UK to launch 'high risk' science agency
19/02/2021 | news | business | 1,117
The new agency will help "cement the UK's position as a science superpower", the government says.
1
19/02/2021 10:05:46 350 23
bbc
Great news, the UK has a long history of discovery and invention but less so in commercial application.

Hopefully we can now ensure we do both.
14
19/02/2021 10:11:38 168 209
bbc
Thanks to Dominic Cummings' vision
131
19/02/2021 10:43:31 29 3
bbc
Technological advancement will be the driving force of the 21st century and the UK needs to be front and centre.

Building and supporting the companies and industries of scale and value.
179
19/02/2021 10:51:07 26 25
bbc
Suspect any successful creations will be sold on to a tory mate at a knockdown price, after the public have shouldered the expensive risk. #chumocracy :(
277
19/02/2021 11:11:56 21 4
bbc
Imagine any other country in the world inventing the internet and gifting it to the world for free! The Oxford/AZ covid vaccine being sold at cost, not for profit, whereas Phizer, Moderna, etc are making $millions from selling their vaccine. UK can often take the moral high ground but in a world where very few else do, we need to commercialise some of these inventions
326
19/02/2021 11:22:47 9 18
bbc
Well we were world beating and got our wealth from buying and selling humans and stealing artifacts from other countries, just because you can do something doesn't mean you should...
410
19/02/2021 11:41:00 5 3
bbc
UK scientists already making ground-breaking discoveries. What we need is Matthew Fell and CBI chums to start back it. An Oxford lab innovation has achieved world record solar capture. Who’s backing it commercially? Germany! In today’s other news, no need now to catch up with rest of Europe in producing green electricity. Boris has a foreign mate cabling under Channel so we can buy it from France.
449
19/02/2021 11:47:07 3 5
bbc
Good idea but we do need to develop the product to our benefit first then the world Instead of the world buying up our ideas to their advantage
Labour I see is flapping around like a dead kipper bless
453
19/02/2021 11:50:17 4 3
bbc
generally it's because we fund the diffcult work, and then we give the knowledge to the Yanks who exploit it commercially and sell it back to us- eg: The jet engine, (The Yanks hadn't a clue till we showed them how) and radar. That's just in aviation, and I'm sure HYS users could offer lots more examples in all fields.
483
19/02/2021 11:57:25 0 6
bbc
That's because invention is easier than entrepreneurship.
600
19/02/2021 12:26:21 3 0
bbc
Good point. We lead the world in fusion research and superconducting magnets. put them together for a major commercial opportunity with environmental benefits
609
19/02/2021 12:28:01 3 2
bbc
Lets hope all the money does not go to Tory supporters.
643
bob
19/02/2021 12:44:16 2 2
bbc
But, let's actually be rational. This is £200M for each of 4 years. The cost of a Chair, CEO and reasonable office expenses are going eat up a £1M pa of that. And I mean 'office' expenses. Now add in lab fees and research costs, we are talking about 5 small groups for 4 years (think TRAC & FEC in uni labs) Little or no capital money here - a puss in the ocean. Big in mouth, tiny on delivery
760
19/02/2021 13:44:33 1 2
bbc
Great news for the scientific community in Barnard Castle then!
2
19/02/2021 10:07:46 46 4
bbc
Fantastic news.
3
19/02/2021 10:07:57 218 7
bbc
Learning from 'failure' can lead to great discoveries, inventions and innovations.

This has been the case in the past and will no doubt be the same in the future.

Interested to see the results- good luck to those involved.
38
19/02/2021 10:19:47 64 24
bbc
If at first you don't succeed try and try again.
213
19/02/2021 10:56:15 10 3
bbc
As a scientist and having seen the way research funding has been cut and redistributed over the last decade, I am a bit cynical. All this government seems to do is take extraordinary risks, with few examples of success. I'd rather it invested more cautiously and made steady progress until the economy sorts itself out. A good gambler only stakes what they can afford.
348
19/02/2021 11:27:30 5 3
bbc
Is that in the same way as the pandemic exercise a few years ago that led to no changes on the off chance that it wouldn't happen?
497
19/02/2021 12:01:34 5 0
bbc
Depends how big the failure is...

I do agree with you and I would love to have a world leading scientific sector. But the trial and error approach should always take into account the risk, we wouldn't want something like chernobyl to happen due to mistakes (I know chernobyl wasnt an experiment, but im thinking more about the outcome of what happened)
20/02/2021 22:45:26 0 0
bbc
its extremely unusual to 'learn' from failure what tends to happen is the cycle of failure is repeated. This is often because not enough is understood about the subject. Or the wrong methodology is involved in trying to resolve the issue.
4
19/02/2021 10:08:39 6 25
bbc
This agency is Cumming's baby.
8
19/02/2021 10:10:22 12 23
bbc
Of course it will never be good enough to please the never satisfied Labourites
30
19/02/2021 10:16:17 6 2
bbc
Yes, so what’s your point? Unless Dominic Cummings continues to have some involvement in this new Agency and the article makes no mention of this, what’s your thread other than pent up bitterness?
5
nfn
19/02/2021 10:08:56 9 9
bbc
So labour wants the government to explain what the agency will do.... Take risks and discover potentially useful benefits to mankind I would hope.
310
19/02/2021 11:20:04 2 3
bbc
Suspect any successful creations will be sold on to a tory mate at a knockdown price, after the public have shouldered the expensive risk. #chumocracy :(
6
19/02/2021 10:09:54 18 19
bbc
I wonder how many of the Remoaners & Comrades who will deride this policy announcement hold university science degrees

Or any university degree at all, for that matter

Science & engineering are not political; they are provable facts, not opinion

Arts however...
19
19/02/2021 10:13:02 21 15
bbc
STEM subjects should be subsidised via a grant incentive
21
19/02/2021 10:14:39 0 3
bbc
Yes, we already have UKRI, throw Cummings a bone by all means ??
26
19/02/2021 10:15:33 6 2
bbc
You just made it political
7
19/02/2021 10:10:07 37 9
bbc
The government must heavily invest in automation and A.I. There is no avoiding the future it will come whether we are prepared or not. Automation will provide resources for the electorate A.I. the design. Clinging to the past and whinging about the disruption is useless. Embrace the future.
25
19/02/2021 10:15:23 12 18
bbc
...and humans will not be needed anymore.
599
19/02/2021 12:25:49 3 2
bbc
UK does, the myth about the UK manufacturing decline is because the moaners look at 'workers' decline - many replaced by automation as we are now 'high tech' manufacturers and '% of GDP' - lower because the City expanded so much. We are not post industrial, we are more like 'future automated' - that presents political problems of what do the displaced workers do?
20/02/2021 11:24:20 1 0
bbc
Could we, maybe, have intelligent automation and AI? Just 'cos we CAN have self-driving cars doesn't mean that we HAVE to have them. Likewise, machines in sole charge of weaponry is probably not a good idea - and if we do, make sure sure they're bloomin' easy to turn off! Who needs an internet connected Kettle? Keyless entry for cars . . . ? Surely ONLY kidnappers and car thieves wanted this?
4
19/02/2021 10:08:39 6 25
bbc
This agency is Cumming's baby.
8
19/02/2021 10:10:22 12 23
bbc
Of course it will never be good enough to please the never satisfied Labourites
169
19/02/2021 10:49:32 0 2
bbc
Suspect any successful creations will be sold on to a tory mate at a knockdown price, after the public have shouldered the expensive risk.
9
19/02/2021 10:10:40 132 6
bbc
It's what The National Lottery should have been used for in the first place, the advancement of this country through science and engineering innovation.
240
19/02/2021 10:56:36 8 52
bbc
That's fundamentally what it is used for.
622
19/02/2021 12:33:08 14 0
bbc
The UK National Lottery profits fund the Canadian Teachers Pensions,

Maybe we should go back to having a national lottery , £1 a go, only one draw a week , charge tax on all other lotteries to help fund covid costs.

To many people living in dream land of winning the lottery , it is causing gambling addiction, and not helping child hood and old age poverty
Pip
20/02/2021 09:45:45 1 0
bbc
Rather than being used as a charity for what should be government funded reaearch..........?
10
jon
19/02/2021 10:10:52 106 7
bbc
Great investment news. Just like the excellent investment with Oxford University and AZ.
11
19/02/2021 10:11:00 113 6
bbc
Excellent news.

The UK has a rich history of science and technology innovation.

We should not rest on these laurels.

Time to push on and for the current and next generation to deliver.
120
19/02/2021 10:41:21 63 75
bbc
But sadly we grow fewer of our own scientists and engineers these days ('hard' subjects). Fortunately other nationals come here to do their work but that's made harder by Brexit.
128
19/02/2021 10:42:55 15 21
bbc
And a completely predictable response from the Labour Party.

