John Lewis considers closing more stores
22/02/2021 | news | business | 731
The department store giant may close another eight stores in a further blow for the High Street.
1
22/02/2021 14:53:02 187 14
bbc
Can understand why but it will be a real loss when everyone has no choice but to buy everything online.
149
22/02/2021 15:29:30 34 168
bbc
A loss to whom? Online retail has created hundreds of thousands of jobs, from I.T, customer service, warehousing, deliveries etc.
320
22/02/2021 16:23:36 24 3
bbc
Shopping online is soulless. I love going to John Lewis, it's always a pleasure to be there. I can't buy shoes online, I need to try them on before I buy them. And having coffee and cake in the store is a real treat. It will be a sad day when they close their stores.
354
22/02/2021 16:35:46 15 2
bbc
Because it is much easier to look at a range of products spread out in a large space when you are not sure which one you want than on a small screen. Also nice to walk around rather than sitting at a screen having already done that all day at work.
420
JC
22/02/2021 16:55:56 4 4
bbc
The answer is quite simple, those that want to shop on the high street do so and those that want to shop online can do that. Just don't expect one group to subsidise the other. If the high street isn't viable because more people want to shop online then that's business. I expect those involved with horses complained when automobiles took over. Peoples choices cause change.
603
22/02/2021 18:36:06 1 2
bbc
No loss at all. High street are and always were useless and horrible. Hard to get to unless rich and run a car, etc.

I have not been in a high street in over a decade and I am very grateful for it too!

On line you can actually find stuff! It is easier to get information about a product, find different things never in shops. Open any moment I want. Then all delivered to the door. Perfect life.
2
22/02/2021 14:53:05 41 8
bbc
Very sad for the employees, but inevitable given the huge move to online shopping.
24
22/02/2021 15:01:03 39 12
bbc
Not employees, partners!
504
22/02/2021 17:28:58 2 2
bbc
But a lot of the move on-line is temporary - many will want to go back to physical shops and they won't be there
3
22/02/2021 14:53:12 5 12
bbc
For UK productivity only bring back jobs that pay £11.68 an hr by 2023 - 1 year before America does it.
Its the low pay jobs that are precarious that damage UK productivity and left us glass chinned with Covid... As even if you run round like a blue arse fly on Minimum wage for 60 hrs a week .. the only place you will end up is at an early death pushing up Daisies.
4
22/02/2021 14:53:19 60 7
bbc
Of the course the person running the show is now an outsider, not somebody who came up through the ranks.
29
Dee
22/02/2021 15:01:40 29 12
bbc
Perhaps she has been left to do the dirty work that her predecessors failed to do.
371
22/02/2021 16:40:33 2 1
bbc
Fraser, sometimes anew set of eyes and ears is what a business needs. The principles of running a business are the same whether it’s John Lewis or a fish and chip shop. A good CEO will recruit the necessary senior management with retail and “people” experience to take care of the front of house. Don’t forget if the skipper is stoking the boiler there’s no one on the bridge.
5
22/02/2021 14:50:44 0 10
bbc
Sealing to Clipper was the best decision this company made. Rom the mole will can claim back the curtains his ex wife took from him.
175
22/02/2021 15:34:32 4 1
bbc
and in English?
393
22/02/2021 16:47:56 0 1
bbc
What ever do you mean?
You certainly live up to your name McNumpty. Removed
6
22/02/2021 14:55:06 13 8
bbc
John Lewis has been a successful business for many decades so why were there no earnings retained to get through the rainy day or to pivot the business in other directions to save it. We have a business culture where profits are removed.
16
22/02/2021 14:58:47 32 3
bbc
Forced closure by the Government for the best part of a year is not a "rainy day".
145
22/02/2021 15:26:48 4 2
bbc
The idea of running a business is to reward yourself with the profits! No point keeping them in the business until you are deceased!
7
22/02/2021 14:55:19 6 20
bbc
To be honest, they might as well close all their stores. The Cheltenham store, a flagship, was so awful to go in last year, my family & I will never shop in there again. An entire generation of over zealous yellow jackets have been given a free run, hideous customer experience’. So many on the list, Boots, Costa, Sainsbury, Morrison’s & countless others. It will never unwind now, so just close.
8
22/02/2021 14:55:23 2 7
bbc
The end is nigh
9
22/02/2021 14:53:44 20 16
bbc
I bought something from JL over the Christmas sales. It took 7 days before they even sent it, and then another 3 days for their budget courier to deliver it.

If you buy something from Amazon it arrives the next day. They haven't kept up with the competition, being over-reliant on the high street stores.
28
22/02/2021 15:01:39 20 2
bbc
Well that is probably just bad luck.

I had good service from JL recently. Amazon can be a bit patchy too at times.
44
22/02/2021 15:06:07 5 2
bbc
I 'bought' a remote control helicopter for one of my cousins from Amazon, turned out it was supposedly coming from China, 3 weeks later when it had not still arrived , I asked for and got my money back. Then had to go to the high street and buy it properly.
136
22/02/2021 15:24:32 4 2
bbc
I think the key here is 'over Christmas'. You know, when a lot of people take time off so business is usually disrupted.
147
Dan
22/02/2021 15:29:18 9 2
bbc
Yes but what amazon is doing to staff and suppliers to meet that delivery speed, you should please research.
They are giving the customer what they want, but with no thought for all the behind the scenes, hard to envision I know but they are bullies.
Patience and support local business should be the way
10
22/02/2021 14:56:00 16 7
bbc
People might whinge and moan about the decline of the High Street however to some extent it is inevitable and has been happening for some considerable time.
11
22/02/2021 14:56:03 19 10
bbc
John Lewis are a highly regarded presence on the High Street, however one has to wonder why this is so when one compares their prices for identical itmes advertised elsewhere.

Example, my elderly mother bought a specific model of TV from them last year, I located three other outlets selling the very same model for over £100 less!
34
22/02/2021 15:03:09 9 3
bbc
Sometimes all the hassle of going elsewhere .. a firm you have not dealt with before .. is not worth the difference in price.

But I agree on the TV .. too much difference.
45
22/02/2021 15:06:11 16 2
bbc
You should have asked John Lewis to price match. Then you would have paid 100 pounds less and got a longer warranty and superior delivery. Unless you bought online then good luck with the service.
176
22/02/2021 15:32:12 7 1
bbc
The initial guarantee length is usually 2 years at John Lewis but 1 year everywhere else.
607
22/02/2021 18:39:45 1 0
bbc
You don't say how much your Mothers TV was but if it was, say for example, £1000+ I personally would be inclined to buy from JL based on previous superb customer service and improved warranty. I hope JL manage to survive with a high street presence because it is one of the few retailers I trust and they have some interesting product lines.
12
22/02/2021 14:56:34 180 12
bbc
Store closures are a real shame as their in store service is excellent.
27
Bob
22/02/2021 15:01:29 35 141
bbc
People always say that their customer service is excellent, but one quick look at the reviews left online shows a completely different story. Their Trustpilot rating is dire. Worse than even the likes of Currys!

I suspect one aspect of this belief in their service is the higher price. I paid more therefore it must be better.
387
22/02/2021 16:46:26 0 2
bbc
Their online customer service is an embarrassment. Even Sports Direct put them to shame with their promptness and communication.
560
22/02/2021 18:01:22 0 1
bbc
Their service is shockingly awful at times. They are so inflexible, they are like a lumbering elephant.
13
22/02/2021 14:56:41 75 5
bbc
everything CANNOT be bought online - it is just a question of working what sells better in shops than online and enhancing the in store experience to lure shoppers in. Surely the "trip to the shops" won't be a thing of the past?
40
22/02/2021 15:05:42 28 7
bbc
You're right, but the problem is that the high street has adapted, amazon and online shopping didn't some out of nowhere, it's been here for 20 years in one form or another.

There's been massive complacency by most shops. I'm in my mid 40s and basically never shop physically apart from food and the odd clothing item. Imagine what the two or three generations below me are going to shop for?
130
22/02/2021 15:25:25 3 2
bbc
Pretty much everything can be bought or at least ordered online. My last few GP consultations have been done over the phone; COVID test was delivered by Amazon and sent back through a royal mail post box with result texted to me. Tyres for car, bought online, could have paid extra for a fitter to come to my house. Other than an Xray that I had done in hospital, what else can't be done online?
170
22/02/2021 15:33:34 3 2
bbc
Some things are better bought face to face but I'm struggling to think of anything that can't. I believe you can even get a self measured tailor made suit.
597
22/02/2021 18:30:04 0 0
bbc
Hmmm, haircuts, coffee,...what have I missed? Most other things I can order online and they are delivered to my house. Gone are the days of overloading my small car with large (and sometimes dirty...gardening) items.
14
22/02/2021 14:58:10 3 26
bbc
If people want to shop on the "high street" they can pay for the privilege. No reason the rest of us should subsidise their lifestyle choices.
168
22/02/2021 15:33:20 1 1
bbc
Your user name is so accurate
609
22/02/2021 18:42:23 0 0
bbc
You continue to bore us. Can we have the armchair comment instead please?
15
22/02/2021 14:58:22 26 2
bbc
Death of the High Street continues.....
17
22/02/2021 14:59:17 10 104
bbc
Don't care. It's not wanted any more.
6
22/02/2021 14:55:06 13 8
bbc
John Lewis has been a successful business for many decades so why were there no earnings retained to get through the rainy day or to pivot the business in other directions to save it. We have a business culture where profits are removed.
16
22/02/2021 14:58:47 32 3
bbc
Forced closure by the Government for the best part of a year is not a "rainy day".
15
22/02/2021 14:58:22 26 2
bbc
Death of the High Street continues.....
17
22/02/2021 14:59:17 10 104
bbc
Don't care. It's not wanted any more.
33
22/02/2021 15:02:53 16 6
bbc
Good for you. Many would disagree.
64
22/02/2021 15:11:05 22 2
bbc
I'm very pro online shopping. However I also want certain shops on the high street.

