Covid: Testing means 'staggered' school return, say heads
18/02/2021 | news | education | 395
The logistics of Covid testing all pupils will mean a phased return in secondary school, say heads.
1
18/02/2021 14:43:48 16 3
bbc
What about the +50 school staff?
151
18/02/2021 16:10:47 7 0
bbc
There are very few left; they are so expensive they've all been forced out.
2
18/02/2021 14:47:42 10 18
bbc
How about asking the schools to stay open over the summer holidays, to help catch up those kids who have missed more than 6 months of proper schooling in the last year? Pay the teachers extra if you have to, but always put the kids' education first!
14
18/02/2021 14:50:05 9 4
bbc
They probably did more academic work during lockdown, with the lack of 'social distractions'.
17
mc
18/02/2021 14:51:56 3 16
bbc
extra pay they had 10 months full pay for staying at home
3
18/02/2021 14:48:58 10 7
bbc
Paul 14.43...If you mean school staff over 50, well the Goverment in England and Wales couldn't care less about them. Yes, they may have followed rules carefully for over a year, but now they have to take a chance for a month or two. That's politics. But to paraphrase Neil Kinnock in 1980's - You can't play politics with peoples lives.
4
18/02/2021 14:49:03 63 9
bbc
If they do undergo a staggered return, it would probably make most sense to prioritize the younger age groups, as they are the ones that are hardest to teach remotely.

It will also mean that more people can get back to work once the burden of home schooling has been lifted, and help recover our decimated economy.
10
18/02/2021 14:53:52 38 5
bbc
Exactly what I was thinking......until it was complicated today with the latest statistics showing the higher prevalence of COVID in the 5 - 11 year age group. Seems nothing's straightforward with this disease.
78
18/02/2021 15:38:38 8 10
bbc
Get 'em all back.
158
18/02/2021 16:07:08 4 0
bbc
Ah yes, those active youngsters. I usually nail mine down at the start of the lesson.
313
18/02/2021 18:56:26 0 1
bbc
all school will have to begin vaccinations
369
19/02/2021 13:43:57 0 0
bbc
totally agree although i have to question the need to stagger in the 1st place, its not like the end of lock down one, schools are well versed in this now with worked through procedure in place and wider risks are lower due to vaccine
5
18/02/2021 14:50:21 51 21
bbc
With reports today of growing infections in under 12's they need to be very careful with schools or we will be back to stop, start all over again.
41
18/02/2021 15:17:44 32 11
bbc
it's not necessarily the number of infections that matters, it's the severity of the illness that results - ie the number of hospitalisations. Why would we lockdown again for a high number of infections that lead to zero hospitalisations??
42
18/02/2021 15:18:57 13 6
bbc
Schools must go back ASAP. This is a political decision by the government.

Will it cause more infections. Probably.

Will it cause more deaths. Probably but not many due to the success of the vaccine roll out.

Is it worth it. Absolutely for the sake of the future opportunities of 10 million children.

If you disagree then there are local elections this summer and a general election in 2024.
44
18/02/2021 15:19:14 11 6
bbc
It's proven that children are at virtually zero risk of covid, and general mortality rates are within normal boundaries for this time of year. Every country in Europe have had the same winter surge (including Sweden with much less harsh of lockdown). Depriving kids of education is obscene, people should take a long hard look at themselves and consider what they think is acceptable.
46
18/02/2021 15:19:45 10 1
bbc
Please link to the reports of growing infection rates amongst under 12's.

The article on the BBC just says that 5-11 year olds and 18-24 year olds have the highest infection rates (still less than <1%). That's a pretty obvious consequence given the age profile of the vaccine roll-out.

Further punishing children because they haven't been vaccinated seems a bit like victim blaming.
86
Bob
18/02/2021 15:40:34 8 0
bbc
Source of your claim?

It goes against the ONS infection survey and the case heatmap on the GOV.UK website.

No group is rising and that age group isn't topping the charts either as someone else claimed.
140
18/02/2021 16:03:51 6 2
bbc
How on earth???

Aren't we all supposed to be holed up and not mixing at the moment?

At least my kids have been stuck at home and not seen another soul since the start of this current lockdown and hence have stayed infection-free...

Evidently not everyone is doing what we're supposed to be doing. That, combined with the vaccinations is the way out of this mess, if only people complied!!
171
18/02/2021 16:12:57 1 4
bbc
school vaccinations is the only way
6
18/02/2021 14:51:02 9 42
bbc
That's fine. So long as the Easter half term holidays my kid is in school. Nurses and doctors have to find a way to treat Covid patients despite it seeming an unsurmountable task. Headteachers need to find a way to get ALL kids back in school on the 8th of March and shut their mouths. Sick of this now. GET OUR KIDS BACK IN SCHOOL NOW!!
15
18/02/2021 14:55:59 20 2
bbc
Looks like someone has found their new career! Plenty of teaching jobs available. The profession needs eloquent and positive educators just like you.
170
18/02/2021 16:12:42 0 2
bbc
school vaccinations is the only way
7
18/02/2021 14:51:16 56 26
bbc
I still don't understand why vaccines aren't being prioritized for school staff.
If it is the government ambition to get schools back ASAP, it would make most sense to protect the frontline adults who work there.
19
18/02/2021 14:58:50 62 18
bbc
Because they're not shown to be at any greater risk than other groups. What about shop workers, bus drivers, transport staff, police officers, people still required to go into work in offices. There are many others that have face to face contact with others, not just teachers.
83
18/02/2021 15:36:10 17 13
bbc
Because it is not teachers at risk anymore than most. This is just political posturing by the Labour party to help keep the union funds flowing. Starmer says follow the science. Scientists say dont prioritise teachers. Which dont they or you understand
169
18/02/2021 16:12:16 1 9
bbc
it would make sense to vaccinate all pupils
191
18/02/2021 16:29:55 5 1
bbc
School staff do not matter at all! That is why.
The problem of schools Is the behaviour.
Gathering a herd in from far and wide daily, spreading diseases in a closed room area all day, then taking it back out to the country. It is the behaviour that is the issue teachers are just not relevant, it changes nothing if they are are vaccinated. The bad behaviour is let start up again!
365
19/02/2021 13:37:04 1 0
bbc
I think you will find the vaccinations are being given first to those who are most likely to catch the virus and be hospitalised and thereby overwhelm the NHS.
8
18/02/2021 14:46:11 68 19
bbc
No jab, no education, simple as that. Let's see how anti-vaxxers like home schooling their kids.....
11
18/02/2021 14:54:42 32 5
bbc
Unfortunately, they'd probably love it, but you'd have to ask whether any effective home education would take place though?
20
18/02/2021 14:59:27 28 4
bbc
But a lack of education is the reason they are anti-vaxxers in the first place.
39
18/02/2021 15:15:14 6 10
bbc
Teachers will be delighted to read your post. No jabs for teachers, no education for children. Sounds like a plan.
51
18/02/2021 15:21:47 20 2
bbc
None of the current vaccinations have been approved for use on children.
106
18/02/2021 15:47:42 7 25
bbc
I most definitely do not consent to my children being tested, Neither will I test them at home, lateral flow test = how accurate, false results.
I personally one-one home school my child in lockdown and will continue to do so,.. i think school should be cancelled for the remainder of the school year.
To get all who want vaccinating vaccinated, Then to return in September for the new school year.
156
18/02/2021 16:15:23 5 2
bbc
But going to school without having the MMR jab is fine.
168
18/02/2021 16:11:46 4 2
bbc
no flu vaccine no jobs
9
18/02/2021 14:52:48 5 15
bbc
No excuse not to start reopening schools from the 8th March.

