 0 0
bbc
lol
11
23/02/2021 03:15:53 1 7
bbc
Is it time for the UK to pay reparations to India?
45
23/02/2021 07:29:22 3 0
bbc
Only if the pay is back for railroads, sanitation, healthcare, education and cricket.
127
23/02/2021 09:03:19 0 1
bbc
My guess is you don't know many Indians. Why am I not surprised.
46
23/02/2021 07:31:14 4 8
bbc
No. We are truly f*#ked. The government's actions will cause intergenerational damage. A monetary reset is the only way out and this is exactly what the crooked IMF have called for.
42
23/02/2021 07:26:11 9 15
bbc
Agreed, but I think bxxxit started all that..
47
23/02/2021 07:35:07 3 0
bbc
No there's been nasty people on here long before that. It's a very vocal minority who have found consistent threads to post on
36
23/02/2021 07:17:49 9 15
bbc
USA has MASSIVE debts and a decline in manufacturing but it will be fine as it still has resources to export

EU also has MASSIVE debts and a decline in manufacturing but it has a closer tie with other nations across the Euro-Asia Continent, this also applies to Africa

BUT

UK a floating island at corner has MASSIVE debts and almost zero manufacturing capability, AND has zero resources

THINK!
48
23/02/2021 07:36:33 6 2
bbc
"UK .... has MASSIVE debts"

So does every other country.

"and almost zero manufacturing capability"

Completely and uttewrly wrong.

"AND has zero resources"

Again, completely and utterly wrong.

"THINK!"

You said it.
Doesn’t really matter what is said in these articles the vast majority of nasty little people will have negative comments no matter what the artcle.
Since lockdown these threads have just turned into opportunities to spout hate.
It’s amazing that so many people have great ideas on how to run the country and are experts..... can I ask why none of them have actually entered politics??
Removed
49
23/02/2021 07:41:02 1 1
bbc
I’ve not entered politics because I can earn more in industry without getting death threats.
74
23/02/2021 08:10:39 0 2
bbc
The problem isn't that politicians get death threats, it's that the death threats are n't working.
50
23/02/2021 07:42:04 14 16
bbc
It’s a bit late to be worrying about the economic fall out.

If you backed lockdown you backed screwing the economy and writing off millions of young lives.

You have sown this by feeding the media with your “I am very worried” and inanely clapping for the NHS. Therefore you now own the economic hardship to have unleashed.
53
23/02/2021 07:50:29 5 12
bbc
You're like a spoiled child who didn't get his way. Grow up and stop being so selfish
57
23/02/2021 07:51:41 7 4
bbc
Spot on. Its about time people realised the truth of what they have allowed to happen
101
23/02/2021 08:41:35 2 1
bbc
Economies recover from even the major catastrophes, you could even argue after the second world war that the Germans and Japanese won the peace despite their huge losses and destruction due to how they configured their economies afterwards. The hundreds of thousands of lives that could have been lost needlessly without lockdown in a totally overwhelmed NHS can't be brought back.
142
23/02/2021 09:11:35 1 0
bbc
Yep, now the lockdown fetishists will immediately pivot their opinion ‘we just have to save the economy’ it’s too late for that, the economy is not a light-switch that can be flicked on and off
155
23/02/2021 09:13:03 0 1
bbc
If you didn't back Lockdown then you screwed over 100,000 people out of their lives...

The point you failed to make there was what exactly !!!
51
23/02/2021 07:46:29 1 1
bbc
Been poaching headlines...
https://www.resolutionfoundation.org/
52
23/02/2021 07:46:56 5 10
bbc
Long Covid or long term economic decline ??

How long before we are overtaken by India, France and even (maybe) Italy, down from 5th to 8th in the IMF "league table" in GDP ??

No doubt the Brexiteer responce will be,
It is a Covid effect
OR
What does it matter, no brexit effect here.
60
23/02/2021 07:56:48 0 5
bbc
Where does environmental degradation fit into your calculations? A country having a big population will most likely start to become a hindrance instead of being an economic benefit.
67
23/02/2021 08:07:24 1 2
bbc
I realise how disappointing it is that Brexit hasn't turned out to be the big disaster you 'predicted'.

Better luck with 'climate change', eh?
50
23/02/2021 07:42:04 14 16
bbc
It’s a bit late to be worrying about the economic fall out.

If you backed lockdown you backed screwing the economy and writing off millions of young lives.

