Mars landing: Nasa's Perseverance rover in 'great shape'
19/02/2021 | news | science | 348
Perseverance will now spend at least two years looking for evidence of past life on the Red Planet.
1
19/02/2021 10:19:04 81 8
bbc
Utterly incredible. I doff my hat to everyone involved.

Whatever the future of humanity is, our exploration of space will be crucial.

Maybe we’ll soon find out the answer to my favourite David Bowie song... is there, or was there, life on Mars?

God I miss Bowie :(

Anyway, I digress.
30
19/02/2021 10:33:45 27 5
bbc
Never apologise for missing the great David Bowie....
74
19/02/2021 10:39:40 0 2
bbc
You sound like Aladdin Sane.
2
19/02/2021 10:19:37 18 3
bbc
Will it find a black oblong monolith ?
28
19/02/2021 10:32:57 16 12
bbc
Did you just assume the Monolith's colour and shape?

RACIST! (tongue firmly implanted in cheek)*

Black Monolith's Lives Matter
44
19/02/2021 10:37:42 2 1
bbc
Covered in chocolate
318
19/02/2021 15:10:28 0 0
bbc
No, mysterious black monoliths are only to be found buried in craters on the Moon or at Lagrange points around Jupiter (although this was originally Saturn).
321
19/02/2021 15:16:19 0 0
bbc
That could be a problem - the rover will then develop sentience and will be coming for us next...
3
19/02/2021 10:19:52 1 35
bbc
Waste of Space
10
19/02/2021 10:23:08 32 1
bbc
Step away from that mirror.
38
19/02/2021 10:36:00 5 1
bbc
Stanley also believes that the Earth is flat, Bill Gates in putting a tiny tracker in every Covid Vaccination and the CIA are prevented from tracking Stanley's thoughts due to the tin foil hat he's wearing, oh and he prefers to use square wheels still
50
19/02/2021 10:39:08 2 1
bbc
Your comment presumably?
150
19/02/2021 10:56:10 2 0
bbc
I think you'll find it's a joke.
Capital S.
4
19/02/2021 10:20:00 28 2
bbc
Good luck perseverance, I can't wait to see what discoveries you find.
5
19/02/2021 10:20:33 26 1
bbc
What an achievement well done
6
19/02/2021 10:20:53 12 27
bbc
In the 1960s NASA put Space Science 50 years ahead of it's time, then budgets were cut and they fell behind. Now, thanks to President Trumps support and funding of brave new projects, NASA is once again leading the way. Very exciting times.
15
19/02/2021 10:25:40 32 1
bbc
Trump had nothing to do with it, NASA had this on the go years before the orange one came to power. it was also a multi country project, ie the parachutes used were made in the UK.
16
Jay
19/02/2021 10:25:47 19 1
bbc
Perseverance started in 2013 when Obama was the President.
19
19/02/2021 10:27:14 13 1
bbc
Lie.
20
19/02/2021 10:29:08 14 1
bbc
Don't politicise great science. Trump had naff all to do with it but always claimed the credit while blaming others for any failures. He's irrelevant now.
26
19/02/2021 10:32:09 7 1
bbc
Let's be honest, Trump should have been sent their too.
7
19/02/2021 10:21:04 44 4
bbc
A wonderfully exciting achievement - congratulations to all involved. I hope they find evidence of past life on Mars .
24
19/02/2021 10:31:04 11 4
bbc
Yes, a wrapper at least.
149
19/02/2021 10:56:08 1 0
bbc
It was a great TV show
335
19/02/2021 18:09:52 0 0
bbc
They already have - but we won't be seeing it. Brookings report....look it up....
8
19/02/2021 10:21:22 16 3
bbc
Well done NASA!
Come on UK, it's time to play catch up
23
19/02/2021 10:30:37 5 4
bbc
Some way to go but I'm sure Rishi and his mates have a few billion tucked up their sleeves to fund it.
25
19/02/2021 10:31:09 5 2
bbc
We have developed ion thrusters for the joint ESA/JAXA BepiColombo project to Mercury.

Never seems to gets a mention, not as sexy as Mars?
40
19/02/2021 10:37:12 3 1
bbc
Don't forget Beagle 2! We did try, but it wasn't so successful
60
19/02/2021 10:34:24 1 1
bbc
No chance.
94
19/02/2021 10:45:54 3 3
bbc
No political will and unfortunately we are now out of the European programme
123
19/02/2021 10:44:06 0 0
bbc
You can watch the new UK rocket take off on 5th November! every year Next to the bonfire.
141
19/02/2021 10:54:18 3 1
bbc
We’re trying to,for instance with HS 2,but we have asxxxles putting themselves in tunnels and swinging in trees trying to stop it
If it’s anything like swampy and his mates when runway two was being built at Manchester officials even bought their DHS payments from Wilmslow PO!
9
19/02/2021 10:22:00 34 2
bbc
Stunning achievement.
3
19/02/2021 10:19:52 1 35
bbc
Waste of Space
10
19/02/2021 10:23:08 32 1
bbc
Step away from that mirror.
11
19/02/2021 10:23:42 1 2
bbc
Does it need to maintain social distancing if it meets any Martians? wouldn't want to wipe out any new friends.
12
19/02/2021 10:23:47 7 3
bbc
'Perseverance', to be renamed 'Biligerance' when it heads off in the wrong direction ;-)

Quite an achievement.
32
19/02/2021 10:33:55 6 4
bbc
Can some people not take a joke.
Get a life . . . On Mars.
13
19/02/2021 10:23:55 6 13
bbc
Could we ask them to have a look at our 'Track and Trace' system(sic). Might help to protect life on this planet.
14
19/02/2021 10:24:53 4 3
bbc
But... in the picture of President Biden he is watching SpaceX and their Starship trying to land in Texas. Wrong space pic.
29
19/02/2021 10:33:30 3 1
bbc
Oh come on, never let the facts get in the way of a good story.
78
19/02/2021 10:41:51 0 5
bbc
Biden will soon cut NASA's budget. Doing things like this "Makes America Great Again" and he does not like thats.