Rather than embracing a good idea, it's an opportunity for political point scoring.

Pathetic!
364
19/02/2021 11:30:43 3 3
bbc
Exactly - History...
521
19/02/2021 12:07:33 1 4
bbc
Lock-down has hamstrung & destroyed prospects for many of the 'next generation'. MSc for example you have 12 months to get your research done & acquire skills. Virologists I know, not on covid were kicked out for 7 months, got 5 month extension, peanuts hardship living for that & BSL3 live virus experience abandoned,normal stuff curtailed. Good on the Cultists and lock-downers damage the young!
964
20/02/2021 00:24:48 1 1
bbc
Five eejits think we have no history of science & innovation, we should sit back as we're useless & shouldn't bother trying as the current & next generation are full of fail.

Let me guess...

...they're socialists.
20/02/2021 10:38:20 2 0
bbc
Then surely we need to improve the teaching of maths and science in our schools? Also, stop this obsession with all the talentless wastes of space who seem to fill the magazines, websites, social media feeds and TV channels, and start promoting actual talent and intelligence again! Seriously, the World doesn't need the Kardashians we've already got, let alone any new talentless Wannabees.
20/02/2021 23:14:44 0 0
bbc
Scotland has a rich history of science and invention rest of UK not so much almost none existent
12
19/02/2021 10:11:09 68 2
bbc
Great news, moving towards the future, and hopefully the UK can build on this and develop science/technology fields further and at larger volumes.

Has to be better for our youngsters future instead of the "back to the way things were" era of the gig economy and zero hours contracts!
156
19/02/2021 10:47:03 25 27
bbc
How many of those 'youngsters' are prepared to engage in the hard slog to get meaningful science and engineering qualifications? Far too few so we'll keep seeking immigrants who are already qualified to fill the gaps. That's the reality! Works in medicine too.
13
19/02/2021 10:11:16 4 7
bbc
This should be measured in how it improves our lives.

We all know that it will be measured in commercial success and shareholder payouts. After all it is easier to carry on as before instead of thinking of innovative measures of success.

In fact we should have think tanks devoted to alternative measures, that do not decimate our happiness and environment.
20
19/02/2021 10:14:16 3 4
bbc
"...measured in commercial success..."

Unfortunately there are no units of measurement of happiness.
36
19/02/2021 10:18:25 0 1
bbc
Are you Tony Blair?

He was fond of a Think Tank or two!
1
19/02/2021 10:05:46 350 23
bbc
Great news, the UK has a long history of discovery and invention but less so in commercial application.

Hopefully we can now ensure we do both.
14
19/02/2021 10:11:38 168 209
bbc
Thanks to Dominic Cummings' vision
22
19/02/2021 10:14:49 42 50
bbc
Dominic Cummings' "vision"

geddit?
104
19/02/2021 10:37:49 42 20
bbc
I seem to remember his 'vision' was to recruit 'weirdos and misfits' into government. He certainly qualified!
109
19/02/2021 10:38:35 12 6
bbc
Good sentiment but this seems to be about more discovery and invention rather than commercialising them.
126
19/02/2021 10:42:18 40 9
bbc
Yup cant stand the bloke like most people given his very long list of political and personal flaws - but doesnt mean he cant also have the champion of a good idea too.
162
19/02/2021 10:47:53 17 8
bbc
Yes good joke. Embarrassed that you had to explain it????
282
19/02/2021 11:04:41 10 10
bbc
'Cummings vision' - is that the vision that needed testing on that trip to Barnard Castle that damaged Government messaging?
289
19/02/2021 11:14:45 7 3
bbc
Is that the best you can do?
397
19/02/2021 11:38:45 5 7
bbc
Would that be the vision he tested by driving to Barnards Castle?
444
19/02/2021 11:37:44 2 4
bbc
well he does test his vision regularly
512
19/02/2021 12:05:58 4 2
bbc
If it's Doms vision I wonder how many of his friends will benefit from the funding?
666
19/02/2021 12:51:27 1 0
bbc
I don't like Cummings at all, however he's right in this, I doubt very much it is HIS vision alone. Lots of people in science and engineering have been calling for more backing to enable 'out there' ideas to come to fruition in the commercial world. You'll find most commercial decisions are based on certainty and the least gamble possible, therefore we need mopre high risk ideas to get a chance.
702
19/02/2021 13:05:01 1 2
bbc
"Thanks to Dominic Cummings' vision"

His "vision" is questionable in more ways than 1.

Oh .. sorry Dom .. is that you ?

Can you let us know which road you are testing your eyes on today ? So we can AVOID.
800
19/02/2021 14:56:03 1 2
bbc
I wouldn’t trust Mr D Cummings to run a shoe-shine stall!
923
19/02/2021 18:43:16 0 2
bbc
Or looking at the past and just repeating it as a new idea... DC hasnt had a single idea of his own, hes just read someone elses books and talked at a dinner party or 2 with a really brusque approach to deflect from his intellectualism... you wont get it... attitude.
15
19/02/2021 10:11:42 4 16
bbc
Watching and waiting mr Cummings....
17
19/02/2021 10:12:47 9 4
bbc
Snore....
16
19/02/2021 10:12:45 218 80
bbc
"But Labour shadow business secretary Ed Miliband said the agency needed to have a clear mandate and to be subject to Freedom of Information laws, to ensure transparency of funding."

So the agency does all the hard expensive and risk work, and then some American or Chinese company submits an FOI request, nicks and patents the research.

Just like penicillin.

Nice one Labour.
34
19/02/2021 10:17:27 175 120
bbc
Labour actively work against UK successes
such as this Science Agency's direction and ethos
35
19/02/2021 10:17:40 18 4
bbc
Alexander Fleming was a man of humility and integrity, he willingly shared his expertise as all decent scientists do.
63
19/02/2021 10:26:51 35 2
bbc
I think it's the funding information that'll be subject to FOIs, not the research results.
101
19/02/2021 10:37:37 41 10
bbc
Are you deliberately misinterpreting Ed Miliband?

He wants transparency over the funding.

In a year where the 2 highest profile civil service jobs went to the wives of Tory MPs with no interview process that seems reasonable.
164
19/02/2021 10:48:27 28 18
bbc
Suspect any successful creations will be sold on to a tory mate at a knockdown price, after the public have shouldered the expensive risk.
294
19/02/2021 11:15:50 17 6
bbc
I have written this elsewhere, but Universities already do this. They have a department to take forward discoveries and inventions to commercialise them, or licence them.

If Universities are ALREADY doing this, then Ed Millibands comment is quite apt.

Why do we need to spend nearly £1bn on something that is ALREADY being done ?

Hence the need for transparency.
403
19/02/2021 11:40:00 5 2
bbc
You certainly don't understand patent law
468
19/02/2021 11:54:13 5 7
bbc
Yeh, Labour did much the same in 1946. Gave the Soviets the jet engine. The Soviets copied it, put in in their Migs and then shot the west out of the sky in Korea.
525
19/02/2021 12:08:06 7 0
bbc
Purposely misquoted what He said.

FOI doesn't extend to the research itself only the scope, applicants and funding as its taxpayers money.

The Chinese aren't going to get anything useful on that unless they want to send Birthday cards
592
19/02/2021 12:24:31 3 3
bbc
We already have a high risk agency-the Tory party- nice and secretive and anal too, so that should please you.
686
19/02/2021 13:00:12 2 1
bbc
What a ridiculous assertion. FOI requests are not there to give away government secrets.
707
19/02/2021 13:06:11 4 0
bbc
Milliband was referring to the allocations of funds and choice of recipients etc. FoI would not force the release of sensitive information. But hey why not not make up stuff to criticise opponents of your political masters.
789
19/02/2021 14:41:36 2 0
bbc
What a load of Tory Bot nonsense, with the bots swamping the voting.

Freedom of Information does not lead to patents being nicked. Anyone of sound mind knows this to be the case.

As for the wild scenario that foreign countries would be allowed to steal research secrets... you'd have to be barmy to believe it!
815
19/02/2021 15:26:25 0 0
bbc
Prove it.
848
19/02/2021 16:03:29 0 0
bbc
My very thoughts.
872
19/02/2021 16:30:53 0 2
bbc
Killed it in one! All Labour thinks about is committee oversight and transparency but for this ARIA type of operation exactly the opposite needs to apply.
910
19/02/2021 17:46:01 0 0
bbc
you might need to change your tin hat
20/02/2021 15:58:05 0 0
bbc
'Doesn't necessarily follow.
What we don't want is the Private Sector abusing public research facilities.
In Britain money usually talks.
20/02/2021 16:42:46 0 0
bbc
No, not like penicillin. Penicillin was a chance discovery, and Fleming didn't even realise what he had, let alone having plans to put the drug into production. The engineering required to turn penicillin from a lab curiosity to a mass life-saver was mostly American. We really must see what we're good at and stop living on national mythology.
15
19/02/2021 10:11:42 4 16
bbc
Watching and waiting mr Cummings....
17
19/02/2021 10:12:47 9 4
bbc
Snore....
166
19/02/2021 10:48:45 0 1
bbc
Suspect any successful creations will be sold on to a tory mate at a knockdown price, after the public have shouldered the expensive risk.
18
19/02/2021 10:12:58 176 15
bbc
If there’s one thing that Covid has shown us it’s that the UK is a global leader in innovation and tech.