Also hope we will hear more about extended school days or being open in summer to help kids who need help catching up. Optional of course.

Completely understand if everything else is slower to return to normal. Schools are the priority and we can't let their reopening be jeopardised because we want a pint a few weeks earlier.
4
18/02/2021 14:49:03 63 9
bbc
If they do undergo a staggered return, it would probably make most sense to prioritize the younger age groups, as they are the ones that are hardest to teach remotely.

It will also mean that more people can get back to work once the burden of home schooling has been lifted, and help recover our decimated economy.
10
18/02/2021 14:53:52 38 5
bbc
Exactly what I was thinking......until it was complicated today with the latest statistics showing the higher prevalence of COVID in the 5 - 11 year age group. Seems nothing's straightforward with this disease.
36
18/02/2021 15:14:15 5 2
bbc
The report from the latest infection rates by age just is the mirror image of the vaccine roll-out.
121
Bob
18/02/2021 15:53:26 3 3
bbc
As the article says - it is falling across all age groups.

The range between age groups is miniscule. You're talking tenths of a percent between age groups. It isn't like the top group is out of control whilst the bottom group is doing ultra well.

The vaccination programme also means the older groups will (should) taper off quickly so it should be expected the younger groups rank higher.
135
18/02/2021 16:00:17 11 6
bbc
This prevalence in the lower age groups is not surprising seeing that 25% of primary age children are in school and only 4% of secondary pupils. The figures certainly expose the lie that 'children do nto get Covid in schools'.
8
18/02/2021 14:46:11 68 19
bbc
No jab, no education, simple as that. Let's see how anti-vaxxers like home schooling their kids.....
11
18/02/2021 14:54:42 32 5
bbc
Unfortunately, they'd probably love it, but you'd have to ask whether any effective home education would take place though?
258
18/02/2021 17:10:18 6 0
bbc
One of the poorest examples of British law: parents may legally "educate" their children at home, and whilst there is a legal duty on parents to provide a suitable education, they do not have to engage with authorities to prove it. BTW, remote learning as under the current restrictions is not home education.
12
18/02/2021 14:54:45 45 7
bbc
Said on the 1 o'clock news virus figures are highest among primary age pupils at the moment
49
18/02/2021 15:20:59 41 23
bbc
Of cause schools should go back and the government will correctly make this political decision.

Will it cause more infections. Probably.

Will it cause more deaths. Probably but not many due to the success of the vaccine roll out.

Is it worth it. Absolutely for the sake of the future opportunities of 10 million children.
61
18/02/2021 15:28:17 7 4
bbc
Ssshhh! Child dumpers don’t want it let out schooling is a huge disease melting pot.
65
18/02/2021 15:29:10 3 6
bbc
So the virus rates are highest amongst the age group that has been offered the least number of vaccine doses?
That's not really a shock revelation that.

And are we avoiding rolling out the vaccine to primary age pupils specifically because they have next to no risk from Covid?
104
Bob
18/02/2021 15:46:59 6 4
bbc
Well, whoever said that is talking rubbish.

Check the heatmap on the GOV.UK website, one of the lowest groups - https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/details/cases?areaType=nation&areaName=England