You have sown this by feeding the media with your “I am very worried” and inanely clapping for the NHS. Therefore you now own the economic hardship to have unleashed.
53
23/02/2021 07:50:29 5 12
bbc
You're like a spoiled child who didn't get his way. Grow up and stop being so selfish
59
23/02/2021 07:54:20 0 1
bbc
I’m allergic to shellfish
41
23/02/2021 07:25:55 67 10
bbc
Economic activity will bounce back as restrictions ease, the appetite for normality is huge. Rebalancing the books however is a different matter. Inflation will rocket and politicians will publicly bemoan this but privately allow the national debt to be shrunk by inflation.
54
23/02/2021 07:50:33 44 49
bbc
Pandering to the appetite for normality is a terrible idea. Environmental degradation was and is the biggest problem we all face.
69
23/02/2021 08:09:14 8 8
bbc
I remember when the biggest threat we faced was Brexit.

Now we've had a year of Covid being the biggest threat we face.

I suppose 'climate change' is due it's day in the sun(!) again.
91
23/02/2021 08:36:17 11 8
bbc
'..Environmental degradation was and is the biggest problem we all face.' Sadly true :-(
154
23/02/2021 09:10:54 7 6
bbc
"Environmental degradation was and is the biggest problem we all face." Only if you believe in such stuff...

Personally the biggest problem I face was and still is, how do I get cured of the incurable illness I have !!!

Something that will do me in long before any "Environmental degradation" does...
172
23/02/2021 09:33:01 0 10
bbc
Personally I blame all of the unnecessary chnags in the name of protecting the planet for COVID. How can it be hygenic to reuse old shopping bags? Why do parents allow their children to stand in supermarket trolleys? Supermarkets have become a breeding ground for bacteria, and don't get me started on reusing old/dirty coffee cups.
223
MVS
23/02/2021 10:24:53 3 5
bbc
So let's all stay at home under our duvets and feel good that we are not actually harming anything except ourselves.
247
23/02/2021 10:34:45 4 4
bbc
Nail on the head - that will be the next control mechanism foisted on us.
Eventually the sheep will wake up and fight back - I hope.
405
23/02/2021 13:06:54 2 1
bbc
Don't know why you are being downvoted as you are right.

Also couple in that a large proportion of people now know that they can work from home and I doubt businesses can convince them otherwise which will change our purchasing patterns (fewer lunches from coffee shops and no need to be constantly updating your wardrobe).

There is no way we will end up going back to the way we were
502
23/02/2021 15:21:07 4 1
bbc
No.
Gross global overpopulation is the biggest threat. All others stem from that.
Removed
10
23/02/2021 03:14:25 7 9
bbc
For what?
China - hey world, there's a nasty virus here.
WHO - you're right - it's REALLY bad - WORLD LOOK OUT!
UK/EU/US - huh? Naw - its only a problem for POOR countries - we're all so awesome we're going to ignore your warnings, do nothing and let the virus spread through our populations.
Removed
56
23/02/2021 07:51:31 18 12
bbc
The process of opening up seems to be too slow. We've spent a fortune on vaccines, and soon will have offered it to all the most vulnerable. I don't see why we need to wait until June. We cannot be held to ransom by those who refuse the vaccine.
61
23/02/2021 08:00:34 12 4
bbc
With a three week period needed for any immunity from a first dose groups 1-9 won't be ready until may and the vulnerable group being done now will just about be getting the benefit of their second jab in June/ July
64
23/02/2021 08:06:25 6 4
bbc
I have some sympathy for that view.

Tempered enormously by the fact that I've just had a year of my life stolen by people who refused to look after themselves and stay locked indoors if they were worried, but instead insisted that seventy million perfectly healthy people join in with their paranoia too.
112
23/02/2021 08:54:19 1 1
bbc
Having a vaccination does not immediately give immunity as someone I know found to their cost - they contracted Covid on the way home from being vaccinated
129
23/02/2021 09:04:16 1 0
bbc
Yesterdays study shows the vaccine is in reality massively effective even three weeks after we a single dose.
50
23/02/2021 07:42:04 14 16
bbc
It’s a bit late to be worrying about the economic fall out.

If you backed lockdown you backed screwing the economy and writing off millions of young lives.

You have sown this by feeding the media with your “I am very worried” and inanely clapping for the NHS. Therefore you now own the economic hardship to have unleashed.
57
23/02/2021 07:51:41 7 4
bbc
Spot on. Its about time people realised the truth of what they have allowed to happen
58
23/02/2021 07:53:39 3 2
bbc
What you mean voting for an inept gov?
57
23/02/2021 07:51:41 7 4
bbc
Spot on. Its about time people realised the truth of what they have allowed to happen
58
23/02/2021 07:53:39 3 2
bbc
What you mean voting for an inept gov?
53
23/02/2021 07:50:29 5 12
bbc
You're like a spoiled child who didn't get his way. Grow up and stop being so selfish
59
23/02/2021 07:54:20 0 1
bbc
I’m allergic to shellfish
52
23/02/2021 07:46:56 5 10
bbc
Long Covid or long term economic decline ??

How long before we are overtaken by India, France and even (maybe) Italy, down from 5th to 8th in the IMF "league table" in GDP ??

