Covid lockdown: 'We are burning through about £500,000 a day'
22/02/2021 | news | business | 1,509
The owner of PureGym says lockdown has been costing his business hundreds of thousands of pounds a day.
1
22/02/2021 11:53:45 727 73
bbc
Gym users are supposed to burn through the pounds.
64
22/02/2021 12:17:58 75 36
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This comment isn't getting enough love
160
22/02/2021 12:36:19 13 10
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Yes, users, not owners.
168
LEO
22/02/2021 12:38:15 13 6
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LOL
194
22/02/2021 12:41:04 41 13
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I think a lot of people will give up the gym. After all walking or running can be done outdoors.
257
22/02/2021 12:43:36 26 22
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you get better exercise walking in the park
320
22/02/2021 12:53:41 5 5
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d-dmm-TSSS!
334
22/02/2021 12:55:33 24 9
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The closure of gyms has proved to many of us that there are other, very effective, ways to exercise that bypass the frequent waiting for other gym-users to vacate a key piece of equipment that they have been hogging.
360
22/02/2021 12:58:52 6 2
bbc
Sometimes if you don't laugh you cry...
886
22/02/2021 14:25:37 2 1
bbc
Who needs a gym - getting out of bed in the morning is more than enough exercise!
913
22/02/2021 14:26:00 2 0
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Lol, the collapse of society through tyrannical restrictions on freedoms and transfer of wealth to the elites is hilarious! Boom boom
22/02/2021 15:19:16 1 0
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Gyms are not Slimming Businesses - the fitter you are, the greater the muscle mass - the heavier the body.

A slim business is a fitter business, as this topic tends to infer because 275 gyms will be losing a load of dosh more than say 10 gyms would.

LOOKING CLOSER, however, this is a FRANCHISE, so the loses will be the franchisees of these investments.
PCS
22/02/2021 16:22:53 0 0
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Whilst I have sympathy for those if it's their sole or limited income that work in these places, I'm afraid they have limited GDP contribution! The priority must be for the largest GDP creators.
2
22/02/2021 11:54:19 18 29
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Never mind gyms. Open the pubs!
166
LEO
22/02/2021 12:38:05 0 0
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LOL
3
22/02/2021 11:56:12 84 62
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Should have donated to the Tories and started selling PPE. Be nimble.

In any other country the current government would be described as corrupt. Why not here?
26
22/02/2021 12:06:13 29 22
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Should have made up "intelligence" and invaded somewhere. Be nimble.

Just how long would tendering have taken out of interest and how much would the price have gone up in the meantime noting the global demand?
303
22/02/2021 12:51:13 4 0
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he could have sold masks
611
22/02/2021 13:39:33 2 2
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Bloody well said!
783
VoR
22/02/2021 14:01:25 4 2
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"Should have donated to the Tories and started selling PPE. Be nimble"

I don't think that works unless the health secretary used to be a member of your gym. Even then, you need to establish regular communications with him so that you can then leverage this relationship (even without the MP's knowledge).
22/02/2021 15:43:29 1 0
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You'd have been the first person complaining when the Govt entered a 6 month tender process to obtain anything.
4
22/02/2021 11:56:12 2 27
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State are destroying the country, damn communists
16
22/02/2021 12:02:36 4 5
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Yes, with a PM called Boris, the government are definitely communists!!
5
22/02/2021 11:57:14 24 24
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Clearly, the owners of Puregym didn't keep up with their monthly 'Donate to the Tories' subscriptions. Had they done so, their voice would have been heard so much quicker...
6
22/02/2021 11:57:23 115 66
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What is more important - Pure Gyms profits - or the nations health?

Selfish indulgence in the extreme.
263
22/02/2021 12:45:34 48 20
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But to some extent gym-going and taking exercise IS the nation's health! At the least, I would have thought we can all agree gyms do no harm and for some at least do a lot of good.
378
22/02/2021 13:01:42 3 3
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I wouldn't call going to the gym "selfish indulgence", especially given the strain that the UK's high obesity rates put on the NHS
525
22/02/2021 13:18:34 2 4
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Nations health is more than just covid.... it’s a lot of things including mental health. This just show how narrow minded you actually are. Let’s lock ourselves away and keep are heads in the sand shall we........nothing can get us then!!! Stay indoors do what you want but let us live our lives
974
22/02/2021 14:42:23 1 1
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Lockdown has done far more damage to the nations health (both mentally and physically) than the coronavirus ever could.
7
22/02/2021 11:58:03 4 6
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Last one out, turn off the lights,...…..oh hang on, they've already been switched off.
29
22/02/2021 12:07:00 3 3
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Not only have the lights gone out - the bulbs have been nicked as well.
8
22/02/2021 11:58:04 124 19
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I've been really happy following online exercise sessions and adding to my home gym equipment during lockdown. Also I have saved an enormous amount of money cancelling my gym membership. So I certainly won't be returning.
175
22/02/2021 12:39:18 30 53
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Enormous amount of money? You must have been a member of a super expensive gym them to have saved that much in a year!
284
22/02/2021 12:49:09 13 7
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good for you. However, there are a fast amount of people out there though that 1. don't have the money to spend on weights and various other gym equipment and 2. dont' have the space for a home gym.
Please don't try to belittle those of us who need to go to a gym to use equipment as that's cheaper than spending hundreds of pounds on equipment.
404
22/02/2021 13:05:48 10 4
bbc
Given that I'd need an extra room to start replicating a few of the facilities I use at the gym, I reckon the cost of providing this for myself at home would equate to around 150 years worth of gym membership.

I'll stick with the gym. It's an awful lot cheaper.
696
22/02/2021 13:51:40 3 13
bbc
Good for you but then, it isn't about you! Gyms employ people and bring well being to many people. As long as you are ok though eh?

Btw - a grown up man doing an exercise class in his house is weird.
9
22/02/2021 11:59:31 69 27
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The problem is....covid 19 isn't bothered about the economy, it just wants to kill poeple!
18
22/02/2021 12:03:14 41 56
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Well 4% of them
291
22/02/2021 12:48:54 0 3
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true but it spreads by travel
10
22/02/2021 11:59:33 80 33
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While I feel bad for this guy - what on earth was society supposed to do? It was a global pandemic and there was death and suffering everywhere. I hope the one thing this guy has definitely learned is GET MORE INSURANCE. Businesses, you either insure yourself or roll the dice - it's entirely your choice.
28
22/02/2021 12:06:53 62 7
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We took out business interruption insurance and guess what.. Covid wasn't covered. The FCA had to go all the way to the supreme court to get insurance co.s to pay businesses. I'll guarantee the next round of insurance will be super costly or there'll be no coverage. https://bit.ly/3unhpG7 . Newsthump nails it again here: https://bit.ly/2NtZrRR
78
22/02/2021 12:21:58 7 3
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Most insurance policies exclude this type of thing - so by all means buy more, you still wont be covered. Great advice though - glad we have experts like you on here.
83
22/02/2021 12:12:57 3 2
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I think a major issue is that insurance doesn't really cover this. In my industry (travel) force majeure clauses in contracts typically only stipulate things that last for up to 3 months
236
22/02/2021 12:44:50 2 0
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It’s public record that business interruption insurance providers have refused claims. It’s taken a year to get this through the FCA. It’ll take another year for the companies to get through the backlog and pay out. PureGym will have lost about £350 million by the time they get paid out. The knock on effect is that the insurers will go bust and there’ll be no payout. Lose lose situation.
299
22/02/2021 12:49:59 5 2
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he will just close down and people will just exercise at home or go running outdoors
22/02/2021 15:10:19 0 0
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Everywhere? I suppose that's technically true, geographically, but it sort of implies that bodies are piling up in the streets. Hadn't noticed that myself yet! But with around 25,000 extra deaths so far in 2021 or around 0.0003 of the population I suppose I'll just have to keep searching.
11
22/02/2021 11:58:14 11 8
bbc
As much as we need to keep conditions safe, I'm sure we can all agree there needs to be a balance with providing some financial ease on everyone affected.

I'm sure there's a solution here that would make sense, for example, having a limited number of people allowed into gyms where they could still socially distance.
31
22/02/2021 12:08:40 12 5
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From day 1 common sense should gave prevailed but it hasn't.
The Government is now employing belt and braces having screwed the whole thing up; attempting damage limitation too late.
12
22/02/2021 12:00:10 13 6
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All government support is ultimately aimed at ensuring commercial landlords get paid. Furlough - paid by tax payers, enables businesses to pay commercial landlords. Suspension of rates - paid by taxpayers, enables businesses pay commercial landlords. CBILS and BBLS - guaranteed/subsidised by taxpayers, enables banks to deploy capital at well above base rate and enables businesses to pay landlords!
147
22/02/2021 12:33:49 4 3
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And it's not working.
I spoke to a friend last week who is a personal guarantor for over £500,000 , he business is going down the pan.
The Government's response, 'were helping businesses and we've paid out £x'.
They have no idea.

Example:
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/coronavirus-lockdown-rishi-sunak-gordon-ramsay-hospitality-b1804843.html
22/02/2021 17:08:41 0 0
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Ooh,what simplistic tripe.
13
22/02/2021 12:00:54 223 59
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I wonder how on earth we survived before gyms were a thing?
27
Sky
22/02/2021 12:06:23 405 36
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We used to have gardens in houses, not a fifty square foot "outdoor space" to provide for 800 flats.
We used to have affordable council leisure centres and swimming pools until they were sold to run at a profit.
We sold off huge swathes of school playing fields to build houses.
Most cycle lanes are unfit for purpose, and traffic numbers have exploded since "before gyms were a thing".
51
22/02/2021 12:14:16 28 8
bbc
Simples.
Joe Public had no Death by Mouth fat dripping, chemical laden, repulsive fast food to scoff and/or 1000 cal choc lattes to slurp. Car was a privilege, kids walked (!) to school, schools did gym days (!)....and people actually home cooked decent scoff. Etc etc.
On top of bone idle scoffing Type 2 self inflicters we'll have thousands of Long Covids to deal with. Heaven help them.
56
22/02/2021 12:15:44 18 12
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Gyms employ people. Keep that in mind
111
22/02/2021 12:27:36 38 8
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When I was young it was unusual to see younger obese people. Back then most people had jobs that involved movement.
Things have changed more people work in a sedate manner. The reason gyms have become popular is it’s the easy way for busy people to stay in shape.
Right or wrong that’s the way of today’s world and there’s no way of going back.
179
22/02/2021 12:39:36 21 9
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You realise gymnasiums go back for thousands of years yes?
258
22/02/2021 12:47:09 14 6
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I was eating my McD's mega burgher, washed down with a coke a few days ago and thought why are so many people unhealthy, not like when I was a kid.
267
22/02/2021 12:47:01 13 12
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running outdoors doesnt cost any money and its a better workout
470
Cal
22/02/2021 13:16:12 1 1
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Odd thing isn't it - I often wonder what aliens who visited would think of gyms!
"So you humans have to spend your free time and energy lifting up heavy pieces of metal because your lifestyles are too sedentary otherwise".
To compare to the past - since globalisation in last 30-40 years we have benefitted from unlimited nutritious & calorific food in the West - that's not always been the case.
543
22/02/2021 13:27:26 6 0
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No-one is saying gyms are essential for the survival of humanity. We all survived before motor vehicles were invented, yet plenty of people will scream they need a car. I do wish people wouild stop posting this stupid strawman that objecting to being without something equates to it being essential for survival. There is more to life than just survival.
601
22/02/2021 13:37:41 2 0
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Easy before Thatcherism we had heavy industry people worked in hard physical environments no need for the gym. In fact most guys were to knackered & just wanted a drink. In those days people died from drink & smoking now we die from inactivity
614
xlr
22/02/2021 13:40:07 3 0
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We died in our early 50s.
668
22/02/2021 13:47:21 1 0
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Let me guess - you are middle aged and overweight?