SLS will be cancelled by Biden.

SpaceX will be doing most of the SPACE stuff in the future, And unless Biden gives Elon the freedom, he will move operations over the boarder to Mexico. Have you noticed how close to the boarder Boca Chica is?
6
19/02/2021 10:20:53 12 27
bbc
In the 1960s NASA put Space Science 50 years ahead of it's time, then budgets were cut and they fell behind. Now, thanks to President Trumps support and funding of brave new projects, NASA is once again leading the way. Very exciting times.
15
19/02/2021 10:25:40 32 1
bbc
Trump had nothing to do with it, NASA had this on the go years before the orange one came to power. it was also a multi country project, ie the parachutes used were made in the UK.
203
19/02/2021 11:07:24 2 2
bbc
"NASA had this on the go years before the orange one came to power."

A bit Racist is it not? Imagine the outcry if I posted about Obama saying " The black one was in power when this started"

But of course it's ok to be racist, as long as it's directed at non black people.
6
19/02/2021 10:20:53 12 27
bbc
In the 1960s NASA put Space Science 50 years ahead of it's time, then budgets were cut and they fell behind. Now, thanks to President Trumps support and funding of brave new projects, NASA is once again leading the way. Very exciting times.
16
Jay
19/02/2021 10:25:47 19 1
bbc
Perseverance started in 2013 when Obama was the President.
17
19/02/2021 10:22:25 28 3
bbc
Seriously fascinating.
18
19/02/2021 10:26:32 48 3
bbc
Amazing achievement, can't wait to see the results of the exploration!
6
19/02/2021 10:20:53 12 27
bbc
In the 1960s NASA put Space Science 50 years ahead of it's time, then budgets were cut and they fell behind. Now, thanks to President Trumps support and funding of brave new projects, NASA is once again leading the way. Very exciting times.
19
19/02/2021 10:27:14 13 1
bbc
Lie.
6
19/02/2021 10:20:53 12 27
bbc
In the 1960s NASA put Space Science 50 years ahead of it's time, then budgets were cut and they fell behind. Now, thanks to President Trumps support and funding of brave new projects, NASA is once again leading the way. Very exciting times.
20
19/02/2021 10:29:08 14 1
bbc
Don't politicise great science. Trump had naff all to do with it but always claimed the credit while blaming others for any failures. He's irrelevant now.
21
19/02/2021 10:29:10 19 4
bbc
It'll be interesting to see how the helicopter performs. Will it generate lift?
I guess they're tested it in a simulated Martian atmosphere.
82
CG
19/02/2021 10:42:48 7 62
bbc
Really could care less, perhaps they can send their next billion to the American Red Cross or a cancer charity...
89
19/02/2021 10:44:24 7 0
bbc
They tested it in their vacumn chambers with atmosphere conditions similar to mars. There was a program on last night which showed this and other aspects of the project
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
36
19/02/2021 10:35:22 15 3
bbc
I feel your opinion is a little naive. Exploration of space has brought us so much technological innovation on earth. It's actually very cheap in the grand scheme of things. As for your other question...facepalm
37
19/02/2021 10:35:40 11 0
bbc
Could explain but judging from your post I doubt you'd understand.
39
19/02/2021 10:36:32 7 1
bbc
Err.. cos nearest galaxies are trillions of miles away while Mars is millions and space travel is slow compared to light
41
19/02/2021 10:37:22 9 0
bbc
Yes I can tell you. Mars is metaphorically 'in our back yard' compared to the nearest star (apart from the sun) - over four light years away. Light travels at approx 186,000 miles per second; so that should give you a feeling for how close Mars is, and how far away the stars are..
45
19/02/2021 10:38:00 3 1
bbc
The rover had landed 11 minutes before nasa received the data.
46
19/02/2021 10:38:17 8 0
bbc
Mars is about 6 and a half light minutes away (It will take light or a radio signal that much time to get there) the nearest star system is 4 and a half light years away. so it would take light much much longer to get there.

If the NASA lander took 7 months to get to Mars, If my sums are right, it would take approx 197,235 years to get to the nearest star system.
48
19/02/2021 10:38:39 5 0
bbc
I suggest you put the kettle on, have nice cup of tea and order yourself a copy of beginners guide to the Universe from Waterstones.
It's wonders to behold.
51
CG
19/02/2021 10:39:08 2 14
bbc
It is quite obscene to spend this amount of money when it could be used to help the problems we have on earth.
52
19/02/2021 10:39:09 1 0
bbc
It travelled at ~25,000 mph to reach Mars in 7 months!
53
19/02/2021 10:39:23 2 0
bbc
One astronomical unit (AU) is the distance from the Earth to the Sun. Mars is around 0.5 AUs from Earth. The nearest star to our solar system is 271937 AU away - it would take ~4.3 years travelling at the speed of light to reach it.
58
19/02/2021 10:33:06 1 0
bbc
You are kidding right?
Removed
64
19/02/2021 10:35:45 1 1
bbc
It's a planet, not a star.
67
19/02/2021 10:36:41 1 0
bbc
Because the planets orbiting the same star as us are much closer to us than the other stars in the galaxy.

In the same way as it takes less time to drive from London to Birmingham than it does to drive from London to Moscow.
69
19/02/2021 10:37:06 3 0
bbc
I would explain it to you but i think whatever i said would go way over your head anyway
70
19/02/2021 10:37:41 3 0
bbc
Do you understand the difference between a million miles and a million light years?
76
Jon
19/02/2021 10:40:56 3 0
bbc
It took Perseverance 7 months to travel 11 light-minutes. Our nearest stellar neighbour, Proxima Centauri, is 4.34 light-years away. That's about 200,000 times further away.
110
19/02/2021 10:49:19 1 1
bbc
Holly, I could tell you but you probably wouldn't understand. I suggest that you stick to putting the kettle on; that would appear to be about your intellectual limit.
119
19/02/2021 10:51:16 0 0
bbc
NASA's #MARS2020 programme cost just under £2bn.
That amount of money won't solve poverty here on Earth.