Take off any shackles and let the scientists do their thing!
60
19/02/2021 10:25:58 86 32
bbc
Take off the bureaucratic shackles that surround all the exiting research institutions. Recall that you needed a two-week residential course to find out how to fill in the forms to apply for an EU research project.
133
19/02/2021 10:43:39 24 13
bbc
Err - nice thought but in what way? Oxford AZ was an international effort (based in UK) in collaberation with a Swedish pharma company. Put the Union Flag away and recognise that the world of science is international. Brexit hasn't helped!
355
Jon
19/02/2021 11:28:39 10 3
bbc
I'm not questioning that the UK is generally very good at innovation and technology (not a world leader but very good).

What part of the Covid response do you mean though? Our Test & Trace app and programme in general are an expensive embarrassment. Also there was the Shielding fiasco where people were missed off as the list was too long for Excel.
365
19/02/2021 11:30:45 15 5
bbc
Ah the good old "shackles", one of the favourite words from Tory bots.

There's more red tape now and the country is reliant on foreign companies and experts for this research. Still, that doesn't suit your "everything is made in Britain by white British" agenda.
6
19/02/2021 10:09:54 18 19
bbc
I wonder how many of the Remoaners & Comrades who will deride this policy announcement hold university science degrees

Or any university degree at all, for that matter

Science & engineering are not political; they are provable facts, not opinion

Arts however...
19
19/02/2021 10:13:02 21 15
bbc
STEM subjects should be subsidised via a grant incentive
13
19/02/2021 10:11:16 4 7
bbc
This should be measured in how it improves our lives.

We all know that it will be measured in commercial success and shareholder payouts. After all it is easier to carry on as before instead of thinking of innovative measures of success.

In fact we should have think tanks devoted to alternative measures, that do not decimate our happiness and environment.
20
19/02/2021 10:14:16 3 4
bbc
"...measured in commercial success..."

Unfortunately there are no units of measurement of happiness.
46
19/02/2021 10:22:07 0 1
bbc
The Bhutan government measures happiness: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gross_National_Happiness
201
19/02/2021 10:53:46 0 1
bbc
Exactly my point. Does that mean we cannot work on this at all?
6
19/02/2021 10:09:54 18 19
bbc
I wonder how many of the Remoaners & Comrades who will deride this policy announcement hold university science degrees

Or any university degree at all, for that matter

Science & engineering are not political; they are provable facts, not opinion

Arts however...
21
19/02/2021 10:14:39 0 3
bbc
Yes, we already have UKRI, throw Cummings a bone by all means ??
14
19/02/2021 10:11:38 168 209
bbc
Thanks to Dominic Cummings' vision
22
19/02/2021 10:14:49 42 50
bbc
Dominic Cummings' "vision"

geddit?
185
19/02/2021 10:52:01 32 42
bbc
All the labour MPs who broke Covid rules did not resign. Hypocrites!
Cummings was not even found guilty in any court.
456
19/02/2021 11:50:26 1 3
bbc
A revelation on the road to Barnards Castle.
23
19/02/2021 10:15:05 265 33
bbc
£100bn+ for HS2.
£200m a year for a high-risk/high-reward scientific research agency.

I think I know which money is better spent.
48
19/02/2021 10:22:20 62 105
bbc
Any new idea produced will need billions spent to turn it into something useful/practical ... just like HS2.
232
19/02/2021 11:02:00 6 6
bbc
Don't universities have a department that takes the universities research and moves it into a potential design, product, invention, development, so as to be presented to society or licensed by a company ?.

If the universities are already doing this, why do we need a government department to copy what many universities are already doing ?
244
19/02/2021 10:58:32 3 2
bbc
Agreed
369
19/02/2021 11:31:20 2 4
bbc
Be brave and innovative and build a rapid underground tube system instead of HS2.

Overground railways are the old idea.
709
19/02/2021 13:07:03 3 1
bbc
HS2 is an arse about face way of improving our Transport Infrastructure.

20 minute Journey time saving when we have major cities in the UK that are still stuck with Deisel Buses as the main form of Public transport and inter regional city links that are still the same as they were 100 years go and with trains that aren't much quicker.
777
19/02/2021 14:12:57 2 0
bbc
Let's all jump on HS2 shall we? Why is Crossrail, a mightily expensive, over budget and late delivering project never mentioned? Or is it ok for London to get infrastructure and the rest of the country can go hang?
20/02/2021 13:18:49 1 0
bbc
"Matt Hancock acted unlawfully over pandemic contracts."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-56125462

I see the BBC have been very reluctant to report this news; they were late in reporting the judgement, didn't open it up for comment and have quickly taken it off the front page, and given it a minor space on the business page.

It's as if the BBC is an arm of the Tory Party!!
20/02/2021 22:40:35 0 0
bbc
HS2 will provide a better return on investment. Infrastructure always does, shouldn't big pharmacy companies be picking up the tab? They will produce the drugs in a low wage economy so there is very little return on this. Investment in infrastructure the benefits stay winton the community
24
19/02/2021 10:15:07 1 29
bbc
Why ? We can’t even feed children in London.
32
jon
19/02/2021 10:17:05 17 6
bbc
Parents get family allowance to fee their children.
47
19/02/2021 10:22:12 8 5
bbc
Know this will get down votes, but why should I always be financially held responsible and emotionally blackmailed for the feeding, education, shelter, and health, not to mention entertaining, the result of two people who I have never met, nor will ever meet, having a quickie behind the night club at kicking out time?
49
19/02/2021 10:22:39 6 4
bbc
That is up to the parents not the government (they are not a corporate parent).
54
19/02/2021 10:23:34 4 3
bbc
Parents?
7
19/02/2021 10:10:07 37 9
bbc
The government must heavily invest in automation and A.I. There is no avoiding the future it will come whether we are prepared or not. Automation will provide resources for the electorate A.I. the design. Clinging to the past and whinging about the disruption is useless. Embrace the future.
25
19/02/2021 10:15:23 12 18
bbc
...and humans will not be needed anymore.
51
19/02/2021 10:22:46 4 2
bbc
Humans will always be needed as there is nothing called true AI. What we see is mostly programmed automation. However as an employer myself some humans make it so hard for me to employ them as they don't find the job interesting. I can't run a factory with demotivated humans so automation makes sense.
80
19/02/2021 10:31:56 11 1
bbc
Humans will always be needed to consume products. There is no rationality in forcing people to do jobs a machine can do faster, cheaper and longer just to provide an income in order to consume products the products they produce. The economic model needs reappraisal to function in a changed economy that is closer than we think.
607
19/02/2021 12:27:35 4 1
bbc
That is the UK's issue, our manufacturing hasn't actually declined, it has risen on average by 1.4% pa since 1948, but we have automated & moved into higher spec stuff. So what do you do with the displaced workers?
6
19/02/2021 10:09:54 18 19
bbc
I wonder how many of the Remoaners & Comrades who will deride this policy announcement hold university science degrees

Or any university degree at all, for that matter

Science & engineering are not political; they are provable facts, not opinion

Arts however...
26
19/02/2021 10:15:33 6 2
bbc
You just made it political
27
SP
19/02/2021 10:15:47 103 17
bbc
Very very happy to see UK marching in right direction.

Science and innovation should be always our priority

Many people are always loving to complain about UK for so many political reasons. But only if you step out of UK you can realise the value of UK compared to so many other nations in the world . I am proud of UK.
74
19/02/2021 10:30:53 61 70
bbc
Downvotes are from Remainers / Lefties.
476
19/02/2021 11:56:32 2 16
bbc
Well said! Pity a few of the HYS leftie whingers don't feel the same way.
28
Ace
19/02/2021 10:15:57 206 6
bbc
We sell our discoveries cheaply. The government should also develop methods to retain some form of UK ownership of promising and clever inventions.
57
19/02/2021 10:25:10 64 15
bbc
Patents?
226
19/02/2021 10:59:15 2 2
bbc
"We sell our discoveries cheaply" - and your evidence for that statement is based on?
460
19/02/2021 11:52:00 3 0
bbc
The Yanks and the Chinese don't respect copyright or intellectual property rights.
466
19/02/2021 11:53:21 4 0
bbc
They are called patents but they take years to finalise and that patent rogue state called China ignores them.
942
19/02/2021 20:17:31 2 0
bbc
One idea that was lost was the supermaterial Starlite in the 70-80's he never give it to nasa or anyone. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starlite very interesting stuff made by a hairdresser, these types of odd sources of research is what we need to pick up on and recognise. This material is commercial but how many more go under the radar as not appearing as commerical for investment.
Pip
20/02/2021 09:43:15 0 0
bbc
Absolutely, think of Graphene discovered at UMIST (Manchester). Made from Carbon, it's Mech, Elec, Chem and Optical properties better than virtually all other materials.