We survived before we had a lot of things. Inside toilets, central heating, electricity. You fancy giving them up too? The fact we survived before gyms doesn't mean we should just let them die out.
674
22/02/2021 13:47:56 2 1
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I don't think anyone's suggesting that gyms are essential for our survival!
You could say that about anything new that you've decided to reject during your lifetime - such a crass comment
980
22/02/2021 14:42:51 0 0
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we ate less jumk....
981
22/02/2021 14:43:13 0 0
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we ate less junk....
14
22/02/2021 12:01:04 476 82
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Really. I'm sure they will use those over inflated figures when they come to claim. The staff are furloughed, the council tax frozen and I hope they switched the lights and heating off...

Most of the loss here is missed profit, depreciation and loans. It's how modern businesses make money but declare a loss to avoid tax.

I don't see them ever refunding all the people who join a gym but never go.
30
22/02/2021 12:07:10 318 35
bbc
Spot on. £500,000 a day seems like an awful lot. I'm highly sceptical about these numbers, I'd like to see a breakdown. I'd also add that Landlords should share the pain, but are they?
33
22/02/2021 12:08:50 51 44
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Someone obviously has never been a director of a business! Senseless dribble.
37
22/02/2021 12:09:53 32 3
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I joined the gym just before lockdown.
When the government anounced the lockdown my gym (PureGym) sens a message assuring me that my account would be frozen. And so it was.
I haven't paid a penny since.

I can't speak for every Gym company out there, but i would think they'd operate the same way.
142
22/02/2021 12:32:46 8 4
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Depreciation doesn't count for tax, loans are something HMRC are very aware of so cap interest, and missed profit is irrelevant when it comes to dodging tax.

You really have no idea.
162
22/02/2021 12:36:58 3 7
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you are so ignorant of the real world!
265
22/02/2021 12:45:56 2 0
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gyms are a tough business to make any money on
314
22/02/2021 12:53:04 3 4
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No rates, no VAT, no salaries, a little electricity to stop everything getting damp is costing £183 500 000 a year!!? I suggest a new accountant and financial management team is required
467
22/02/2021 13:15:51 3 2
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Typical lefty and anti-enterprise comment.
476
22/02/2021 13:16:49 4 0
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What about rent and insurance?

Both probably the greatest expense after staff costs.

A lot of the equipment may well be leased too, which will incur repayments and interest regardless of them not being used.
515
22/02/2021 13:24:43 3 2
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You clearly know nothing about a running a business , furlough pays 80% of some wages it does not make anyone a profit , council tax / business rates are a cost etc , not having to pay them does reimburse lost profits , you are clearly a socialist who knows a lot about spending other peoples money but absolutely nothing about making money - thank god for capitalists who pay for you !
648
22/02/2021 13:43:08 1 1
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Why should they refund people who take out a contract knowing full well what they're signing for, do SKY, Netflix or Amazon prime refund if you don't watch the TV every day?
651
22/02/2021 13:44:09 0 1
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I wish if you had done a simple math before posting. The article says they had 275 gyms. If they were to pay min £2000pm rent for those gyms (they have large gyms), that only adds up more than £500k month. Gov would not cover staff pension and NI under furlough remember.
690
VoR
22/02/2021 13:50:46 0 0
bbc
Could depend on
(a) whether they have loads of debt to manage
(b) whether they have high rents to pay on premises
(c) whether they are tied into other contracts for things they don't need right now, such as various kinds of insurance, cleaning.

I wouldn't be surprised if they might also be taking a chance to do some refurbs while the place is empty, finances permitting.
794
22/02/2021 14:04:04 0 0
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Depreciation costs are added back when calculating corp tax
859
22/02/2021 14:17:59 1 0
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PureGym has left lights on continuously in the Lambeth gym during national lockdowns. I contacted PureGym and was told the gym was being deep cleaned - it is unfeasible that the gym is being deep cleaned for months. This is an enormous waste when energy saving measures are crucial to avoid fossil fuel consumption. Perhaps this is why they spend £500,000 per day on 260+ gyms.
999
22/02/2021 14:50:24 0 0
bbc
Depreciation is added back to get taxable profit as it is not allowable expense. You get capital allowances to deduct to get taxable profit. Your comments are wrong. Loan interest is allowable.
15
22/02/2021 12:01:06 578 108
bbc
My monthly subscription renewed a day before the lockdown last March. I asked for the money back and they didn't reply. So I am not sympathetic. They are ruthless business people and will have to take the rough with the smooth.
20
22/02/2021 12:03:45 133 357
bbc
Bold words, as long as you don't mind running the risk of having no gym to return to when this is over.
128
22/02/2021 12:30:06 47 1
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PureGym just froze my payments, so I didn't pay anything when they were closed during lockdown...
130
22/02/2021 12:30:47 25 1
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So did mine however they adjusted the payment when they reopened so I did not lose out.
161
22/02/2021 12:36:35 15 70
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As an important part of the nation's health, the Government should step in and taking over these failing businesses. A proactive element of the NHS perhaps?
185
22/02/2021 12:40:40 8 14
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Lie thier system automatically pause membership
208
dhl
22/02/2021 12:41:32 1 2
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As will you
215
22/02/2021 12:41:50 28 1
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Mine was always adjusted when they reopened, the first lockdown was quite sudden and they have millions of members so no shock there, they probably had tens of thousands of people contacting them at once.

If you'd read their website though, like I did, you'd have discovered that your next full month after reopening would have been adjusted for (i.e. free) as would every other future closure.
260
22/02/2021 12:44:55 10 2
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ruthless like airlines
484
22/02/2021 13:18:12 9 6
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I for one would like the gyms to reopen as soon as possible. It keeps gym goers off the streets and then I won't have to step out of the way as they bound past,running around the streets with their ear pods in like you are in their way.
495
22/02/2021 13:20:51 3 0
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Not all are the same. My gym has frozen the monthly fee whilst they are closed due to COVID.
599
22/02/2021 13:37:17 6 1
bbc
My gym stopped collecting subscriptions whilst they were not open. They also have their trainers providing free online classes throughout lockdowns.
Oh no you lost 19 quid. Get over it loser. Removed
645
22/02/2021 13:39:41 1 0
bbc
I'm with Puregym and they stopped my direct debit on both occasions of lockdown, I think they've been exceptional in what they've done. The classes when it reopened were structured properly to accommodate with adequate cleaning stations.
679
VoR
22/02/2021 13:48:13 10 1
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This doesn't sound unique to Covid. Gyms are notorious for making it difficult to cancel memberships!
766
22/02/2021 13:58:34 0 0
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At least you are not tied to the contract... I wouldn't mind missing out on £25 and be free from a gym that keeps you in contract due to covid and don't care if your circumstances changed. My one year contract should have been done last year October... Now most likely will be end of this year :(
905
22/02/2021 14:27:58 0 1
bbc
I'm surprised you're saying this about PureGym. They immediately gave me the option to freeze payments or pay a reduced amount and in return get lots of new online content. I initially chose to continue paying 50% of what I normally pay because I value the contributions gyms have on society and I can fortunately afford it. I really hope PureGym gets through this - they've been better than most.
22/02/2021 15:09:57 0 0
bbc
You should use backstreet gyms ?? loads £2 every time use monthly for £10, open, given key to use, no sauna but you do get equipment cash in hand instructors and beefy blokes.
22/02/2021 15:27:27 0 0
bbc
It is possible they SHOULD repay you, due to the statutory consumer law - Goods and Services, that you have not receives as a CONSUMER.

If these services are supplied as part of business (perks etc) they would probably not apply.

You would need to politely write giving a demand date time and process it carefully to comply with rules and regulations.

Simply, "I want my money back", gets nothing.
4
22/02/2021 11:56:12 2 27
bbc
State are destroying the country, damn communists
16
22/02/2021 12:02:36 4 5
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Yes, with a PM called Boris, the government are definitely communists!!
17
22/02/2021 12:02:45 424 132
bbc
"We can make a massive contribution to the health of the nation" says the boss.

Nothing to stop folk going for a brisk walk during lockdown instead of going to the gym. Okay, you're not going to build big muscles but walking keeps you fit and keeps the pounds off. And it's free.
63
22/02/2021 12:17:45 246 48
bbc
Not everyone goes to the gym for big muscles. I don't use a gym, but people go for all sorts of reasons, including rehabilitation from injury.
70
22/02/2021 12:18:58 84 22
bbc
If you go to a gym and subject yourself to hard, gruelling training, you'll understand that a "walk" doesn't cut it.
I do agree though, if someone lives a very sedate life, a walk will do, but if you are extremely fit, it's next to useless.
The mental motivation you get when training in a gym cannot be quantified.
121
22/02/2021 12:28:57 45 9
bbc
Sorry but it really isn't that simple, a gym space to work out in where you're not outside in the cold and wet is something most people don't have access to at home, it's a life saver.

Running and walking are just one type of a whole range of exercises that are beneficial.

I'd bet the number of gym goers who have died of covid is extremely low, and the vulnerable are now vaccinated.
144
22/02/2021 12:33:17 44 12
bbc
Big muscles ARE healthy and functional, being strong is healthy and functional, increased bone density and the myriad effects of heavy weight training are healthy and functional.

For those of us in strength sports there is no way to replicate that stimulus at home unless you are lucky enough to have the money and space for a home gym. Walking and push ups does not cut it, we are suffering.
156
22/02/2021 12:35:14 23 10
bbc
you really have no idea do you!
172
22/02/2021 12:38:43 10 19
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But I need a mirror!! You clearly don't understand.
178
22/02/2021 12:39:33 20 13
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Not everyone go gym for big muscles . In fact many arent and resistance training burns more fat than any . I bet ur happy to sit on couch and eat crap ! One of the main reason why out country is in deep covid shit
198
22/02/2021 12:41:16 10 13
bbc
In case it's passed you by; the weather has been so appalling since we were locked up AGAIN that it has been impossible to go out walking. I've been trapped inside for weeks. Fortunately my gym has provided daily online exercise classes to those choosing to continue to pay.
213
22/02/2021 12:41:43 12 2
bbc
Agreed, but gyms also have a large social aspect to them in the many group exercise classes that are on offer. They also offer crèche facilities so that parents can train with peace of mind. Not with standing this there are the thousands of furloughed staff members desperate to come back asa well as local economy supply network such as sports drinks, nutrition and clothing etc.
224
22/02/2021 12:42:52 12 4
bbc
You have absolutely no idea what going to the gym actually means for those of us who do go and are desperate to get back.
Going for a walk? In Winter? In Scotland? When - by the time I finish work - it's cold, dark, usually raining and due to it being winter - occasionally snowing.
I can't wait to get back to the gym and feel like I've actually worked out.
232
22/02/2021 12:44:36 5 5
bbc
Walking isn't exercise. Some of the most obese people i know walk a dog twice a day
235
22/02/2021 12:44:47 8 5
bbc
Walking doesn’t keep you fit. I never met anyone that looked fit and asked what their fitness regime was and they said “walking” It may keep you active enough to walk the next day. But the day I say that I must get fit and draw up a plan to “walk” I am in denial, living in mediocrity with high body fat convinced I am fit because I am not as fat as my neighbour. This is why COVID has affected many!
259
22/02/2021 12:44:29 3 8
bbc
running is outdoors is free and more tougher than a treadmill
282
22/02/2021 12:48:43 11 2
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I have upper spine damage. Going for a walk does nothing for it, and can make it worse. I need gyms back so I can exercise the damaged bits in a safe and controlled environment.
344
22/02/2021 12:54:28 9 1
bbc
So many comments on how we don't need gyms are laughable - so many assuming people - acting like runs/walks are just as good. What about swimming? (Obviously I'm not talking Purgym). Lakes/sea swimming isn't feasible in the winter, most people have memberships purely for swimming... would love to here alternatives for this!
412
22/02/2021 13:06:38 1 2
bbc
Said by someone who clearly doesn't partake in anything more strenuous than a stroll in the park. Walks are excellent for the sedentary and also for mental health, for anything requiring real strength and stamina they're purely inadequate.
You should try viewing from other perspectives. Why do people think that "the world according to them" is how everyone else should live?
429
22/02/2021 13:10:07 2 1
bbc
We can make a massive contribution to the health of the nation.
What he really means is, "You can make a massive contribution to the profits of my company".
507
22/02/2021 13:23:36 1 5
bbc
Lets face it, Gym's are for people who struggle to motivate themselves and need to pay £50 a month to make them do anything. Saying that, they are still full of people who think that actually paying makes them fit, and just chat and pose.