I do a lot of "man stuff", small DIY jobs, electronics etc., and I'm fed up with not being able to properly see what I'm ordering, or having it come from China.

Used to have hardware shops on my high street, not any more.

Would love to be able to go the high street and just pick up what I need on the day.
187
CB
22/02/2021 15:36:57 12 2
bbc
I feel the same about you.
222
22/02/2021 15:46:45 6 2
bbc
Many would say that about you
512
22/02/2021 17:32:47 0 1
bbc
R u?
18
22/02/2021 15:00:05 313 38
bbc
They need to get rid of Sharon White, their CEO and appoint someone who understands the retail business. God only knows why she is a Dame. How on earth does someone with absolutely zero experience of retail turn a firm around. What on earth is an ex civil servant doing running this firm? All she does is close sites and sack staff. JL has gone down hill fast since she took over.
51
22/02/2021 15:08:55 115 23
bbc
Head, nail, the, on. Rearrange into a popular phrase.
79
22/02/2021 15:13:34 41 4
bbc
That's the only thing these overpaid, untalented, bluffers who call themselves as "captains of industy" ever think of. They come in to "turn around" the company, and end up closing it down.
152
22/02/2021 15:30:23 32 4
bbc
And offshore their IT services to WIPRO in India causing hundreds of UK job losses. The mind biggles ......
165
22/02/2021 15:32:49 23 3
bbc
Bean Counter and good at standing in a circle and blame the person on the right.
173
22/02/2021 15:33:50 16 35
bbc
It's unfair to blame this on Sharon White. She has only been at JL for 12 months and the business has been going downhill for at least a decade.
180
22/02/2021 15:35:11 34 6
bbc
She was a civil servant in the treasury i.e. a bean counter and expert in understanding and meeting the needs of its citizens - NOT!!!
228
22/02/2021 15:47:11 19 5
bbc
I'm a current partner for Waitrose working alongside my academic studies, although JL has struggled the food side (or my branch) has done extremely well even during the months of struggle due to food shortages, alongside bonus' she has also set up a great support network within the partnership during a really tough time - JL was struggling before she came in, only fair that she is given some time
230
22/02/2021 15:48:36 31 3
bbc
Well she did a fantastic job at Ofcom; you know, like Dido did at Talk Talk.

Truth is, most of the these "parachuted in" leaders, are often chosen by a panel of other generalists so none of them even have the benefit of past experience in the sector to guide them and are (in reality) not markedly brighter than anyone else, just skilled in "networking" and jumping ship before they are rumbled.
240
22/02/2021 15:53:40 4 9
bbc
What a truly inane comment. Have you heard about Covid, Amazon's dubious tax practices, the fact that people moan about losing the high street but buy junk from Wish made by prisoners or in sweat shops. You pay your money you make your choice. I'm sure you know all about business and macroeconomic trends... and the psychology of the shopper who just can't resist a deal whatever the cost.
258
22/02/2021 15:59:40 13 2
bbc
Main reason a lot of businesses struggle, CEO’s not having a real understanding of how the day to day business is run. They come in swing the axe, Initially bottom line looks good, Then without the experienced staff things soon go tits up.
279
22/02/2021 16:07:56 10 8
bbc
I think we know why . But dare not say anything , for fear being classed as a racist . It's pathetic what the bbc do to any comment they don't agree with . What about commonsense and freedom of speech
380
22/02/2021 16:44:19 6 4
bbc
Dave Lewis sorted Tesco, he was not a retailer. He also made thousands redundant, closed shops. I work for Waitrose, bricks & mortar retail was already on the decline. Business rates etc just don't make it tenable. Dotcom retail has accelerated by about 5 years growth in 12 months due to the pandemic. The high st needs to be reinvented. Big shops will probably be a thing of the past
388
22/02/2021 16:46:35 8 1
bbc
Once worked for a firm that was in a little trouble. In came the bean counters and came up with a great idea. "If we get rid of all the sales staff we'll turn the company around!" Duh! Guess the CEO had the same idea. Let's close all the shops and save a bundle. Oh wait, we're destroyed the business. Time to move on to another plumb job
423
22/02/2021 16:56:26 1 2
bbc
Agreed.
437
22/02/2021 17:01:55 0 1
bbc
CV comparable to 'Dame' Dido Harding's then!
526
22/02/2021 17:40:05 4 2
bbc
I have to say as a lifelong retailer & someone who was a JL Partner myself, you take the words right out of my mouth. Nobody is that gifted to be able to move into a business in which they have absolutely no shop floor grass roots experience & call the right shots. It simply doesn't work that way & I fear she will end up doing untold damage to the best retail store group this country has ever had!
538
22/02/2021 17:47:02 1 1
bbc
Thanks for posting this. Suddenly everything makes sense to me now - JL has gone downhill rapidly over the last few years

Big decisions like offshoring IT and outsourcing install/repair work show a lack of commercial acumen and short term cost cutting mentality.

Even worse, the decision makers do this believing they are being ‘strategic’ lol
543
22/02/2021 17:51:28 0 3
bbc
Absolutely agree, she was also terrible at Ofcom, way over friendly with useless Dido Harding.
554
22/02/2021 17:58:49 1 2
bbc
she got the job due to connections , we have people buying ppe for this bloody pandemic that have not a jot of experience , why ? due to connections , its seems you get to a level where its who you know and not what you know , cronyism its not right but were just shouting into the wind while they get richer n richer
564
22/02/2021 18:04:53 1 1
bbc
So how do you explain Topshop and M&S?
617
22/02/2021 18:25:36 1 0
bbc
She will close loads of shops and sack staff,then walk away with a golden handshake after 5 years!!
621
22/02/2021 18:50:57 0 0
bbc
Just a minute - John Lewis was losing money. So it employed Sharon White, previously earning £341,700 as CE of Ofcom and offered her an annual salary of £990,000 for her new role as Chairman of John Lewis. Duh!
678
22/02/2021 19:57:19 1 0
bbc
It isn't her fault, JL has been losing money from about 12 years ago, when they pushed a portion of their front office agents to a 3rd party, quality would go down in terms of support for the customer.

And last year they had to end benefits for workers to help try and keep some stores open, St Pancras was always going to be non-profit during the pandemic. 1/2
679
22/02/2021 19:59:04 1 0
bbc
2/2 So by removing the benefits temporarily they could help try and funnel the extra money into those dormant stores to keep people in jobs, unfortunately the pandemic has gone on longer, and stores had to be closed or else risk a business wide problem.

They could have stopped Partnership card vouchers to help, but could you imagine what the customer would have been like if that happened. Ouch.
19
22/02/2021 15:00:13 40 12
bbc
Amazon is cheaper and faster to deliver than John Lewis but as they say "you get what you pay for"...John Lewis is better quality but it seems that for the majority of people, convenience and cheapness trumps quality and assurance of the brand. No judgement, just stating the facts
47
22/02/2021 15:06:53 24 4
bbc
Aren't we confusing 'facts' with opinions? If you buy a branded item, it's the same quality irrespective of which retailer you bought it from. Amazon may be quicker to deliver if it's something already stocked in the UK, otherwise you're looking at weeks for it to get shipped from China.
53
22/02/2021 15:09:21 12 3
bbc
It does make me laugh those Amazon ads about electric vehicles, they deliver cheap Chinese tat made using coal power and shipped across the globe using using either jet fuel or bunker oil.
78
22/02/2021 15:09:58 6 2
bbc
I use Amazon a lot but if I want long-lasting quality I will happily wait a few days more for John Lewis. I recently bought a duvet on Amazon which turned out not be to be very good. For just £10 more I got an excellent one from John Lewis which I know will last forever! Both outlets have their place, but I would be very sad to lose John Lewis.
353
Dee
22/02/2021 16:35:27 2 1
bbc
Many people use JL stores as a showroom before pulling the trigger online. This is unfair. That is why business rates should be reduced on stores and a warehouse tax introduced to balance out this unfairness.
562
22/02/2021 18:03:48 0 0
bbc
None of what you say is actually a "fact".
20
22/02/2021 15:00:14 9 1
bbc
The problem is .. it is very expensive to have a foot in both online & high street camps.

It might be wise to try and wait out the lockdown... but I could understand why they might not.
21
22/02/2021 15:00:43 10 6
bbc
A lot of people treat shopping as a hobby. We've ended up with high streets, if they aren't full of charity shops and estate agents, full of "lifestyle" shops, instead of useful shops.

Can't think of a time I went to town to shop for anything other than food.

But then I'm not an old person, a woman, or any of the minority demographic who fit the "lifestyle" market.
212
22/02/2021 15:43:53 3 3
bbc
I'm a 69 year old woman, and I can't see the point in shopping in town, either.
545
22/02/2021 17:52:16 0 0
bbc
no pet shops ?
22
22/02/2021 15:00:46 5 6
bbc
Always liked John Lewis but couldn't really afford to shop there.....
23
22/02/2021 15:01:03 113 12
bbc
Can someone explain how this is a shock? Bury at Edmunds council has mad everything within a mile of the town centre residents only and put up the fees for their carparks as well as restricting the market. Stuff is cheaper online and you don't have to park. Shops need to ALL close until councils make parking free. They will end up closed anyway if they don't take action
38
Bob
22/02/2021 15:04:54 74 7
bbc
Local council here is about to embark on the same. Thanks to the 'COVID green fund' or whatever it was called councils are just making money grabs to implement schemes that are to the detriment of the high street.
144
22/02/2021 15:25:56 8 7
bbc
How much rise in your council tax are you willing to accept to make up for lost parking charges?
158
22/02/2021 15:31:56 4 11
bbc
You should be cycling in to the shops.
188
22/02/2021 15:37:09 4 7
bbc
Car parks could be free but who would use them? The shop owners and workers are the first to spring to mind. By the time we all get there it'll already be over half full.