I'm not sure what your second point is.

Mars is roughly 205 million km, away at the moment (and it takes light/signals about 11minutes to reach Earth), and seven months is about right for a transit to Mars using current technology.
179
19/02/2021 10:54:24 1 0
bbc
You know the money does not disappear right? NASA give it to their supply chain. They give it to their supply chain and employees. They spend it on whatever they want to spend it on. All the while, with EVERY transaction, the government claws back a big chunk in tax.
264
19/02/2021 11:59:47 0 0
bbc
The only star close to us is the Sun and light takes around 8 minutes to reach us from it. Mars is a planet within our own solar system so again light takes a few minutes to reach us from it. By contrast the next nearest star after the Sun is around 4 light years away. The stars we see are all within our own galaxy - the Milky Way. Other galaxies exist at millions of light years distance.
8
19/02/2021 10:21:22 16 3
bbc
Well done NASA!
Come on UK, it's time to play catch up
23
19/02/2021 10:30:37 5 4
bbc
Some way to go but I'm sure Rishi and his mates have a few billion tucked up their sleeves to fund it.
7
19/02/2021 10:21:04 44 4
bbc
A wonderfully exciting achievement - congratulations to all involved. I hope they find evidence of past life on Mars .
24
19/02/2021 10:31:04 11 4
bbc
Yes, a wrapper at least.
73
19/02/2021 10:38:56 0 0
bbc
Kanye?
8
19/02/2021 10:21:22 16 3
bbc
Well done NASA!
Come on UK, it's time to play catch up
25
19/02/2021 10:31:09 5 2
bbc
We have developed ion thrusters for the joint ESA/JAXA BepiColombo project to Mercury.

Never seems to gets a mention, not as sexy as Mars?
72
19/02/2021 10:38:25 1 2
bbc
Mercury is the new Mars - that's why they named it after the Queen front man.
6
19/02/2021 10:20:53 12 27
bbc
In the 1960s NASA put Space Science 50 years ahead of it's time, then budgets were cut and they fell behind. Now, thanks to President Trumps support and funding of brave new projects, NASA is once again leading the way. Very exciting times.
26
19/02/2021 10:32:09 7 1
bbc
Let's be honest, Trump should have been sent their too.
135
19/02/2021 10:53:19 2 1
bbc
There!
This not working really starts to affect me. I'm still having breakfast! (Am not furloughed)
27
SJB
19/02/2021 10:32:28 63 13
bbc
What hasn't been reported is that the fabric used for the parachute was designed, developed and made by Heathcotes, a Devon company. If that fabric had failed, the rover would be 50 feet underground. The parachute slowed the capsule down from 12,000mph....yes, 12,000mph! Heathcotes is a world leader in this and is over 200 years old.
No one celebrates this, why not!
65
19/02/2021 10:41:07 5 1
bbc
Yes it did.
66
19/02/2021 10:35:59 1 19
bbc
Because no one cares and they're just a very small cog in a huge machine.
79
19/02/2021 10:42:11 3 1
bbc
You are right but to be fair I have seen this mentioned in various news sources.
100
19/02/2021 10:46:39 4 2
bbc
Making an awesome parachute is not quite in the same bracket as successfully sending the Rover to Mars. There will be thousands of awesome things which have been developed and utilised to successfully make and send the rover to Mars. This is but one.
105
Art
19/02/2021 10:48:17 11 3
bbc
Cannot understand the down arrows. Heathcoats were originally a Nottinghamshire lace company that came to Tiverton to escape the Luddites and promptly created not only a decent factory but also good accommodation for its workers. It has been an asset to the town ever since now at the high end of technical fabric manufacture -check out their website. British achievements at its best.
134
19/02/2021 10:51:49 3 0
bbc
Well done Devon. Has more of a space industry than Uk govt
219
19/02/2021 11:14:43 2 4
bbc
If we follow standard uk practice, Heathcotes will be bought out by the Chinese or US private equity like everything else.

Apologies for the negativity but it always happens this way.
222
19/02/2021 11:17:17 0 4
bbc
Boris's underpants would gave done just as well.
258
19/02/2021 11:50:03 3 2
bbc
I should imagine the contributors to the success of this vast NASA project are too numerous to mention, let alone celebrate, in a brief news bulletin.

I also expect they come from all four corners of the globe, Devon included.

Are you a champion of Brexit by any chance, looking for evidence of the UK's innate superiority?
296
19/02/2021 13:15:18 2 0
bbc
How can anyone down vote this comment(?) Aaaaaagh......
314
19/02/2021 14:59:59 3 0
bbc
Actually, the heat shield is the initial means of slowing the vehicle down, as a result of friction from the Martian atmosphere. The parachute deploys after the craft has already been slowed down to below 1,000mph.
2
19/02/2021 10:19:37 18 3
bbc
Will it find a black oblong monolith ?
28
19/02/2021 10:32:57 16 12
bbc
Did you just assume the Monolith's colour and shape?

RACIST! (tongue firmly implanted in cheek)*

Black Monolith's Lives Matter
151
19/02/2021 10:56:11 1 0
bbc
Seriously read Arthur C Clarke (otherwise there was no need to comment),

The monolith was a machine effectively doing what perservence is trying to do (detect life on another planet except from millions of light years away (did not completely turn out too well for humanity in the long run as it decided to protect some underwater life as it's priority)
209
19/02/2021 11:10:32 1 0
bbc
Get over yourself!
14
19/02/2021 10:24:53 4 3
bbc
But... in the picture of President Biden he is watching SpaceX and their Starship trying to land in Texas. Wrong space pic.
29
19/02/2021 10:33:30 3 1
bbc
Oh come on, never let the facts get in the way of a good story.
1
19/02/2021 10:19:04 81 8
bbc
Utterly incredible. I doff my hat to everyone involved.

Whatever the future of humanity is, our exploration of space will be crucial.

Maybe we’ll soon find out the answer to my favourite David Bowie song... is there, or was there, life on Mars?