Stopped going years ago as the Insta-sheep just annoyed me so much. Still doing triathlons, saving money, saving stress.
510
22/02/2021 13:23:54 2 1
bbc
And for those of us who wish to get significantly physically stronger?
513
22/02/2021 13:24:08 1 0
bbc
I go to the gym for swimming as I find walking difficult due to arthritis. Can't swim anywhere else except a pool as not allowed to travel.
520
22/02/2021 13:25:18 1 1
bbc
Damn straight. I'm just back from my brisk lunchtime bike ride in the beautiful sunshine and yesterday I did a brisk walk in the hills around Edinburgh in the beautiful sunshine - not indoors with all the sweat and swearing and folk showing off.
528
22/02/2021 13:20:11 1 2
bbc
My programme was based around strength intensive workouts, using a multitude of gym units. I'm 184cm tall and 72kg: this, for me and many, isn't about muscles. I've lost a lot of race performance and bone density as a result.
It's about the longevity of my physical health (and it's impacted on my mental health). Strength training increases bone density. Keep pressure of NHS? Open gyms mate!
544
no
22/02/2021 13:26:34 3 0
bbc
I hope you hear yourself when you say this out loud. And God bless you. I have been walking 10km every day that's not raining since the first lockdown and guess what, the day the gym was opened I returned to two times a day not because I cannot walk, but because it's not my preferable way of sport. Many will share that opinion...
584
22/02/2021 13:34:46 0 0
bbc
I think every man and his dog are going on walks from what I've seen. On the road and the footpath!
596
22/02/2021 13:36:51 0 0
bbc
Agreed. Lets put gyms, golf courses etc into perspective. They were often over priced and certainly over hyped. As Groucho Marx would've said " Gyms are for bunnies."
615
FT
22/02/2021 13:40:17 1 0
bbc
Spoken like someone that doesn't know what true exercise is.
635
22/02/2021 13:42:59 0 1
bbc
You either have a very tunneled vision of gym users or know nothing about its benefits. I for example use the gym for depression brought on by my tourettes.
649
22/02/2021 13:43:47 0 0
bbc
Seemingly you have been locked away for the last 30 years. Gyms are part of modern day life. You're right, there are many ways to keep fit. Gyms are one of them.
It's called variety. Bit like saying "let's all play football - we don't need all these other sports to get our competitive juices flowing - they're just silly and expensive"
Welcome to the modern world :-)
655
22/02/2021 13:44:35 1 1
bbc
Walking does not keep you fit. It has it's benefits and should be used as part of a regime. But you do not get fit from it haha. Think about what people who are fit for a living do (athletes, footballers, boxers etc.) - they don't just for a "brisk walk" every day lmao. Some people want to be genuinely fit and walking does not cut it!
694
VoR
22/02/2021 13:51:28 0 0
bbc
Unless you get a fine.
700
22/02/2021 13:52:33 2 1
bbc
Ignorance. Clearly not a gym member.
708
22/02/2021 13:54:15 1 0
bbc
Yes, similarly we can all stop going out to pubs and holidays too when we reopen saving thousands, isn't it? We all learned how to cook at home and how to enjoy at home.
926
22/02/2021 14:30:10 1 1
bbc
For me, going to the gym requires less motivation. I like that it is indoors so it doesn't mayyer what the weather is like that day and, as a woman, I like that I feel safer there than pounding the streets every day. Half an hour in the gym is a better workout for me than half an hour walks. Of course, I can make do now but I know which I'd prefer - each to their own though.
939
22/02/2021 14:32:17 1 0
bbc
There are workouts that you can do at home which are more beneficial than going to the gym because they have exercises which use that more muscles in one go and improve oyur core muscles based on Max workout philosophy
940
ME
22/02/2021 14:32:18 1 0
bbc
I bought an exercise bike, I go for a run every morning and also have a set of weights - the only thing I miss is the social atmosphere which Spurs me on
985
22/02/2021 14:44:35 0 0
bbc
I feel less safe than going to the gym when going for a brisk walk - joggers brush past and cyclists insist on riding on the pavement. And now my local authority has introduced an electric scooter hire scheme ...
22/02/2021 15:14:36 0 0
bbc
person goes "I like walking therefore eveyone should". I walk but I don't call it exercise i it barely replaces my daily step count of going to work. Pre lockdown I was doing 5hr of high intensity exercise a week. I don't like running so certainly not going to do that in the cold and wet (+ LBH&F have banned it in a lot of places during daylight hours) so have done nothing in months ...
9
22/02/2021 11:59:31 69 27
bbc
The problem is....covid 19 isn't bothered about the economy, it just wants to kill poeple!
18
22/02/2021 12:03:14 41 56
bbc
Well 4% of them
35
22/02/2021 12:09:34 15 22
bbc
So what you are essentially saying is 120,000 dead people are just a statistic? Glad to see how we've all become kinder as a result of the pandemic
85
22/02/2021 12:23:28 13 22
bbc
I am so pleased that none of your nearest and dearest are neither pert of the 4% or have suffered greatly.

That was a crass and insensitive remark. In my humble opinion
88
22/02/2021 12:22:03 11 18
bbc
That is a very flippant remark. I hope one of your nearest and dearest is never claimed by the terrible virus.
108
22/02/2021 12:27:06 6 14
bbc
As well as kinda' callous -- technically wrong.

Covid WANTS to take actions that result in 100% of people it is inside dying.

It's just it is often beaten.
200
22/02/2021 12:36:38 18 9
bbc
About 0.17% of them, actually!
288
22/02/2021 12:50:17 9 12
bbc
So you're willing to sacrifice that 4% to open a gym.... or are you being glib?
662
22/02/2021 13:45:57 4 7
bbc
And so long as none of your family are among the dead you couldn't care less
785
22/02/2021 14:00:28 5 2
bbc
With alk the deaths being linked to covid asap way before any autopsy, you have to query a percentage as high as that. Even the media headlines for Corporate Tom's death tried to imply it was from covid, conveniently leaving out the fact he had pneumonia for a year and had only had a covid test not diagnosis.
828
22/02/2021 14:12:23 1 3
bbc
So in a classroom of 25 students, it’s fine to say, “one of you will die this year.” Right?
Or a smallish pub with 25 folks in it, “one of you will die this year.”

Just 4%, right?
877
22/02/2021 14:23:31 4 1
bbc
more like 0.7%. And if you're under 60 and healthy, 0.001%.
22/02/2021 15:25:53 1 0
bbc
Where on earth do you get four percent from? The number of deaths last year was about 15% higher than the so called average but since that average is less than 1% of the population the extra deaths amount to about 0.134% of the population. Just count all the extra funerals you went to last year compared to 2019 to estimate the real suffering.
22/02/2021 15:27:16 0 1
bbc
4% of 67 million in the UK is rather a large number!
19
Ian
22/02/2021 12:03:44 85 49
bbc
Last year we had "Eat Out to Help Out" plus Boris trying to get people back in the office quickly combined with schools and universities starting term topped off with a Christmas relaxation and look what happened.

It all cost us more in the end.
Sorry to say this, but gyms are not essential just now.
Perhaps they need more help, as the issue is not of their doing.
57
22/02/2021 12:15:46 49 88
bbc
Not essential for you.
Why levy your opinion on other people?
67
22/02/2021 12:18:34 16 13
bbc
Very narrow shortsighted thinking. People who are physically fit have been shown to have a much better chance of fighting the virus.
98
22/02/2021 12:25:14 15 28
bbc
Think about it Ian, gyms ARE essential now. For the physical AND mental health of us. They are ventilated, equipment is sanitised after each use by the user, fans keep the air circulating.....unlike in pubs or indeed supermarkets where there is NO ventilation, NO fans and, for all the publicity in the form of brainwashing , NO social distancing .
293
22/02/2021 12:49:19 6 4
bbc
he let people go on holidays abroad too no covid tests
15
22/02/2021 12:01:06 578 108
bbc
My monthly subscription renewed a day before the lockdown last March. I asked for the money back and they didn't reply. So I am not sympathetic. They are ruthless business people and will have to take the rough with the smooth.
20
22/02/2021 12:03:45 133 357
bbc
Bold words, as long as you don't mind running the risk of having no gym to return to when this is over.
134
CJR
22/02/2021 12:32:06 59 24
bbc
No big loss, have found better ways to keep fit. Mostly gyms seem to be a social club, instead of a place of exercise.
226
22/02/2021 12:43:33 72 33
bbc
Who needs a gym when there is ample supply of steep gradients to climb, and rocks to lift!

I haven't been in a gym since I left school in 1965 but still fit as a fiddle.

A modern commercial gym is nothing more than a poser's palace.
227
22/02/2021 12:43:39 38 16
bbc
I think we've all realised we can do without the gym. It's a nice luxury, but I can get the same calorie burn from a run or a bit of HIIT in my living room.
471
22/02/2021 13:16:22 12 9
bbc
Glad you appear happy to pay for something you cannot use, it's mainly for the vane to look good in the latest lycra is what I realised so now do most of the same outdoors
652
22/02/2021 13:44:30 6 1
bbc
Strangely enough, in the olden days gyms weren't an absolute necessity, or even a necessity at all, just like baristas.

Physical labour met the physiological needs of the working class, though the pay wasn't necessarily that great, whilst the bosses got fat and died from diseases related to lack of physical exertion
713
Jim
22/02/2021 13:55:18 0 3
bbc
Bang on. The "Save all lives" groups need to stop being so naive and wake up to the damage we are causing.
738
22/02/2021 13:57:26 4 4
bbc
Who needs a Gym. Posers Palace's.
872
22/02/2021 14:21:44 6 1
bbc
"bold words". I don't think so. Puregym could go into adminstration and so long as the demand is there some other business will take over to meet demand. All that kit and all those premises will sold on to new operators.
897
22/02/2021 14:27:03 3 0
bbc
The death of one business is the life of a new one capitalism in a nutshell
909
22/02/2021 14:23:46 1 3
bbc
Who cares? Exercise at home or outdoors.
931
ME
22/02/2021 14:30:48 1 1
bbc
I wouldn’t pay to rent a bicycle if it wasn’t available - why would I
Pay £40 a month for a gym I can’t get into
933
22/02/2021 14:31:22 0 0
bbc
Plenty more fish in the sea!
945
22/02/2021 14:33:09 0 0
bbc
No its ok we can do without them. Peoples health is far more important than peoples pockets.
950
22/02/2021 14:31:34 0 0
bbc
if there is a demand someone will meet that demand, just someone different. It's called capitalism.
970
22/02/2021 14:41:54 0 2
bbc
You don't need a gym to keep fit, gyms are for posers and amateurs
982
22/02/2021 14:43:18 0 1
bbc
No one NEED'S a gym. Workout at home save money.
22/02/2021 15:10:12 1 0
bbc
Oh noooooooo.... whatever will i do.