What can we use it for, ask the Chinese, they have more patents for its use than anything we've come up with, and that's the rub.

We invent, someone else does the commercial applications............?
29
19/02/2021 10:16:02 3 4
bbc
"Necessity is the Mother of invention" - seems straightforward enough - but then you get bogged down in "define necessity". For Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention necessity was "Sex and Drugs and Rock n Roll". Frank invented crowd surfing - seems it was very high risk - cos now he dead!
4
19/02/2021 10:08:39 6 25
bbc
This agency is Cumming's baby.
30
19/02/2021 10:16:17 6 2
bbc
Yes, so what’s your point? Unless Dominic Cummings continues to have some involvement in this new Agency and the article makes no mention of this, what’s your thread other than pent up bitterness?
31
19/02/2021 10:16:50 39 8
bbc
We must be cautious this is not overwhelmed by vanity projects like HS2 has hijacked the need for transport solutions.
220
19/02/2021 10:57:20 5 6
bbc
We need our own Men in Black.
All these probes we're sending to Mars: goodness knows what we might unleash!
657
19/02/2021 12:48:43 0 1
bbc
"We must be cautious this is not overwhelmed by vanity projects like HS2 has hijacked the need for transport solutions"

... only in the eyes of the uninformed who are determined to campaign against HS2 in any and every context.
24
19/02/2021 10:15:07 1 29
bbc
Why ? We can’t even feed children in London.
32
jon
19/02/2021 10:17:05 17 6
bbc
Parents get family allowance to fee their children.
33
19/02/2021 10:17:14 97 37
bbc
Not before time. However, I am concerned about Miliband's call for transparency. Is he really saying we should publicly disclose our direction of travel in innovative science, and in so doing let potential competitors compete with us, before we reach our technical (and profitable) destination?
44
19/02/2021 10:21:26 75 30
bbc
Yes because he really is that stupid.
55
19/02/2021 10:24:20 26 8
bbc
Maybe he's more concerned about this Govt's track record of giving all the money to MP's mates and family members without a proper bidding process?

Serco's chairman is Brother-in-Law to Phillip Dunne MP.
Dido Harding is the wife of John Penrose MP.
Kate Bingham is the wife of Jesse Norman MP.

Maybe it's the transparency of the decision making process he's talking about?
79
19/02/2021 10:31:19 8 2
bbc
No, all it means is, the government must own any resulting IP (patents), so private sector, foreign competitors don't reap all the rewards - plain common sense!
344
19/02/2021 11:26:44 15 1
bbc
No, you just made that up. He wants it to be transparent where the funding is going.
490
19/02/2021 11:58:25 0 7
bbc
He needs to work out how to eat a pasty before he gets involved with science and technology.
719
19/02/2021 13:13:25 2 0
bbc
No - he's stating that tax payers money wants to be spent in the right places, that we are getting value for money. It's not advocating we open up to the world all our secrets! It is an internal audit that is open to an independant committee to ensure money is spent well and on worthwhile projects, I am assuming that would be the case anyway, just Miliband raising that up front.
853
19/02/2021 16:07:52 0 0
bbc
Exactly, exactly, exactly.
20/02/2021 23:26:55 0 0
bbc
Ah hiding where the government money goes what could possibly go wrong? Bless Tories handing government contracts to clueless family members no crime nothing to see here
16
19/02/2021 10:12:45 218 80
bbc
"But Labour shadow business secretary Ed Miliband said the agency needed to have a clear mandate and to be subject to Freedom of Information laws, to ensure transparency of funding."

So the agency does all the hard expensive and risk work, and then some American or Chinese company submits an FOI request, nicks and patents the research.

Just like penicillin.

Nice one Labour.
34
19/02/2021 10:17:27 175 120
bbc
Labour actively work against UK successes
such as this Science Agency's direction and ethos
504
19/02/2021 12:03:12 0 6
bbc
They are remoaner and internationalists, nothing more can be expected of them - why they couldn't even agree that just showing the Union Jack as a sign of their 'patriotism' was acceptable! Tories are garbage, but until we get another party, they are the best of the LibLabCons.
816
19/02/2021 15:26:46 0 0
bbc
Prove it.
918
19/02/2021 18:21:26 3 0
bbc
Labour is a party that helps ordinary British people. You need to tone down your divisive language.
16
19/02/2021 10:12:45 218 80
bbc
"But Labour shadow business secretary Ed Miliband said the agency needed to have a clear mandate and to be subject to Freedom of Information laws, to ensure transparency of funding."

So the agency does all the hard expensive and risk work, and then some American or Chinese company submits an FOI request, nicks and patents the research.

Just like penicillin.

Nice one Labour.
35
19/02/2021 10:17:40 18 4
bbc
Alexander Fleming was a man of humility and integrity, he willingly shared his expertise as all decent scientists do.
191
19/02/2021 10:52:17 10 1
bbc
Fleming discovered penicillin by accident (his petri dishes were dirty), published the results and then forgot about it. It was another team who, when the WWII broke out, took penicillin and developed the mass production technique, but didn't patent it due to the fact. An American company realised there was no patent, grabbed the patent for themselves despite the war.

According docudrama I saw.
13
19/02/2021 10:11:16 4 7
bbc
This should be measured in how it improves our lives.

We all know that it will be measured in commercial success and shareholder payouts. After all it is easier to carry on as before instead of thinking of innovative measures of success.

In fact we should have think tanks devoted to alternative measures, that do not decimate our happiness and environment.
36
19/02/2021 10:18:25 0 1
bbc
Are you Tony Blair?

He was fond of a Think Tank or two!
37
19/02/2021 10:19:25 68 32
bbc
"Recruitment for a chief executive and chair for the agency will begin in the coming weeks."

I wonder which Tory MP's wife or husband will get those jobs?
139
19/02/2021 10:44:14 25 40
bbc
I wonder how many anti-Conservative Remainers will allege corruption?
260
19/02/2021 11:05:47 1 3
bbc
Recruiting a “chair”? Perhaps a chairman/women/person.
3
19/02/2021 10:07:57 218 7
bbc
Learning from 'failure' can lead to great discoveries, inventions and innovations.

This has been the case in the past and will no doubt be the same in the future.

Interested to see the results- good luck to those involved.
38
19/02/2021 10:19:47 64 24
bbc
If at first you don't succeed try and try again.
88
19/02/2021 10:33:55 11 8
bbc
Unless we're talking about socialism then the cries of " it didn't work before so it'll never work!" drowns out any discussion.
522
19/02/2021 12:08:01 5 1
bbc
Unless you’re a sky diver.
562
19/02/2021 12:17:46 2 0
bbc
Unless you take up skydiving.
829
19/02/2021 15:40:05 2 0
bbc
“You tried your best and you failed miserably. The lesson is, never try.”

(Homer Simpson)
20/02/2021 10:10:16 0 0
bbc
Tell that to Theresa May! (Please, DON'T tell that to Donald Trump!)
20/02/2021 22:47:57 0 0
bbc
if at first you don't succeed continue and fail again and again until you fluke a result then concoct a alibi why it worked this time? That one?
39
19/02/2021 10:20:12 29 18
bbc
Yesterday Labour proposes using people's savings to prop up businesses ... today the government launches a science based research project.

Guess which one will generate more jobs and investment ... yep it's not labours
69
jon
19/02/2021 10:29:28 10 7
bbc
Stupid Labour idea stuck in the 1940’s and war bonds. Why reward wealthy individuals when the government can borrow more cheaply from the markets.
142
19/02/2021 10:44:28 3 2
bbc
That would make sense, they are not in Govt so their idea (which has worked in the past - we call it NS&I) will not be implemented.