God I miss Bowie :(

Anyway, I digress.
30
19/02/2021 10:33:45 27 5
bbc
Never apologise for missing the great David Bowie....
31
19/02/2021 10:33:46 25 4
bbc
Fantastic in a world of gloom. I thoroughly enjoyed watching and will remember it forever.
12
19/02/2021 10:23:47 7 3
bbc
'Perseverance', to be renamed 'Biligerance' when it heads off in the wrong direction ;-)

Quite an achievement.
32
19/02/2021 10:33:55 6 4
bbc
Can some people not take a joke.
Get a life . . . On Mars.
33
CG
19/02/2021 10:34:39 7 31
bbc
I understand the achievement but all the trillions of dollars being spent looking for fossils on Mars when millions across the world are homeless, we have pressing needs for cures for cancer etc does rather sit uncomfortably. Think how many homeless Americans could be housed and fed with a fraction of what is being spent sending probes to Mars etc.
54
19/02/2021 10:39:34 17 4
bbc
Never understood this argument. Do you buy nice biscuits? Why? You could give that money to a homeless charity. There are always pressing issues that need to be resolved, and they need to be funded properly, but that does not mean at the expense of everything else.
68
19/02/2021 10:41:17 5 1
bbc
Have you contributed financially to the homeless today? I notice you say nothing of the trillions spent on nuclear weapons..
75
19/02/2021 10:42:06 7 1
bbc
How do you know there are millions accross the world who are homeless? How did you and I just communicate. How is it possible America is not an undiscovered continent? Why are we not all still living in Africa?
86
19/02/2021 10:43:45 6 1
bbc
Scientific and engineering progress is never wasted money. Each step brings rewards. Some are not in the short term or obvious. If we could harness a fraction of the resource of the Solar System it would result in an incredible benefit for all humanity. This work is just part of the investment in our long term future.
118
19/02/2021 10:51:10 6 1
bbc
"Estimates of the return on investment in the space program range from $7 for every $1 spent on the Apollo Program to $40 for every $1 spent on space development today"

On top of that, medical advancements that come from the space program save lives every day
122
19/02/2021 10:42:51 6 1
bbc
They didn't launch the money to Mars, it was spent here on Earth, at thousands of companies and manufacturers.
132
19/02/2021 10:50:23 5 1
bbc
The money spent does not cease to exist or leave the earth. It’s just temporarily in the hands of NASA’s supply chain
153
19/02/2021 10:56:21 2 0
bbc
Like many, you look at a long term solution through a short termism lens.
Colonizing other planets is vital to our species long term survival. While we remain tied to a single home planet we are ALL at the mercy of a one off cataclysmic event. We could spend all our resources trying to “fix” this worlds problems (to no avail) but would look foolish if/when that world is damaged beyond repair
261
19/02/2021 11:51:40 1 2
bbc
Some context, it is not trillions. The cost of this mission equates to what US citizens spend on their pets every 10 days or running the US Dept of Defense for less than 1.5 days. It is very cost efficient considering what it aims to achieve and it hasn't taken money from cancer research etc.
34
19/02/2021 10:35:01 9 8
bbc
Why does the BBC keep calling NASA, Nasa??? Or should I say Bbc...
47
19/02/2021 10:38:32 6 0
bbc
Doesn't make a difference when you say it ;-)
102
19/02/2021 10:47:40 2 0
bbc
Acronyms are specifically words formed from the initial letters of other words and pronounced as words themselves. e.g Laser, Radar, Scuba, Nasa

A set of initials that doesn't create a new word, eg BBC, is called an initialism.
142
19/02/2021 10:54:23 2 0
bbc
Because it's an acronym that's become a word in its own right, like scuba, laser, spam and numerous other such terms that we use lowercase for. We say it as a word without really thinking about what the letters stand for. The BBC stays in uppercase because it has no vowels and we say it as individual letters.
35
19/02/2021 10:35:13 38 6
bbc
Scientists are the best. They make the rest of the world's population look stupid by comparison - and certainly brighter than politicians!
93
19/02/2021 10:45:19 3 34
bbc
Expect Biden will claim this as his own.
188
19/02/2021 10:59:35 3 0
bbc
That’s a given regarding politicians!.
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
36
19/02/2021 10:35:22 15 3
bbc
I feel your opinion is a little naive. Exploration of space has brought us so much technological innovation on earth. It's actually very cheap in the grand scheme of things. As for your other question...facepalm
83
19/02/2021 10:42:51 1 0
bbc
Agree, also non stick pans, memory foam, robotics, the list is endless
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
37
19/02/2021 10:35:40 11 0
bbc
Could explain but judging from your post I doubt you'd understand.
267
19/02/2021 12:09:50 0 1
bbc
Which means you don't know either.
3
19/02/2021 10:19:52 1 35
bbc
Waste of Space
38
19/02/2021 10:36:00 5 1
bbc
Stanley also believes that the Earth is flat, Bill Gates in putting a tiny tracker in every Covid Vaccination and the CIA are prevented from tracking Stanley's thoughts due to the tin foil hat he's wearing, oh and he prefers to use square wheels still
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
39
19/02/2021 10:36:32 7 1
bbc
Err.. cos nearest galaxies are trillions of miles away while Mars is millions and space travel is slow compared to light
266
19/02/2021 12:09:23 0 1
bbc
That's what we used to call gobbledygook in old money, answers nothing.
8
19/02/2021 10:21:22 16 3
bbc
Well done NASA!
Come on UK, it's time to play catch up
40
19/02/2021 10:37:12 3 1
bbc
Don't forget Beagle 2! We did try, but it wasn't so successful
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
41
19/02/2021 10:37:22 9 0
bbc
Yes I can tell you. Mars is metaphorically 'in our back yard' compared to the nearest star (apart from the sun) - over four light years away. Light travels at approx 186,000 miles per second; so that should give you a feeling for how close Mars is, and how far away the stars are..
42
19/02/2021 10:37:30 37 11
bbc
We need to send one of those rovers to search for signs of intelligent life in Westminster.
My money's on finding it on Mars first.
342
20/02/2021 12:01:31 1 0
bbc
They tried it in Rhyl but the wheels were nicked before it could report anything.
43
19/02/2021 10:37:35 7 4
bbc
The German space program (funded by the USA) keeps on delivering.*

*just joshing chaps :)
2
19/02/2021 10:19:37 18 3
bbc
Will it find a black oblong monolith ?
44
19/02/2021 10:37:42 2 1
bbc
Covered in chocolate
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
45
19/02/2021 10:38:00 3 1
bbc
The rover had landed 11 minutes before nasa received the data.
268
19/02/2021 12:13:04 0 0
bbc
Thank you, gives some dimension to the time in space.
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
46
19/02/2021 10:38:17 8 0
bbc
Mars is about 6 and a half light minutes away (It will take light or a radio signal that much time to get there) the nearest star system is 4 and a half light years away. so it would take light much much longer to get there.