Also, yellow lines and parking attendants are still necessary to avoid congestion and people taking the "mickey" otherwise it wouldn't be safe for the shoppers.
196
22/02/2021 15:40:14 10 3
bbc
Very true about all councils I would suggest. The car owner has always been the cash cow of civil servants local and central. They need to know how to look after the business without killing the patient. Some hope of that
209
22/02/2021 15:43:07 4 1
bbc
here on the iow the council are increasing parking charges and increasing the areas that used to be free to be charged even more of a problem for the likes of me with a town Centre shop, will be interesting to see what the rate increase will be
214
22/02/2021 15:44:35 10 1
bbc
Sadly councils with their charges and "upward only" rent reviews are missing the point about the decline. An empty unit makes very much less than a cheaper unit and cheaper parking fees generate more money than empty parking spaces - which then worsens the council ax position
224
22/02/2021 15:47:00 9 4
bbc
A primary duty of the councils is to support local trade, but most of them seem far more interested in running money-grabbing car park businesses. In my hometown, the council runs a car park business on the town square> The square was actually a GIFT to the people of the town. The land doesn't even belong to the council!
281
22/02/2021 16:09:22 5 1
bbc
You can park all day in Bury St Edmunds for about £3 if you use certain car parks. That’s not that bad. I don’t drive so it costs me over £6 return to go there by bus. It’s all a matter of making it worthwhile. Until covid I went to town twice a month on market day and a day of it.
305
Dee
22/02/2021 16:17:53 2 1
bbc
Also, the government needs to reduce business rates in bricks and mortar shops & stores like John Lewis need to renegotiate their rents sharply downwards or get a prepay rent reduction from their landlord after lockdown.
326
22/02/2021 16:25:16 3 2
bbc
It's a mad world we live in. Seems that councils prefer shops in the town centre to close and be converted into flats/small apartments. This way they rake in thousands per unit every year in council tax as distinct from very little in business rates. I fear that councils have hastened the demise of the local shopping experience
335
22/02/2021 16:29:02 1 1
bbc
Same in my town. Council encourages people into town on market day by INCREASING parking charges. But still get 2 hours free in ASDA, TESCO Sainsburys, LIDL and Morisons, just keep moving the car every 2 hours.
447
22/02/2021 17:04:55 1 2
bbc
The high street is dead, the number and variety of shops in most town centres is decreasing, and combined with councils using shoppers as a cash cow, that trend will continue.

Why pay a fortune to park in a town centre with only 2 or 3 decent shops?

Still the council has to pay its gold plated pensions somehow.
616
22/02/2021 18:46:01 1 0
bbc
Visit Birmingham and see a truly anti car council in operation... they must be delighted with their handy work and a permanently closed JL store... then they increase the council tax by 5 percent...
630
22/02/2021 19:01:44 1 0
bbc
There are not enough spaces for even one per house in BSE, too many people buy housing with no space and get shocked when there is no room. Try taking responsibility. And the council can't make it free, it costs money ffs! And they have to pay their own rates. Maybe if people weren't so stuck up about paying for a service. If you care about the high street you would be happy to pay. Mmmm
671
22/02/2021 19:41:47 0 0
bbc
Short sightedness by Councils they never look at the long game
707
22/02/2021 22:34:56 0 0
bbc
Make all car parking free? Don’t you realise it costs money to purchase land and turn it into a car park? Let’s increase taxes on car-users to pay for it all. How does that sound to you?
2
22/02/2021 14:53:05 41 8
bbc
Very sad for the employees, but inevitable given the huge move to online shopping.
24
22/02/2021 15:01:03 39 12
bbc
Not employees, partners!
186
22/02/2021 15:36:54 7 1
bbc
Exactly, Paul! When you speak to someone in store, you are speaking to the boss(es)! I love their business model: no pesky shareholders, all profits (when there are any!) go to the partners!
25
22/02/2021 15:01:14 71 12
bbc
There needs to be different business rates for those operating online only vs shops.

Rishi Sunak should consider a warehouse tax to even up the tax burden, with discounts offset by retail square footage.

Stores also need to up their game when re-opening by opening 12-8 weekday, not 9-5. Why have stores open on a Monday morning when they'd do far more trade on a Thursday & Friday evening.
52
22/02/2021 15:09:12 24 47
bbc
Why are you volunteering others to pay more tax? How about reduce the high street taxes? I can decide for myself how to spend my money thanks, I don't need an overbearing government to help themselves to more of it and spend it for me.
76
22/02/2021 15:13:16 8 3
bbc
Protection policies through taxing particular industries or styles of doing business only entrenches low productivity and poor quality. We made that mistake in the 60s and 70s and our industries fell through the floor rather than remain competitive in a global marketplace. We don't need to make that mistake again.
206
22/02/2021 15:42:03 6 2
bbc
Perhaps we need to scrap business rates altogether for retailers who sell directly to the general public. Maybe replace it with a straightforward sales tax. That would give a more level playing field.
295
KL
22/02/2021 16:15:28 7 1
bbc
Taxes are just an excuse. Sure get rid of business rates or add an extra tax to online it won't make any difference. People don't shop online because it's cheaper, it often isn't anyway taking into account delivery charges, they shop online because of the convenience.
301
22/02/2021 16:16:56 3 3
bbc
Local councils will fight against this because they won't see any revenue and so they will raise parking to compensate a keep people away. Could just get rid of local councils altogether.
307
22/02/2021 16:19:07 0 2
bbc
It is the delivery service to a home or a click/collect from a warehouse which is where an additional tax could be levied. This service saves the the customer incurring travel and car parking costs.
It could level the costs between high street stores and direct delivery, but may not be popular with customers.
329
Dee
22/02/2021 16:25:55 1 2
bbc
Agree on the Warehouse tax but should also reduce business rates for brick & mortar stores to balance it out. Re: stores opening hours, much depends on the location, product offering & demographic.
458
JC
22/02/2021 17:09:17 1 3
bbc
Taxes are not something any businesses pay, they just pass on part of the money paid by the customer. What you are asking for is for online shoppers to pay more just because you prefer to shop in the high street. If any business can reduce it's cost and be able sell something cheaper then do you think they should be obliged to charge the same as others and pay the savings in tax?
670
22/02/2021 19:40:37 0 0
bbc
John Lewis had already wised up to that one when I was still at school. Closed on Monday, open until 8pm on Thursday.
26
22/02/2021 15:01:21 13 6
bbc
It is sad, but unfortunately even before COVID many stores had lost their way e.g. John L filled with 'concessions' (which seem pointless) or dodgy never heard of lines. With growth of online the stores seem to increasingly resemble a market of ill assorted, often old looking 'stuff' so little to attract anyone in - they must accept some 'own goal' blame here.
12
22/02/2021 14:56:34 180 12
bbc
Store closures are a real shame as their in store service is excellent.
27
Bob
22/02/2021 15:01:29 35 141
bbc
People always say that their customer service is excellent, but one quick look at the reviews left online shows a completely different story. Their Trustpilot rating is dire. Worse than even the likes of Currys!

I suspect one aspect of this belief in their service is the higher price. I paid more therefore it must be better.
48
22/02/2021 15:07:00 57 4
bbc
While I've personally experienced less-than-great customer service in John Lewis (specifically the store in Westfield) I think you have to take negative reviews online with a pinch of salt, as people who've had a bad experience are more likely to leave a review than people who've had a good experience.
60
22/02/2021 15:10:49 52 2
bbc
Most people won't leave a Trustpilot review unless they've either had problems or actively been pestered to after purchasing something. Trustpilot charges businesses to ask customers with positive experiences to leave reviews, and I suspect John Lewis probably haven't paid up unlike many others. Online reviews are just terrible and untrustworthy in general...
126
22/02/2021 15:24:12 29 4
bbc
Trust Pilot is a fake review site and completely untrustworthy.

Find reviews for it on other sites and you'll see why you can't trust it, and especially the reviews for the other brands in their group (Verastar, Unicom etc).
155
22/02/2021 15:31:37 35 1
bbc
Don’t know why it’s called Trustpilot. It can’t be relied on to be trustworthy. Too easy for people to place fake reviews.
179
22/02/2021 15:34:53 19 2
bbc
Never heard of competitors leaving poor reviews ? Reviews are opinion not verifiable fact. If you choose to rely on them then poor fool you
235
22/02/2021 15:50:46 18 2
bbc
I've bought from plenty of retailers online.

Currys, Next, even White Company have all sent emails a couple of weeks later asking "how was your experience?" with links to rating sites.

Not once have I had a pestering follow up email from John Lewis asking for a rating.

Online reviews/ratings are complete bunk and do not reflect customer experience in any reliable way.
247
22/02/2021 15:55:41 16 1
bbc
Most of us are more ready to complain than to praise.
321
22/02/2021 16:24:04 3 1
bbc
Review sites are either full of people who have complaints or the staff of the company bumping up the ratings. Few people who have good service offer praise as good service is expected.
330
22/02/2021 16:26:00 0 1
bbc
I wouldn't trust Trustpilot because people generally only take to writing a review when they have a negative experience. I have shopped at JL for 27 years and cannot fault them. Staff are well trained, they know their products and no disputes in returning items.
331
22/02/2021 16:26:44 3 1
bbc
You don't pay more in John Lewis... it's part of their policy to "never knowingly to be undersold", or they refund the difference.
362
22/02/2021 16:37:07 1 1
bbc
People are too lazy to post comments when they are happy, generally they only do it when they are very cross.
429
22/02/2021 16:58:54 2 1
bbc
If you believe Trustpilot that is. Most people only post reviews when they are not happy, that is why their ratings are often skewed. You buy something and it works, do you really bother to post that on Trustpilot? And JL always price match other stores, otherwise why would anyone pay £50 more for exactly the same product just because it comes from a 'posh' store?
486
22/02/2021 17:18:06 1 1
bbc
The last TV I bought I wanted to see it demonstrated and went to both Currys & John Lewis.