No doubt the Brexiteer responce will be,
It is a Covid effect
OR
What does it matter, no brexit effect here.
60
23/02/2021 07:56:48 0 5
bbc
Where does environmental degradation fit into your calculations? A country having a big population will most likely start to become a hindrance instead of being an economic benefit.
56
23/02/2021 07:51:31 18 12
bbc
The process of opening up seems to be too slow. We've spent a fortune on vaccines, and soon will have offered it to all the most vulnerable. I don't see why we need to wait until June. We cannot be held to ransom by those who refuse the vaccine.
61
23/02/2021 08:00:34 12 4
bbc
With a three week period needed for any immunity from a first dose groups 1-9 won't be ready until may and the vulnerable group being done now will just about be getting the benefit of their second jab in June/ July
62
23/02/2021 08:02:56 8 7
bbc
We must maintain the current policy of hotel quarentine and/or negative tests (or proof of vaccination) for ALL people (including returning British holiday makers) entering the country.

We´ve done the hard yards, lets not blow it for 2 weeks in Benidorm !!!
17
23/02/2021 03:59:01 49 18
bbc
Our economy just needs to adapt to the new reality, just as other economies do. The sooner it does that, the better off we will be. Looking at current rise the value of the pound, it seems the market believes we are already on the right track. We should remain positive and take whatever opportunities that present themselves. I think we'll be just fine.
63
23/02/2021 08:04:24 34 63
bbc
Simplistic and meaningless platitudes. Do you write Bojo's speeches?
515
23/02/2021 15:38:28 0 0
bbc
Facts which don't fit the socialist mantra more like.
What IS it about socialism which demands good news & enterprise be stifled?
Is it because most socialists hate to see others doing better than they ever can?
56
23/02/2021 07:51:31 18 12
bbc
The process of opening up seems to be too slow. We've spent a fortune on vaccines, and soon will have offered it to all the most vulnerable. I don't see why we need to wait until June. We cannot be held to ransom by those who refuse the vaccine.
64
23/02/2021 08:06:25 6 4
bbc
I have some sympathy for that view.

Tempered enormously by the fact that I've just had a year of my life stolen by people who refused to look after themselves and stay locked indoors if they were worried, but instead insisted that seventy million perfectly healthy people join in with their paranoia too.
65
23/02/2021 08:07:03 4 6
bbc
So it's going to be like last summer but this time with a vaccine.

Makes you wonder why the over-optimistic, bungling PM made all those empty promises and wasted a year, costing tens of thousands of lives.
81
23/02/2021 08:17:55 4 4
bbc
Are you one of those people who think that once we embarked on this lockdown insanity that HMG and SAGE weren't fully aware that it would mean stealing a year of everybody's lives?

You mean that when we locked down last March for 'three weeks to flatten the sombrero', it came as a big surprise to find yourself in the same place a year later with the prospect of four months more house arrest?
66
23/02/2021 08:07:09 3 8
bbc
One common sense way to support the U.K. economy and the NHS would be for HMG to ban all foreign holidays until Jan 2022 allowing only business travel. We may be all vaccinated but this is a global epidemic.
72
23/02/2021 08:10:25 12 2
bbc
Brilliant idea, by the way when did we start living in a totalitarianism state?
76
23/02/2021 08:14:37 6 1
bbc
You mean be like cold war USSR or North Korea? No thanks. It would create an over subscribed home market with holiday firms making sure they up their profits to cover their previous losses. Also who wants a windy, wet week B&B in Cleethorpes? Hardly fun sitting in a shelter keeping out of the rain trying to keep the children amused. Also being UK most places close at 6PM.
Removed
Removed
206
23/02/2021 10:07:30 0 1
bbc
Sadly as you can see from many of the posts made here then "common sense" is an alien concept to many people today...
52
23/02/2021 07:46:56 5 10
bbc
Long Covid or long term economic decline ??

How long before we are overtaken by India, France and even (maybe) Italy, down from 5th to 8th in the IMF "league table" in GDP ??

No doubt the Brexiteer responce will be,
It is a Covid effect
OR
What does it matter, no brexit effect here.
67
23/02/2021 08:07:24 1 2
bbc
I realise how disappointing it is that Brexit hasn't turned out to be the big disaster you 'predicted'.

Better luck with 'climate change', eh?
68
23/02/2021 08:09:01 2 7
bbc
When are we going to see "vaccination certificates" to facilitate and speed up re opening ??
54
23/02/2021 07:50:33 44 49
bbc
Pandering to the appetite for normality is a terrible idea. Environmental degradation was and is the biggest problem we all face.
69
23/02/2021 08:09:14 8 8
bbc
I remember when the biggest threat we faced was Brexit.

Now we've had a year of Covid being the biggest threat we face.