If the NASA lander took 7 months to get to Mars, If my sums are right, it would take approx 197,235 years to get to the nearest star system.
270
19/02/2021 12:14:50 0 0
bbc
Well thanks for answering my query.
34
19/02/2021 10:35:01 9 8
bbc
Why does the BBC keep calling NASA, Nasa??? Or should I say Bbc...
47
19/02/2021 10:38:32 6 0
bbc
Doesn't make a difference when you say it ;-)
128
19/02/2021 10:49:20 3 0
bbc
But when you write NASA some dink will demand you “stop shouting”
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
48
19/02/2021 10:38:39 5 0
bbc
I suggest you put the kettle on, have nice cup of tea and order yourself a copy of beginners guide to the Universe from Waterstones.
It's wonders to behold.
49
19/02/2021 10:38:44 4 20
bbc
$2,400,000,000 well spent?
57
CG
19/02/2021 10:40:39 3 6
bbc
Awful tbh.
84
19/02/2021 10:43:06 7 2
bbc
"Estimates of the return on investment in the space program range from $7 for every $1 spent on the Apollo Program to $40 for every $1 spent on space development today"

So yes, very well spent.
85
19/02/2021 10:43:41 2 2
bbc
Yes indeed.. Better to find out about our place in the universe than spending it on nuclear weapons.
88
19/02/2021 10:44:08 2 2
bbc
I suppose you would moan about anything.
108
19/02/2021 10:48:30 2 3
bbc
You could argue that this money would be better spent on education and helping the less well off get a better chance in life. On the other hand, the Earth has a finite life span, and we humans will need to find somewhere else to live in a few billion years, even sooner if we don't start looking after the planet we've got. So we're basically laying the foundations for those who are yet to live.
113
19/02/2021 10:49:49 3 2
bbc
It's a great use of money. Think about how many people have been employed, directly or indirectly, by this project. Think about all the research papers that have been published and will be published. Think about how all that research could benefit us. Science and technology is very good value for money, something a lot of people struggle to get.
197
19/02/2021 11:04:33 0 0
bbc
I think I would approve if they spent that much on birth-control for the planet. Well done to the scientists! A quite remarkable achievement and their efforts to explore will help future generations I'm sure.
305
19/02/2021 13:48:14 0 1
bbc
More use than the £24,200,000,000 spent on Christmas presents in the UK!!!
3
19/02/2021 10:19:52 1 35
bbc
Waste of Space
50
19/02/2021 10:39:08 2 1
bbc
Your comment presumably?
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
51
CG
19/02/2021 10:39:08 2 14
bbc
It is quite obscene to spend this amount of money when it could be used to help the problems we have on earth.
120
19/02/2021 10:51:33 1 0
bbc
Contributed financially today have you?
166
19/02/2021 10:58:32 0 0
bbc
Compare it to the cost of HS2
271
19/02/2021 12:15:43 0 0
bbc
I agree wholeheartedly.
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
52
19/02/2021 10:39:09 1 0
bbc
It travelled at ~25,000 mph to reach Mars in 7 months!
273
19/02/2021 12:16:55 0 0
bbc
At these speeds must be difficult to avoid space debris and clutter of old satellites.
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
53
19/02/2021 10:39:23 2 0
bbc
One astronomical unit (AU) is the distance from the Earth to the Sun. Mars is around 0.5 AUs from Earth. The nearest star to our solar system is 271937 AU away - it would take ~4.3 years travelling at the speed of light to reach it.
265
19/02/2021 12:02:54 0 0
bbc
Surely the distance to Mars varies hugely with the relative position of each planet in its orbit. Often over 2.5 AU
274
19/02/2021 12:17:21 0 0
bbc
Many thanks Dave.
33
CG
19/02/2021 10:34:39 7 31
bbc
I understand the achievement but all the trillions of dollars being spent looking for fossils on Mars when millions across the world are homeless, we have pressing needs for cures for cancer etc does rather sit uncomfortably. Think how many homeless Americans could be housed and fed with a fraction of what is being spent sending probes to Mars etc.
54
19/02/2021 10:39:34 17 4
bbc
Never understood this argument. Do you buy nice biscuits? Why? You could give that money to a homeless charity. There are always pressing issues that need to be resolved, and they need to be funded properly, but that does not mean at the expense of everything else.
55
19/02/2021 10:39:48 3 19
bbc
Big deal.
71
19/02/2021 10:41:59 14 1
bbc
Indeed it is..
99
19/02/2021 10:46:26 2 0
bbc
It is a big deal. This is the culmination of decades of preparation, research and engineering, quite a lot of which is likely to benefit us on Earth too (as much of space exploration has). It is a huge achievement to accomplish something like this when there are just so many variables that have to be accounted for.
56
DJP
19/02/2021 10:40:17 7 4
bbc
Humans are born to explore, otherwise we would still be in the stone age.
Perhaps we're too successful at the cost of our environment though ?