Absolutely no comparison - Currys didn't have a clue on the TV's features and the staff seemed disinterested whereas the JL staff knew everything about it and were happy to spend time with me going through it all.

£20 cheaper in Currys but I purchased from JL - I don't mind paying for excellent service.
493
22/02/2021 17:23:07 0 1
bbc
Not true. Trolling is so ghastly.
506
22/02/2021 17:30:08 0 1
bbc
Or could it be that only those with a complaint can be a---d to leave a review? People in general are much happier to complain than to praise unfortunately.
553
22/02/2021 17:58:35 0 1
bbc
I don't trust pilot
668
22/02/2021 19:39:56 0 0
bbc
The comments are about the shopping in the store. You can suspect what you like but you're no Hercule Poirot and don't understand that JL will match the price of its competitors
9
22/02/2021 14:53:44 20 16
bbc
I bought something from JL over the Christmas sales. It took 7 days before they even sent it, and then another 3 days for their budget courier to deliver it.

If you buy something from Amazon it arrives the next day. They haven't kept up with the competition, being over-reliant on the high street stores.
28
22/02/2021 15:01:39 20 2
bbc
Well that is probably just bad luck.

I had good service from JL recently. Amazon can be a bit patchy too at times.
201
22/02/2021 15:41:19 5 2
bbc
And look at how Amazon treat their workers! :(
4
22/02/2021 14:53:19 60 7
bbc
Of the course the person running the show is now an outsider, not somebody who came up through the ranks.
29
Dee
22/02/2021 15:01:40 29 12
bbc
Perhaps she has been left to do the dirty work that her predecessors failed to do.
252
22/02/2021 15:58:01 1 3
bbc
Fair point, but worse still they have none of the experience of their predecessor.
30
22/02/2021 15:01:55 4 4
bbc
The inevitable result of online shopping and the failure of some firms to have an online presence.
225
22/02/2021 15:47:24 0 1
bbc
Not in JL case, they have been selling online for years. Now that's the option as no staff in shop can advise on differences between built-in ovens or dishwashers and most models won't be displayed in store anyway..
31
22/02/2021 15:00:03 5 6
bbc
I'm a 'geek' and thus most of my specialist tastes (anime, board games, comics, science fiction books etc) have never been catered for on the high street and when they have it's either an absurdly small selection or an eye watering price or both.

I've gone to cities/towns to look around, take photographs and be touristy, but I haven't travelled for shopping purposes for probably 7+ years.
32
22/02/2021 15:02:00 10 5
bbc
John Lewis was always the "go to store" for many things even when internet shopping was well established. Helpful advice, service,friendly knowledgeable staff and 2 year no quibble returns.

Then, service levels dropped, staff surly and unhelpful all of a sudden and getting advice frankly became a chore with huge queues and little/no help

worse, product delivery went to pot - they lost their USP
41
22/02/2021 15:05:48 6 6
bbc
Definitely concur with shoddy service to the point of rude and offensive. Own goal in every way.
81
22/02/2021 15:14:00 7 1
bbc
"staff surly and unhelpful"? Really? That's awful if it's true.
I've never found the JL staff anything like that.
291
22/02/2021 16:14:46 4 1
bbc
Having worked for JL at a flagship store I can tell you that "partners" are not well treated. Managers spend their time, especially when busy ,off the shop floor, there isn't enough man power on the floor to serve, restock, man tills,mount reductions etc and some , not all, customers think it's ok to abuse staff and treat them like hired help as that's their version of " customer service".
17
22/02/2021 14:59:17 10 104
bbc
Don't care. It's not wanted any more.
33
22/02/2021 15:02:53 16 6
bbc
Good for you. Many would disagree.
11
22/02/2021 14:56:03 19 10
bbc
John Lewis are a highly regarded presence on the High Street, however one has to wonder why this is so when one compares their prices for identical itmes advertised elsewhere.

Example, my elderly mother bought a specific model of TV from them last year, I located three other outlets selling the very same model for over £100 less!
34
22/02/2021 15:03:09 9 3
bbc
Sometimes all the hassle of going elsewhere .. a firm you have not dealt with before .. is not worth the difference in price.

But I agree on the TV .. too much difference.
35
22/02/2021 15:03:11 325 11
bbc
I recently bought a digital camera from John Lewis online for my daughter. The main selling points for me were that whilst they were £30 more expensive than other online retailers, I can take it back to the local Waitrose store if there are any problems with it and they included a 2 year warranty covering accidental damage in the price, service is sometimes more important than price.
137
22/02/2021 15:27:11 201 6
bbc
John Lewis customer service is why I have bought stuff from them for years. Honestly it is seldom different in price to many other retailers who I have had lots of subsequent problems with.
334
22/02/2021 16:27:44 9 1
bbc
You should have used their price matching to avoid spending the extra £30.
347
22/02/2021 16:33:44 2 2
bbc
JurassicPark 15:03
included a 2 year warranty covering accidental damage in the price,

I would strongly suggest you check the terms and conditions about the warranty.
ACCIDENTAL DAMAGE is NOT usually covered in warranties and even when ARE, will usually have exclusions that reduce the expectations of what is actually covered.
382
JC
22/02/2021 16:44:45 9 2
bbc
I think John Lewis were very good for service at one time but I have found instances recently where they are less so. I bought a printer but could not get one of the advertised features to work. After several emails to John Lewis and the manufacturer they admitted it would not work. Tried to return it but they refused as I had already used it. Similar with my daughters TV but they did in the end.
439
22/02/2021 17:02:05 6 1
bbc
But the difference in price is often the cost of the extended warranty.
463
22/02/2021 17:10:30 3 1
bbc
Hopefully your local Waitrose will not be one of those due for closure during 2021. Ours is not closing but building being sold and Waitrose to rent from new owner.
537
22/02/2021 17:46:59 4 1
bbc
We used to think the same, but have found their customer service to be shocking when you have a problem with a large appliance. We only got any satisfaction when threatening them with court action. We will never buy from them again.
628
22/02/2021 18:57:36 2 0
bbc
You've got to be joking. John Lewis used to be good, but now they have the worst customer service of any business in the UK. Their "2 year warranty" is not worth anything, as they refuse to honour it. Check out their TrustPilot reviews for a dose of reality.
36
MDK
22/02/2021 15:03:20 2 8
bbc
If online is growing the. Jobs move from retail front line to back office operations/ distribution. Not a negative unless you can’t re-skill into a new role.
110
ray
22/02/2021 15:20:03 1 1
bbc
That would be fine, if the online jobs had parity. Same salary, same hours, same number of jobs. But that will not be the case. They will need fewer people, will undoubtedly pay less, and sadly I suspect, expect people to work longer hours. Economically I can see the inevitable move to online, but to think that no one will loose out is, with great respect,
miss-guided.
37
22/02/2021 15:03:43 63 4
bbc
Of course what everybody wants to know is which JL stores will close...

I like the store very much and frequent it in both Kingston and Exeter.

I think there is still a place for these stores with high quality products, good service and nice clean well run inhouse coffee shops/restaurants. people will still visit them.
43
22/02/2021 15:06:05 30 4
bbc
Whether people will visit them or not is irrelevant. Its whether they can afford to run them, with sky high rents, expensive staff, rates etc etc. If they are not profitable, they are dust.
464
22/02/2021 17:10:56 1 1
bbc
I think you can probably tell. Sheffield John Lewis is big but tired and the city centre has been negatively affected by Meadowhall. Leeds on the other hand has a very impressive new store in the classy Victoria Gate centre. I think I know which one will be for the chop.
23
22/02/2021 15:01:03 113 12
bbc
Can someone explain how this is a shock? Bury at Edmunds council has mad everything within a mile of the town centre residents only and put up the fees for their carparks as well as restricting the market. Stuff is cheaper online and you don't have to park. Shops need to ALL close until councils make parking free. They will end up closed anyway if they don't take action
38
Bob
22/02/2021 15:04:54 74 7
bbc
Local council here is about to embark on the same. Thanks to the 'COVID green fund' or whatever it was called councils are just making money grabs to implement schemes that are to the detriment of the high street.
191
22/02/2021 15:38:00 2 2
bbc
Here in Lincolnshire,the same,councils applying car parking charges,yet in Sleaford hardly any shops open,it's not worth the effort to go,even if within our local area
39
22/02/2021 15:05:21 13 23
bbc
They mustn`t be allowed to close! I need them to try out tellies before I buy them cheaper online
55
Tim
22/02/2021 15:09:48 9 6
bbc
Absolutely disgusting comment
58
Jim
22/02/2021 15:10:00 2 1
bbc
Alas that is the problem. Far too many of us go to a physical store, get feel for something and then shop around for a far better deal.

Or do what someone did to JL, bought 46 pair of shoes and then sent 45 back.
68
22/02/2021 15:07:18 0 1
bbc
Surprised you can can find them cheaper with the same guarantee?
70
22/02/2021 15:08:01 3 1
bbc
That is the problem with so much retail. If you ask the shop, they will probably be able to get closer to online prices. But once physical retail is gone, we might end up with higher taxes on something like warehousing or delivery vans, so online prices will have to rise.
97
22/02/2021 15:17:46 1 1
bbc
i think you just hit the nail on the head there.
109
ray
22/02/2021 15:19:52 1 1
bbc
Not a funny comment if you work in JL and have spent time helping you choose a TV, then having you shop elsewhere.
13
22/02/2021 14:56:41 75 5
bbc
everything CANNOT be bought online - it is just a question of working what sells better in shops than online and enhancing the in store experience to lure shoppers in. Surely the "trip to the shops" won't be a thing of the past?
40
22/02/2021 15:05:42 28 7
bbc
You're right, but the problem is that the high street has adapted, amazon and online shopping didn't some out of nowhere, it's been here for 20 years in one form or another.