I guess I'll just jog around the park and use my weights at home instead of paying 30 quid a month to do the same thing in a sweaty wee room
22/02/2021 15:29:47 0 0
bbc
Oh rly? Step outside your front door and look around you. With a bit of vision, you are surrounded by the best gym facilities ever.
21
22/02/2021 12:03:45 278 33
bbc
Funny how some of these company's are loosing thousands of pounds, but a couple of years ago were making no profit when it comes to wage claims etc.
155
22/02/2021 12:34:56 57 85
bbc
*losing

Your comment has the exact opposite impact to that which you intended. It is entirely correct that those that were making no profit a couple of years ago will now be losing massively. If they were operating at close to break even or small loss levels then now that their income stream has been stopped they will obviously lose a lot of money as they sink further in to debt and extra lending
209
22/02/2021 12:38:06 10 8
bbc
And a comment like that proves that you don't have a degree in accountancy. Maybe just stick to your day job yeah?
242
22/02/2021 12:45:29 5 4
bbc
Do you want to provide some evidence that it is the SAME companies in both situations?
269
22/02/2021 12:47:17 5 4
bbc
gyms are hard business to make money
493
22/02/2021 13:20:15 4 2
bbc
not really, it's logical. If they weren't making a big profit when trading they are going to be hit especially hard when trading stops, as they don't have huge profit to fall back on, and income v liability was obviously tight.
659
22/02/2021 13:45:04 3 2
bbc
Funnier how you can't spell losing correctly.
699
VoR
22/02/2021 13:52:09 5 0
bbc
Wouldn't that be what you expected? Companies that made no profit before Covid are making losses with Covid?
960
22/02/2021 14:38:03 6 1
bbc
Expenses £500,000 per day, income £500,100 per day = £100 per day profit.
Expenses £500,000 per day, income £0 per day = £500,000 per day loss.
22
22/02/2021 12:05:05 78 13
bbc
This is nonsense, if the business's are franchises then it's the franchisee that's losing the money not this man.
42
22/02/2021 12:11:12 37 9
bbc
Head office gets a profit share from the franchise. That's the point.
46
22/02/2021 12:13:20 3 2
bbc
Technically he'd be losing too.

A franchise (or franchising) is a method of distributing products or services involving a franchisor, who establishes the brand's trademark or trade name and a business system, and a franchisee, who pays a royalty and often an initial fee for the right to do business under the franchisor's name and system.
62
22/02/2021 12:17:23 6 2
bbc
Puregym are not a franchise
65
22/02/2021 12:17:58 1 1
bbc
Franchising companies do have significant costs in that quite frequently they have to fund the underlying land purchase (McDonald's for instance) as well as be the prime lender to the Franchisee for the capital which is then repaid back through fees. The guy should have been more expansive in saying the business model they use means that the business and franchisees etc.
262
22/02/2021 12:45:24 3 0
bbc
It's not franchised!
301
22/02/2021 12:50:49 1 1
bbc
Gyms go bankrupt all time
852
22/02/2021 14:16:47 1 0
bbc
you and everyone that up voted your post is completely clueless about how business works
22/02/2021 15:50:28 0 0
bbc
Puregym is not a Franchise. There are franchises out there such as Anytime Fitness or Snap Fitness, but Puregym is not one.
22/02/2021 17:13:48 0 0
bbc
You'll be happy to explain that to the owner, shareholders, accountants, HMRC, HMT, and all the staff & customers, too.

Or - maybe it's as simple as it seems - "business with no income loses money hand over fist"
22/02/2021 17:17:02 0 0
bbc
Why business's and not franchises's? But 10/10 for it's and that's.
23
22/02/2021 12:05:10 204 12
bbc
we have never had such a large choice of gyms as we have today. We also, incidentally, have never had, as a nation, so many people with a 30 + BMI. Food for thought
32
22/02/2021 12:08:46 24 9
bbc
Good point, up until post 2000 going to the gym was something that was more a minority thing/hobby as at that time was the exception. Now it’s the rule, tbh I think the official stats must be wrong as my anecdotal experience just contradicts all this.
53
22/02/2021 12:14:40 18 5
bbc
USA, Brazil, Mexico, UK, obesity is between 29%-32%.

India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia, obesity rates 3%-8%.

Look at covid death rates, the former countries being way worse.

Covid has never been a danger to properly/athletically fit individuals, hence survival rates in high 90s%.
79
22/02/2021 12:22:00 24 6
bbc
Why we have suffered so badly from covid as we're a fat nation. We'd never have the debate again about funding for NHS folk got fit, as NHS would have more money that it required and could invest in hospitals and technology, but instead we spend £billions annually on obesity diseases! Being fat is not normal, it's a curse on society and should be frowned upon like smoking
81
22/02/2021 12:22:58 15 6
bbc
And that is exactly the reason why we need to get gyms open again.
During lockdown (6 months out of the last 11, and counting), people have definitely added weight and the longer this lockdown continues, obesity rates will rise.
182
22/02/2021 12:27:33 6 0
bbc
like it "food" for thought - funny person
275
22/02/2021 12:47:48 2 2
bbc
cross fit is great but then again you can exercise outdoors too
475
22/02/2021 13:16:43 6 3
bbc
How does a gym help someone stuffing fast food into their faces, and not using a gym? Not exactly food for thought after all, is it?
574
22/02/2021 13:32:22 7 0
bbc
Maybe because so many people think they NEED a car to do the equivalent of a 10 minute walk to buy a pint of milk. As wonderful as technological advancement and labour saving devices have been over the decades, it has made us lazy, and unfortunately the basic human instinct to devour high calorie food to get through lean times hasn't caught up with the fact that we don't have to endure lean timea.
751
22/02/2021 13:57:35 4 2
bbc
Take the bmi results with a pinch of salt. According to experts, 1 in 3 children are obese. I have 5 young children attending two different schools, according to these experts i be seeing 120 fat kids at each school run. I have seen one child in years id consider to be anywhere near overweight. In any place where there are maybe 10,000 kids going to school, you really see 3000 fat kids around?!
805
22/02/2021 14:06:30 6 0
bbc
BMI is flawed and near garbage as it doesn't take into account muscle mass...
888
Boz
22/02/2021 14:17:34 4 0
bbc
People don't become obese because they don't go to the gym, they become obese because they eat more calories than they burn. You can't outrun a bad diet but you absolutely can lose weight if you eat less. Obviously it's easier when you do some exercise as well but people are putting on weight i the pandemic because not only are they sedentary, they're snacking too much. Gyms won't stop that.
898
22/02/2021 14:27:10 2 1
bbc
re 30+ BMI: Blame those who said 'eating fat / cholesterol will kill you' and thus replaced those calories in our diet with refined sugars and carbs. yet ANOTHER example of those 'scientists' claiming superior knowledge that is in truth harmful.
918
22/02/2021 14:28:59 5 1
bbc
Very good point.

I was a regular for about 15 years and I don't miss it. I've merely adapted what I do to stay fit and healthy. Gyms are not the only way.

But then for those folk unable to share a selfie of themselves in the mirror of their local gym every time they visit... How are they coping at this time?
22/02/2021 15:02:38 0 0
bbc
Yep. The fattest in Europe.
22/02/2021 16:56:58 0 0
bbc
Or should that be "Thought for Food".
NJD
22/02/2021 17:01:41 0 0
bbc
Well said and a fact we are a nation of fatties!!-think of all the health risks associated with obesity and the strain on the NHS even before Covid
24
22/02/2021 12:05:41 175 37
bbc
Losing half a million a day! Someone's been mugging off the public.
58
22/02/2021 12:16:26 56 29
bbc
Hardly - they are a budget gym and have one of the lowest membership fees.
72
22/02/2021 12:19:39 30 1
bbc
275 Gyms at £500,000 a day is only about £1800 a site - given the rents for some of those places, rental/leases on the equipment, other fixed cists as well as the staff costs still in place (pensions, essential staff etc.) it's quite easy to get to that figure - a bit of simple maths needed...
120
22/02/2021 12:28:54 17 1
bbc
1800 a day per gym - and no rent holidays. Soon mounts up. Insurance too.
281
22/02/2021 12:48:33 0 14
bbc
they save money on not having heating
759
22/02/2021 13:58:40 0 8
bbc
my thoughts exactly, and this is just one gym chain out of how many countrywide... Personally im not buying it
22/02/2021 16:10:55 1 0
bbc
Half a million per day from a total of 275 gyms.
25
22/02/2021 12:05:50 8 2
bbc
Businesses (small to medium) are screwed any which way now.
Even if they manage to survive until lockdown ends, they'll have to then raise prices to compensate the loss and deal with tax rises as a result of government's borrowing and spending.

Will the customer bare that, when they can exercise or drink outside of venues?
127
22/02/2021 12:29:55 4 3
bbc
Customers (like me), will have to.
Exercising out doors is not the same as training in a gym.
To this day, I have never seen a squat rack or a deadlift platform in an outdoor gym in England.
And people need to remember about the mental motivation you get from working out around other people who are also pushing hard.
3
22/02/2021 11:56:12 84 62
bbc
Should have donated to the Tories and started selling PPE. Be nimble.

In any other country the current government would be described as corrupt. Why not here?
26
22/02/2021 12:06:13 29 22
bbc
Should have made up "intelligence" and invaded somewhere. Be nimble.

Just how long would tendering have taken out of interest and how much would the price have gone up in the meantime noting the global demand?
39
22/02/2021 12:10:35 12 5
bbc
Classic whataboutery
41
22/02/2021 12:11:10 11 10
bbc
Should have sold up and entered one of the industries that could benefit from Brexit.

Haha only joking, there arn't any.
448
22/02/2021 13:13:24 4 3
bbc
A bit like the Suez Crisis then? The Tory Govt were the original proponents of lies and deceit..!
452
22/02/2021 13:13:48 6 1
bbc
And the self same people would be moaning that we had no PPE.....
802
22/02/2021 14:04:32 3 3
bbc
Well the media aren't highlighting that the EU are paying 60% less for the Oxford dose than we are, despite you guessed it, it is made here in the uk
22/02/2021 15:17:59 3 2
bbc
Getting PPE from experienced suppliers would have been quicker, not slower, than getting it from people with zero experience but with the right connections. Are you really not able to see that?
13
22/02/2021 12:00:54 223 59
bbc
I wonder how on earth we survived before gyms were a thing?
27
Sky
22/02/2021 12:06:23 405 36
bbc
We used to have gardens in houses, not a fifty square foot "outdoor space" to provide for 800 flats.
We used to have affordable council leisure centres and swimming pools until they were sold to run at a profit.
We sold off huge swathes of school playing fields to build houses.
Most cycle lanes are unfit for purpose, and traffic numbers have exploded since "before gyms were a thing".
109
22/02/2021 12:27:11 24 7
bbc
And pepple went to the pub to play pool and darts, and have a laugh, something that seems to be missing these days.
No phones, no TVs in pubs, just conversation and interaction.
352
22/02/2021 12:57:45 1 4
bbc
Move out of cities and start up life in the home counties.
370
22/02/2021 13:00:21 7 1
bbc
No. Almost no one ever exercised for the sake of it. I remember the laughing at the crazy USA people going out jogging. In reality we had fewer if any cars, walked and carried stuff. Even if you get a bus you have to walk to the stops. Household 'gadgets' saved us lots of exercise! More tv, computer, and work sitting jobs. Now you pay ?? to replace the exercise you ??not to do!
431
22/02/2021 13:10:09 3 2
bbc
We still do out in the shires. I spent yesterday in my garden getting rained on. It was nicer than a gym imo. Not all of us live in the inner city. I don't disagree about the leisure centres etc, and you're not wrong on the playing fields either. But there are other ways to keep fit, even in these urban settings.
752
22/02/2021 13:57:37 0 0
bbc
Very well said!
22/02/2021 14:58:56 0 0
bbc
And we used to be a joke at the Olympics, Rugby,tennis and cricket. I imagine that nothing to with the advent of cheap gymnasium for people who have neither the time, or money to lol about.
22/02/2021 15:25:54 0 0
bbc
Cheaper food, higher calorie intake, reliance on cars, inactivity at home & school
22/02/2021 15:33:53 0 0
bbc
we used to do manual labour.
10
22/02/2021 11:59:33 80 33
bbc
While I feel bad for this guy - what on earth was society supposed to do? It was a global pandemic and there was death and suffering everywhere. I hope the one thing this guy has definitely learned is GET MORE INSURANCE. Businesses, you either insure yourself or roll the dice - it's entirely your choice.
28
22/02/2021 12:06:53 62 7
bbc
We took out business interruption insurance and guess what.. Covid wasn't covered. The FCA had to go all the way to the supreme court to get insurance co.s to pay businesses. I'll guarantee the next round of insurance will be super costly or there'll be no coverage. https://bit.ly/3unhpG7 . Newsthump nails it again here: https://bit.ly/2NtZrRR
52
22/02/2021 12:14:20 6 12
bbc
So you either specifically didn't insure yourselves against pandemics you chose to take the chance, or you didn't read the small print. Don't worry I certainly understand - noone saw this coming.