Well done Nasa.
49
19/02/2021 10:38:44 4 20
bbc
$2,400,000,000 well spent?
57
CG
19/02/2021 10:40:39 3 6
bbc
Awful tbh.
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
58
19/02/2021 10:33:06 1 0
bbc
You are kidding right?
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
Removed
8
19/02/2021 10:21:22 16 3
bbc
Well done NASA!
Come on UK, it's time to play catch up
60
19/02/2021 10:34:24 1 1
bbc
No chance.
61
19/02/2021 10:34:40 2 3
bbc
Humanity is underrated.
127
19/02/2021 10:47:24 2 0
bbc
Some of it
62
19/02/2021 10:41:05 8 1
bbc
Watched it live. It was actually a lot more exciting than I expected it to be, and it basically involved people glued to their computer screens..
205
19/02/2021 11:08:49 5 0
bbc
I watched on NASA TV. It was great, the joy on the techies faces (despite masks) was lovely.

Science, much of it is beyond me but I love it.
331
19/02/2021 16:35:49 1 0
bbc
some of us remember the apollo 11 landing. not taking anything away from this achievement, but not the pivotal point for mankind of man's first landing on another body in space.
63
19/02/2021 10:35:27 13 6
bbc
What an unbelievable achievement. Science and technology wins again!
125
19/02/2021 10:46:28 7 0
bbc
Another win for the experts. How many vehicles have the “gut feeling” and “common sense” brigade landed on other planets
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
64
19/02/2021 10:35:45 1 1
bbc
It's a planet, not a star.
27
SJB
19/02/2021 10:32:28 63 13
bbc
What hasn't been reported is that the fabric used for the parachute was designed, developed and made by Heathcotes, a Devon company. If that fabric had failed, the rover would be 50 feet underground. The parachute slowed the capsule down from 12,000mph....yes, 12,000mph! Heathcotes is a world leader in this and is over 200 years old.
No one celebrates this, why not!
65
19/02/2021 10:41:07 5 1
bbc
Yes it did.
27
SJB
19/02/2021 10:32:28 63 13
bbc
What hasn't been reported is that the fabric used for the parachute was designed, developed and made by Heathcotes, a Devon company. If that fabric had failed, the rover would be 50 feet underground. The parachute slowed the capsule down from 12,000mph....yes, 12,000mph! Heathcotes is a world leader in this and is over 200 years old.
No one celebrates this, why not!
66
19/02/2021 10:35:59 1 19
bbc
Because no one cares and they're just a very small cog in a huge machine.
339
19/02/2021 22:13:00 1 0
bbc
For heaven's sake, show a bit of pleasure. It is a British firm, and as such contributes to the general well being of what is a marvellous country. Some people have pride in the UK even if you don't.
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
67
19/02/2021 10:36:41 1 0
bbc
Because the planets orbiting the same star as us are much closer to us than the other stars in the galaxy.

In the same way as it takes less time to drive from London to Birmingham than it does to drive from London to Moscow.
33
CG
19/02/2021 10:34:39 7 31
bbc
I understand the achievement but all the trillions of dollars being spent looking for fossils on Mars when millions across the world are homeless, we have pressing needs for cures for cancer etc does rather sit uncomfortably. Think how many homeless Americans could be housed and fed with a fraction of what is being spent sending probes to Mars etc.
68
19/02/2021 10:41:17 5 1
bbc
Have you contributed financially to the homeless today? I notice you say nothing of the trillions spent on nuclear weapons..
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
69
19/02/2021 10:37:06 3 0
bbc
I would explain it to you but i think whatever i said would go way over your head anyway
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
70
19/02/2021 10:37:41 3 0
bbc
Do you understand the difference between a million miles and a million light years?
277
19/02/2021 12:21:59 0 0
bbc
No
55
19/02/2021 10:39:48 3 19
bbc
Big deal.
71
19/02/2021 10:41:59 14 1
bbc
Indeed it is..
25
19/02/2021 10:31:09 5 2
bbc
We have developed ion thrusters for the joint ESA/JAXA BepiColombo project to Mercury.

Never seems to gets a mention, not as sexy as Mars?
72
19/02/2021 10:38:25 1 2
bbc
Mercury is the new Mars - that's why they named it after the Queen front man.
24
19/02/2021 10:31:04 11 4
bbc
Yes, a wrapper at least.
73
19/02/2021 10:38:56 0 0
bbc
Kanye?
1
19/02/2021 10:19:04 81 8
bbc
Utterly incredible. I doff my hat to everyone involved.

Whatever the future of humanity is, our exploration of space will be crucial.

Maybe we’ll soon find out the answer to my favourite David Bowie song... is there, or was there, life on Mars?

God I miss Bowie :(

Anyway, I digress.
74
19/02/2021 10:39:40 0 2
bbc
You sound like Aladdin Sane.
33
CG
19/02/2021 10:34:39 7 31
bbc
I understand the achievement but all the trillions of dollars being spent looking for fossils on Mars when millions across the world are homeless, we have pressing needs for cures for cancer etc does rather sit uncomfortably. Think how many homeless Americans could be housed and fed with a fraction of what is being spent sending probes to Mars etc.
75
19/02/2021 10:42:06 7 1
bbc
How do you know there are millions accross the world who are homeless? How did you and I just communicate. How is it possible America is not an undiscovered continent? Why are we not all still living in Africa?
22
19/02/2021 10:27:21 3 42
bbc
Apart from the nauseating amounts of money spent on space exploration when we have so much poverty on earth can anyone tell me why it only takes seven months for this contraption to reach Mars (128 million miles away) and yet we are always told stars and galaxies are millions of light years away and what light we see from a star or planet could have taken years to reach earth.
76
Jon
19/02/2021 10:40:56 3 0
bbc
It took Perseverance 7 months to travel 11 light-minutes. Our nearest stellar neighbour, Proxima Centauri, is 4.34 light-years away. That's about 200,000 times further away.
278
19/02/2021 12:22:21 0 0
bbc
Thank you Jon, this is now making sense.
77
19/02/2021 10:41:34 6 3
bbc
This was a fantastic world scientific effort and everybody should be proud of the achievement.

My only slight criticism was the NASA coverage. I felt like I was watching an episode of Playschool for much of it.