You can also check the infection survey to scoop up asymptomatic data and they're still not top - 1.07% over last 7 days of data vs. 1.14% for 16-24 and 1.25% for 35-49 (top group).
359
19/02/2021 12:22:25 1 2
bbc
Which proves we were lied to all along about them not catching it! Sending them back to school now will provide the virus with the perfect opportunity to mutate again, and maybe work out how to make children really poorly.
394
19/02/2021 21:59:06 0 0
bbc
About right they have blamed all different ages at one time or another
13
18/02/2021 14:55:03 84 13
bbc
How about the house of commons returns with the same mitigations as schools. A few bottles of hand sanitiser & the odd mask in the lobbies and all will be fine.
16
18/02/2021 14:57:18 27 3
bbc
Exactly!
97
18/02/2021 15:45:16 3 6
bbc
How about the House of Commons are furloughed on 80% wage and then let’s see how quickly restrictions are lifted.
Anal swabs mandatory.. Removed
159
18/02/2021 16:08:20 1 0
bbc
A few bottles of wine and the odd cigar on the river terrace!
311
18/02/2021 18:55:58 0 3
bbc
vaccinate all pupils
393
19/02/2021 21:48:39 0 0
bbc
Agreed but until social distancing ends Parliament can't return properly anyway
2
18/02/2021 14:47:42 10 18
bbc
How about asking the schools to stay open over the summer holidays, to help catch up those kids who have missed more than 6 months of proper schooling in the last year? Pay the teachers extra if you have to, but always put the kids' education first!
14
18/02/2021 14:50:05 9 4
bbc
They probably did more academic work during lockdown, with the lack of 'social distractions'.
23
18/02/2021 15:05:35 2 3
bbc
But without opportunities to peer assess, support one another or gain instant teacher feedback.
6
18/02/2021 14:51:02 9 42
bbc
That's fine. So long as the Easter half term holidays my kid is in school. Nurses and doctors have to find a way to treat Covid patients despite it seeming an unsurmountable task. Headteachers need to find a way to get ALL kids back in school on the 8th of March and shut their mouths. Sick of this now. GET OUR KIDS BACK IN SCHOOL NOW!!
15
18/02/2021 14:55:59 20 2
bbc
Looks like someone has found their new career! Plenty of teaching jobs available. The profession needs eloquent and positive educators just like you.
47
18/02/2021 15:20:07 2 0
bbc
????
13
18/02/2021 14:55:03 84 13
bbc
How about the house of commons returns with the same mitigations as schools. A few bottles of hand sanitiser & the odd mask in the lobbies and all will be fine.
16
18/02/2021 14:57:18 27 3
bbc
Exactly!
2
18/02/2021 14:47:42 10 18
bbc
How about asking the schools to stay open over the summer holidays, to help catch up those kids who have missed more than 6 months of proper schooling in the last year? Pay the teachers extra if you have to, but always put the kids' education first!
17
mc
18/02/2021 14:51:56 3 16
bbc
extra pay they had 10 months full pay for staying at home
25
18/02/2021 15:06:31 14 2
bbc
Before posting dumb comments like this why don't you educate yourself. Teachers were either in school for those children who are considered vulnerable or from families of key workers or providing online lessons. They still had marking to do, planning of lessons and all the normal activities that teachers carry out. They certainly weren't paid for staying at home.
38
TJ
18/02/2021 15:14:59 12 3
bbc
Oh do give it a rest. Teachers have been on full pay because they have been working full time throughout both lockdowns, either in school or online. I'm currently on my (unpaid) half term and now marking and providing online support to my students for the fourth day in a row. Will be doing the same over Easter. How much unpaid over-time do you do and what has been your positive contribution been?
218
18/02/2021 16:42:36 3 1
bbc
After that comment you could do with extra lessons
18
18/02/2021 14:58:49 31 10
bbc
Staggered return is the best way.
33
18/02/2021 15:11:05 15 55
bbc
Said the elderly person who has already had their education and childhoods unimpeded and doesn't give a toss about kids so long as they are safe.
167
18/02/2021 16:11:00 2 3
bbc
starting vaccinations at school for covid is a good start
7
18/02/2021 14:51:16 56 26
bbc
I still don't understand why vaccines aren't being prioritized for school staff.
If it is the government ambition to get schools back ASAP, it would make most sense to protect the frontline adults who work there.
19
18/02/2021 14:58:50 62 18
bbc
Because they're not shown to be at any greater risk than other groups. What about shop workers, bus drivers, transport staff, police officers, people still required to go into work in offices. There are many others that have face to face contact with others, not just teachers.
22
18/02/2021 15:04:55 16 3
bbc
I would have no objection to priority being given to all those in a public facing role.
I can happily easily work from home with my job, and keep myself safe. I would be more than happy to give up my place in the vaccine queue to someone who is less able to isolate.
27
18/02/2021 15:07:18 17 9
bbc
Teachers are shown to be at no greater risk by research conducted between April and December when for 2/3rds of the time the teachers were leading remote learning & not in direct contact with children!
Look at the data more closely, and you'll find (small sample; I admit not statistically significant) that there was a higher death toll of approx. +35% in older male teachers from the autumn term.
28
18/02/2021 15:08:24 6 12
bbc
So are you suggesting that 5 and 6 year olds all wear masks in order to give the teacher the same level of protection as those workers you referred to?
141
18/02/2021 16:06:48 9 13
bbc
All it will take is to have a couple of teachers out with COVID and the schools will have to close again, back to square one. Teachers (as well as any other frontline workers) should absolutely be prioritised in front of the queue. I see less value in vaccinating people who are stuck within four walls out of their own choice, regardless of COVID pandemic or not.
230
18/02/2021 16:46:44 3 3
bbc
All of the above she be vaccinated as a priority. It has been found that teachers are not at a greater risk of death, due to average age and health, but no one has looked at risk of catching it. I’m not worried about dying but I am worried about long Covid as I know of too many school staff who have been unwell for a long time and no one knows the lasting damage.
341
18/02/2021 22:43:37 2 1
bbc
Start school again with those children studying for exams. Try other ages part time. A gradual return.