There's been massive complacency by most shops. I'm in my mid 40s and basically never shop physically apart from food and the odd clothing item. Imagine what the two or three generations below me are going to shop for?
95
22/02/2021 15:17:25 1 1
bbc
Did you mean "hasn't"?
674
22/02/2021 19:44:10 0 0
bbc
Perhaps a real experience a throwback to their grandparents days
32
22/02/2021 15:02:00 10 5
bbc
John Lewis was always the "go to store" for many things even when internet shopping was well established. Helpful advice, service,friendly knowledgeable staff and 2 year no quibble returns.

Then, service levels dropped, staff surly and unhelpful all of a sudden and getting advice frankly became a chore with huge queues and little/no help

worse, product delivery went to pot - they lost their USP
41
22/02/2021 15:05:48 6 6
bbc
Definitely concur with shoddy service to the point of rude and offensive. Own goal in every way.
62
Jim
22/02/2021 15:10:59 2 2
bbc
The move away from suited staff was not a good idea
85
22/02/2021 15:14:37 0 1
bbc
Which branch?
42
22/02/2021 15:05:49 8 10
bbc
Sadly JL is not what is was. Before lockdowns when I last shopped at JL Customer Service was non existent. I bought a dinner service (separates ie not in a box) and they didn't offer to wrap it or put it in a bag or anything and moaned when I asked. They just took my money and walked off. I feel sad for the staff but it is another overpriced Department store.
83
22/02/2021 15:14:15 5 2
bbc
Don't believe you.
37
22/02/2021 15:03:43 63 4
bbc
Of course what everybody wants to know is which JL stores will close...

I like the store very much and frequent it in both Kingston and Exeter.

I think there is still a place for these stores with high quality products, good service and nice clean well run inhouse coffee shops/restaurants. people will still visit them.
43
22/02/2021 15:06:05 30 4
bbc
Whether people will visit them or not is irrelevant. Its whether they can afford to run them, with sky high rents, expensive staff, rates etc etc. If they are not profitable, they are dust.
268
22/02/2021 16:02:30 6 1
bbc
I agree with your comments about rates but expensive rents? - Many retailers (e.g. M&S) adopted a business model some years ago of sale and leaseback of the premises they once owned outright. If they are now stuffed with high rents it's only because of their own desire for short term gain over long term profitability.
9
22/02/2021 14:53:44 20 16
bbc
I bought something from JL over the Christmas sales. It took 7 days before they even sent it, and then another 3 days for their budget courier to deliver it.

If you buy something from Amazon it arrives the next day. They haven't kept up with the competition, being over-reliant on the high street stores.
44
22/02/2021 15:06:07 5 2
bbc
I 'bought' a remote control helicopter for one of my cousins from Amazon, turned out it was supposedly coming from China, 3 weeks later when it had not still arrived , I asked for and got my money back. Then had to go to the high street and buy it properly.
11
22/02/2021 14:56:03 19 10
bbc
John Lewis are a highly regarded presence on the High Street, however one has to wonder why this is so when one compares their prices for identical itmes advertised elsewhere.

Example, my elderly mother bought a specific model of TV from them last year, I located three other outlets selling the very same model for over £100 less!
45
22/02/2021 15:06:11 16 2
bbc
You should have asked John Lewis to price match. Then you would have paid 100 pounds less and got a longer warranty and superior delivery. Unless you bought online then good luck with the service.
135
22/02/2021 15:23:21 3 2
bbc
Not sure that they do the price match any more, but I think they will come closer if yo can prove that the item is immediately available elsewhere for less.
207
22/02/2021 15:42:15 0 5
bbc
That promise has been abandoned, no price matching, more "usually knowingly overpriced"
46
22/02/2021 15:06:23 514 35
bbc
As a 6ft 2" bloke who is pretty slim due to taking care of my diet & a distance runner I can honestly say that not 1 single item of clothing I have bought online has fitted me, and always have to be sent back. Online shopping is actually just a drag, I actually find it easier to go to a shop, try the clothes on, get an idea of the cut/material etc. Surprised most others don't feel the same really.
54
22/02/2021 15:09:31 108 17
bbc
5.11 female, 9 stone and feel exactly the same!!! But I have a few favoured brands that I know fit perfectly and so cannot be bothered with the endless 'try on'.
67
22/02/2021 15:12:08 45 4
bbc
I feel exactly the same. I need to try stuff on - in the shop! Sending online purchases back is expensive and time-consuming.
82
22/02/2021 15:14:06 29 3
bbc
You are right! Many times I have bought things not expected cheap material, coats need to try on,
What an arrogant cnut Removed
87
dan
22/02/2021 15:15:40 10 20
bbc
This is true, but ironically barely anything from John Lewis would fit you because their target market seems to be wealthy, yet "cuddly" men. At least that's been my experience as a 5'11" slim/average built bloke.
108
22/02/2021 15:19:29 40 2
bbc
Short fat dumpy bloke here, nothing fits me regardless of where I buy it.
125
22/02/2021 15:24:06 19 2
bbc
5 foot 1 female here and feel exactly the same! Even buying from the 'petite' online ranges means I have to return most things because they still don't fit well. I've had an email from asos warning me that they'll deactivate my account if I continue (i've not bought new clothes during this last year anyways) but it really is such a struggle!
139
22/02/2021 15:27:23 4 9
bbc
And if you try something on and it doesn't fit? They can't wash it before selling it to someone else. The thought of buying something that possibly some sweaty oaf with unknown levels of personal hygiene has worn before me is disgusting.
151
BTJ
22/02/2021 15:30:02 12 4
bbc
I will never order clothes online! You never know what colour, size, quality or fit will come out of the bag!
156
22/02/2021 15:31:44 3 1
bbc
try jacamo, have a long and tall section. like me 6.1" avoid the high street. but Jacamo is free returns, and they have branded products
157
22/02/2021 15:29:12 5 2
bbc
Off the pegs clothes rarely fit anyone, because people are not standard sizes. Which is why I would never buy clothes online, apart from a few repeat basics that I know fit. And my suits come from a good tailor, and I look after them!
169
22/02/2021 15:33:23 4 2
bbc
I couldn't agree more - and I will never buy clothes on-line. It isn't just the fit but the quality as well
If that means restricted choice so be it
200
22/02/2021 15:40:49 1 1
bbc
Same kind of deal here too. so many Clothes and other items have arrived either far too big or tiny compared to the photos and size claim.
204
22/02/2021 15:41:41 4 2
bbc
Clothes shops are poor at stocking clothing. When the wife was pregnant, we visited a number of stores only to find that their maternity wear was online only! Even Mothercare only stocked a limited range in store. Forced us to buy online and waste time trying things on at home and returning them.

Shops only have themselves to blame!
221
22/02/2021 15:46:30 1 4
bbc
Well excuse us fat slobs that like shopping online.
229
22/02/2021 15:48:35 4 2
bbc
I agree with most of what you've said, even if we didn't need to know why you're slim.

Unfortunately these days many people enjoy the sport of ordering loads of stuff online, only to try it on and return most of it. It's continued expectation of everything in life being as "convenient" as possible.
237
22/02/2021 15:52:51 1 3
bbc
Yes, but are there enough of you to justify having a shop to cater or your needs?
245
Bob
22/02/2021 15:55:17 4 5
bbc
Online has a wider choice of clothing. If you are able to find in store then you'd find it on their site too.

What you *really* mean is you don't want the hassle of ordering and returning clothing, you just want to go in and find something.

That's fair enough. But personally given returns are free I'd rather not leave the house and shop with a brand I trust with sizing.
249
22/02/2021 15:56:21 1 1
bbc
4ft 3in guy , 24 stone , i have the same problem in store or online
250
22/02/2021 15:57:48 1 1
bbc
Most department stores only stock items that sell in high volumes. I find online shopping easier as I can get the fit I want.
262
22/02/2021 16:01:18 2 1
bbc
Agree, but I never underestimate the laziness of the general public, which trumps all else.
270
22/02/2021 16:03:35 4 2
bbc
Shoes likewise - even if the size is apparently correct the fitting is usually not.
278
22/02/2021 16:07:53 1 2
bbc
Same problem here. They get at us for being overweight and inactive but when we get off our backside and successfully do something about it, the infrastructure isn't there to support us.
306
22/02/2021 16:18:26 2 2
bbc
You forgot to include the pain of having to socially distance at the post office in the rain to send the article back as well
412
22/02/2021 16:52:46 1 2
bbc
well you vote with your feet. TAX AMAZON that would help
417
22/02/2021 16:54:09 1 1
bbc
Agreed.
As a bit of a short-a**e, with a 29" leg, I find it difficult to find trousers, esp jeans, to fit.
Online I have never been able to keep anything ordered online.
(I'm also somewhat chunky).
also, I find clothing photographers use artistic talent in their photos quite a bit.
452
22/02/2021 17:07:59 1 2
bbc
And don't even get me started on shoes!!
471
22/02/2021 17:12:56 0 1
bbc
6ft 4 and not slim. I haven't bought an item of clothing in a shop for years except for polos etc.
I actually bought 4 pairs of trousers in the US in 2019 because its the only place i can get stuff of the shelf.
The only thing that i can normally buy in a shop are socks, boxer shorts, ties (remember those) and duvet covers and pillowcases!
503
22/02/2021 17:27:53 0 1
bbc
This was always the way when online retail began to overtake the catalogue shopping. I thought the very same - why buy things when haven't physically seen them or tried them on? Half the stuff ended up going back.
511
Bsw
22/02/2021 17:32:26 0 1
bbc
One of the issues for me is the demise of the delivery drivers, plus how does online fit in with omissions/climate change? Finally absolutely loath bozo/Amazon great for those less fortunate, but we are and oversized lazy nation and I do not subscribe to such a sinister corporation
532
22/02/2021 17:43:38 1 2
bbc
You me find it a drag using online shopping, but millions don't. That's why the High Street is in trouble. Even John Lewis are expecting 75% of their sales to be online in three years time. They are converting to what the public want.
19
22/02/2021 15:00:13 40 12
bbc
Amazon is cheaper and faster to deliver than John Lewis but as they say "you get what you pay for"...John Lewis is better quality but it seems that for the majority of people, convenience and cheapness trumps quality and assurance of the brand. No judgement, just stating the facts
47
22/02/2021 15:06:53 24 4
bbc
Aren't we confusing 'facts' with opinions? If you buy a branded item, it's the same quality irrespective of which retailer you bought it from. Amazon may be quicker to deliver if it's something already stocked in the UK, otherwise you're looking at weeks for it to get shipped from China.
172
22/02/2021 15:30:11 7 2
bbc
So called 'Branded' items on Amazon aren't always as they seem.
474
22/02/2021 17:14:02 3 1
bbc
I can order something from Amazon at 4pm and it will be delivered next day. But it's not all about that, tv's for example come with a free 5 year warranty at John Lewis but usually only 1 year at Amazon. And JL aren't always more expensive, I've bought a lot of electrical goods at JL just for the extended warranty.
654
22/02/2021 19:30:08 0 0
bbc
Same product for maybe half the price on some branded products. And next day delivery for Prime. I'm sorry but you can't beat that when it is so comparable. In many cases why so people think Amazon is undercutting? Maybe the other businesses have just been overcharging for ages?
27
Bob
22/02/2021 15:01:29 35 141
bbc
People always say that their customer service is excellent, but one quick look at the reviews left online shows a completely different story. Their Trustpilot rating is dire. Worse than even the likes of Currys!