I understand NASA need to appeal to kids however there are also grown ups watching as well and there was just a little bit too much cutesy kid, showing their drawings, going on...
90
CG
19/02/2021 10:44:26 4 25
bbc
Why proud of billions being spent on a glorified fossil hunt when millions are starving or homeless????
104
19/02/2021 10:47:55 0 1
bbc
Kids named the spacecraft didn't they? In the US there have been big efforts to get kids involved in this mission, and presumably education is a key part of it's remit.
147
19/02/2021 10:55:03 3 0
bbc
Kids are the future scientists
322
19/02/2021 15:18:04 0 0
bbc
NASA has different levels of coverage for major events, from those aimed at younger audiences, general audiences and in the case of the "clean feed" (i..e. without the talking heads) directly from Mission Control, to technical audiences who can understand the jargon without translation. You possibly weren't watching the appropriate one.
14
19/02/2021 10:24:53 4 3
bbc
But... in the picture of President Biden he is watching SpaceX and their Starship trying to land in Texas. Wrong space pic.
78
19/02/2021 10:41:51 0 5
bbc
Biden will soon cut NASA's budget. Doing things like this "Makes America Great Again" and he does not like thats.

SLS will be cancelled by Biden.

SpaceX will be doing most of the SPACE stuff in the future, And unless Biden gives Elon the freedom, he will move operations over the boarder to Mexico. Have you noticed how close to the boarder Boca Chica is?
27
SJB
19/02/2021 10:32:28 63 13
bbc
What hasn't been reported is that the fabric used for the parachute was designed, developed and made by Heathcotes, a Devon company. If that fabric had failed, the rover would be 50 feet underground. The parachute slowed the capsule down from 12,000mph....yes, 12,000mph! Heathcotes is a world leader in this and is over 200 years old.
No one celebrates this, why not!
79
19/02/2021 10:42:11 3 1
bbc
You are right but to be fair I have seen this mentioned in various news sources.
80
19/02/2021 10:42:24 4 14
bbc
Pathetic comment, your world of scientific technocrats is on the horizon, if you think you will be part of, it except as some sort of menial servant think again. Too much Star Trek.
126
19/02/2021 10:46:38 4 0
bbc
Pathetic comment. Go troll somewhere else
81
19/02/2021 10:42:11 1 11
bbc
Until we start seeing little green men im not interested.
95
19/02/2021 10:45:54 7 0
bbc
Have you never waited for one when wanting to cross a road?
124
19/02/2021 10:44:52 1 0
bbc
Britain would probably not want to let them in
21
19/02/2021 10:29:10 19 4
bbc
It'll be interesting to see how the helicopter performs. Will it generate lift?
I guess they're tested it in a simulated Martian atmosphere.
82
CG
19/02/2021 10:42:48 7 62
bbc
Really could care less, perhaps they can send their next billion to the American Red Cross or a cancer charity...
115
19/02/2021 10:50:01 18 2
bbc
If you couldn't care less, then why did you read this article in the first place?
117
19/02/2021 10:50:47 14 2
bbc
"Really could care less, perhaps they can send their next billion to the American Red Cross or a cancer charity..."

Why are you spending your time reading and commenting about it? Shouldn't you be out feeding the homeless or something?
130
19/02/2021 10:52:12 3 22
bbc
Quite. These science geeks do my head in. Put someone on a planet 52 years ago and can’t cure cancer. Misguided priorities.
190
19/02/2021 11:00:01 5 2
bbc
Bore off.
235
19/02/2021 11:24:54 11 0
bbc
I'm sure you are doing your bit. And if you are great, but why are you scrolling through an article to a comments section to post negativity on a subject you 'could care less about'. Cheer up.
243
19/02/2021 11:34:28 2 1
bbc
'Really could care less' - that means you do care, at least a little

heyheyhey #wordcrimes
316
19/02/2021 15:07:21 1 0
bbc
And we really can't care about hearing your inane opinions
36
19/02/2021 10:35:22 15 3
bbc
I feel your opinion is a little naive. Exploration of space has brought us so much technological innovation on earth. It's actually very cheap in the grand scheme of things. As for your other question...facepalm
83
19/02/2021 10:42:51 1 0
bbc
Agree, also non stick pans, memory foam, robotics, the list is endless
49
19/02/2021 10:38:44 4 20
bbc
$2,400,000,000 well spent?
84
19/02/2021 10:43:06 7 2
bbc
"Estimates of the return on investment in the space program range from $7 for every $1 spent on the Apollo Program to $40 for every $1 spent on space development today"

So yes, very well spent.
49
19/02/2021 10:38:44 4 20
bbc
$2,400,000,000 well spent?
85
19/02/2021 10:43:41 2 2
bbc
Yes indeed.. Better to find out about our place in the universe than spending it on nuclear weapons.
33
CG
19/02/2021 10:34:39 7 31
bbc
I understand the achievement but all the trillions of dollars being spent looking for fossils on Mars when millions across the world are homeless, we have pressing needs for cures for cancer etc does rather sit uncomfortably. Think how many homeless Americans could be housed and fed with a fraction of what is being spent sending probes to Mars etc.
86
19/02/2021 10:43:45 6 1
bbc
Scientific and engineering progress is never wasted money. Each step brings rewards. Some are not in the short term or obvious. If we could harness a fraction of the resource of the Solar System it would result in an incredible benefit for all humanity. This work is just part of the investment in our long term future.
87
19/02/2021 10:43:51 19 3
bbc
Electrically powered for the next ten years without a single charging point for 300 million miles.

See it can be done :)
114
19/02/2021 10:49:54 2 2
bbc
Cost?
226
19/02/2021 11:20:54 7 0
bbc
I doubt if many people would welcome a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator containing Plutonium in their car.
269
19/02/2021 12:17:53 2 0
bbc
nuclear power - plutonium!!!
49
19/02/2021 10:38:44 4 20
bbc
$2,400,000,000 well spent?
88
19/02/2021 10:44:08 2 2
bbc
I suppose you would moan about anything.
21
19/02/2021 10:29:10 19 4
bbc
It'll be interesting to see how the helicopter performs. Will it generate lift?
I guess they're tested it in a simulated Martian atmosphere.
89
19/02/2021 10:44:24 7 0
bbc
They tested it in their vacumn chambers with atmosphere conditions similar to mars. There was a program on last night which showed this and other aspects of the project
77
19/02/2021 10:41:34 6 3
bbc
This was a fantastic world scientific effort and everybody should be proud of the achievement.