Staff should be vaccinated because it is very difficult to maintain distancing with younger children. Vaccination might be the difference between mild illness or hospitalisation.
383
19/02/2021 16:39:42 0 0
bbc
False, there is no data!! This is as there has been no school to get data from!
The propaganda you talk about is a year old before the first lock down and based on a very small sample.
The virus has changed
Teachers lives do matter!!
391
19/02/2021 20:04:20 0 0
bbc
Really!! Try telling that to a member of our school staff who caught Covid working at a Primary school, passed it to her husband who has since died !!!
8
18/02/2021 14:46:11 68 19
bbc
No jab, no education, simple as that. Let's see how anti-vaxxers like home schooling their kids.....
20
18/02/2021 14:59:27 28 4
bbc
But a lack of education is the reason they are anti-vaxxers in the first place.
21
18/02/2021 15:02:14 36 2
bbc
Testing is a strain on schools; we've conducted >1000 of them at our school since 4 January.
However, I'd rather have the burden of scaling this up with my trained staff & volunteer team and know that the tests are accurate, than send the kits home with the associated risk of DIY-ers giving themselves false negatives.
59
18/02/2021 15:27:52 6 24
bbc
You're the winner SouthCoaster, on HYS at 15.02 on a school day!
173
18/02/2021 16:20:48 1 1
bbc
As you seem to know...what is the position with parental consent then?...many will not give permission for a stranger who has watched a 30 minute video to stick swabs in their kids nose and throat?
363
19/02/2021 13:12:31 1 0
bbc
Unfortunately, whilst having trained staff improves the effectiveness of LFTs it does not make them 'accurate'- they will miss many, many positive cases. It would be somewhat better with medically trained staff, but still no more than 75% of cases are detected. It is vital that staff and students do not consider the lack of a positive as evidence of a negative!
19
18/02/2021 14:58:50 62 18
bbc
Because they're not shown to be at any greater risk than other groups. What about shop workers, bus drivers, transport staff, police officers, people still required to go into work in offices. There are many others that have face to face contact with others, not just teachers.
22
18/02/2021 15:04:55 16 3
bbc
I would have no objection to priority being given to all those in a public facing role.
I can happily easily work from home with my job, and keep myself safe. I would be more than happy to give up my place in the vaccine queue to someone who is less able to isolate.
111
18/02/2021 15:50:12 15 0
bbc
I have accepted that I may well be towards the back of the queue, being under 50 and with a job I can do at home.
I think it's reasonable to vaccinate those in public facing roles first within their risk band. But I don't see justification for delaying anyone in groups 5-9 so that people under 40 can move up the queue.
14
18/02/2021 14:50:05 9 4
bbc
They probably did more academic work during lockdown, with the lack of 'social distractions'.
23
18/02/2021 15:05:35 2 3
bbc
But without opportunities to peer assess, support one another or gain instant teacher feedback.
24
18/02/2021 15:06:25 11 13
bbc
All the state schools will open first. Then if it is safe the posh schools like Eton and Harrow will be the last to open. Can't have the little darlings of our great leaders and business leaders being exposed. I do hope the parents are not paying full fees? Can't be treating them like university students.
58
18/02/2021 15:26:42 9 2
bbc
What matters are parents, those with good ones will have soared ahead at home, so private schooled ones more than most. The bottom will have been doing nothing as they do in school. Matching their ability.
92
VoR
18/02/2021 15:42:20 3 0
bbc
I'd actually expect them to be about the first to open.
1. They tend to have boarders, so can reduce contact with the outside world. (Effectively forming a bubble.)
2. They have smaller class sizes, and more space per student.
3. They tend to be more flexible in terms of spreading classes out over different times of day, since teachers tend to live "on campus".
4. They want the fee income.
17
mc
18/02/2021 14:51:56 3 16
bbc
extra pay they had 10 months full pay for staying at home
25
18/02/2021 15:06:31 14 2
bbc
Before posting dumb comments like this why don't you educate yourself. Teachers were either in school for those children who are considered vulnerable or from families of key workers or providing online lessons. They still had marking to do, planning of lessons and all the normal activities that teachers carry out. They certainly weren't paid for staying at home.
26
18/02/2021 15:07:15 8 4
bbc
Surely all children and teachers could all be tested before returning to school
31
18/02/2021 15:10:23 13 4
bbc
Yes, which is why we need a staggered start. The logistics of testing 1200 people twice whilst maintaining a blend of face-to-face and online lessons is not easy.
164
18/02/2021 16:10:30 0 0
bbc
they will be all vaccinated too in time
19
18/02/2021 14:58:50 62 18
bbc
Because they're not shown to be at any greater risk than other groups. What about shop workers, bus drivers, transport staff, police officers, people still required to go into work in offices. There are many others that have face to face contact with others, not just teachers.
27
18/02/2021 15:07:18 17 9
bbc
Teachers are shown to be at no greater risk by research conducted between April and December when for 2/3rds of the time the teachers were leading remote learning & not in direct contact with children!
Look at the data more closely, and you'll find (small sample; I admit not statistically significant) that there was a higher death toll of approx. +35% in older male teachers from the autumn term.
264
18/02/2021 17:20:59 3 0
bbc
"there was a higher death toll of approx. +35% in older male teachers from the autumn term"

All of whom are due a vaccine in the next couple of weeks (being over 50)
345
19/02/2021 00:57:59 0 0
bbc
Older male teachers is the reason it should be on age.

As also older male police, older male security guards, older male binmen, older male transport workers, older male factory workers, older male retail workers.
19
18/02/2021 14:58:50 62 18
bbc
Because they're not shown to be at any greater risk than other groups. What about shop workers, bus drivers, transport staff, police officers, people still required to go into work in offices. There are many others that have face to face contact with others, not just teachers.
28
18/02/2021 15:08:24 6 12
bbc
So are you suggesting that 5 and 6 year olds all wear masks in order to give the teacher the same level of protection as those workers you referred to?
40
sw
18/02/2021 15:16:02 7 5
bbc
Good suggestion. Well done.
197
18/02/2021 16:33:50 4 1
bbc
That’s what they do in Canada. School outbreaks are minimal
29
18/02/2021 15:08:40 9 4
bbc
I noted the list of symptoms had recently been extended to 7 but "Staggering" wasn't one of them - so that's 8 now to look out for - right?
30
18/02/2021 14:57:32 6 7
bbc
The opening of Schools on March 8th is great for pupils parents and teachers alike.
I just hope and pray now that there will not be a irrevocable situation where they have to close again.
Wouldn’t be the first time.
26
18/02/2021 15:07:15 8 4
bbc
Surely all children and teachers could all be tested before returning to school
31
18/02/2021 15:10:23 13 4
bbc
Yes, which is why we need a staggered start. The logistics of testing 1200 people twice whilst maintaining a blend of face-to-face and online lessons is not easy.
87
sw
18/02/2021 15:40:46 2 2
bbc
Hire unemployed young people to do the tests. Ask Sunak for extra money for them. 2 Wins, Teachers not doing testing, young people employed.
32
18/02/2021 15:00:55 7 3
bbc
Students are not a homogeneous group. Different ages have different needs and carry different risks for community transmission. Surely it makes sense to prioritise the return of students in earlier year groups who need to go back more urgently and carry lower risks to their communities. If BoJo wants all students to return at once this means waiting longer than necessary for earlier years groups?
18
18/02/2021 14:58:49 31 10
bbc
Staggered return is the best way.
33
18/02/2021 15:11:05 15 55
bbc
Said the elderly person who has already had their education and childhoods unimpeded and doesn't give a toss about kids so long as they are safe.
45
18/02/2021 15:13:32 10 4
bbc
"doesn't give a toss about kids so long as they are safe"

You just contradicted yourself.