If you can't get coverage for pandemic coverage 'next time' - then I'd propose your only option is to raise prices sufficiently to ensure your business can withstand a few months of being shut down.
588
22/02/2021 13:35:23 0 0
bbc
I'm an insurance broker. You don't need to worry about pandemics being covered in future because policy wordings are being tightened up so that if there is a next time, it definitely won't be covered.

And before you lot kick off about it, insurance is not designed to cover large scale mass events like this, which is why war is also not covered (war is covered by the govt though).
750
VoR
22/02/2021 13:58:06 0 0
bbc
Some policies *explicitly* excluded pandemic claims from the product, and explicitly excluded the cost of pandemic claims when calculating premiums. These generally should not be paying out.

Others didn't explicitly exclude pandemic claims from the product, but did exclude it from the premiums. These should be paying out.

Both will need to hike premiums to cover pandemic going forward.
7
22/02/2021 11:58:03 4 6
bbc
Last one out, turn off the lights,...…..oh hang on, they've already been switched off.
29
22/02/2021 12:07:00 3 3
bbc
Not only have the lights gone out - the bulbs have been nicked as well.
14
22/02/2021 12:01:04 476 82
bbc
Really. I'm sure they will use those over inflated figures when they come to claim. The staff are furloughed, the council tax frozen and I hope they switched the lights and heating off...

Most of the loss here is missed profit, depreciation and loans. It's how modern businesses make money but declare a loss to avoid tax.

I don't see them ever refunding all the people who join a gym but never go.
30
22/02/2021 12:07:10 318 35
bbc
Spot on. £500,000 a day seems like an awful lot. I'm highly sceptical about these numbers, I'd like to see a breakdown. I'd also add that Landlords should share the pain, but are they?
66
22/02/2021 12:18:33 48 13
bbc
its £1923 per day for each of their gyms. Think about wages, rent, utilities, everything.

Still sceptical?
97
22/02/2021 12:24:47 37 6
bbc
Divide by 275 gyms = £1,800/day.
Commercial rent, insurances, interest on business loans, etc, etc . . .
101
22/02/2021 12:25:41 29 7
bbc
I value commercial property for a living. High Street Retail property values have roughly halved, most tenants aren't paying their rent - or have CVA agreements to cut rents or pay rents as % of turnover (5-10%). There has been a huge increase in vacant shops - just look at your local high street. The Landlord's are suffering! More worryingly, so are their banks (shades of 2008)
118
22/02/2021 12:28:51 30 3
bbc
A lot of pension funds have investments in commercial properties so if you want landlords to share the pain you also need to accept that a lot of people will see a reduction in the funds in their pension pot
123
22/02/2021 12:29:19 9 3
bbc
just do some simple division – if you can't be bothered, see below!
135
22/02/2021 12:32:16 13 5
bbc
Take a look at the state of most REIT (Real Estate Investment Trusts) that are effectively the landlords you mention. Most have collected between 50-75% of rents, mostly from essential retail that is still open. They have huge losses as well. Their shareholders (mostly pensions) have huge losses and no income either. It's a throwaway comment about landlords, but it's mostly untrue.
137
22/02/2021 12:32:19 7 1
bbc
1,100,000 members x (say) £13 average monthly fee x 12 months = £171,600,000 annual income, which divided by 365 days = £470,137 per day.
187
22/02/2021 12:40:46 4 4
bbc
As a fractional landlord of Pure Gym I sincerely hope we don't ?? Also why should landlords share the pain. They're a big business, they knew the risks (not like pandemics are a totally unknowable risk) and they signed the contract. Landlords should only indulge them to the point of self interest.
206
22/02/2021 12:41:29 0 3
bbc
No landlord dont tgats the problem
245
22/02/2021 12:45:42 0 2
bbc
Why Landlords? All they do is provide homes. Most have either been unable to trade or have been stuck with tenants shouting "Covid! Can't pay!" and been unable to get rid of them. And no grants available either, Many have had to sell up and go bankrupt. Only those without mortgages can just put their business on ice, earn nothing but will be able to trade again after Loony Lockup mark15: NOT fair!
300
22/02/2021 12:50:19 4 1
bbc
For 275 gyms, that is around £1800 a day. Rent for some gyms is as high as £1000 a week, plus they have pensions, equipment maintenance, licensing, security, cctv companies, software licensing, telephone line rental, training and certification, legal fees, staff who are still working and handling queries, etc. loads more expenditure as well, but no membership fees are coming in to pay for all that
478
22/02/2021 13:15:48 2 0
bbc
When they publish their accounts to corporate house, you can
717
Jim
22/02/2021 13:55:48 0 0
bbc
Why should landlords share the pain? Have they no bills or staff to pay?
871
22/02/2021 14:21:29 0 0
bbc
yeah, and the money grows on trees of course.
919
22/02/2021 14:29:00 0 0
bbc
Landlords do share pain because there's no Govt handout for them
11
22/02/2021 11:58:14 11 8
bbc
As much as we need to keep conditions safe, I'm sure we can all agree there needs to be a balance with providing some financial ease on everyone affected.

I'm sure there's a solution here that would make sense, for example, having a limited number of people allowed into gyms where they could still socially distance.
31
22/02/2021 12:08:40 12 5
bbc
From day 1 common sense should gave prevailed but it hasn't.
The Government is now employing belt and braces having screwed the whole thing up; attempting damage limitation too late.
23
22/02/2021 12:05:10 204 12
bbc
we have never had such a large choice of gyms as we have today. We also, incidentally, have never had, as a nation, so many people with a 30 + BMI. Food for thought
32
22/02/2021 12:08:46 24 9
bbc
Good point, up until post 2000 going to the gym was something that was more a minority thing/hobby as at that time was the exception. Now it’s the rule, tbh I think the official stats must be wrong as my anecdotal experience just contradicts all this.
22/02/2021 21:34:08 0 0
bbc
Don’t know where you are looking. There are obese people everywhere. In fact it is sometimes hard to spot a properly trim person.
14
22/02/2021 12:01:04 476 82
bbc
Really. I'm sure they will use those over inflated figures when they come to claim. The staff are furloughed, the council tax frozen and I hope they switched the lights and heating off...

Most of the loss here is missed profit, depreciation and loans. It's how modern businesses make money but declare a loss to avoid tax.

I don't see them ever refunding all the people who join a gym but never go.
33
22/02/2021 12:08:50 51 44
bbc
Someone obviously has never been a director of a business! Senseless dribble.
133
LEO
22/02/2021 12:32:03 24 15
bbc
Not senseless dribble at all. Glad I don't work for a firm that has supercilious, patronising directors like you.
441
22/02/2021 13:12:13 3 0
bbc
Not on the Scale of the Gym. But I have 180 staff on Furlough, 16 premises closed, and only 3 people working, and their at home.

I however do not leverage debt and expect the taxman to bail me out year on year. It's how successful businesses are run. These are short term profit makers, running a model that most venture capitalists use to relieve a company of all assets.
You need to learn to lead!
34
22/02/2021 12:09:19 70 20
bbc
This article is very misleading "We are burning about £500,000 a day and that's the average over eight months of closure," Humphrey Cobbold told the BBC's Today programme" Whats this "WE" rubbish when the business is franchise based?? By definition any loss in incurred by the franchisee not Puregym. Lets get the facts straight before printing rubbish.
43
22/02/2021 12:11:35 34 6
bbc
If we are talking about getting facts right - Puregym isnt a franchise- lol
272
22/02/2021 12:47:40 5 2
bbc
Get YOUR facts right, PUREGYM is not franchised!
634
no
22/02/2021 13:30:09 2 1
bbc
When do BBC get their facts straight? you shouldn't be surprised.
22/02/2021 17:17:42 1 0
bbc
18
22/02/2021 12:03:14 41 56
bbc
Well 4% of them
35
22/02/2021 12:09:34 15 22
bbc
So what you are essentially saying is 120,000 dead people are just a statistic? Glad to see how we've all become kinder as a result of the pandemic
747
22/02/2021 13:57:42 7 2
bbc
Good news is no one dies of cancer anymore, or heart disease, or obesity causes, or diabetes. Only covid lives matter don't they...
763
22/02/2021 13:59:22 6 0
bbc
Do you get so wound up about people that die of other things? Statistics are not about kindness, they are about facts & facts don't care about your feelings!
22/02/2021 15:26:23 1 0
bbc
Ask ONS!
36
22/02/2021 12:09:34 12 2
bbc
It's not just private companies that are burning through the cash. Local Authority support for their leisure services are too - think GLL, Places, Everyone Active, Fusion, Fredom and other trusts and in house services. If opening happens after April/Furlough ends it'll be even worse. Look at the 4global DataHub for the social value impact of leisure facilities being closed.
14
22/02/2021 12:01:04 476 82
bbc
Really. I'm sure they will use those over inflated figures when they come to claim. The staff are furloughed, the council tax frozen and I hope they switched the lights and heating off...

Most of the loss here is missed profit, depreciation and loans. It's how modern businesses make money but declare a loss to avoid tax.

I don't see them ever refunding all the people who join a gym but never go.
37
22/02/2021 12:09:53 32 3
bbc
I joined the gym just before lockdown.
When the government anounced the lockdown my gym (PureGym) sens a message assuring me that my account would be frozen. And so it was.
I haven't paid a penny since.

I can't speak for every Gym company out there, but i would think they'd operate the same way.
38
22/02/2021 12:10:19 13 16
bbc
Panting indoors is not a great thing for the virus - especially if they are not ventilated which in the depth of winter is difficult

However by the end of March ventilation is possible and gyms can almost be effectively outside

Experience has shown gyms were not sources of transmission generally last autumn

Our caution is really cowardice and it's destroying our country and children's futures
96
LEO
22/02/2021 12:24:36 2 4
bbc
It's not cowardice. It's common sense and doing the best for the majority. Nor is it destroying our country. Perhaps you would like to explain that remark?
26
22/02/2021 12:06:13 29 22
bbc
Should have made up "intelligence" and invaded somewhere. Be nimble.

Just how long would tendering have taken out of interest and how much would the price have gone up in the meantime noting the global demand?
39
22/02/2021 12:10:35 12 5
bbc
Classic whataboutery
463
22/02/2021 13:15:35 2 0
bbc
Unlike the original comment?
40
ds
22/02/2021 12:10:42 2 11
bbc
Gyms, pubs, plenty of other businesses have suffered. But how about those not in the headlines such as freelance musicians and actors. They need help too, and as last summer the hospitality industry had its mad eat out to help out scheme then perhaps it's the turn of other sectors before hospitality this time. And gyms, get them open before pubs too; but we're a long way from that at the moment.
26
22/02/2021 12:06:13 29 22
bbc
Should have made up "intelligence" and invaded somewhere. Be nimble.

Just how long would tendering have taken out of interest and how much would the price have gone up in the meantime noting the global demand?
41
22/02/2021 12:11:10 11 10
bbc
Should have sold up and entered one of the industries that could benefit from Brexit.

Haha only joking, there arn't any.
22
22/02/2021 12:05:05 78 13
bbc
This is nonsense, if the business's are franchises then it's the franchisee that's losing the money not this man.
42
22/02/2021 12:11:12 37 9
bbc
Head office gets a profit share from the franchise. That's the point.
68
22/02/2021 12:18:51 2 3
bbc
But they do not incur costs and the franchisee would be liable for the rent. That's the point.
720
VoR
22/02/2021 13:56:01 0 1
bbc
Their expenses seem very high if costs are borne by the franchisee.
915
22/02/2021 14:26:56 0 2
bbc
For doing next to b-all!
22/02/2021 16:01:34 0 2
bbc
so that is a loss of income, not a cost.
34
22/02/2021 12:09:19 70 20
bbc
This article is very misleading "We are burning about £500,000 a day and that's the average over eight months of closure," Humphrey Cobbold told the BBC's Today programme" Whats this "WE" rubbish when the business is franchise based?? By definition any loss in incurred by the franchisee not Puregym. Lets get the facts straight before printing rubbish.
43
22/02/2021 12:11:35 34 6
bbc
If we are talking about getting facts right - Puregym isnt a franchise- lol
44
22/02/2021 12:11:45 15 14
bbc
Losing £500,000 per day?