This idea sounds sounds great in theory but given the current administrations' track record in employing from a limited talent pool of Tory MP's friends and family it could be an expensive flop.
823
19/02/2021 15:32:57 0 0
bbc
Prove it.
40
19/02/2021 10:20:15 10 15
bbc
If Cummings wanted it, I think we all know where most of our money will end up.
53
19/02/2021 10:23:01 12 7
bbc
In the UK pockets instead of fat cats in the EU?
41
19/02/2021 10:20:22 104 2
bbc
As an engineer this is very good news. Tired of seeing US companies (Us govt can say national security and get our data and IP anytime) taking over smaller companies in other countries. Rise up, Rise up and shine!
137
19/02/2021 10:44:05 46 74
bbc
Suspect any successful creations will be sold on to a tory mate at a knockdown price, after the public have shouldered the expensive risk.
42
19/02/2021 10:20:42 15 15
bbc
Not bad for what people called 'an insignificant island without the EU'.
45
19/02/2021 10:22:06 4 25
bbc
Not Great British people, though
43
19/02/2021 10:21:24 3 2
bbc
Perhaps those with long enough memories might remember the DSIR, (Department of Scientific and Industrial Research ) set up around 1915 and dissolved around 1965. Some might say ‘What goes round, comes round’
602
19/02/2021 12:26:49 0 0
bbc
Along with DERA which was privatised into Qinetiq 20 years ago.
33
19/02/2021 10:17:14 97 37
bbc
Not before time. However, I am concerned about Miliband's call for transparency. Is he really saying we should publicly disclose our direction of travel in innovative science, and in so doing let potential competitors compete with us, before we reach our technical (and profitable) destination?
44
19/02/2021 10:21:26 75 30
bbc
Yes because he really is that stupid.
646
19/02/2021 12:45:35 7 0
bbc
It appears that you are with that line.

There is a good reason if you bothered reading the article. Its to safeguard our own research, make sure that taxpayer funds are are targeted properly .

That doesn't have any conflict or pose any more risk of competitors stealing said research. The opposite in fact.
42
19/02/2021 10:20:42 15 15
bbc
Not bad for what people called 'an insignificant island without the EU'.
45
19/02/2021 10:22:06 4 25
bbc
Not Great British people, though
20
19/02/2021 10:14:16 3 4
bbc
"...measured in commercial success..."

Unfortunately there are no units of measurement of happiness.
46
19/02/2021 10:22:07 0 1
bbc
The Bhutan government measures happiness: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gross_National_Happiness
24
19/02/2021 10:15:07 1 29
bbc
Why ? We can’t even feed children in London.
47
19/02/2021 10:22:12 8 5
bbc
Know this will get down votes, but why should I always be financially held responsible and emotionally blackmailed for the feeding, education, shelter, and health, not to mention entertaining, the result of two people who I have never met, nor will ever meet, having a quickie behind the night club at kicking out time?
23
19/02/2021 10:15:05 265 33
bbc
£100bn+ for HS2.
£200m a year for a high-risk/high-reward scientific research agency.

I think I know which money is better spent.
48
19/02/2021 10:22:20 62 105
bbc
Any new idea produced will need billions spent to turn it into something useful/practical ... just like HS2.
76
19/02/2021 10:31:04 26 9
bbc
HS2 isn't useful or practical
135
19/02/2021 10:43:41 7 1
bbc
... But if the principle of operation is copyright or patented, licences can be offered for future development, and the income streams thus formed would run for years and years. (Microsoft OS for instance) And by the right to withdraw that licence would allow control over any illegal or undesired exploits in the future.
391
19/02/2021 11:37:27 15 4
bbc
HS2 will never be useful or practical
486
19/02/2021 11:57:49 0 0
bbc
I recall you could buy Surrey for 4p.
508
19/02/2021 12:03:55 4 0
bbc
Are youb saying that HS2 is useful of practical?
541
19/02/2021 12:13:22 4 3
bbc
HS2 could and should have been Maglev, a Great British invention now available in China.

Could have had 500mph trains, but it was ruled out because of the frauulent underbid of the heavy, energy-hungry French TGVs. They even forgot to add VAT.
554
19/02/2021 12:16:15 6 1
bbc
"Any new idea produced will need billions spent to turn it into something useful/practical, so let's not waste that money on HS2."

There you go, I fixed your typo for you.
654
19/02/2021 12:47:29 3 0
bbc
"something useful/practical ... just like HS2."

Not sure what you do in life ... but I know for sure that you are not a successful Venture Capitalist.
677
19/02/2021 12:57:19 4 1
bbc
The trouble with HS2 is it will give us a very expensive high speed link or two, that will be mainly used by business (though the recent WFH and comms technology means HS2 when it finally opens in 2033 will be redundant!) when the vast majority of the country still operates on a 3rd class basis!
20/02/2021 10:08:37 2 0
bbc
Not necessarily. Replacing Rees-Mogg with a genetically modified slug (or maybe even just a regular one) would almost certainly increase the Integrity Quotient in Parliament - possibly even the average IQ?

A new hair product to make our idiotic leaders look less idiotic would be start . . . and if we could find a way to make them actually less idiotic - RESULT!
20/02/2021 15:54:36 0 0
bbc
By the time the middle men and shysters have dealt with any innovation - sadly yes.
20/02/2021 19:42:30 0 0
bbc
sorry but no amount of money7 will ever turn HS2 into anything other than a tory vanity project designed for purely the rich but paid for by those who will never need or be able to afford a ticket.
Remember this is the tory party they will happily spend taxpayers money just so they can then give the use of it to a private company and give them billions in taxpayer subs too
24
19/02/2021 10:15:07 1 29
bbc
Why ? We can’t even feed children in London.
49
19/02/2021 10:22:39 6 4
bbc
That is up to the parents not the government (they are not a corporate parent).
50
19/02/2021 10:22:43 19 7
bbc
I predict another slew of good ideas, given away for other nations to develop & plunder.
132
19/02/2021 10:43:37 5 7
bbc
Suspect any successful creations will be sold on to a tory mate at a knockdown price, after the public have shouldered the expensive risk.
146
19/02/2021 10:45:44 0 1
bbc
Let's hope not. The UK does develop and profit from at least some or our innovations, if not as many as we should.
25
19/02/2021 10:15:23 12 18
bbc
...and humans will not be needed anymore.
51
19/02/2021 10:22:46 4 2
bbc
Humans will always be needed as there is nothing called true AI. What we see is mostly programmed automation. However as an employer myself some humans make it so hard for me to employ them as they don't find the job interesting. I can't run a factory with demotivated humans so automation makes sense.
52
19/02/2021 10:22:56 38 5
bbc
The only way to success is by failing.
Once you've learned from failure you swerve that and do the success.
And to be a success you only have to have 1 more success than you have failures.
The most encouraging bit of this announcement is binning all the bureaucratic shackles which ensure that every other Govt project or undertaking is a monumental failure.
20/02/2021 13:42:41 1 0
bbc
The "binning of bureaucratic shackles" means being a bit less cautious in deciding what to fund, so more chance of big success but also more chance of failure.

However I think most government project failures are down to poor planning and inadequate project management, not things which are addressed by this initiative.
40
19/02/2021 10:20:15 10 15
bbc
If Cummings wanted it, I think we all know where most of our money will end up.
53
19/02/2021 10:23:01 12 7
bbc
In the UK pockets instead of fat cats in the EU?
59
19/02/2021 10:25:45 6 3
bbc
You missed off some wording - in the UK pockets of his mates. Not like he hasn’t got form.
145
19/02/2021 10:45:16 0 2
bbc
Offshore bank accounts of certain tory friends #chumocracy :(
24
19/02/2021 10:15:07 1 29
bbc
Why ? We can’t even feed children in London.
54
19/02/2021 10:23:34 4 3
bbc
Parents?
33
19/02/2021 10:17:14 97 37
bbc
Not before time. However, I am concerned about Miliband's call for transparency. Is he really saying we should publicly disclose our direction of travel in innovative science, and in so doing let potential competitors compete with us, before we reach our technical (and profitable) destination?
55
19/02/2021 10:24:20 26 8
bbc
Maybe he's more concerned about this Govt's track record of giving all the money to MP's mates and family members without a proper bidding process?

Serco's chairman is Brother-in-Law to Phillip Dunne MP.
Dido Harding is the wife of John Penrose MP.
Kate Bingham is the wife of Jesse Norman MP.

Maybe it's the transparency of the decision making process he's talking about?
81
19/02/2021 10:31:57 7 1
bbc
Fair point. Of course there has to be some form of accountancy (of decisions as well as money) and a blank cheque cannot be given. I look forward to some clarification.
721
19/02/2021 13:14:23 1 1
bbc
To be fair, we got lucky in Kate's case - she knew what to do.
56
19/02/2021 10:07:22 3 5
bbc
Comments allowed. How about that ?
28
Ace
19/02/2021 10:15:57 206 6
bbc
We sell our discoveries cheaply. The government should also develop methods to retain some form of UK ownership of promising and clever inventions.
57
19/02/2021 10:25:10 64 15
bbc
Patents?
153
19/02/2021 10:46:49 14 9
bbc
Suspect any successful creations will be sold on to a tory mate at a knockdown price, after the public have shouldered the expensive risk.
175
19/02/2021 10:50:24 4 2
bbc
The patent system is very poor ( not just in the UK. Fast investment behind a good idea has far more chance of success
176
DSA
19/02/2021 10:50:29 7 2
bbc
Patents are a waste of time and money unless you can afford the huge expense of defending them in court.