Clever you.
142
18/02/2021 16:07:20 6 2
bbc
Staggered Return is also the safest thing for both the kids and the school staff. Gives time to test them all before they restart.
212
18/02/2021 16:41:04 6 3
bbc
you cant cope with your kids at home I take it.
34
18/02/2021 15:12:05 3 1
bbc
When people talk about the risks involved, what risk do they mean? The risk of teachers contracting the virus or the risk of chilren contracting the virus and then passing it on to their families? The first is easy to assess just look at how many teachers contracted the disease when schools were open as compared to other groups. The second rather harder due ot isolation being preferred to testing.
35
18/02/2021 15:13:25 8 18
bbc
Just a thought but maybe it's now time to give priority to our kids instead of this one sided obsession with giving priority to older people and the NHS? EVERYONE matters in this pandemic unless you happen to be under 20.
132
18/02/2021 15:56:57 2 2
bbc
One trick pony
145
18/02/2021 16:08:49 1 0
bbc
or a parent
206
18/02/2021 16:39:01 0 1
bbc
with you Seadog!
10
18/02/2021 14:53:52 38 5
bbc
Exactly what I was thinking......until it was complicated today with the latest statistics showing the higher prevalence of COVID in the 5 - 11 year age group. Seems nothing's straightforward with this disease.
36
18/02/2021 15:14:15 5 2
bbc
The report from the latest infection rates by age just is the mirror image of the vaccine roll-out.
37
18/02/2021 15:14:17 46 4
bbc
Please do not let families administer their own tests! Research clearly shows that LFD testing is only accurate when conducted by trained & experienced operatives.
74
18/02/2021 15:36:36 13 1
bbc
Even then it still only has a sensitivity of about 75% - so it's still passing off 1/4 of all those infected as being negative.
160
18/02/2021 16:17:22 2 1
bbc
Would apply to teachers as well in terms of being trained and experienced with regard to testing. On top of that just the idea that its ok to further damage the kids by sticking swabs down their throat and up there nose on a regular basis, Imagine the bullying etc that will follow when the 1 kid in100 who tests positive also happens to be the kid with a troubled background/previously bullied??
17
mc
18/02/2021 14:51:56 3 16
bbc
extra pay they had 10 months full pay for staying at home
38
TJ
18/02/2021 15:14:59 12 3
bbc
Oh do give it a rest. Teachers have been on full pay because they have been working full time throughout both lockdowns, either in school or online. I'm currently on my (unpaid) half term and now marking and providing online support to my students for the fourth day in a row. Will be doing the same over Easter. How much unpaid over-time do you do and what has been your positive contribution been?
43
18/02/2021 15:19:03 5 3
bbc
You deserve every penny.
8
18/02/2021 14:46:11 68 19
bbc
No jab, no education, simple as that. Let's see how anti-vaxxers like home schooling their kids.....
39
18/02/2021 15:15:14 6 10
bbc
Teachers will be delighted to read your post. No jabs for teachers, no education for children. Sounds like a plan.
147
18/02/2021 16:10:09 3 5
bbc
That's the whole objective of the teachers unions.
199
18/02/2021 16:35:17 1 5
bbc
A bad plan as the the science says parents more at risk as hug and kiss the children unlike the teachers.

So a better plan is vaccinate all parents over 40 not 20 year old teachers as its been proven they are less risk than general public.

All workers over 40 at risk in and you can't work in a food processing plan online.
256
18/02/2021 17:05:38 6 1
bbc
Good lord not this nonsense again. Teacher-haters need to give us all a break from their vitriol.
28
18/02/2021 15:08:24 6 12
bbc
So are you suggesting that 5 and 6 year olds all wear masks in order to give the teacher the same level of protection as those workers you referred to?
40
sw
18/02/2021 15:16:02 7 5
bbc
Good suggestion. Well done.
5
18/02/2021 14:50:21 51 21
bbc
With reports today of growing infections in under 12's they need to be very careful with schools or we will be back to stop, start all over again.
41
18/02/2021 15:17:44 32 11
bbc
it's not necessarily the number of infections that matters, it's the severity of the illness that results - ie the number of hospitalisations. Why would we lockdown again for a high number of infections that lead to zero hospitalisations??
144
18/02/2021 16:08:14 5 6
bbc
kids infect their parents - it's easy to understand if you think
5
18/02/2021 14:50:21 51 21
bbc
With reports today of growing infections in under 12's they need to be very careful with schools or we will be back to stop, start all over again.
42
18/02/2021 15:18:57 13 6
bbc
Schools must go back ASAP. This is a political decision by the government.

Will it cause more infections. Probably.

Will it cause more deaths. Probably but not many due to the success of the vaccine roll out.

Is it worth it. Absolutely for the sake of the future opportunities of 10 million children.

If you disagree then there are local elections this summer and a general election in 2024.
38
TJ
18/02/2021 15:14:59 12 3
bbc
Oh do give it a rest. Teachers have been on full pay because they have been working full time throughout both lockdowns, either in school or online. I'm currently on my (unpaid) half term and now marking and providing online support to my students for the fourth day in a row. Will be doing the same over Easter. How much unpaid over-time do you do and what has been your positive contribution been?
43
18/02/2021 15:19:03 5 3
bbc
You deserve every penny.
5
18/02/2021 14:50:21 51 21
bbc
With reports today of growing infections in under 12's they need to be very careful with schools or we will be back to stop, start all over again.
44
18/02/2021 15:19:14 11 6
bbc
It's proven that children are at virtually zero risk of covid, and general mortality rates are within normal boundaries for this time of year. Every country in Europe have had the same winter surge (including Sweden with much less harsh of lockdown). Depriving kids of education is obscene, people should take a long hard look at themselves and consider what they think is acceptable.
33
18/02/2021 15:11:05 15 55
bbc
Said the elderly person who has already had their education and childhoods unimpeded and doesn't give a toss about kids so long as they are safe.
45
18/02/2021 15:13:32 10 4
bbc
"doesn't give a toss about kids so long as they are safe"

You just contradicted yourself.