I suppose 'climate change' is due it's day in the sun(!) again.
Doesn’t really matter what is said in these articles the vast majority of nasty little people will have negative comments no matter what the artcle.
Since lockdown these threads have just turned into opportunities to spout hate.
It’s amazing that so many people have great ideas on how to run the country and are experts..... can I ask why none of them have actually entered politics??
Removed
70
23/02/2021 08:09:50 1 2
bbc
Because politicians are psychopaths.

And we're not psychopaths.
71
23/02/2021 08:09:58 34 12
bbc
One thing missing from the roadmap is when the request for people to work from home will be removed. A lot of businesses in hospitality and events, cafes and pubs, transport, etc. rely on people going out to work. Like many, I hate WFH and there won't be any kind of normality until I can leave the house to go to work.
78
23/02/2021 08:16:42 39 10
bbc
Many Firms which have used WFH during the pandemic are likely to either make WFH the default or take a "hybrid" approach - most staff who have had the opportunity to WFH enjoy it and many Firms will need to offer it to employees in the future to retain staff (and to new staff, to attract those they want). Firms won't prop up Pret/Greggs/Costa etc at the expense of their own success.
157
23/02/2021 09:19:47 8 0
bbc
There has to be a balance for those who can WFH to have less time going back to an office, I don't miss the 4 hours a day travel time and I am safer at home than travelling and then being stuck in an office with no possibility of social distancing.
412
23/02/2021 12:58:19 2 2
bbc
I think it's fair to say the "local travel restrictions lifted" part can be taken to read "WFH ends" as well.
648
24/02/2021 06:22:41 3 0
bbc
I'm hoping to avoid the office as long as possible, a long commute, silly dress rules and politics are all things I can do without
66
23/02/2021 08:07:09 3 8
bbc
One common sense way to support the U.K. economy and the NHS would be for HMG to ban all foreign holidays until Jan 2022 allowing only business travel. We may be all vaccinated but this is a global epidemic.
72
23/02/2021 08:10:25 12 2
bbc
Brilliant idea, by the way when did we start living in a totalitarianism state?
33
23/02/2021 07:12:38 63 15
bbc
Why do politicians still think we need four different approaches to the UK pandemic? England and Wales for instance share a 160 mile long border with large centres of population on either side and many thousands travelling in each direction every day. Children have to cross borders to go to school daily. Does anyone really think that covid respects political variations? Hardly scientific.
73
23/02/2021 08:10:31 27 87
bbc
Health is a devolved matter.

It's hypocritical for English nationalists to want to deny rights to self-determination to other nationalists.
98
23/02/2021 08:36:54 23 6
bbc
Health is indeed a devolved matter. One that that the devolved regions have generally made a monumental hash of.
122
23/02/2021 08:58:58 12 2
bbc
''Health is a devolved matter''

Didnt know viruses recognise borders.
250
23/02/2021 10:36:10 3 1
bbc
Other nationalists? What about the folk who live in these countries? What do they want?
393
23/02/2021 12:42:54 11 1
bbc
Especially when English nationalists don't have their own Parliament and receive £2k per person per annum less than Scotland.
550
23/02/2021 16:57:13 2 4
bbc
62 people don't understand the word hypocrisy. I wonder if they voted for Brexit?
49
23/02/2021 07:41:02 1 1
bbc
I’ve not entered politics because I can earn more in industry without getting death threats.
74
23/02/2021 08:10:39 0 2
bbc
The problem isn't that politicians get death threats, it's that the death threats are n't working.
2
23/02/2021 00:30:06 107 47
bbc
Don't say it too loudly or the BBC will remove your comment, but the pound is surging against the dollar and euro and over 1000 business's have applied to do business in the City.
If Boris does not the squander the initiative then the country looks like it's heading for boom time but if he gets it's wrong and keeps business locked down then it all would have been for nothing.
75
23/02/2021 08:12:08 27 17
bbc
EU firms are duplicating costs by having to set up in the UK. This is due to extra Brexit paperwork. You'll end up paying for this in higher prices or lower wages.
66
23/02/2021 08:07:09 3 8
bbc
One common sense way to support the U.K. economy and the NHS would be for HMG to ban all foreign holidays until Jan 2022 allowing only business travel. We may be all vaccinated but this is a global epidemic.
76
23/02/2021 08:14:37 6 1
bbc
You mean be like cold war USSR or North Korea? No thanks. It would create an over subscribed home market with holiday firms making sure they up their profits to cover their previous losses. Also who wants a windy, wet week B&B in Cleethorpes? Hardly fun sitting in a shelter keeping out of the rain trying to keep the children amused. Also being UK most places close at 6PM.
77
23/02/2021 08:14:40 3 8
bbc
Still, if it saves just one life, eh...?
71
23/02/2021 08:09:58 34 12
bbc
One thing missing from the roadmap is when the request for people to work from home will be removed. A lot of businesses in hospitality and events, cafes and pubs, transport, etc. rely on people going out to work. Like many, I hate WFH and there won't be any kind of normality until I can leave the house to go to work.
78
23/02/2021 08:16:42 39 10
bbc
Many Firms which have used WFH during the pandemic are likely to either make WFH the default or take a "hybrid" approach - most staff who have had the opportunity to WFH enjoy it and many Firms will need to offer it to employees in the future to retain staff (and to new staff, to attract those they want). Firms won't prop up Pret/Greggs/Costa etc at the expense of their own success.
86
23/02/2021 08:31:27 10 0
bbc
Think it has to be a hybrid approach. Would be interested to see research on productivity levels when WFH. Companies will love the lower costs of office space, but there's a trade off against staff effectiveness in their jobs.
92
23/02/2021 08:36:36 4 8
bbc
I think you will find that once the pandemic is over WFH will gradually wither away. It has advantages for some, but the disadvantages outweigh them. Many people especially the young don’t have the space to work from home for example
258
23/02/2021 10:39:22 7 6
bbc
Anyone who has worked from home using screens for collaboration knows it is no substitute for face to face working. It is not as creative and firms who do not realise that will be at a creative , and eventually financial, disadvantage.
708
24/02/2021 16:18:04 0 0
bbc
There will be a lot of low paid Pret/Greggs/Costa employees taking the ferry home.
79
23/02/2021 08:16:50 111 40
bbc
The 1 thing to take from the EU vaccine fiasco + Brexit is that we are more nimble + innovative than most.