I made an invention, won awards, and it was quickly copied with very minor changes.

I was advised to just beat them in the marketplace.

I stopped marketting in the UK so they wouldn't see my improvements and now successfully concentrate on export.
286
19/02/2021 11:13:32 3 1
bbc
patents is a virtue?
303
19/02/2021 11:18:43 9 1
bbc
China just ignore patents.
649
19/02/2021 12:46:22 2 0
bbc
Patents? China?
659
19/02/2021 12:49:13 0 2
bbc
Whoosh.

Patents aren't ownership of a company ...

:-D
685
19/02/2021 13:00:01 4 0
bbc
Yes, but they can be sold too, to the next foreign buyer when no British government or company shows any interest in an invention! The patent owner may reap rewards, but often the engineering etc is done abroad and they get the majority of the jobs and the trade profits.
987
20/02/2021 08:55:30 0 0
bbc
Jet engine?
Hovercraft?
Graphene?
If it's useful enough, someone will steal it
20/02/2021 15:55:17 0 0
bbc
Yeah - those too.
58
19/02/2021 10:25:42 12 12
bbc
Aria will have a "higher tolerance for failure than is normal", the government said.

Rather like this Government itself.

Sounds like an ideal project for Grayling, Patel or Williamson to oversee on that basis.
72
19/02/2021 10:30:31 9 2
bbc
So Corbyn would have been great then? Go figure?
167
19/02/2021 10:49:00 0 1
bbc
Actually this government has delivered the best vaccine rollout in the world, has overseen a successful vaccine procurement programme (in stark contrast to many others, especially the EU, which has been an unmitigated disaster), and has supported AZ to produce a British vaccine that is among the best.

Facts > delusions of 20/20 hindsight > default, moribund, discredited political ideology.
53
19/02/2021 10:23:01 12 7
bbc
In the UK pockets instead of fat cats in the EU?
59
19/02/2021 10:25:45 6 3
bbc
You missed off some wording - in the UK pockets of his mates. Not like he hasn’t got form.
18
19/02/2021 10:12:58 176 15
bbc
If there’s one thing that Covid has shown us it’s that the UK is a global leader in innovation and tech.

Take off any shackles and let the scientists do their thing!
60
19/02/2021 10:25:58 86 32
bbc
Take off the bureaucratic shackles that surround all the exiting research institutions. Recall that you needed a two-week residential course to find out how to fill in the forms to apply for an EU research project.
143
19/02/2021 10:44:35 19 11
bbc
And now you need that course to fill in 98 documents to export fish! careful what you wish for.
258
19/02/2021 11:05:12 8 14
bbc
Plus a 3-week "diversity" course.
347
19/02/2021 11:27:16 12 1
bbc
Is that a request to be given public money without filling in forms, or the hope that a Whitehall department has shorter forms than the EU?

Keep in mind that Whitehall's forms to get £1,500 million in energy improvement grants was so difficult that only £71 million was paid out - and that took a 3 month extension of the deadline.
374
19/02/2021 11:31:58 17 1
bbc
I never had to do any such course when applying for/getting my EU research funding.
495
19/02/2021 12:01:05 2 7
bbc
and that is before the equality & diversity course, the unconscious bias course, the health & safety course - hm they'll need more of those given that this current flock of UK scientists in Uni labs have had their lab experience savaged. How many of our current virologists will get BSL3 live lab experience? Not the group I know, 7 months suspended, 5 month course extension & peanuts to live on.
507
19/02/2021 12:03:32 5 0
bbc
Thats absolute rubbish. You are talking about applying for funds, which is no different than us.

The reality is European Countries invest greater amounts of capital in advanced tech and research on scale and in small companies.

We have invested little in R&D & concentrated on short term return, and been overtaken in many of the high tech fields we used to excel at excepting medical research.
693
19/02/2021 13:02:27 1 0
bbc
Any evidence of that course or was it just something you overheard in Wetherspoons?
866
19/02/2021 16:25:31 0 0
bbc
Exiting? Freudian slip?
988
20/02/2021 08:57:30 0 0
bbc
If you've ever applied for a UK grant, you'll know:
A) it takes a lot longer than two weeks
B) the anti-fraud controls are weak
61
19/02/2021 10:25:59 15 1
bbc
Education, innovation, the creative arts and scientific excellence.
The people of the UK are our finest assets and our future.
Not a statement of politics but of proven facts.
62
19/02/2021 10:26:07 5 2
bbc
Great that we are investing in new bio-sciences and technologies - Britain has always punched way above its weight with innovation since the mid 18thCentury - but we are letting other innovative industries die on the vine - post Brexit impact on creative industries is a total disaster losing us massive GDP, global prowess/status and soft power - that needs putting right urgently
16
19/02/2021 10:12:45 218 80
bbc
"But Labour shadow business secretary Ed Miliband said the agency needed to have a clear mandate and to be subject to Freedom of Information laws, to ensure transparency of funding."

So the agency does all the hard expensive and risk work, and then some American or Chinese company submits an FOI request, nicks and patents the research.

Just like penicillin.

Nice one Labour.
63
19/02/2021 10:26:51 35 2
bbc
I think it's the funding information that'll be subject to FOIs, not the research results.
307
dan
19/02/2021 11:19:39 22 13
bbc
Of course that's what it means Dee, but let's not let the truth get in the way of the usual completely unfounded Labour bashing by the same people in every HYS...
64
19/02/2021 10:27:41 84 4
bbc
It is no good coming up with world leading science & innovation if the powers that be are unwilling to then stump up the money to capitalise on them. Too many examples in the past to mention. Not enough people in Parliament have a scientific background.
82
19/02/2021 10:32:04 46 5
bbc
So true, far too many from the legal profession end up as PM's.
130
19/02/2021 10:43:27 10 1
bbc
It's absolutely woeful, isn't it. There are more of them now than in my youth, but the usual entry is PPE then political researcher.
I believe that Margaret Thatcher is still the only Labour or Conservative party leader in 80 years to have had a hard science degree.
177
19/02/2021 10:50:29 6 3
bbc
Lord Sainsbury, grocer with history and psychology degree, minister for Science and Innovation in Blair's government. Says it all.
580
19/02/2021 12:21:16 1 5
bbc
The left hated the last Tory PM with a scientific background, still blame her for everything including the cat having kittens! ;-)
851
19/02/2021 16:06:23 1 0
bbc
......or a business background to take inovations tp market.
65
19/02/2021 10:28:15 9 2
bbc
It seems the idea for this came out of the sale of Deep Mind to Google. Perhaps putting this extra money into the existing scheme, with 1 section doing the "ground breaking discoveries" would be better.

The idea that "selling off the countries jewels" is a good idea has now been shown to be a gain for the moment only has long been realised by all but capitalists seeking a quick gain.
66
19/02/2021 10:28:40 10 17
bbc
Typical Tory idea.

Taxpayer takes the risk, private companies make the profit (if any).

I call this THEFT.
77
jon
19/02/2021 10:31:07 2 1
bbc
Pound reaches $1.40
87
19/02/2021 10:33:20 3 2
bbc
That's unfair, it isn't any "private company" that will make the profit, it will be the ones the Govt chooses to back. Having cut the "red tape" that makes people accountable for their decisions, I expect those to be owned exclusively by the friends, donors and families of the Tory Party.

Just look at their track record over the last year.
119
19/02/2021 10:41:02 2 1
bbc
The Labour way is no cash for anyone.
67
19/02/2021 10:28:50 13 14
bbc
Jobs and cash for the boys. It is the Tory way.
141
19/02/2021 10:44:28 0 1
bbc
Ironically enough, "jobs and cash for the boys [and indeed, the girls too]" *is* the Tory Way!

Nicely put, well done you!
68
19/02/2021 10:29:02 2 1
bbc
Labour, as Asquith said, will "have to wait and see", just like the rest of us.
39
19/02/2021 10:20:12 29 18
bbc
Yesterday Labour proposes using people's savings to prop up businesses ... today the government launches a science based research project.