Clever you.
5
18/02/2021 14:50:21 51 21
bbc
With reports today of growing infections in under 12's they need to be very careful with schools or we will be back to stop, start all over again.
46
18/02/2021 15:19:45 10 1
bbc
Please link to the reports of growing infection rates amongst under 12's.

The article on the BBC just says that 5-11 year olds and 18-24 year olds have the highest infection rates (still less than <1%). That's a pretty obvious consequence given the age profile of the vaccine roll-out.

Further punishing children because they haven't been vaccinated seems a bit like victim blaming.
110
18/02/2021 15:50:04 4 0
bbc
Not growing but reducing more slowly.
15
18/02/2021 14:55:59 20 2
bbc
Looks like someone has found their new career! Plenty of teaching jobs available. The profession needs eloquent and positive educators just like you.
47
18/02/2021 15:20:07 2 0
bbc
????
48
sw
18/02/2021 15:20:11 25 1
bbc
Whose mad idea was it to do home testing. Kids will play with the tests, try it on the dog/cat etc.
57
18/02/2021 15:21:59 15 2
bbc
Personally I'd be reassured if Tiddles tested negative
146
18/02/2021 16:09:05 2 1
bbc
Well a friend tried it on a family dog and a puddle and they both tested positive.
282
18/02/2021 17:30:08 1 0
bbc
Don't give them ideas
12
18/02/2021 14:54:45 45 7
bbc
Said on the 1 o'clock news virus figures are highest among primary age pupils at the moment
49
18/02/2021 15:20:59 41 23
bbc
Of cause schools should go back and the government will correctly make this political decision.

Will it cause more infections. Probably.

Will it cause more deaths. Probably but not many due to the success of the vaccine roll out.

Is it worth it. Absolutely for the sake of the future opportunities of 10 million children.
63
18/02/2021 15:28:43 16 9
bbc
Hope you would feel the same if you were a teacher aged 60, who had not had the vaccine...maybe not having it until end of April. ( Some teachers back in full classrooms in Wales on 25th Feb). Just a few more months...thirty of you packed into a small room...keeping your fingers crossed....
272
18/02/2021 17:25:01 2 4
bbc
And what about the children of the teachers and adults who die by going back on the crusade of march 8th to provide a baby sitter for annoyed Tories
373
Rob
19/02/2021 13:56:51 0 0
bbc
They won't be that far behind most schools do GCSE lite in years 7 and 8 then start in year 9 doing GCSEs those ks4 courses are designed to be taught in 2 years not three and even then if needed you could do it quicker if your dept is organised.

This is done because Ofsted want to know what your doing to push the students the schemes of work are designed to push. That's why KS3 no fun anymore.
377
19/02/2021 14:45:15 0 0
bbc
So why haven't the teachers had the vaccine?
50
18/02/2021 15:21:26 5 6
bbc
Brining students back in year groups is not the way to go.

Many families have 2 or 3 kids at the same school in different year groups.

Most schools still have ‘houses’ that span the year groups. When I was at school it was common practice, and I believe it still is, to assign siblings to the same ‘house’.

So return pupils by house not year group.
8
18/02/2021 14:46:11 68 19
bbc
No jab, no education, simple as that. Let's see how anti-vaxxers like home schooling their kids.....
51
18/02/2021 15:21:47 20 2
bbc
None of the current vaccinations have been approved for use on children.
52
18/02/2021 15:22:21 22 13
bbc
Has the only metric now become Covid infection rates, without any consideration for the importance of education, the economy, mental health of the nation, etc? It seems like we're subordinating everything else to this singular goal, as if there are no costs and nothing else matters.
Am I the only one who sees this as a bit crazy?
79
VoR
18/02/2021 15:38:40 13 8
bbc
You are in a (fairly large) minority who see the things you mention as being of greater weight than the impact of Covid. Don't forget, if there were no restrictions, the economy would be badly hit (because of lack of public confidence to go out), the health service would have collapsed (meaning things like heart attacks can't be dealt with properly). That would not have been good mentally either
53
18/02/2021 15:23:03 22 5
bbc
We all want schools opened when it is safe - reopening is a HUGE movement of people, when we have all been at home, so we must really ensure that social distancing and all the other guidelines are VERY strictly adhered to or the virus will have a field day, and back into lockdown we will go.
54
18/02/2021 15:23:28 7 9
bbc
Don’t worry testing is a waste of time. It is not accurate it is not quick enough and you can catch it moments after the test. Only separation works, and that is never compatible with herd based activities like schooling. Rammed into a sealed room all day long.

Staggered return will just soften the reemergence of the virus a bit. Reckless child dumping. As open now, it is only wanted for that.
73
VoR
18/02/2021 15:36:11 5 2
bbc
This is a misleading comment. Firstly, the tests tend to miss positives mainly when the viral load is low, which also means the person is less infectious. Tests are more likely to pick people up as they become more infectious. Hence they are still protective. That also means that if you catch it moments after the test, you won't be that infectious for a while. The next test can pick it up.
55
18/02/2021 15:24:50 19 7
bbc
“Details of how cancelled GCSEs and A-levels will be replaced this summer”.

Teachers and students have been left in limbo since shutdown, not knowing what is required. Why didn’t the Government prepare for this? After last year’s fiasco you would have thought they would have a plan if it happened again. But no, just having a ‘consolation’ now with relevant parties.
64
Bob
18/02/2021 15:28:59 18 4
bbc
The curriculum hasn't changed, so teachers should be continuing to teach that to the students.