An exaggeration perhaps?
61
22/02/2021 12:17:01 13 2
bbc
There are 260 pure gyms. This equates to £1923 a day lost each.

Still sound so unfeasible?
87
22/02/2021 12:18:12 0 1
bbc
Do you run a business to know what it costs?
115
22/02/2021 12:28:08 0 1
bbc
1,100,000 members x (say) £13 average monthly fee x 12 months = £171,600,000 annual income, which divided by 365 days = £470,137 per day.
361
22/02/2021 12:59:07 1 0
bbc
Surely this must BS? If you are losing £120 Million in 8 months with no fees coming in that means you'd lose £180 million in a full year. What on earth is their TO?
45
22/02/2021 12:04:23 122 58
bbc
Pure Gym should not be allowed to open until they can demonstrate covid compliance. Relying on users to clean equipment and providing no on site monitoring is just not good enough.
220
22/02/2021 12:42:39 85 42
bbc
I used Pure Gym between lockdown 1 and lockdown 2. I was happy to clean equipment and take responsibility.
I suggest it was no more risky to use the gym than going to the supermarket. Some of the decisions taken and rules used for lockdown are inconsistent to say the least.
305
22/02/2021 12:51:35 17 1
bbc
Have you been in a puregym? I was going before the last lockdown and there were staff always about cleaning.
And as for people cleaning down equipment after use? That's just pure basic hygiene! I used to go to another gym up north and their policy has always been to wipe down equipment after use and they provided antibac spray and paper towels.
504
22/02/2021 13:22:50 17 0
bbc
As opposed to all the supermarkets and shops that have no wipe down, distancing or any other Covid measures in place.
569
22/02/2021 13:31:48 16 1
bbc
Puregym took it very seriously, and unlike pubs cut capacities by at least 50%. All machines spaced out, no classes, cleaning stations everywhere and kept stocked.

Who else is supposed to clean equipment though? Are they supposed to employ someone to wait by each machine?

I would bet big money on gyms being cleaner and way more covid secure than schools, but you can't close schools can you?
581
22/02/2021 13:33:52 11 2
bbc
Can you demonstrate that gyms are a significant COVID transmission risk? Use objective evidence, not opinion or assumption.
703
22/02/2021 13:52:54 8 3
bbc
Well it was good enough as we never saw a single outbreak from a gym.
711
22/02/2021 13:55:04 9 3
bbc
They already have mate, every single time they've reopened. There are actual studies and statistics that show gym's are among the LOWEST transmission places there are. So I guess that blows your theory out the water.
744
22/02/2021 13:55:19 1 6
bbc
You are spot on Billy. The reliance on users to clean isn't enough. The 'personal trainers' that work in these gyms are not interested in the cleanliness of the gym or wiping down the equipment for everyone, they are only interested in their own clients. Also - why can't people just exercise whilst wearing a mask?
22/02/2021 15:15:42 3 0
bbc
Plenty of on site monitoring from the staff and trainers who we regularly saw wiping equipment down and/or reminding clients to do this. It's standard to clean down machines after use and good manners. They also spaced put machines, limited numbers and were great at answering emails if you had any concerns. So no, it was more than good enough, better in fact that most customer facing facilities.
22/02/2021 16:23:55 2 0
bbc
how hard is it to wipe down your own equipment before and after you use it? seriously? come on you don't need the gym staff to actually do that for you do you?

Do you want the staff in a restaurant to chew your food for you too?
22/02/2021 17:09:54 0 0
bbc
Will you say the same for every other business, or did you just feel compelled to state the bleedin obvious to this article?
22/02/2021 18:44:03 0 0
bbc
What about supermarkets, should they shut down too because none of them are covid compliant...in fact, they are one of the places where you are at highest risk for infection, I've seen little to no social distancing, shopping in larger groups, you name it. Why pick on the gym?
22
22/02/2021 12:05:05 78 13
bbc
This is nonsense, if the business's are franchises then it's the franchisee that's losing the money not this man.
46
22/02/2021 12:13:20 3 2
bbc
Technically he'd be losing too.

A franchise (or franchising) is a method of distributing products or services involving a franchisor, who establishes the brand's trademark or trade name and a business system, and a franchisee, who pays a royalty and often an initial fee for the right to do business under the franchisor's name and system.
47
22/02/2021 12:13:45 8 6
bbc
Boo hoo. We're all in the same boat, but some have invested in a more expensive paddle.
48
JWG
22/02/2021 12:13:48 14 10
bbc
Cue loads of zero covid types who couldn't run a bath never mind a business saying, its all fine.
207
22/02/2021 12:37:59 0 2
bbc
Spot on!
308
22/02/2021 12:52:04 1 1
bbc
You mean like zero smallpox, zero polio, effectively zero measles.... yes, those are bad things *facepalm*
49
22/02/2021 12:14:10 119 52
bbc
You don't need a fancy gym to exercise and while I feel for him, his business and his employees, it is not an essential business.
631
no
22/02/2021 13:28:34 29 90
bbc
Yes, Karen, definitely not an essential business, that's exactly why every petition to open the gyms have received just over 100k signatures, because it is not essential. Because mental health is not essential. Because this way of sport is not essential...
721
22/02/2021 13:56:07 10 20
bbc
You do, actually. I can guarantee you are not fit and don't have an understanding of fitness. Resistance training is key alongside cardio both steady state and high intensity. Running around the park will only achieve 1 thing, making you good at running around the park. There is a lot more to it than that.
728
22/02/2021 13:56:37 15 17
bbc
Tell that to the people who go for their mental health and the families of those who have committed suicide. Tell that to all the self employed PT's that don't get furlough. I'm going to assume you're an overweight, middle aged Karen who's comfortably sitting at home on furlough in your middle class lifestyle, correct?
749
22/02/2021 13:56:41 10 13
bbc
Tell that too the thousands of people who rely on the gym for their mental health. Young people have been locked down for a disease that is close to harmless for them, and they're the ones suffering most from gyms being closed. Garden centres aren't exactly essentially either but they're open.
22/02/2021 15:52:11 3 4
bbc
Some people live in flats with no garden. Some people like the classes that they offer. The business may not be essential to you but it is to the people these businesses employ !
50
22/02/2021 12:14:15 5 25
bbc
The future deaths caused by the cowardice of the govt sacrificing the future for a failed attempt at controlling the virus which hasn't worked and actually might still not work has been caused by the quality of our politicians

Both the skills (do they get maths at all) and imaginations (do they know what 400 billion looks like) have destroyed the future for us all

We'll all just die younger now
74
LEO
22/02/2021 12:20:25 8 2
bbc
Utter rubbish
13
22/02/2021 12:00:54 223 59
bbc
I wonder how on earth we survived before gyms were a thing?
51
22/02/2021 12:14:16 28 8
bbc
Simples.
Joe Public had no Death by Mouth fat dripping, chemical laden, repulsive fast food to scoff and/or 1000 cal choc lattes to slurp. Car was a privilege, kids walked (!) to school, schools did gym days (!)....and people actually home cooked decent scoff. Etc etc.
On top of bone idle scoffing Type 2 self inflicters we'll have thousands of Long Covids to deal with. Heaven help them.
243
22/02/2021 12:45:31 40 5
bbc
but you had dripping sandwiches, smog, leaded petrol, coal dust, majority of the public smoking.... don't try and whitewash the past as good when it wasn't, public health was bad then too. It wasn't a shock when uncle albert had a heart attack at 65, so not noted as a problem.
28
22/02/2021 12:06:53 62 7
bbc
We took out business interruption insurance and guess what.. Covid wasn't covered. The FCA had to go all the way to the supreme court to get insurance co.s to pay businesses. I'll guarantee the next round of insurance will be super costly or there'll be no coverage. https://bit.ly/3unhpG7 . Newsthump nails it again here: https://bit.ly/2NtZrRR
52
22/02/2021 12:14:20 6 12
bbc
So you either specifically didn't insure yourselves against pandemics you chose to take the chance, or you didn't read the small print. Don't worry I certainly understand - noone saw this coming.

If you can't get coverage for pandemic coverage 'next time' - then I'd propose your only option is to raise prices sufficiently to ensure your business can withstand a few months of being shut down.
173
22/02/2021 12:38:46 7 1
bbc
As in all things it's a tough choice and insurance wording does tend to be a bit ambigous hence why insurance companies said they weren't covered and the FSA said they were. If it was entirely excluded then businesses wouldn't have a leg to stand on. Yep, I think we'll all be better prepared next time. I never thought I'd see a global pandemic in my lifetime. Crazy times indeed!
736
22/02/2021 13:57:22 0 0
bbc
Drawlinson works in tesco or something, no understanding of what running a business is about.
23
22/02/2021 12:05:10 204 12
bbc
we have never had such a large choice of gyms as we have today. We also, incidentally, have never had, as a nation, so many people with a 30 + BMI. Food for thought
53
22/02/2021 12:14:40 18 5
bbc
USA, Brazil, Mexico, UK, obesity is between 29%-32%.

India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia, obesity rates 3%-8%.

Look at covid death rates, the former countries being way worse.

Covid has never been a danger to properly/athletically fit individuals, hence survival rates in high 90s%.
54
22/02/2021 12:15:11 11 2
bbc
Damned if you do something and damned if you don't. I would say that almost every country in the world is looking for a workable and realistic strategy to kick start the economy in tandem with protecting public health. If someone knows how to do this according to the armchair HYS' on this thread, submit your answers on a postcard to WHO. Who knows - you may be nominated for the Nobel Peace prize.
119
22/02/2021 12:28:52 8 6
bbc
New Zealand, Japan, Tiawan, South Korea and so on... plenty of countries with socially responsible, community minded citizens and orgnaised, honest governments communicating a simple strategy that seem to be coping rather well.

Rather than a garbled chumocratic fill your boots and line your pockets free for all that has not worked quite so well (unless you are one of Bozos Cronys, obvs)
55
22/02/2021 12:15:20 91 22
bbc
Puregym has a very aggressive business model which has put a number of their competitors out of business. Whilst you always feel for the workers - I wont lose any sleep if they go bust and disappear.
22/02/2021 15:04:54 12 39
bbc
You are a complete tool! Puregym is a budget gym and serves a need. If you knew anything about business, then you would know a company of this size generates millions pounds in business rates and other taxes, half this money goes to local councils and goes towards paying the services we rely upon. This money can't easily be replaced and would mean our taxes going up to compensate.
13
22/02/2021 12:00:54 223 59
bbc
I wonder how on earth we survived before gyms were a thing?
56
22/02/2021 12:15:44 18 12
bbc
Gyms employ people. Keep that in mind
294
22/02/2021 12:51:01 8 1
bbc
"Gyms employ people. Keep that in mind"

Businesses don't operate simply to employ people. They have to be viable businesses too.
22/02/2021 15:35:04 0 0
bbc
and those same people will be employed by the new owners when demand returns.
19
Ian
22/02/2021 12:03:44 85 49
bbc
Last year we had "Eat Out to Help Out" plus Boris trying to get people back in the office quickly combined with schools and universities starting term topped off with a Christmas relaxation and look what happened.

It all cost us more in the end.
Sorry to say this, but gyms are not essential just now.
Perhaps they need more help, as the issue is not of their doing.
57
22/02/2021 12:15:46 49 88
bbc
Not essential for you.
Why levy your opinion on other people?
112
LEO
22/02/2021 12:27:48 28 14
bbc
They are not essential just now. How many people die from not going to a gym?
285
22/02/2021 12:49:16 19 9
bbc
Because we've all discovered we can exercise for free during lockdown, ergo, not essential.
423
22/02/2021 13:09:08 9 4
bbc
When you look at the initial take off of infections at the end of the summer it really occurred in September. Eat out to help out was not responsible for it. It looks more like the return to university was involved - with some contribution from senior schools. University return entailed large scale movement across the country. Fees and rents. Financial interests dominated.
619
22/02/2021 13:40:52 3 1
bbc
That's why this is called have your say., or opinion.
791
VoR
22/02/2021 14:02:01 2 0
bbc
Because lots of people die if you don't?
912
22/02/2021 14:28:44 4 0
bbc
Not essential to anyone
963
Ian
22/02/2021 14:40:41 2 0
bbc
I Gym may be important, but in the light of the need to distance for a bit longer, I still say that it is not essential.