My only slight criticism was the NASA coverage. I felt like I was watching an episode of Playschool for much of it.

I understand NASA need to appeal to kids however there are also grown ups watching as well and there was just a little bit too much cutesy kid, showing their drawings, going on...
90
CG
19/02/2021 10:44:26 4 25
bbc
Why proud of billions being spent on a glorified fossil hunt when millions are starving or homeless????
109
19/02/2021 10:49:15 2 0
bbc
Do you really think that if the money wasn't spent on exploration, that it would have been spent on good deeds? If you do, you live in Cloud Cuckoo Land.
133
19/02/2021 10:50:58 4 1
bbc
Oh top virtue signal ! Well done
323
19/02/2021 15:19:23 0 0
bbc
Get down off your soapbox - we're NOT interested in hearing you.
345
20/02/2021 12:15:20 1 0
bbc
Perhaps you could donate the money you spend on your Internet connection to good causes. That would be two good deeds in one.
91
19/02/2021 10:44:33 5 20
bbc
utter waste of money...
107
DJP
19/02/2021 10:48:26 6 0
bbc
At least it gives you something to moan about.
Wouldn't it be boring without Nasa ?
116
19/02/2021 10:50:10 5 0
bbc
you're a waste of money
138
19/02/2021 10:53:25 2 0
bbc
Surprised you’re not blaming Columbus. He started this trend of spending vast sums of money for pointless exploration.... I mean look where his explorations got us as a species.

I guess your saying we’d all be better off living in mud huts and marvelling at fire?
245
19/02/2021 11:36:45 0 0
bbc
Americans spent 10x as much on Valentine's Day in 2020:
https://www.statista.com/statistics/285028/us-valentine-s-day-sales/
92
jay
19/02/2021 10:45:03 2 5
bbc
Yay great achievement and all but I think even we as humans keep dumping our crap everywhere even Mars , discovering.. all for it but god were messy !
103
19/02/2021 10:47:49 3 2
bbc
What's this got to do with god and when did god become a thing of the past?
35
19/02/2021 10:35:13 38 6
bbc
Scientists are the best. They make the rest of the world's population look stupid by comparison - and certainly brighter than politicians!
93
19/02/2021 10:45:19 3 34
bbc
Expect Biden will claim this as his own.
139
19/02/2021 10:54:00 11 2
bbc
| Expect Biden will claim this as his own.

..and when that turns out to NOT be the case, are you going to revisit your misguided assumptions and perhaps reassess where you get your news from, or are you going to forget all about this and move on to the next conspiracy?
156
19/02/2021 10:56:30 1 3
bbc
Err. No. Though he is a science denier, he is a god beleiver who must therefore believe the nonsense in the bible, he won't claim this as his. In fact he has already spoken.
161
19/02/2021 10:57:07 3 1
bbc
A wee bit of a negative Nelly there! (apologies to all Nelly's)
192
19/02/2021 11:01:03 7 0
bbc
Spoken by an archetypal trumper.
8
19/02/2021 10:21:22 16 3
bbc
Well done NASA!
Come on UK, it's time to play catch up
94
19/02/2021 10:45:54 3 3
bbc
No political will and unfortunately we are now out of the European programme
136
19/02/2021 10:53:20 1 1
bbc
Maybe Nicola will let us build a Space Centre in her fiefdom
173
19/02/2021 11:00:19 7 0
bbc
No we are not. We are full members of the ESA. It has nothing to do with the EU
295
19/02/2021 13:08:07 0 0
bbc
The UK remains a member of the European Space Agency ( ESA ) and continues to participate
320
19/02/2021 15:14:45 1 0
bbc
We're still part of ESA; just locked out of EU programmes with security aspects such as Galileo
81
19/02/2021 10:42:11 1 11
bbc
Until we start seeing little green men im not interested.
95
19/02/2021 10:45:54 7 0
bbc
Have you never waited for one when wanting to cross a road?
96
19/02/2021 10:46:01 10 1
bbc
It will be hell of a surprise if there is a police telephone box up there!
97
19/02/2021 10:46:04 16 2
bbc
The dawn of a new age in space exploration. Fantastic to see.
98
19/02/2021 10:46:13 2 13
bbc
"Bringing rocks back for further, more sophisticated analysis.."

Hooray, just what Earth needs right now is an alien virus...

Oh well, probably for the best humans can been pretty awful. We certainly don't seem that bothered about wrecking this planet..
140
19/02/2021 10:54:12 6 0
bbc
Considering that viruses are closely evolved with their host organism, and that Mars and Earth life would have been separated by billions of years of evolution, ..I wouldn't expect the invasion of the body snatchers any time soon.
148
19/02/2021 10:55:18 0 0
bbc
That may have happened billions of years ago......

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-23872765
55
19/02/2021 10:39:48 3 19
bbc
Big deal.
99
19/02/2021 10:46:26 2 0
bbc
It is a big deal. This is the culmination of decades of preparation, research and engineering, quite a lot of which is likely to benefit us on Earth too (as much of space exploration has). It is a huge achievement to accomplish something like this when there are just so many variables that have to be accounted for.
27
SJB
19/02/2021 10:32:28 63 13
bbc
What hasn't been reported is that the fabric used for the parachute was designed, developed and made by Heathcotes, a Devon company. If that fabric had failed, the rover would be 50 feet underground. The parachute slowed the capsule down from 12,000mph....yes, 12,000mph! Heathcotes is a world leader in this and is over 200 years old.
No one celebrates this, why not!
100
19/02/2021 10:46:39 4 2
bbc
Making an awesome parachute is not quite in the same bracket as successfully sending the Rover to Mars. There will be thousands of awesome things which have been developed and utilised to successfully make and send the rover to Mars. This is but one.