Whether or not an exam takes place at the end is irrelevant.
213
CJL
18/02/2021 16:41:08 2 0
bbc
Agree. I’m concerned about my daughters GCSE’s for next summer (2022).
380
19/02/2021 16:27:21 0 0
bbc
They said recently "lessons will be learned". But as usual whenever someone says this you know it will never happen.
56
18/02/2021 15:21:32 2 7
bbc
They need to start mass Covid vaccinations at school
68
sw
18/02/2021 15:32:04 6 0
bbc
There are no complete vaccine trials on children yet.
131
18/02/2021 15:55:35 0 0
bbc
Why??
48
sw
18/02/2021 15:20:11 25 1
bbc
Whose mad idea was it to do home testing. Kids will play with the tests, try it on the dog/cat etc.
57
18/02/2021 15:21:59 15 2
bbc
Personally I'd be reassured if Tiddles tested negative
24
18/02/2021 15:06:25 11 13
bbc
All the state schools will open first. Then if it is safe the posh schools like Eton and Harrow will be the last to open. Can't have the little darlings of our great leaders and business leaders being exposed. I do hope the parents are not paying full fees? Can't be treating them like university students.
58
18/02/2021 15:26:42 9 2
bbc
What matters are parents, those with good ones will have soared ahead at home, so private schooled ones more than most. The bottom will have been doing nothing as they do in school. Matching their ability.
21
18/02/2021 15:02:14 36 2
bbc
Testing is a strain on schools; we've conducted >1000 of them at our school since 4 January.
However, I'd rather have the burden of scaling this up with my trained staff & volunteer team and know that the tests are accurate, than send the kits home with the associated risk of DIY-ers giving themselves false negatives.
59
18/02/2021 15:27:52 6 24
bbc
You're the winner SouthCoaster, on HYS at 15.02 on a school day!
70
18/02/2021 15:34:06 28 0
bbc
It is actually half term this week but i am sure your apology be accepted
84
18/02/2021 15:40:03 18 0
bbc
In a half term when I worked Monday to Wednesday.
85
18/02/2021 15:37:31 14 0
bbc
It's half term
136
18/02/2021 16:00:57 15 0
bbc
Feeling like a bit of a numpty Londonfirst?
166
TJ
18/02/2021 16:19:39 7 2
bbc
Shouldn't you be doing your regular 24 hours a day 365 days a year shift at the School of Hard knocks and Martyrdom at the moment?
You're an idiot It's half term - do keep up! Removed
310
18/02/2021 18:45:13 3 0
bbc
It's half term at the moment!!
321
18/02/2021 19:30:43 3 0
bbc
??????? ??
344
RPH
18/02/2021 23:50:35 1 0
bbc
Yep, as I'm sure even you have realised by now: Half-term: you are a numpty...
364
19/02/2021 13:35:26 1 0
bbc
its half term mate
60
Bob
18/02/2021 15:27:57 12 6
bbc
I see this head's union leader has failed to read the part about testing being an ongoing affair and not a one-off, rendering his staggering process of return pointless.

No doubt sowing some seeds for post-announcement.
72
18/02/2021 15:36:10 11 3
bbc
No Bob. It would be foolish to invite the children in and then test them and find a positive child who has been mixing for a few days. Then having to send home half a class for 10 days. Teachers are aware that testing will need to be ongoing and have teams ready for this. Once all students are back rolling rotas can take place.
77
18/02/2021 15:38:09 4 1
bbc
Sadly, that's not the guidance to schools. We are told to test twice (3 days apart) and then never again.
We've ignored that advice and have tested key worker & vulnerable children working on-site weekly since 4 Jan.
95
18/02/2021 15:43:29 2 1
bbc
We used to have to test kids once a week, the government then changed this to twice since their return to school...the tests may not be brilliant but they still do catch cases. Why test staff bi-weekly and not the kids at all?
382
19/02/2021 16:32:32 0 0
bbc
You can't possibl;y be suggesting he might make a U turn !!!
12
18/02/2021 14:54:45 45 7
bbc
Said on the 1 o'clock news virus figures are highest among primary age pupils at the moment
61
18/02/2021 15:28:17 7 4
bbc
Ssshhh! Child dumpers don’t want it let out schooling is a huge disease melting pot.
374
19/02/2021 14:13:13 0 0
bbc
I sincerely hope you have nothing to do with children or education. Your constant negativity towards children, parents and schools is quite depressing that I really do hope that you are simply frustrated and passing the time of day.
62
01
18/02/2021 15:22:47 15 10
bbc
So we can look forward to another devastating wave when schools reopen.
91
18/02/2021 15:42:06 5 4
bbc
Just so long as you are safe and your needs are met. That's all that matters.
49
18/02/2021 15:20:59 41 23
bbc
Of cause schools should go back and the government will correctly make this political decision.

Will it cause more infections. Probably.

Will it cause more deaths. Probably but not many due to the success of the vaccine roll out.

Is it worth it. Absolutely for the sake of the future opportunities of 10 million children.
63
18/02/2021 15:28:43 16 9
bbc
Hope you would feel the same if you were a teacher aged 60, who had not had the vaccine...maybe not having it until end of April. ( Some teachers back in full classrooms in Wales on 25th Feb). Just a few more months...thirty of you packed into a small room...keeping your fingers crossed....
149
18/02/2021 16:10:23 5 5
bbc
Then you vaccinate the teachers but children need to be back in school
193
18/02/2021 16:31:22 5 4
bbc
How about 48 years old and asthmatic- vaccine cancelled (latest gov U-turn with 3 days notice) and now I’m in autumn. 30 students times 5 lessons. That’s packed in a small classroom with 150 different households per day!
55
18/02/2021 15:24:50 19 7
bbc
“Details of how cancelled GCSEs and A-levels will be replaced this summer”.

Teachers and students have been left in limbo since shutdown, not knowing what is required. Why didn’t the Government prepare for this? After last year’s fiasco you would have thought they would have a plan if it happened again. But no, just having a ‘consolation’ now with relevant parties.
64
Bob
18/02/2021 15:28:59 18 4
bbc
The curriculum hasn't changed, so teachers should be continuing to teach that to the students.

Whether or not an exam takes place at the end is irrelevant.
98
18/02/2021 15:45:23 6 1
bbc
The teaching stays the same, but the hoops the teaching staff have to jump through behind the scenes varies widely depending on what evidence the government want to back up grade predictions. The March series exams haven't been cancelled so some kids will be sitting them next week having had no face to face teaching since Xmas!
209
18/02/2021 16:39:50 1 0
bbc
Try telling that to students, and to be honest more problematically, the parents.
302
18/02/2021 17:55:44 1 0
bbc
The curriculum has not , but the ability to deliver it has been removed. We have been learning as we go. We are expected to deliver the same education without contact. It is overly simplistic to simply say “... hasn't changed, so teachers should be continuing to teach..”. Trust me we are to the very best of our ability, but this will not come anywhere near what we would normally achieve.
12
18/02/2021 14:54:45 45 7
bbc
Said on the 1 o'clock news virus figures are highest among primary age pupils at the moment
65
18/02/2021 15:29:10 3 6
bbc
So the virus rates are highest amongst the age group that has been offered the least number of vaccine doses?
That's not really a shock revelation that.