The UK must now move fast + adapt.

Change is the price of survival.

We need to start inventing + engineering things like we have done throughout our history.

We need to address our trade balance by creating + buying quality British products

This needs to come from ALL 4 corners of the UK
83
23/02/2021 08:20:56 52 96
bbc
Meaningless waffle, Bojo. When will you ever learn?
107
23/02/2021 08:49:40 15 24
bbc
The 1 thing you've omitted is that we have the highest death rate in the world.

World beating fiasco.
474
23/02/2021 14:21:36 8 7
bbc
Why this false vaccination propaganda again?

The UK, the EU and the USA financed the research and most of the research was done in the EU and much of the vaccines were produced there.

We've needed to remove all our eggs from the service basket for decades but at the moment there does not seem to be any great diversion from that road of travel.
510
23/02/2021 15:38:22 6 6
bbc
Nice sentiments. But cloud cuckoo land.

We would be exactly where we are now with vaccines if we were still in the EU.

Brexit will do nothing to achieve your goals for the country. Quite the opposite. Out of the EU we're a less desirable place for foreign investment. Plus, the UK is now likely to break up.

It's perhaps the end phase of a 100 year decline of the UK.
563
23/02/2021 17:26:41 4 1
bbc
We need to export by offering better prices or make it easier to do so. Little or nothing has changed regarding our ability post brexit to invent/engineer. We need to compete with other countres all trying to do the same.
566
23/02/2021 17:38:28 6 1
bbc
We had the means to be that before , but have chosen not to for the last 40 plus years, concentrating on Short Term Economic gain rather than long term Capital Investment. I

Being in or out of the EU makes no difference whatsever on that issue.

Our great Medical Research abilities that have aided in development of the Vaccines didn't appear out of thin air post Brexit did they?.
574
23/02/2021 18:12:54 2 5
bbc
You forgot to mention in the past we had an enforced market for goods, that also took our useless unemployable - much like the present cabinet, and the main thing - ASSET STRIPPED - colonies - an Wales of Coal, Scots of Timber and Oil and Soldiers from all the 3 nations... please dont come back about English regimental history...
599
23/02/2021 18:48:37 1 2
bbc
We need to address our trade balance by creating + buying quality British products.

Then exporting such manufacture to China, Korea, Japan et al so that it is cheaper to make.

Office jobs can be exported to India Call Centres and the remainder automated so that a text "You are redundant" can be received.

Do not like it - but that is progress for REALITY, now and not tomorrow.
605
23/02/2021 19:10:50 0 1
bbc
How?
There are no engineers, no raw materials, no skills base, limited vocational training, minimal investment in manufacturing compared to making money out of money but otherwise....
645
PCS
23/02/2021 23:53:47 0 0
bbc
Everything you refer has seen lack of investment for 30+ years, as per the current plebs running the show they'd prefer private industry step up with open cheque books, THAT WILL SIMPLY NEVER HAPPEN! Meanwhile all the UK silver has been sold off decades ago aka THATCHER years!
680
24/02/2021 11:45:38 0 0
bbc
Yes, the EU have now shot themselves in both feet by chucking their toys out the pram and have now convinced large swathes of their population the Astra jab is no good.