Guess which one will generate more jobs and investment ... yep it's not labours
69
jon
19/02/2021 10:29:28 10 7
bbc
Stupid Labour idea stuck in the 1940’s and war bonds. Why reward wealthy individuals when the government can borrow more cheaply from the markets.
824
19/02/2021 15:33:11 0 0
bbc
Ignorance personified.
70
19/02/2021 10:30:14 9 5
bbc
At last someone has remembered what made Britain great

We are a nation of creative talent in STEM and work best when collaborating with colleagues worldwide

Scientific and technological advances should be for the benefit of all mankind. Altruism trumps Nationalism
90
19/02/2021 10:35:32 1 8
bbc
Slaves to AI - they don't do anything for the good of others only for their own bank accounts, the difference between when the UK was relevant and now, was when we had industry that wanted to help improve the lives of the masses, make things that last, make things affordable and that improve others standards of living - that was when we thrived - the likes of Ford mentality in business.
71
19/02/2021 10:30:23 33 6
bbc
Fantastic!
Nice to see UK back at the forefront of science where it belongs.
86
19/02/2021 10:33:10 13 34
bbc
Believe that and you can't see the woods for the trees
98
19/02/2021 10:36:10 5 1
bbc
Hold your horses, not there yet.
725
19/02/2021 13:17:10 1 0
bbc
We've been at the forefront for years .. look at the recent vaccines, all the US and ESA satellites that go into space, the Mars Landers all have some British scientific and technological contribution. Look at Formula 1 - nearly all top teams are based in the UK and use British technology and engineers - even Mercedes Team are based here!
20/02/2021 11:26:18 0 0
bbc
I'm not sure we're quite there yet . . . ?
58
19/02/2021 10:25:42 12 12
bbc
Aria will have a "higher tolerance for failure than is normal", the government said.

Rather like this Government itself.

Sounds like an ideal project for Grayling, Patel or Williamson to oversee on that basis.
72
19/02/2021 10:30:31 9 2
bbc
So Corbyn would have been great then? Go figure?
73
PW
19/02/2021 10:30:49 19 3
bbc
It's a step in the right direction - especially since our scientists have been collaborating to pioneer Covid vaccines, and our engineers develop quietly up there, alongside the best in the world.
27
SP
19/02/2021 10:15:47 103 17
bbc
Very very happy to see UK marching in right direction.

Science and innovation should be always our priority

Many people are always loving to complain about UK for so many political reasons. But only if you step out of UK you can realise the value of UK compared to so many other nations in the world . I am proud of UK.
74
19/02/2021 10:30:53 61 70
bbc
Downvotes are from Remainers / Lefties.
134
19/02/2021 10:43:41 21 6
bbc
Irrelevant and nonsensical. There is no relationship between this and someones views on Brexit, despite your attempt to shoehorn it in.
157
19/02/2021 10:47:24 12 8
bbc
Suspect any successful creations will be sold on to a tory mate at a knockdown price, after the public have shouldered the expensive risk. #chumocracy :(
597
19/02/2021 12:25:44 11 2
bbc
Oh dear theres always one.

Most of our scientists and Graduates who you would probably class as leftie remainers are happily working with thier European counterparts.

Quite a few are European.

All of them, the majority of the electorate and most of the MP's on BOTH sides of the divide are up for this as well .

Its best to ignore the old gits that have nothing sensible to add.
710
19/02/2021 13:07:38 2 2
bbc
Only for you dear boy!
740
19/02/2021 13:25:32 8 1
bbc
Says the easily led member of the failed Brexit squad
791
19/02/2021 14:42:15 4 1
bbc
Do not believe the hype. UK could have done this years ago whilst within the EU. Ask Boris and his Tory predecessors
819
19/02/2021 15:29:20 2 1
bbc
Prove it! I suggest you cannot.
912
19/02/2021 17:47:29 2 1
bbc
words fail me with people like you..i mean what is the point ?
990
20/02/2021 08:59:29 1 1
bbc
Otherwise known as "people with jobs"
Pip
20/02/2021 10:09:38 2 1
bbc
What a bitter silly little billy you are.........?
20/02/2021 10:39:16 0 1
bbc
They're really not!
20/02/2021 15:59:50 0 0
bbc
And you know this how...?
20/02/2021 23:23:27 0 0
bbc
many Remainers are righties? Small businesses owners, fishermen, farmers who are now unable to export to Europe.
75
19/02/2021 10:30:54 2 13
bbc
We are still in a situation where children’s education has been damaged by COVID, and many people are finding life extremely difficult. Vanity projects like this are ok, but you need to fix the holes in the underside first.
48
19/02/2021 10:22:20 62 105
bbc
Any new idea produced will need billions spent to turn it into something useful/practical ... just like HS2.
76
19/02/2021 10:31:04 26 9
bbc
HS2 isn't useful or practical
233
19/02/2021 11:02:08 15 14
bbc
Can you suggest a better way to reduce the number of polluting commercial vehicles from our motorway network? One train can carry 20 semi-trailers and can be loaded in half an hour. HS2 is not about speed, it's about capacity and, by removing the intercity expresses from the existing network, provide a better service to intermediate stations and new opportunities for cargo operations.
352
19/02/2021 11:28:15 3 4
bbc
HS2 would be much better if it went from Birmingham to Bournemouth so in the next pandemic the streets of Bournemouth won't be clogged up with Black Country cars whenever the sun came out.
66
19/02/2021 10:28:40 10 17
bbc
Typical Tory idea.

Taxpayer takes the risk, private companies make the profit (if any).

I call this THEFT.
77
jon
19/02/2021 10:31:07 2 1
bbc
Pound reaches $1.40
78
19/02/2021 10:31:13 18 4
bbc
As long as it doesn't turn out to be jobs for the boys, and girls, and its finances are capable of being scrutinised by the NAO then everybody should be happy with a scientific advance.
33
19/02/2021 10:17:14 97 37
bbc
Not before time. However, I am concerned about Miliband's call for transparency. Is he really saying we should publicly disclose our direction of travel in innovative science, and in so doing let potential competitors compete with us, before we reach our technical (and profitable) destination?
79
19/02/2021 10:31:19 8 2
bbc
No, all it means is, the government must own any resulting IP (patents), so private sector, foreign competitors don't reap all the rewards - plain common sense!
150
19/02/2021 10:46:24 8 5
bbc
Suspect any successful creations will be sold on to a tory mate at a knockdown price, after the public have shouldered the expensive risk.
669
19/02/2021 12:54:12 3 0
bbc
Patents don't achieve that, at least not unless backed by an agency with very deep pockets and a lot of manpower
25
19/02/2021 10:15:23 12 18
bbc
...and humans will not be needed anymore.
80
19/02/2021 10:31:56 11 1
bbc
Humans will always be needed to consume products. There is no rationality in forcing people to do jobs a machine can do faster, cheaper and longer just to provide an income in order to consume products the products they produce. The economic model needs reappraisal to function in a changed economy that is closer than we think.
55
19/02/2021 10:24:20 26 8
bbc
Maybe he's more concerned about this Govt's track record of giving all the money to MP's mates and family members without a proper bidding process?

Serco's chairman is Brother-in-Law to Phillip Dunne MP.
Dido Harding is the wife of John Penrose MP.
Kate Bingham is the wife of Jesse Norman MP.

Maybe it's the transparency of the decision making process he's talking about?
81
19/02/2021 10:31:57 7 1
bbc
Fair point. Of course there has to be some form of accountancy (of decisions as well as money) and a blank cheque cannot be given. I look forward to some clarification.
207
19/02/2021 10:55:14 6 1
bbc
"I look forward to some clarification."

Absolutely if Labour are against this idea in principle then they are mad, if they are against the "cuts in red tape" enabling funding for donors and friends then they are right to oppose this.

Govt doesn't have a good track record of picking winners in the technology space.
64
19/02/2021 10:27:41 84 4
bbc
It is no good coming up with world leading science & innovation if the powers that be are unwilling to then stump up the money to capitalise on them. Too many examples in the past to mention. Not enough people in Parliament have a scientific background.
82
19/02/2021 10:32:04 46 5
bbc
So true, far too many from the legal profession end up as PM's.
129
19/02/2021 10:43:17 11 1
bbc
Far to many self serving career politicians.
252
19/02/2021 11:03:54 1 1
bbc
Like who?
991
20/02/2021 09:00:25 0 0
bbc
Better the legal profession than a journalist, surely?
83
19/02/2021 10:32:15 2 22
bbc
What a load of poppycock - go back to nature - stop with all the technological BS, stop fracking the Earth, stop the LHC, return to natures storehouse of gifts, have natural and normal clothes, have relationships with people, do not put your trust in AI or watch the planet turn to the chaos of Wall-e films. There is no superpower needed. Nature has all the answers we need - normal pace of life
89
19/02/2021 10:34:59 8 1
bbc
Been watching re-runs of the The Good Life, have we?
96
19/02/2021 10:36:00 0 1
bbc
Nope! let's develop an 80% efficient solar cell and create Utopia
97
19/02/2021 10:36:06 0 1
bbc
Which natural products did you use to view this article and add your comment?
124
19/02/2021 10:42:02 0 1
bbc
Yes, lets all live in mud huts and become farmers. I just need to figure out how to fix that wagon wheel with some natural sticks and stones now that we have no technology.
125
19/02/2021 10:42:03 0 1
bbc
Yeah, I'll have a half-ounce of whatever you're smoking plse. Thanks.
187
19/02/2021 10:48:50 0 1
bbc
Our (UK) world leading geneticists tell about 10% of our DNA comes from Neanderthals, (now extinct of course) I think your percentage might be a little higher!
84
19/02/2021 10:32:25 8 10
bbc
Are we sure that this will not just be a conduit for cash to friends of Boris and his cabal?
100
19/02/2021 10:37:26 1 4
bbc
Almost guarantee it. Millions vanishing with no accountability? What could
possibly go wrong?
85
19/02/2021 10:32:49 18 10
bbc
Good news. We have over many years given away or sold the very best of British ingenuity. Time we stopped this stupidity. I fear any Labour Government could not be trusted to do so. Milliband already given us a clue. Another failed politician doing his worst for the UK.
71
19/02/2021 10:30:23 33 6
bbc
Fantastic!
Nice to see UK back at the forefront of science where it belongs.
86
19/02/2021 10:33:10 13 34
bbc
Believe that and you can't see the woods for the trees
612
19/02/2021 12:28:44 0 1
bbc
I can only say you have an apt username, come back once you found the truth, PS you might find it here, but I doubt you'd believe the posters providing it, you'd vote them down.
66
19/02/2021 10:28:40 10 17
bbc
Typical Tory idea.