For me Essential is being able to get food and having access to medical services.
I would also say that children's education needs to come before Gyms just now.

If we open up too early we would probably end up with another lockdown which would be even worse.
987
22/02/2021 14:44:44 2 0
bbc
It's called debate.
22/02/2021 16:46:12 0 0
bbc
"Levy your opinion"? What gibberish is this you try to speak?
22/02/2021 16:54:34 2 0
bbc
because this forum is for people to express there opinion.
22/02/2021 18:00:09 1 0
bbc
Is that not HYS is for to "levy your opinion" this thank goodnessbis a democracy.
24
22/02/2021 12:05:41 175 37
bbc
Losing half a million a day! Someone's been mugging off the public.
58
22/02/2021 12:16:26 56 29
bbc
Hardly - they are a budget gym and have one of the lowest membership fees.
59
22/02/2021 12:16:55 9 4
bbc
If you do your homework you will see that private equity firm Leonard Green and Partners have been pumping money into Pure Gym;it is not clear to what extent it is based on a franchise model at this moment in time but has plans for this in the future.
What value would you place on 200k Covid deaths;400k;600k etc if we had no restrictions in place and perhaps no vaccine?
125
22/02/2021 12:29:38 2 2
bbc
The striaght value of a death caused by a third party is something like £30k when I looked some time ago (there's standard tariff). For the NHS/NICE they will fund something like £100k of costs a year. So that's how much we are worth...other things being equal. I think the GDP losses and NHS costs vastly exceeds multiples of these figures. (needs exact fact checking but its about right)
60
22/02/2021 12:16:58 16 9
bbc
As ye sow so shall ye reap. These big business owners have not given a toss about people struggling to survive on low incomes. They have done nothing but grab, grab and grab again
184
22/02/2021 12:28:36 8 2
bbc
They also employ a lot of ppl from trainers to cleaners and these gyms are full of ppl like me who can use them late hours .. gyms keep ppl going interns of mental and physical health . We don’t have a country with sun is out 360 days so gyms are saviour
420
22/02/2021 13:08:32 0 1
bbc
if you are on a low income it's probably unwise to be a member of a gym, so I cant see how it's even remotely relevant. Gyms aren't responsible for other peoples poor financial decisions.
44
22/02/2021 12:11:45 15 14
bbc
Losing £500,000 per day?

An exaggeration perhaps?
61
22/02/2021 12:17:01 13 2
bbc
There are 260 pure gyms. This equates to £1923 a day lost each.

Still sound so unfeasible?
80
LEO
22/02/2021 12:22:24 1 1
bbc
Is it lost revenue or actual running cost this £500,000?
22
22/02/2021 12:05:05 78 13
bbc
This is nonsense, if the business's are franchises then it's the franchisee that's losing the money not this man.
62
22/02/2021 12:17:23 6 2
bbc
Puregym are not a franchise
22/02/2021 15:02:33 1 0
bbc
First line of article
" budget gym franchise Pure Gym "
17
22/02/2021 12:02:45 424 132
bbc
"We can make a massive contribution to the health of the nation" says the boss.

Nothing to stop folk going for a brisk walk during lockdown instead of going to the gym. Okay, you're not going to build big muscles but walking keeps you fit and keeps the pounds off. And it's free.
63
22/02/2021 12:17:45 246 48
bbc
Not everyone goes to the gym for big muscles. I don't use a gym, but people go for all sorts of reasons, including rehabilitation from injury.
1
22/02/2021 11:53:45 727 73
bbc
Gym users are supposed to burn through the pounds.
64
22/02/2021 12:17:58 75 36
bbc
This comment isn't getting enough love
307
T
22/02/2021 12:51:52 8 9
bbc
Because it's a dad joke.
22
22/02/2021 12:05:05 78 13
bbc
This is nonsense, if the business's are franchises then it's the franchisee that's losing the money not this man.
65
22/02/2021 12:17:58 1 1
bbc
Franchising companies do have significant costs in that quite frequently they have to fund the underlying land purchase (McDonald's for instance) as well as be the prime lender to the Franchisee for the capital which is then repaid back through fees. The guy should have been more expansive in saying the business model they use means that the business and franchisees etc.
30
22/02/2021 12:07:10 318 35
bbc
Spot on. £500,000 a day seems like an awful lot. I'm highly sceptical about these numbers, I'd like to see a breakdown. I'd also add that Landlords should share the pain, but are they?
66
22/02/2021 12:18:33 48 13
bbc
its £1923 per day for each of their gyms. Think about wages, rent, utilities, everything.

Still sceptical?
154
LEO
22/02/2021 12:34:54 10 11
bbc
Wages are furloughed, rent negotiable, utilities should be mainly shut down. Yes, still sceptical.
19
Ian
22/02/2021 12:03:44 85 49
bbc
Last year we had "Eat Out to Help Out" plus Boris trying to get people back in the office quickly combined with schools and universities starting term topped off with a Christmas relaxation and look what happened.

It all cost us more in the end.
Sorry to say this, but gyms are not essential just now.
Perhaps they need more help, as the issue is not of their doing.
67
22/02/2021 12:18:34 16 13
bbc
Very narrow shortsighted thinking. People who are physically fit have been shown to have a much better chance of fighting the virus.
42
22/02/2021 12:11:12 37 9
bbc
Head office gets a profit share from the franchise. That's the point.
68
22/02/2021 12:18:51 2 3
bbc
But they do not incur costs and the franchisee would be liable for the rent. That's the point.
69
22/02/2021 12:18:52 18 18
bbc
18 million already vaccinated with huge protection now, positive test results plummeting ( note I didn't say ''cases'' as the majority of those won't even get ill), deaths plummeting yet the lockdown lovers and sofa surfers will still be hysterically pleading for more and more lockdown. Time to live with it like we do with the flu and get on with it. Save society before it's too late.
77
22/02/2021 12:21:34 14 9
bbc
You would be a Hero on Daily Mail..where IQ is not an issue
341
22/02/2021 12:56:31 1 2
bbc
The misinformed out to willfully misinform again I see.
17
22/02/2021 12:02:45 424 132
bbc
"We can make a massive contribution to the health of the nation" says the boss.

Nothing to stop folk going for a brisk walk during lockdown instead of going to the gym. Okay, you're not going to build big muscles but walking keeps you fit and keeps the pounds off. And it's free.
70
22/02/2021 12:18:58 84 22
bbc
If you go to a gym and subject yourself to hard, gruelling training, you'll understand that a "walk" doesn't cut it.
I do agree though, if someone lives a very sedate life, a walk will do, but if you are extremely fit, it's next to useless.
The mental motivation you get when training in a gym cannot be quantified.
153
22/02/2021 12:34:35 3 3
bbc
I've completed loads of online Zoom exercise sessions - having others around you is motivating. But yes looking forward to later in the year getting back to a traditional gym, as long as the membership price is right.
225
22/02/2021 12:43:04 1 11
bbc
Try running not walking then. Or cycle very fast on a bike? Lift some tree trunks like Rocky Balboa
851
22/02/2021 14:16:00 0 0
bbc
Spot on.
958
22/02/2021 14:36:13 0 1
bbc
Couldnt agree more. I went 3 times a week and my partner spent several hours in getting in good shape. She is now feeling quite down mentally as she cant undertake the rigourous training she used and is getting paranoid about putting on weight. Walking around your town is a very poor consolation!
71
22/02/2021 12:19:30 5 3
bbc
Possibly everyone who pays a subscription for gym membership and doesn't bother attending after the novelty has worn off (2 to 3 months), could continue to pay.
It should reduce the losses considerably.
181
22/02/2021 12:25:58 1 1
bbc
They run a very easy to use website /app where u can pause and resume whenever you want . Do research before u talk . It’s a very efficiently run business and users like me who can use their 24 gyms are affected
24
22/02/2021 12:05:41 175 37
bbc
Losing half a million a day! Someone's been mugging off the public.
72
22/02/2021 12:19:39 30 1
bbc
275 Gyms at £500,000 a day is only about £1800 a site - given the rents for some of those places, rental/leases on the equipment, other fixed cists as well as the staff costs still in place (pensions, essential staff etc.) it's quite easy to get to that figure - a bit of simple maths needed...
577
22/02/2021 13:32:55 1 0
bbc
Simple maths = simple answers.
73
22/02/2021 12:20:10 9 7
bbc
I don't hear anyone complaining when they're millions of pounds in profit. I'm sure when the 'good times' are here, this chap is raking hundreds of thousands in dividends and not saving for rough weather ahead.
199
22/02/2021 12:36:30 1 1
bbc
Completely agree. Lot of people have completely missed the point about savings and reserves.
50
22/02/2021 12:14:15 5 25
bbc
The future deaths caused by the cowardice of the govt sacrificing the future for a failed attempt at controlling the virus which hasn't worked and actually might still not work has been caused by the quality of our politicians

Both the skills (do they get maths at all) and imaginations (do they know what 400 billion looks like) have destroyed the future for us all

We'll all just die younger now
74
LEO
22/02/2021 12:20:25 8 2
bbc
Utter rubbish
75
22/02/2021 12:20:29 7 7
bbc
Oh dearie me the rich sure love to complain almost like they have come to get used to the SOCALISIM they recive but deny others.
113
22/02/2021 12:28:07 3 4
bbc
Your comment makes no sense what-so-ever! Why the shouty SOCIALISM (Which you spelt wrong!)? What has socialism got to do with a privately owned business...
76
22/02/2021 12:20:46 14 15
bbc
Gym's are not an essential part of life. We never used to have, we did what was called "going for a walk" or a "bike ride" both in the fresh air and not in a germ filled room, and it was free.
It's easy to criticise the government about decision making but the situation is fluid and changes by the day therefore the rules need to change also,
We just need people to abide by the rules.
89
22/02/2021 12:22:53 3 4
bbc
Exact reason our country is one of the worst affected ! Let’s open bars and more calories full takeaway but no gym !
102
22/02/2021 12:26:06 3 3
bbc
We never used to hide from viruses either, we accepted them as a way of life! you can't have one argument without the other.
69
22/02/2021 12:18:52 18 18
bbc
18 million already vaccinated with huge protection now, positive test results plummeting ( note I didn't say ''cases'' as the majority of those won't even get ill), deaths plummeting yet the lockdown lovers and sofa surfers will still be hysterically pleading for more and more lockdown. Time to live with it like we do with the flu and get on with it. Save society before it's too late.
77
22/02/2021 12:21:34 14 9
bbc
You would be a Hero on Daily Mail..where IQ is not an issue
600
22/02/2021 13:37:25 0 1
bbc
If that is the case then WHY are you not commenting on the Daily Mail website instead of this one. After all, you comments appear to be far more suitable for the Daily Mail website, which is proven by all the down votes you have got for every comment you have made today.
10
22/02/2021 11:59:33 80 33
bbc
While I feel bad for this guy - what on earth was society supposed to do? It was a global pandemic and there was death and suffering everywhere. I hope the one thing this guy has definitely learned is GET MORE INSURANCE. Businesses, you either insure yourself or roll the dice - it's entirely your choice.
78
22/02/2021 12:21:58 7 3
bbc
Most insurance policies exclude this type of thing - so by all means buy more, you still wont be covered. Great advice though - glad we have experts like you on here.
321
22/02/2021 12:53:48 2 1
bbc
Thanks :) We all try to help where we can.