I suspect one aspect of this belief in their service is the higher price. I paid more therefore it must be better.
48
22/02/2021 15:07:00 57 4
bbc
While I've personally experienced less-than-great customer service in John Lewis (specifically the store in Westfield) I think you have to take negative reviews online with a pinch of salt, as people who've had a bad experience are more likely to leave a review than people who've had a good experience.
255
Bob
22/02/2021 15:59:01 2 4
bbc
That is a fallacy. Yes you are more likely to rush to leave a review if you have a bad experience, but if more people are having bad experiences then you end up with more bad reviews.

So if you have comparatively lower score than other brands you *are* worse than those brands.

Also to those doubting TP, note JL has a claimed profile and the same bad score is seen on other review platforms.
49
22/02/2021 15:07:16 83 4
bbc
If John Lewis can’t make it economically viable on the high street, what chance has anyone else got.
300
22/02/2021 16:16:56 28 13
bbc
IMHO the elephant in the physical retail room is the fact that an awful lot of us really don't like shopping and have better things to do with our time.

The regulatory challenge going forward isn't how to force people to drag themselves round town to buy some towels and sink plug, but how to ensure diversity of online retailers and avoid a [Long River] monopoly.
314
ME
22/02/2021 16:21:48 4 7
bbc
John Lewis are overpriced and pander to a niche market - pretentious people who would like to shop in Harrods but don’t. They are the people who would buy their milk from Waitrose or M@S even if there was a Morrison’s next door as they “wouldn’t be seen dead buying milk in Morrison’s ????
338
Dee
22/02/2021 16:30:02 1 1
bbc
It depends on the store location and demographic. Some JL areas have become markedly less affluent than years gone by or even decades gone by & John Lewis’s new business model must take that into consideration. That is why they’re closing older, less profitable stores.
50
22/02/2021 15:07:59 9 6
bbc
They should continue to focus on making sure their reputation for quality and value continues to transition to the online world.

Big physical department stores are a legacy of the 20th century.
18
22/02/2021 15:00:05 313 38
bbc
They need to get rid of Sharon White, their CEO and appoint someone who understands the retail business. God only knows why she is a Dame. How on earth does someone with absolutely zero experience of retail turn a firm around. What on earth is an ex civil servant doing running this firm? All she does is close sites and sack staff. JL has gone down hill fast since she took over.
51
22/02/2021 15:08:55 115 23
bbc
Head, nail, the, on. Rearrange into a popular phrase.
127
22/02/2021 15:24:18 22 1
bbc
Nail The Head On ?

hahaha - we all know what you mean, but you missed out the words "Hit" and another "The"
248
22/02/2021 15:56:21 2 1
bbc
Shouldn't that be Screw instead of nail. Mine is anyway.
378
22/02/2021 16:44:02 0 2
bbc
You forgot the word "hit"...
25
22/02/2021 15:01:14 71 12
bbc
There needs to be different business rates for those operating online only vs shops.

Rishi Sunak should consider a warehouse tax to even up the tax burden, with discounts offset by retail square footage.

Stores also need to up their game when re-opening by opening 12-8 weekday, not 9-5. Why have stores open on a Monday morning when they'd do far more trade on a Thursday & Friday evening.
52
22/02/2021 15:09:12 24 47
bbc
Why are you volunteering others to pay more tax? How about reduce the high street taxes? I can decide for myself how to spend my money thanks, I don't need an overbearing government to help themselves to more of it and spend it for me.
309
22/02/2021 16:19:27 6 1
bbc
Actually Steve you do. There is something called the public good (NHS, schools, roads, defence, police, courts, fire service, etc) that is more important than the ‘Steve Good’. I am willing to bet that you use, or benefit from, most of these public good services. There’s no such thing as a free lunch Steve!
540
22/02/2021 17:47:31 2 1
bbc
I suppose you do not need roads, schools, a health service, police etc etc.
19
22/02/2021 15:00:13 40 12
bbc
Amazon is cheaper and faster to deliver than John Lewis but as they say "you get what you pay for"...John Lewis is better quality but it seems that for the majority of people, convenience and cheapness trumps quality and assurance of the brand. No judgement, just stating the facts
53
22/02/2021 15:09:21 12 3
bbc
It does make me laugh those Amazon ads about electric vehicles, they deliver cheap Chinese tat made using coal power and shipped across the globe using using either jet fuel or bunker oil.
487
22/02/2021 17:18:53 2 2
bbc
A Sony 'XXY' model of tv from Amazon is exactly the same as a Sony 'XXY' model sold anywhere else. Made in the same place, shipped in the same way. The place to go for cheap tat with regards to electrical goods is your local supermarket. Like the 'Polaroid', 'Median' and 'Veltech' tv's everyone scraps over on Black Friday.
46
22/02/2021 15:06:23 514 35
bbc
As a 6ft 2" bloke who is pretty slim due to taking care of my diet & a distance runner I can honestly say that not 1 single item of clothing I have bought online has fitted me, and always have to be sent back. Online shopping is actually just a drag, I actually find it easier to go to a shop, try the clothes on, get an idea of the cut/material etc. Surprised most others don't feel the same really.
54
22/02/2021 15:09:31 108 17
bbc
5.11 female, 9 stone and feel exactly the same!!! But I have a few favoured brands that I know fit perfectly and so cannot be bothered with the endless 'try on'.
115
22/02/2021 15:20:55 38 6
bbc
As a man, I guess I'm a bit of a 'girl' when it comes to shopping & quite enjoy it - actually more than my wife does, she can't stand it lol! I've always enjoyed going out to buy my things, plus it's more sociable & you talk to the staff etc. I just find online really soulless.
117
22/02/2021 15:21:40 22 2
bbc
You two, get a room!! :-)
507
22/02/2021 17:30:19 0 1
bbc
Wow! Against current BMI trends.
39
22/02/2021 15:05:21 13 23
bbc
They mustn`t be allowed to close! I need them to try out tellies before I buy them cheaper online
55
Tim
22/02/2021 15:09:48 9 6
bbc
Absolutely disgusting comment
56
22/02/2021 15:09:53 2 2
bbc
Some of these shops lose track of things. When they make money they are not satisfied but must make more and more, take over other groups and then the crash comes. Do they really need so many shops within close distance of each other? We can't shop in them all.
57
DSA
22/02/2021 15:09:54 2 19
bbc
I don't suppose this couldn't be them putting shareholder profits before people's jobs?
61
22/02/2021 15:10:52 18 1
bbc
There are no shareholders
65
22/02/2021 15:11:59 3 1
bbc
No - because they don't have shareholders.
66
dan
22/02/2021 15:11:59 5 1
bbc
Well given that John Lewis is famously OWNED by their employees (i.e. their employees ARE their shareholders), absolutely not.

Try to have at least the slightest bit of understanding about a company before commenting on them :)
72
22/02/2021 15:13:02 1 4
bbc
Don't be naive - of course it is for without shareholders and a working business model there is no John Lewis and zero jobs.
73
22/02/2021 15:13:06 4 1
bbc
John Lewis' employees are its shareholders. The company is owned by a trust on behalf of all its employees — known as Partners – and a bonus, akin to a share of the profit was paid to employees until 2020.
39
22/02/2021 15:05:21 13 23
bbc
They mustn`t be allowed to close! I need them to try out tellies before I buy them cheaper online
58
Jim
22/02/2021 15:10:00 2 1
bbc
Alas that is the problem. Far too many of us go to a physical store, get feel for something and then shop around for a far better deal.

Or do what someone did to JL, bought 46 pair of shoes and then sent 45 back.
59
22/02/2021 15:10:47 12 3
bbc
Haberdashery. Just got to love it.
663
22/02/2021 19:35:35 0 0
bbc
Was already getting shrunk and pushed to the side compared to the past
27
Bob
22/02/2021 15:01:29 35 141
bbc
People always say that their customer service is excellent, but one quick look at the reviews left online shows a completely different story. Their Trustpilot rating is dire. Worse than even the likes of Currys!