Taxpayer takes the risk, private companies make the profit (if any).

I call this THEFT.
87
19/02/2021 10:33:20 3 2
bbc
That's unfair, it isn't any "private company" that will make the profit, it will be the ones the Govt chooses to back. Having cut the "red tape" that makes people accountable for their decisions, I expect those to be owned exclusively by the friends, donors and families of the Tory Party.

Just look at their track record over the last year.
38
19/02/2021 10:19:47 64 24
bbc
If at first you don't succeed try and try again.
88
19/02/2021 10:33:55 11 8
bbc
Unless we're talking about socialism then the cries of " it didn't work before so it'll never work!" drowns out any discussion.
251
19/02/2021 11:03:35 8 2
bbc
Fact is its never BEEN tried, socialism has just been used as am excuse for dictatorships. Yeah it's another thats not real socialism statement.

But jokes aside look up the definition of socialism, then read up on the "socialist" regimes in History. ..

Then if you want a laugh look up a lot of people who call themselves socialist, yeah thats right they don't have a clue either...
83
19/02/2021 10:32:15 2 22
bbc
What a load of poppycock - go back to nature - stop with all the technological BS, stop fracking the Earth, stop the LHC, return to natures storehouse of gifts, have natural and normal clothes, have relationships with people, do not put your trust in AI or watch the planet turn to the chaos of Wall-e films. There is no superpower needed. Nature has all the answers we need - normal pace of life
89
19/02/2021 10:34:59 8 1
bbc
Been watching re-runs of the The Good Life, have we?
105
19/02/2021 10:38:05 1 1
bbc
Shush - Truthseeker thinks that is a documentary.
70
19/02/2021 10:30:14 9 5
bbc
At last someone has remembered what made Britain great

We are a nation of creative talent in STEM and work best when collaborating with colleagues worldwide

Scientific and technological advances should be for the benefit of all mankind. Altruism trumps Nationalism
90
19/02/2021 10:35:32 1 8
bbc
Slaves to AI - they don't do anything for the good of others only for their own bank accounts, the difference between when the UK was relevant and now, was when we had industry that wanted to help improve the lives of the masses, make things that last, make things affordable and that improve others standards of living - that was when we thrived - the likes of Ford mentality in business.
103
19/02/2021 10:37:45 1 3
bbc
Now now grandad, time for your nap.
237
19/02/2021 10:54:32 2 1
bbc
"industry that wanted to help improve the lives of the masses" You must be joking, no health or safety, children working in coal mines etc etc. The masses existed to line the pockets of the industrialists.
91
19/02/2021 10:35:39 4 1
bbc
There will be influential and highly paid jobs created here. It would be good if they did not go to Oxford, but sonewhere in the country where they could make a difference to the wider economy. A great idea though!
92
19/02/2021 10:35:49 3 9
bbc
Science today depends on international cooperation. It is naive and pretentious of the UK to think we can accomplish more alone than in cooperation with others, but let's face it, island people are island people and have an island mentality. It is however ironic to refer to GPS, which was originally a military development by the way, while brexit has kicked us out of the European Galileo project.
111
19/02/2021 10:38:51 0 1
bbc
Did we get our money back?
112
19/02/2021 10:39:06 2 1
bbc
Mr Negative talking us down. Luckily the majority of the population believe in this country.
183
19/02/2021 10:44:42 2 1
bbc
We did lead the way in innovation for about 200 years and it would be foolish not to set up an innovation capability, it is neither naive or pretentious. But I do have sympathy with the loss of contribution to the Galileo project. GPS and the modern internet came directly from the American equivalent of what is being proposed DARPA.
196
19/02/2021 10:52:51 0 1
bbc
We're part of Navstar, richard.
93
19/02/2021 10:35:51 8 10
bbc
Expect EXTREME nepotism. Ministers all go to oxbridge and so will the money. Jobs for the boys and theft from common British people.
147
19/02/2021 10:46:03 0 2
bbc
I love getting downvotes from name recognition. Try arguing the point losers!
94
19/02/2021 10:35:51 5 10
bbc
Surely anything the clown and cabinet fools do is high risk due to lack of planning, understanding, prevelance of corruption and general incompetence?
102
19/02/2021 10:37:41 4 2
bbc
Eye roll.

Vaccine!
116
19/02/2021 10:40:27 2 1
bbc
Yeah, that's why the UK vaccination programme is #1 in the world, and our vaccine is already being distributed on an industrial scale to millions.

I think you'll find this "clown" you speak of led his party to their worst GE defeat in 90 years, mate. Man, sucking those lemons must be chore.
127
37p
19/02/2021 10:42:18 3 1
bbc
That would be true of anyone in the position they are in. No-one expected to have a pandemic.
95
19/02/2021 10:36:00 12 2
bbc
Absolutely the right thing to do, especially as we develop clean energy etc.
Far too often, really good ideas are stopped in their tracks due to a lack of vision or fear of failure.
110
19/02/2021 10:38:49 0 7
bbc
Their clean energy is not clean at all - nuclear power stations leave nothing but a potential ping pong game of explosive capability on our shorelines with earthquakes and more and more environmental and weather instability - they are the very last thing we should be investing in. No where for nuclear waste - look at the chaos and after effects of Fukushima
114
37p
19/02/2021 10:39:31 1 1
bbc
Or commercial pressures.
115
19/02/2021 10:39:42 1 2
bbc
The Fracking business is not clean at all and is poisoning all of us the land and the waters, the air and impacting all our health with CV affects on the lungs and sense of smell and taste
117
19/02/2021 10:40:47 1 3
bbc
If they wanted clean energy they know they would be fitting all homes with solar panels and Tesla Batteries - but they are not because they dont, they just want to profit from it. Not clean at all - complete farce
20/02/2021 16:11:31 0 0
bbc
Add reluctance of our banking services to invest.
"Risk Takers"- they'd have you believe.
83
19/02/2021 10:32:15 2 22
bbc
What a load of poppycock - go back to nature - stop with all the technological BS, stop fracking the Earth, stop the LHC, return to natures storehouse of gifts, have natural and normal clothes, have relationships with people, do not put your trust in AI or watch the planet turn to the chaos of Wall-e films. There is no superpower needed. Nature has all the answers we need - normal pace of life
96
19/02/2021 10:36:00 0 1
bbc
Nope! let's develop an 80% efficient solar cell and create Utopia
83
19/02/2021 10:32:15 2 22
bbc
What a load of poppycock - go back to nature - stop with all the technological BS, stop fracking the Earth, stop the LHC, return to natures storehouse of gifts, have natural and normal clothes, have relationships with people, do not put your trust in AI or watch the planet turn to the chaos of Wall-e films. There is no superpower needed. Nature has all the answers we need - normal pace of life
97
19/02/2021 10:36:06 0 1
bbc
Which natural products did you use to view this article and add your comment?
71
19/02/2021 10:30:23 33 6
bbc
Fantastic!
Nice to see UK back at the forefront of science where it belongs.
98
19/02/2021 10:36:10 5 1
bbc
Hold your horses, not there yet.
99
19/02/2021 10:36:12 2 4
bbc
Boris' Bunsen Burner!
84
19/02/2021 10:32:25 8 10
bbc
Are we sure that this will not just be a conduit for cash to friends of Boris and his cabal?
100
19/02/2021 10:37:26 1 4
bbc
Almost guarantee it. Millions vanishing with no accountability? What could
possibly go wrong?