So their vaccination program will now be even slower since many are now refusing the Astra jab, this will have a serious effect on the UK economic recovery.
721
24/02/2021 19:12:05 0 0
bbc
Well said
80
23/02/2021 08:17:31 4 2
bbc
It's really important that reopening can be sustained and hopefully permanent . There are a lot of people who may have been shielding who will probably always be nervous of crowds and others who can't wait to be in them .
It will be a big opportunity for new and established businesses to find a way to satisfy both.
65
23/02/2021 08:07:03 4 6
bbc
So it's going to be like last summer but this time with a vaccine.

Makes you wonder why the over-optimistic, bungling PM made all those empty promises and wasted a year, costing tens of thousands of lives.
81
23/02/2021 08:17:55 4 4
bbc
Are you one of those people who think that once we embarked on this lockdown insanity that HMG and SAGE weren't fully aware that it would mean stealing a year of everybody's lives?

You mean that when we locked down last March for 'three weeks to flatten the sombrero', it came as a big surprise to find yourself in the same place a year later with the prospect of four months more house arrest?
37
DG
23/02/2021 07:20:12 21 14
bbc
Companies should rely more on British products rather than buying cheap, and in some cases, fake products from China.

the public should also check where the product is made and stop buying Chinese products which may have been made by slave labour.
82
23/02/2021 08:20:09 17 7
bbc
You are delusional. We do not have the capacity to manufacture competitively. It would take several years to gear up to manufacture more.
Either workers would have to accept massive wage cuts and suffer lack of employment protection or the consumer expect huge price rises. Good luck with that.
87
23/02/2021 08:32:28 8 0
bbc
The OP refers to China, not imports generally. Fully agree we need to actively look elsewhere for our goods and, hopefully increase our own manufacturing base as well.
118
23/02/2021 08:59:57 5 0
bbc
Half the problem with cheap products is that they don't last and get replaced or they are so cheap that they get thrown away or not used again. A lot of electrical goods are designed to not be repaired. No wonder we have so many problems with waste and landfill.
79
23/02/2021 08:16:50 111 40
bbc
The 1 thing to take from the EU vaccine fiasco + Brexit is that we are more nimble + innovative than most.

The UK must now move fast + adapt.

Change is the price of survival.

We need to start inventing + engineering things like we have done throughout our history.

We need to address our trade balance by creating + buying quality British products

This needs to come from ALL 4 corners of the UK
83
23/02/2021 08:20:56 52 96
bbc
Meaningless waffle, Bojo. When will you ever learn?
108
23/02/2021 08:51:45 24 11
bbc
Buying British is not meaningless waffle - you just cannot accept that the British Government might just have got something right for a change
117
23/02/2021 08:59:51 14 8
bbc
is that you macron?
I propose a new categorisation for the likes of Strawcat now we have left the EU - instead of "Remoaner", I think just "Moaner" is now more apt. Removed
495
23/02/2021 15:09:09 9 6
bbc
And your magical socialist solution is...?

Oh, there isn't one, as all the left has is criticism & hindsight.
722
24/02/2021 19:18:20 0 0
bbc
Same negative UK posters I wonder why.
30
23/02/2021 07:08:14 22 27
bbc
Green new deal...see what happened to Texas... Renewables dont cut it
84
23/02/2021 08:21:00 12 2
bbc
Gas and a nuclear plants also went offline as well as wind turbines, the problem was systems that lacked resilience to predictable cold weather not the source of energy. On top of that Texas is the only state not connected to the winder US grid and its grid operator does not have a capacity market (providers paid to be on standby). Renewables aren't the problem, cost cutting costing lives is.
85
23/02/2021 08:26:07 10 10
bbc
I think that much as we might despise BoJo, you have to admire his professionalism in employing psychologists as part of the SAGE team.

And you have to admit they've done a pretty impressive job of turning 'three weeks to flatten the sombrero' into what looks like 15 months of house arrest, and they did all that while convincing much of the population that it was their own idea.