I suspect one aspect of this belief in their service is the higher price. I paid more therefore it must be better.
60
22/02/2021 15:10:49 52 2
bbc
Most people won't leave a Trustpilot review unless they've either had problems or actively been pestered to after purchasing something. Trustpilot charges businesses to ask customers with positive experiences to leave reviews, and I suspect John Lewis probably haven't paid up unlike many others. Online reviews are just terrible and untrustworthy in general...
510
22/02/2021 17:32:10 0 1
bbc
Now this is really interesting. I didn't know this, and I guess many don't. How can this be better known. It's important.(and thanks).
57
DSA
22/02/2021 15:09:54 2 19
bbc
I don't suppose this couldn't be them putting shareholder profits before people's jobs?
61
22/02/2021 15:10:52 18 1
bbc
There are no shareholders
74
22/02/2021 15:13:06 1 1
bbc
Yes there are, all employees are partners in the business.
75
22/02/2021 15:13:11 1 1
bbc
DOH!
41
22/02/2021 15:05:48 6 6
bbc
Definitely concur with shoddy service to the point of rude and offensive. Own goal in every way.
62
Jim
22/02/2021 15:10:59 2 2
bbc
The move away from suited staff was not a good idea
489
22/02/2021 17:20:03 0 1
bbc
Yes, tricky sometimes to decide who was the JL employee and who was just a fellow customer...
63
Bob
22/02/2021 15:11:04 8 13
bbc
Always knowingly overpriced.

John Lewis is a victim of media hype in my view. People expect them to be more than they ever were. The sole reason they receive the hype is because of the partnership model the operate. Nothing else.

It is a useful shop for gifting as they sell items that are less tatty than elsewhere, but that's it's limit for most people.
17
22/02/2021 14:59:17 10 104
bbc
Don't care. It's not wanted any more.
64
22/02/2021 15:11:05 22 2
bbc
I'm very pro online shopping. However I also want certain shops on the high street.

I do a lot of "man stuff", small DIY jobs, electronics etc., and I'm fed up with not being able to properly see what I'm ordering, or having it come from China.

Used to have hardware shops on my high street, not any more.

Would love to be able to go the high street and just pick up what I need on the day.
132
22/02/2021 15:21:47 9 1
bbc
Exactly. It is a pain to have to drive ten miles if al you need is a boz of scews and a length of 4x1!
573
22/02/2021 18:10:52 0 0
bbc
if people continue to buy on line then independent pet shops will also disappear
57
DSA
22/02/2021 15:09:54 2 19
bbc
I don't suppose this couldn't be them putting shareholder profits before people's jobs?
65
22/02/2021 15:11:59 3 1
bbc
No - because they don't have shareholders.
57
DSA
22/02/2021 15:09:54 2 19
bbc
I don't suppose this couldn't be them putting shareholder profits before people's jobs?
66
dan
22/02/2021 15:11:59 5 1
bbc
Well given that John Lewis is famously OWNED by their employees (i.e. their employees ARE their shareholders), absolutely not.

Try to have at least the slightest bit of understanding about a company before commenting on them :)
46
22/02/2021 15:06:23 514 35
bbc
As a 6ft 2" bloke who is pretty slim due to taking care of my diet & a distance runner I can honestly say that not 1 single item of clothing I have bought online has fitted me, and always have to be sent back. Online shopping is actually just a drag, I actually find it easier to go to a shop, try the clothes on, get an idea of the cut/material etc. Surprised most others don't feel the same really.
67
22/02/2021 15:12:08 45 4
bbc
I feel exactly the same. I need to try stuff on - in the shop! Sending online purchases back is expensive and time-consuming.
142
22/02/2021 15:27:59 3 7
bbc
Then shop with someone who does free returns i.e. Almost everybody.
39
22/02/2021 15:05:21 13 23
bbc
They mustn`t be allowed to close! I need them to try out tellies before I buy them cheaper online
68
22/02/2021 15:07:18 0 1
bbc
Surprised you can can find them cheaper with the same guarantee?
69
22/02/2021 15:07:35 4 7
bbc
Have been avoiding JL for at least a couple of years now as their levels of service deteriorated quite significantly. I believe this is the real issue behind their decline, perhaps accelerated by Covid.
39
22/02/2021 15:05:21 13 23
bbc
They mustn`t be allowed to close! I need them to try out tellies before I buy them cheaper online
70
22/02/2021 15:08:01 3 1
bbc
That is the problem with so much retail. If you ask the shop, they will probably be able to get closer to online prices. But once physical retail is gone, we might end up with higher taxes on something like warehousing or delivery vans, so online prices will have to rise.
89
22/02/2021 15:15:54 1 1
bbc
Or higher income tax to compensate for the business rates and corporation tax that the online firms do not pay.
71
22/02/2021 15:12:38 142 8
bbc
If people/govt are serious about saving the High Street, make online retailers pay the same taxes as High Street shops. I don't like Mike Astley/Philip Green one little bit, but they pointed this out and were right basically. Many bemoan the death of real shops, but how many have eyed up an article there and then bought it at Amazon bc it's a few quid cheaper?
120
22/02/2021 15:22:48 112 7
bbc
Absolutely agree 100%. Crazy that the high street retailers pay fortunes in various taxes etc when the online lot get away almost scot free.
138
22/02/2021 15:27:17 9 3
bbc
I agree, make online pay business rates depending on whether they sell to other businesses or consumers. Not on a warehouse or shop. One day the environmental groups will realise the adverse impact of online verses the high street
233
22/02/2021 15:50:00 6 9
bbc
So you think a small independent startup in their garage should be penalised to keep the likes of Michael Ashley and Philip Green in their monopoly position do you? I like John Lewis as a shop, but they were, like the other big players, hopelessly slow to adapt. They were complacent and lazy, assuming they were entitled to their dominant position. They failed as a result. That's business.
283
22/02/2021 16:10:03 6 2
bbc
It was department stores like JL that destroyed the local high streets in the first instance. For many a town in the vicinity of one.

Putting everything in one single store for convenience and at cheaper prices, and the shoppers lapped it up

Getting rid of these huge department stores may mean the high street has space again for specialty shops who can't compete on JLs economies of scale.
349
22/02/2021 16:34:17 1 1
bbc
Online retailers should of course pay the same taxes where they provide the same service, but maybe we need rethink the purpose of the High Street. Why should it be about retail, rather than say leisure and social activities? Maybe it's an opportunity for the High Street to become about experiences instead of products.
530
22/02/2021 17:41:36 1 1
bbc
Ignoring all the legal tax issues the basic issue is that high street needs to pay for buildings and staff even if they are doing very little. You can't get over that.
547
22/02/2021 17:54:06 2 1
bbc
(1) I grew up in a small town in the South West with lots of shops, a choice of greengrocers, butchers ironmongers, etc., a thriving biweekly market and only one small supermarket in the 70s. By the late 80s/early 90s a large number of people have retired to the area, who have different needs. There are now four supermarkets and the local shops and market have changed.
549
22/02/2021 17:54:49 1 2
bbc
(2) Now many charity shops (good for recycling items, but with reduced business rates) fill the high street and local multi-generation businesses have closed. This is change, driven by the consumer. As one elderly and poor local said, "What loyalty do I owe to these local businesses. When did they reduce prices to help the likes of me?" He swapped to the supermarkets which were cheaper.
551
22/02/2021 17:55:59 1 1
bbc
(3) Now move forward another 30 years and we see the next phase of consumerism. Charity shops still abound, but supermarkets and department stores as well as small shops are being hit by online retailers. Despite being in the top 25% household income wise, I still feel that most department stores are outside my income range, however, I do seem to be able to afford similar items online...
552
22/02/2021 17:57:07 1 1
bbc
(4) High streets developed in Britain after the Great Fire of London and reached their heyday in the late 19th Century. As we are always short of housing, perhaps we can convert some of them back to the houses that they would/could have been. However I hope that they don't all disappear as I will miss them.
558
22/02/2021 18:00:41 0 2
bbc
(5) One potential advantage to having all your goods delivered, is perhaps a reduction in the use of the car. One van delivers to 25 houses a day. Saves on fuel, wear and tear and parking costs for your car and saves the environment. Before I moved online I was visiting the shops ~3 times a week, now I online shop about once every 10 days. Could we build much needed houses on the carparks?
570
22/02/2021 18:06:46 2 0
bbc
'... how many have eyed up an article there and then bought it at Amazon bc it's a few quid cheaper?'

Sadly, you are probably correct. For me the saddest thing is that somehow Amazon has managed to persuade lots of the population that they are always the cheapest and people don't bother to look elsewhere. I always check other retailers and, news to some, Amazon are definitely not the cheapest.
57
DSA
22/02/2021 15:09:54 2 19
bbc
I don't suppose this couldn't be them putting shareholder profits before people's jobs?
72
22/02/2021 15:13:02 1 4
bbc
Don't be naive - of course it is for without shareholders and a working business model there is no John Lewis and zero jobs.
57
DSA
22/02/2021 15:09:54 2 19
bbc
I don't suppose this couldn't be them putting shareholder profits before people's jobs?
73
22/02/2021 15:13:06 4 1
bbc
John Lewis' employees are its shareholders. The company is owned by a trust on behalf of all its employees — known as Partners – and a bonus, akin to a share of the profit was paid to employees until 2020.
61
22/02/2021 15:10:52 18 1
bbc
There are no shareholders
74
22/02/2021 15:13:06 1 1
bbc
Yes there are, all employees are partners in the business.
61
22/02/2021 15:10:52 18 1
bbc
There are no shareholders
75
22/02/2021 15:13:11 1 1
bbc
DOH!
25
22/02/2021 15:01:14 71 12
bbc
There needs to be different business rates for those operating online only vs shops.

Rishi Sunak should consider a warehouse tax to even up the tax burden, with discounts offset by retail square footage.