The idea of getting insured against pandamics meaning that you're still not insured against pandemics is, well, really silly. Still, nice talking.
23
22/02/2021 12:05:10 204 12
bbc
we have never had such a large choice of gyms as we have today. We also, incidentally, have never had, as a nation, so many people with a 30 + BMI. Food for thought
79
22/02/2021 12:22:00 24 6
bbc
Why we have suffered so badly from covid as we're a fat nation. We'd never have the debate again about funding for NHS folk got fit, as NHS would have more money that it required and could invest in hospitals and technology, but instead we spend £billions annually on obesity diseases! Being fat is not normal, it's a curse on society and should be frowned upon like smoking
485
22/02/2021 13:18:33 9 0
bbc
Obesity is a huge problem, and enabling culture is to blame, you CANNOT be healthy if you are obese, something which is proven by the statistics.
908
22/02/2021 14:28:08 2 2
bbc
No, fat is not normal, but neither is 3 meals a day (evolutionarily). We evolved to seek out high-carb high-fat foods and to eat as much as we could because it might be days before our next meal. We have developed technology to ensure a steady supply of food, but th reptilian brain hasn't developed past see-it-eat-it. Obesity is a really complex issue. until healthy=affordable it isn't going away
23/02/2021 08:29:03 0 0
bbc
Careful.. you'll be accused of body shaming in a minute by some woke person
61
22/02/2021 12:17:01 13 2
bbc
There are 260 pure gyms. This equates to £1923 a day lost each.

Still sound so unfeasible?
80
LEO
22/02/2021 12:22:24 1 1
bbc
Is it lost revenue or actual running cost this £500,000?
23
22/02/2021 12:05:10 204 12
bbc
we have never had such a large choice of gyms as we have today. We also, incidentally, have never had, as a nation, so many people with a 30 + BMI. Food for thought
81
22/02/2021 12:22:58 15 6
bbc
And that is exactly the reason why we need to get gyms open again.
During lockdown (6 months out of the last 11, and counting), people have definitely added weight and the longer this lockdown continues, obesity rates will rise.
22/02/2021 21:36:00 0 0
bbc
No reason to though. Training is a very poor way to loose weight. Best loose as much as possible before starting.
82
22/02/2021 12:23:08 4 7
bbc
BBC comment filled by the radical left, who are happy to see these business go under without cnsideration of their employees and the knock on effect on family and real lives, their arguments have always been extreamly short siighted, These are real business supporting real people through employment, they are not cannon fodder for your righteous way of life.
95
22/02/2021 12:24:23 2 4
bbc
Hahaha cry on Parler they use terms like Radical Left picked up by bufoons on the right
122
22/02/2021 12:29:01 0 2
bbc
Nothing to do with the radical left. Gyms and pubs help facilitate infection - especially gyms where people having a work-out inevitably breathe more heavily. BTW, learn to spell - it's "extremely"
124
22/02/2021 12:29:32 0 2
bbc
Would the "radical left" not ee these important facilities best served as nationalised with access on the basis of need rather than just for those who can afford the fees?
10
22/02/2021 11:59:33 80 33
bbc
While I feel bad for this guy - what on earth was society supposed to do? It was a global pandemic and there was death and suffering everywhere. I hope the one thing this guy has definitely learned is GET MORE INSURANCE. Businesses, you either insure yourself or roll the dice - it's entirely your choice.
83
22/02/2021 12:12:57 3 2
bbc
I think a major issue is that insurance doesn't really cover this. In my industry (travel) force majeure clauses in contracts typically only stipulate things that last for up to 3 months
84
22/02/2021 12:14:13 5 4
bbc
wow.losing 1/2 million a day.time to sell it all,or are you over leveraged?dont suppose you are on universal credit.
18
22/02/2021 12:03:14 41 56
bbc
Well 4% of them
85
22/02/2021 12:23:28 13 22
bbc
I am so pleased that none of your nearest and dearest are neither pert of the 4% or have suffered greatly.

That was a crass and insensitive remark. In my humble opinion
325
22/02/2021 12:54:19 21 9
bbc
News flash for you, our nearest and dearest die every year.....

I have been effected by cancer, heart disease, suicide, old age all before covid arrived...
86
22/02/2021 12:15:38 4 7
bbc
Why are gyms non essential when alcohol in Tesco’s is?? People need to see how stupid this government really are. Also gyms take pressure off the NHS and contribute to the health of the nation! Pure gym deserves better treatment from this shoddy good for nothing government.
114
22/02/2021 12:28:08 3 5
bbc
Perhaps the stupid ones are those who prefer to be inside with deep breathing, panting crowds in the same room during a pandemic when droplet transmission is prevelant?
503
22/02/2021 13:22:26 0 0
bbc
Alcohol is obviously still being consumed mainly in people's homes at present, and not everyone is an alcoholic. Plus the fact it is still one of life's pleasures to many people and , if you would like to think very carefully, it still keeps tens of thousands in employment at the manufactures.
44
22/02/2021 12:11:45 15 14
bbc
Losing £500,000 per day?

An exaggeration perhaps?
87
22/02/2021 12:18:12 0 1
bbc
Do you run a business to know what it costs?
18
22/02/2021 12:03:14 41 56
bbc
Well 4% of them
88
22/02/2021 12:22:03 11 18
bbc
That is a very flippant remark. I hope one of your nearest and dearest is never claimed by the terrible virus.
76
22/02/2021 12:20:46 14 15
bbc
Gym's are not an essential part of life. We never used to have, we did what was called "going for a walk" or a "bike ride" both in the fresh air and not in a germ filled room, and it was free.
It's easy to criticise the government about decision making but the situation is fluid and changes by the day therefore the rules need to change also,
We just need people to abide by the rules.
89
22/02/2021 12:22:53 3 4
bbc
Exact reason our country is one of the worst affected ! Let’s open bars and more calories full takeaway but no gym !
355
22/02/2021 12:57:55 0 2
bbc
As the number of gyms has increased the rate of obesity has also increased. Gyms do not help with obesity or weight loss.
90
22/02/2021 12:23:28 2 1
bbc
Struggling to feel anything for the people running Marston's, the staff 100% feel for them but the management were awful to pub I worked in, tried to take the money from the council that was supposed to be given to the landlords, fired staff including live in landlords leaving them homeless, stopping the front line staff from being paid which ended up with some staff being ineligible for furlough.
91
22/02/2021 12:23:51 6 5
bbc
Dude, this lockdown hardly touches me, but I really feel for you. In my younger years it would have catapulted me from being a very well paid homeowner to moving back with my parents.

It must be so upsetting to see how countries like Sweden still have a lower death rate than the UK. What's been done to this country is criminal madness.
92
22/02/2021 12:24:04 4 3
bbc
Are we supposed to have a tear in our eye?
Please tell us how much he/staff have been given, rather than revenue lost
93
22/02/2021 12:24:09 4 2
bbc
Boris should have shared the pain with landlords - should have legally halved rents for all businesses unable to operate. Many landlords have voluntarily cut rent (don't want their tenants to go bust) but not all.
94
22/02/2021 12:24:17 4 11
bbc
The lockdown luvvies and the wokes will not like the economy to reopen. The economy seems to not matter to them.
100
22/02/2021 12:25:37 2 1
bbc
Maga tears? cant tell Borris boys and Maga apart these days
106
22/02/2021 12:26:55 1 1
bbc
Economy is open dingus.

You are a consumer nothing else
110
22/02/2021 12:27:20 2 1
bbc
I suggest you look up what woke means before you just start using it. You'll find thinking of yourself as "anti-woke" is actually not what you think it is.
82
22/02/2021 12:23:08 4 7
bbc
BBC comment filled by the radical left, who are happy to see these business go under without cnsideration of their employees and the knock on effect on family and real lives, their arguments have always been extreamly short siighted, These are real business supporting real people through employment, they are not cannon fodder for your righteous way of life.
95
22/02/2021 12:24:23 2 4
bbc
Hahaha cry on Parler they use terms like Radical Left picked up by bufoons on the right
180
22/02/2021 12:39:48 1 0
bbc
"cry on parler" not sure what you mean.... but well done for stretching your intellect and imagination on that reply, assuming from your "baffon" coment you disagree with my sentiment and are therefore happy to see victims and suffering as long as it is not your people!
395
22/02/2021 13:04:11 0 1
bbc
Clowns to the left, jokers to the right. It's funny, momentum and MAGA / Parler idiots are so similar, despite being polar opposites.
38
22/02/2021 12:10:19 13 16
bbc
Panting indoors is not a great thing for the virus - especially if they are not ventilated which in the depth of winter is difficult

However by the end of March ventilation is possible and gyms can almost be effectively outside

Experience has shown gyms were not sources of transmission generally last autumn

Our caution is really cowardice and it's destroying our country and children's futures
96
LEO
22/02/2021 12:24:36 2 4
bbc
It's not cowardice. It's common sense and doing the best for the majority. Nor is it destroying our country. Perhaps you would like to explain that remark?
460
22/02/2021 13:14:43 0 0
bbc
Cleaners, staff, personal trainers, buildings maintenance, equipment suppliers, nutrition consultants.... all of these are people who rely on gyms for their income. Hundreds of thousands of jobs, hundreds of thousands of people, hundreds of thousands of lives. These jobs are often a percentage (or whole) household income. Does it make sense yet? the knock on effect is huge.
30
22/02/2021 12:07:10 318 35
bbc
Spot on. £500,000 a day seems like an awful lot. I'm highly sceptical about these numbers, I'd like to see a breakdown. I'd also add that Landlords should share the pain, but are they?
97
22/02/2021 12:24:47 37 6
bbc
Divide by 275 gyms = £1,800/day.
Commercial rent, insurances, interest on business loans, etc, etc . . .
117
22/02/2021 12:28:32 11 3
bbc
Exactly, and a business at the scale. Even repairs on premises, vehicle leases...
626
22/02/2021 13:41:57 2 0
bbc
PureGym is a franchise so those costs are likely paid by the franchisees of the individual gyms not by the franchisor.
977
22/02/2021 14:41:36 1 0
bbc
Ok so its £13 on average per month per gym user at Pure. That's approx 40p revenue a day from each member. £1,800/0.4 = 4,500 members per gym to break even? Doesn't seem right to me...
19
Ian
22/02/2021 12:03:44 85 49
bbc
Last year we had "Eat Out to Help Out" plus Boris trying to get people back in the office quickly combined with schools and universities starting term topped off with a Christmas relaxation and look what happened.

It all cost us more in the end.
Sorry to say this, but gyms are not essential just now.
Perhaps they need more help, as the issue is not of their doing.
98
22/02/2021 12:25:14 15 28
bbc
Think about it Ian, gyms ARE essential now. For the physical AND mental health of us. They are ventilated, equipment is sanitised after each use by the user, fans keep the air circulating.....unlike in pubs or indeed supermarkets where there is NO ventilation, NO fans and, for all the publicity in the form of brainwashing , NO social distancing .
159
CJR
22/02/2021 12:36:12 7 8
bbc
Add in try getting round a group of people who are ignorant to the fact that they are in every ones way, that’s your social distance out of the window, it’s not the gyms it’s the users.
369
22/02/2021 13:00:05 20 10
bbc
I was an avid gym user before lockdown, now i just run outdoors and picked up some dumbells online. The biggest "mental health" crisis from the gyms being shut is the lack of a huge mirror for people to take selfies with so they can post it to Instagram for everybody to see how self absorbed and vain they are.
409
22/02/2021 13:02:23 12 2
bbc
c.7% of the UK population have a gym membership, and I would expect a number of them to be dormant - when you say they are for the "physical AND mental health of us" do you mean that exclusive 7%...
99
22/02/2021 12:25:32 7 1
bbc
We all want lockdown to end, especially those of us who are feeling deprived of meeting with relatives and friends.

Physical health is important, of course, but mental health is just as important.

As an indoor bowls player, I benefited from both physical and mental activity at the same time.
94
22/02/2021 12:24:17 4 11
bbc
The lockdown luvvies and the wokes will not like the economy to reopen. The economy seems to not matter to them.
100
22/02/2021 12:25:37 2 1
bbc
Maga tears? cant tell Borris boys and Maga apart these days