Well done.
147
23/02/2021 09:14:29 3 1
bbc
I think it shows that there are an awful lot of people who just want to follow the rules unquestioningly, whatever they may be. The government have had the media on their side, so their task has been relatively easy. Mass compliance is great, up to a point, but can also be abused by those in power.
156
23/02/2021 09:19:28 1 1
bbc
And every other Government in the Western world has had the same problems as the UK - some with riots to boot
78
23/02/2021 08:16:42 39 10
bbc
Many Firms which have used WFH during the pandemic are likely to either make WFH the default or take a "hybrid" approach - most staff who have had the opportunity to WFH enjoy it and many Firms will need to offer it to employees in the future to retain staff (and to new staff, to attract those they want). Firms won't prop up Pret/Greggs/Costa etc at the expense of their own success.
86
23/02/2021 08:31:27 10 0
bbc
Think it has to be a hybrid approach. Would be interested to see research on productivity levels when WFH. Companies will love the lower costs of office space, but there's a trade off against staff effectiveness in their jobs.
675
24/02/2021 11:23:11 1 0
bbc
Having done some WFH a while back, I found WFH cuts out the wasted time of the commute (an hour or so each way, for me). So people WFH start fresher and possibly more productive. WFH can spread your effort, too, not just 9-5. WFH does have distractions, of course, but clock-watching so you don't miss your train doesn't help, either. Would love to see some hard data.
82
23/02/2021 08:20:09 17 7
bbc
You are delusional. We do not have the capacity to manufacture competitively. It would take several years to gear up to manufacture more.
Either workers would have to accept massive wage cuts and suffer lack of employment protection or the consumer expect huge price rises. Good luck with that.
87
23/02/2021 08:32:28 8 0
bbc
The OP refers to China, not imports generally. Fully agree we need to actively look elsewhere for our goods and, hopefully increase our own manufacturing base as well.
88
23/02/2021 08:33:22 5 9
bbc
Government policy has been the problem not the virus, every winter there is an NHS crisis with headlines of beds in corridors and queue's of ambulances.
NHS beds have been cut by 50%, at the same time the population has grown by 10,000,000. UK drags out opening up, other countries never locked down, Japan being one.
153
23/02/2021 09:17:57 0 0
bbc
The NHS crisis is often a result of its success - it is no use having beds in hospitals if we cannot staff them without taking them from other countries where they are also needed. The more ailments that we can treat will always mean that there is an increased claim on its services
89
23/02/2021 08:33:40 12 10
bbc
I have to admit that previously I held psychologists in low esteem.

No way would I have believed you that with a few simple mind games they could convince seventy million people to give up a year of their lives to 'save' 0.2% of the population in their 80s.

But they have.

And, more impressively. Now that we've 'saved' the 90% for whom we supposedly wrecked the economy, we're still imprisoned.
146
23/02/2021 09:14:15 3 6
bbc
You will never know how many lives have been saved because we were not prepared to take that risk. It could have been millions extra deaths if it had been allowed to spread without check. Vulnerable younger people would have just as likely been victims as the elderly with society falling in chaos and the health service collapsing completely.
395
Dea
23/02/2021 12:57:14 1 1
bbc
Under 70s make up a small proportion of those who have died with covid-19 but nearly half of those admitted to hospital after 1st August 2020

If those people couldn’t get a bed in a completely full NHS how may people under 70 might then have died or have long term damage to their health too?

Presumably only people your age matter and every one you consider old is expendable
2
23/02/2021 00:30:06 107 47
bbc
Don't say it too loudly or the BBC will remove your comment, but the pound is surging against the dollar and euro and over 1000 business's have applied to do business in the City.
If Boris does not the squander the initiative then the country looks like it's heading for boom time but if he gets it's wrong and keeps business locked down then it all would have been for nothing.
90
23/02/2021 08:35:20 21 2
bbc
If you're using the £ as a plimsoll line for the UK economy going forward, them I'm afraid you could drown. It's far more complicated than that.
454
23/02/2021 13:32:21 1 2
bbc
Go on then; what's YOUR indicator?

£ higher
FTSE higher
Business confidence higher

If the price of bananas rises, you'd blame brexit, rather than banana blight
54
23/02/2021 07:50:33 44 49
bbc
Pandering to the appetite for normality is a terrible idea. Environmental degradation was and is the biggest problem we all face.
91
23/02/2021 08:36:17 11 8
bbc
'..Environmental degradation was and is the biggest problem we all face.' Sadly true :-(
78
23/02/2021 08:16:42 39 10
bbc
Many Firms which have used WFH during the pandemic are likely to either make WFH the default or take a "hybrid" approach - most staff who have had the opportunity to WFH enjoy it and many Firms will need to offer it to employees in the future to retain staff (and to new staff, to attract those they want). Firms won't prop up Pret/Greggs/Costa etc at the expense of their own success.
92
23/02/2021 08:36:36 4 8
bbc
I think you will find that once the pandemic is over WFH will gradually wither away. It has advantages for some, but the disadvantages outweigh them. Many people especially the young don’t have the space to work from home for example
93
23/02/2021 08:36:52 15 8
bbc
Absolutely, with this sort of business news as reported by the BBC.