Stores also need to up their game when re-opening by opening 12-8 weekday, not 9-5. Why have stores open on a Monday morning when they'd do far more trade on a Thursday & Friday evening.
76
22/02/2021 15:13:16 8 3
bbc
Protection policies through taxing particular industries or styles of doing business only entrenches low productivity and poor quality. We made that mistake in the 60s and 70s and our industries fell through the floor rather than remain competitive in a global marketplace. We don't need to make that mistake again.
77
22/02/2021 15:13:24 5 4
bbc
these big company are there own worst enemes more store, finish all the little shops and when they think they have all the trade they costs are to high and they have to close themselves
19
22/02/2021 15:00:13 40 12
bbc
Amazon is cheaper and faster to deliver than John Lewis but as they say "you get what you pay for"...John Lewis is better quality but it seems that for the majority of people, convenience and cheapness trumps quality and assurance of the brand. No judgement, just stating the facts
78
22/02/2021 15:09:58 6 2
bbc
I use Amazon a lot but if I want long-lasting quality I will happily wait a few days more for John Lewis. I recently bought a duvet on Amazon which turned out not be to be very good. For just £10 more I got an excellent one from John Lewis which I know will last forever! Both outlets have their place, but I would be very sad to lose John Lewis.
365
Dee
22/02/2021 16:37:45 1 1
bbc
Agree with you re: JL Duvets. They’re the best. They need to stick to the quality, middle class JL branded products that people want & not try to be all things to all people.
18
22/02/2021 15:00:05 313 38
bbc
They need to get rid of Sharon White, their CEO and appoint someone who understands the retail business. God only knows why she is a Dame. How on earth does someone with absolutely zero experience of retail turn a firm around. What on earth is an ex civil servant doing running this firm? All she does is close sites and sack staff. JL has gone down hill fast since she took over.
79
22/02/2021 15:13:34 41 4
bbc
That's the only thing these overpaid, untalented, bluffers who call themselves as "captains of industy" ever think of. They come in to "turn around" the company, and end up closing it down.
146
22/02/2021 15:29:00 60 2
bbc
John Lewis need to remember what sort of company they are and not parachute people in at the top at enormous expense. Must be plenty of experienced partners with many years of experience who gradually work their way up. And with loyalty to the company they don’t go flitting off from job to job following the money.
556
22/02/2021 17:59:59 0 1
bbc
it doesnt close until those hedge fund managers suck it dry and bet against it failing its as if it was a mighty con against the normal proles of this country
80
22/02/2021 15:13:47 30 5
bbc
Folks. Use your local stores or one day when you want to try before you buy you simply won't be able to.
100
22/02/2021 15:18:15 20 2
bbc
Unfortunately too many people also like to try in store before they buy online.
658
22/02/2021 19:32:53 0 0
bbc
And if you really care about local businesses and your high street surviving just pay for parking. If you are arguing the toss for a few quid you really don't care about local shops after all.
32
22/02/2021 15:02:00 10 5
bbc
John Lewis was always the "go to store" for many things even when internet shopping was well established. Helpful advice, service,friendly knowledgeable staff and 2 year no quibble returns.

Then, service levels dropped, staff surly and unhelpful all of a sudden and getting advice frankly became a chore with huge queues and little/no help

worse, product delivery went to pot - they lost their USP
81
22/02/2021 15:14:00 7 1
bbc
"staff surly and unhelpful"? Really? That's awful if it's true.
I've never found the JL staff anything like that.
217
22/02/2021 15:45:47 1 1
bbc
Same path M&S took. Treat the staff less well, they'll treat customers similarly badly. I don't need to pay to park the car and struggle round a shopping mall just to be sneered at by disinterested staff.
46
22/02/2021 15:06:23 514 35
bbc
As a 6ft 2" bloke who is pretty slim due to taking care of my diet & a distance runner I can honestly say that not 1 single item of clothing I have bought online has fitted me, and always have to be sent back. Online shopping is actually just a drag, I actually find it easier to go to a shop, try the clothes on, get an idea of the cut/material etc. Surprised most others don't feel the same really.
82
22/02/2021 15:14:06 29 3
bbc
You are right! Many times I have bought things not expected cheap material, coats need to try on,
42
22/02/2021 15:05:49 8 10
bbc
Sadly JL is not what is was. Before lockdowns when I last shopped at JL Customer Service was non existent. I bought a dinner service (separates ie not in a box) and they didn't offer to wrap it or put it in a bag or anything and moaned when I asked. They just took my money and walked off. I feel sad for the staff but it is another overpriced Department store.
83
22/02/2021 15:14:15 5 2
bbc
Don't believe you.
84
22/02/2021 15:14:17 1 8
bbc
Until everyone is "safe", everything must close. Selfish people.
41
22/02/2021 15:05:48 6 6
bbc
Definitely concur with shoddy service to the point of rude and offensive. Own goal in every way.
85
22/02/2021 15:14:37 0 1
bbc
Which branch?
46
22/02/2021 15:06:23 514 35
bbc
As a 6ft 2" bloke who is pretty slim due to taking care of my diet & a distance runner I can honestly say that not 1 single item of clothing I have bought online has fitted me, and always have to be sent back. Online shopping is actually just a drag, I actually find it easier to go to a shop, try the clothes on, get an idea of the cut/material etc. Surprised most others don't feel the same really.
What an arrogant cnut Removed
99
22/02/2021 15:18:03 1 2
bbc
Thanks lol!
46
22/02/2021 15:06:23 514 35
bbc
As a 6ft 2" bloke who is pretty slim due to taking care of my diet & a distance runner I can honestly say that not 1 single item of clothing I have bought online has fitted me, and always have to be sent back. Online shopping is actually just a drag, I actually find it easier to go to a shop, try the clothes on, get an idea of the cut/material etc. Surprised most others don't feel the same really.
87
dan
22/02/2021 15:15:40 10 20
bbc
This is true, but ironically barely anything from John Lewis would fit you because their target market seems to be wealthy, yet "cuddly" men. At least that's been my experience as a 5'11" slim/average built bloke.
490
22/02/2021 17:21:21 0 1
bbc
not relevant.
88
22/02/2021 15:15:40 3 3
bbc
They've done well to last as long as they have. We have to accept the big store with helpful staff is a thing of the past now. They will join a long list of similar companies who have closed over the last few years due to customers buying online.
70
22/02/2021 15:08:01 3 1
bbc
That is the problem with so much retail. If you ask the shop, they will probably be able to get closer to online prices. But once physical retail is gone, we might end up with higher taxes on something like warehousing or delivery vans, so online prices will have to rise.
89
22/02/2021 15:15:54 1 1
bbc
Or higher income tax to compensate for the business rates and corporation tax that the online firms do not pay.
90
22/02/2021 15:16:25 3 3
bbc
Why would I want to take a bus into town to our grubby high street when I can have everything I want delivered to my door ?

I've got better things to do with my time.
91
22/02/2021 15:16:29 32 6
bbc
We may benefit from online shopping in terms of pricing and ease , but at what price , roads busier with delivery vans , less business rates to councils leading to higher tax , automation by online firms leading to less employment etc we may think we are saving money but we're paying the price elsewhere , as we all effectively have to pay the price for the damage as taxpayers .
112
Dan
22/02/2021 15:20:20 44 12
bbc
Yes I'd rather see amazon fail than john Lewis.

The they dont pay tax and treat everyone bad and manipulate customers.
421
22/02/2021 16:56:00 1 1
bbc
Why would it make roads busier?
if one delivery van delivers 200 items its saved a hell of a lot of emissions than 200 people going to John Lewis,
I don't want to lose any shops but the world is changing and had changed so much that its now just a matter of time
604
22/02/2021 18:38:03 0 0
bbc
Yes - and once all the shops are shut the online retailers will start charging for all returns - that will be a shock to the internet shoppers
92
22/02/2021 15:16:38 3 2
bbc
Shame. I really like John Lewis. The only department store we had shopped in for quite a while (before lockdown).
93
22/02/2021 15:17:06 3 3
bbc
Luddites won't like it but bricks and mortar shops are a thing of the past.
94
22/02/2021 15:17:14 1 2
bbc
God help us when the high street is finished. In the run up to Christmas my street which has 10 houses was visited by delivery vans at least 25 times a day, at one time there were three white vans in the street at the same time. I just can't believe how lazy people are over going to the shops and it drives me nuts when people drive to the gym instead of walking to it.
40
22/02/2021 15:05:42 28 7
bbc
You're right, but the problem is that the high street has adapted, amazon and online shopping didn't some out of nowhere, it's been here for 20 years in one form or another.

There's been massive complacency by most shops. I'm in my mid 40s and basically never shop physically apart from food and the odd clothing item. Imagine what the two or three generations below me are going to shop for?
95
22/02/2021 15:17:25 1 1
bbc
Did you mean "hasn't"?
96
22/02/2021 15:17:37 2 6
bbc
Overpriced and out of touch with consumer demand so no surprise here.
39
22/02/2021 15:05:21 13 23
bbc
They mustn`t be allowed to close! I need them to try out tellies before I buy them cheaper online
97
22/02/2021 15:17:46 1 1
bbc
i think you just hit the nail on the head there.
98
22/02/2021 15:12:55 48 2
bbc
I buy everything from JL, the Glasgow store is brilliant, so are all the staff, always very polite and helpful. Edinburgh store also first class! Very sad to see any of them go ??
696
22/02/2021 21:14:40 0 0
bbc
Those 2 ok but Aberdeen on the list I hear. Sad times
What an arrogant cnut Removed
99
22/02/2021 15:18:03 1 2
bbc
Thanks lol!
80
22/02/2021 15:13:47 30 5
bbc
Folks. Use your local stores or one day when you want to try before you buy you simply won't be able to.
100
22/02/2021 15:18:15 20 2
bbc
Unfortunately too many people also like to try in store before they buy online.