“Brexit: 1,000 EU finance firms 'set to open UK offices”

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56155531
100
23/02/2021 08:41:25 15 15
bbc
You seem to forget how many jobs and money went the other way in 2020, over a £trillion and over 7,000 jobs just for starters. You can pour as much in your bucket as you like, but if it's got a gaping hole in the bottom, you're going nowhere.
198
23/02/2021 10:00:02 4 1
bbc
Bless. They're being forced to in order to cope with increased red tape from Bojo's bad Brexit deal. This is an extra cost to business.
94
23/02/2021 08:37:34 14 9
bbc
After the war, a lot of work went into trying to understand how a supposedly educated European society could be hijacked by a few psychopaths and turned into such a ruthless killing machine filled with fanatics prepared to do anything for the perceived 'common good'. And why there were so few dissenters.

After the year we've just had, I now see how it was so easy.
371
23/02/2021 12:37:24 6 4
bbc
Absolutely correct, UK has it's first dictator since Cromwell. "All it takes for evil to flourish, is for good men to do nothing"
95
23/02/2021 08:35:33 26 19
bbc
We can avoid economic long covid if we BUY BRITISH. Back British businesses and products. Holiday at home this year. The UK, is in a great position to pull out of this quickly.
Removed
352
23/02/2021 12:18:45 4 3
bbc
Adam Smith spent some considerable time demonstrating that international trade is what generates increases in wealth, not nationalist protectionism. You avoid economic long covid by developing export markets, not by living off turnips in February.
532
23/02/2021 16:23:38 2 2
bbc
Completely unrealistic apart from where a comparable british product exists in the same or similar price range.
96
Al
23/02/2021 08:38:27 2 2
bbc
After the amount of disruption caused by the pandemic, some habits will change and the economy will need to adapt. WFH for instance will be here to stay to a greater or lesser extent and this will impact sectors like the hospitality sector. Things will be substantially different to 2019 even when all restrictions are gone.
The role of the Government should be to help facilitate the adjustment.
135
23/02/2021 09:07:08 5 1
bbc
The role of government is to get out of the way. Government spending is akin to giving yourself a blood transfusion from your right arm to your left arm, but in the process you spill half of the blood on the floor. Inefficient and wasteful, and a huge burden on the private sector.
17
23/02/2021 03:59:01 49 18
bbc
Our economy just needs to adapt to the new reality, just as other economies do. The sooner it does that, the better off we will be. Looking at current rise the value of the pound, it seems the market believes we are already on the right track. We should remain positive and take whatever opportunities that present themselves. I think we'll be just fine.
97
23/02/2021 08:36:08 9 7
bbc
The economy will recover much faster if we BUY BRITISH!
110
23/02/2021 08:52:25 5 7
bbc
Like what? Even your beloved Daily Express isn't British., It's owner lives in France, which is in the EU.
114
23/02/2021 08:55:49 7 6
bbc
Considering the fact the the UK relies on 53% of all goods sold here to be imported into the UK then it's kinda hard if not impossible to "BUY BRITISH" when we don't even make/ manufacture most of the things we buy anymore !!!
364
23/02/2021 12:34:41 2 3
bbc
Yeah because protectionism has always worked...?
73
23/02/2021 08:10:31 27 87
bbc
Health is a devolved matter.

It's hypocritical for English nationalists to want to deny rights to self-determination to other nationalists.
98
23/02/2021 08:36:54 23 6
bbc
Health is indeed a devolved matter. One that that the devolved regions have generally made a monumental hash of.
552
23/02/2021 16:57:42 1 2
bbc
BS; as usual.
2
23/02/2021 00:30:06 107 47
bbc
Don't say it too loudly or the BBC will remove your comment, but the pound is surging against the dollar and euro and over 1000 business's have applied to do business in the City.
If Boris does not the squander the initiative then the country looks like it's heading for boom time but if he gets it's wrong and keeps business locked down then it all would have been for nothing.
99
23/02/2021 08:39:26 17 9
bbc
I produce stuff in the UK for the UK market, competing with mostly EU imports. the £ at E1.20 is fine for me. We don't want a return to E1.40 that makes imports artificially too cheap.
111
23/02/2021 08:53:47 12 19
bbc
I take it you produce horse manure.
458
23/02/2021 13:59:38 1 0
bbc
A rise in the pound should motivate you to innovate and improve your operation then you can complete with the whole world. After all it was the competition we faced when we joined the EU that drove us out of the post war depths and stopped us being the sick man of Europe.
93
23/02/2021 08:36:52 15 8
bbc
Absolutely, with this sort of business news as reported by the BBC.

“Brexit: 1,000 EU finance firms 'set to open UK offices”

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56155531
100
23/02/2021 08:41:25 15 15
bbc
You seem to forget how many jobs and money went the other way in 2020, over a £trillion and over 7,000 jobs just for starters. You can pour as much in your bucket as you like, but if it's got a gaping hole in the bottom, you're going nowhere.
119
23/02/2021 08:59:58 4 2
bbc
Drop in the ocean when London, as a global financial capital, is viewed as a whole. 7,000 jobs? One UK bank employs 80,000 plus - there are c.300 in UK from all over Europe etc