And are we avoiding rolling out the vaccine to primary age pupils specifically because they have next to no risk from Covid?
290
18/02/2021 17:36:05 6 0
bbc
There is yet to be a vaccine approved for the under 18`s.
307
18/02/2021 18:36:55 4 0
bbc
No we are not - no vaccine has been approved for use on children .
66
18/02/2021 15:29:11 9 10
bbc
Vaccinate the Teachers and then no need for testing
69
sw
18/02/2021 15:33:01 6 2
bbc
If they are in the correct tier they will be vaccinated.
71
18/02/2021 15:34:16 5 1
bbc
Kids catch everything going then bring it home to the parents.

I think I've found the flaw in your plan.
81
18/02/2021 15:39:19 7 1
bbc
Why? Just because a teacher has been vaccinated it doesn't mean they can't infect pupils.
335
18/02/2021 20:05:45 1 0
bbc
Teachers are irrelevant, not the point! The behaviour of schooling in herds is the point. Mass mixing, not the health of one minder.
67
18/02/2021 15:31:26 17 21
bbc
There is hardly a day goes by without some teacher or headmaster on the news bleating and whining. They 100% not 'can do' people!
75
18/02/2021 15:36:39 25 2
bbc
That's the press asking the wrong ones!
We have maintained a 100% timetable of online lessons.
We have remained open everyday for vulnerable & keyworker children.
We LFD test everyone (in the building) every week.
We're ready for the green light to open.
YES WE CAN!
80
18/02/2021 15:38:56 8 1
bbc
And there are always those like Terry, who know nothing about education and the practicalities imvolved
90
18/02/2021 15:41:55 4 1
bbc
And even fewer without people moaning about teachers moaning...
126
18/02/2021 15:56:08 2 1
bbc
You’re a 100% can’t spell person. No wonder you’ve got it in for teachers.
241
18/02/2021 16:53:38 2 1
bbc
Try mixing with 150 household per day (30 students 5 lessons) in a small room and see if you still feel the same. No make no protection
56
18/02/2021 15:21:32 2 7
bbc
They need to start mass Covid vaccinations at school
68
sw
18/02/2021 15:32:04 6 0
bbc
There are no complete vaccine trials on children yet.
66
18/02/2021 15:29:11 9 10
bbc
Vaccinate the Teachers and then no need for testing
69
sw
18/02/2021 15:33:01 6 2
bbc
If they are in the correct tier they will be vaccinated.
59
18/02/2021 15:27:52 6 24
bbc
You're the winner SouthCoaster, on HYS at 15.02 on a school day!
70
18/02/2021 15:34:06 28 0
bbc
It is actually half term this week but i am sure your apology be accepted
66
18/02/2021 15:29:11 9 10
bbc
Vaccinate the Teachers and then no need for testing
71
18/02/2021 15:34:16 5 1
bbc
Kids catch everything going then bring it home to the parents.

I think I've found the flaw in your plan.
60
Bob
18/02/2021 15:27:57 12 6
bbc
I see this head's union leader has failed to read the part about testing being an ongoing affair and not a one-off, rendering his staggering process of return pointless.

No doubt sowing some seeds for post-announcement.
72
18/02/2021 15:36:10 11 3
bbc
No Bob. It would be foolish to invite the children in and then test them and find a positive child who has been mixing for a few days. Then having to send home half a class for 10 days. Teachers are aware that testing will need to be ongoing and have teams ready for this. Once all students are back rolling rotas can take place.
175
Bob
18/02/2021 16:21:43 1 2
bbc
I don't follow your logic there. You say that teachers are ready for ongoing testing of all students - so what differs on day 1 from day 100 that means on day 1 you need to have a staggered return but on day 100 there's no issue with the entire school being present?

Likewise with your mixing point, unless you think children only see other humans when schools are closed?
54
18/02/2021 15:23:28 7 9
bbc
Don’t worry testing is a waste of time. It is not accurate it is not quick enough and you can catch it moments after the test. Only separation works, and that is never compatible with herd based activities like schooling. Rammed into a sealed room all day long.

Staggered return will just soften the reemergence of the virus a bit. Reckless child dumping. As open now, it is only wanted for that.
73
VoR
18/02/2021 15:36:11 5 2
bbc
This is a misleading comment. Firstly, the tests tend to miss positives mainly when the viral load is low, which also means the person is less infectious. Tests are more likely to pick people up as they become more infectious. Hence they are still protective. That also means that if you catch it moments after the test, you won't be that infectious for a while. The next test can pick it up.
316
18/02/2021 19:21:44 1 0
bbc
People still get run over on quiet roads. Lower risk is just excuses to get back to appalling behaviours beloved of diseases. Schooling and foreign travel.
37
18/02/2021 15:14:17 46 4
bbc
Please do not let families administer their own tests! Research clearly shows that LFD testing is only accurate when conducted by trained & experienced operatives.
74
18/02/2021 15:36:36 13 1
bbc
Even then it still only has a sensitivity of about 75% - so it's still passing off 1/4 of all those infected as being negative.
122
18/02/2021 15:53:27 7 2
bbc
Surely better to identify 75% than none at all?
330
18/02/2021 19:55:26 2 0
bbc
it is not even 75%... Only 50% accurate in people who are asymptomatic!
67
18/02/2021 15:31:26 17 21
bbc
There is hardly a day goes by without some teacher or headmaster on the news bleating and whining. They 100% not 'can do' people!
75
18/02/2021 15:36:39 25 2
bbc
That's the press asking the wrong ones!
We have maintained a 100% timetable of online lessons.
We have remained open everyday for vulnerable & keyworker children.
We LFD test everyone (in the building) every week.
We're ready for the green light to open.
YES WE CAN!
76
18/02/2021 15:37:02 6 7
bbc
Someone should tell the Government that it's child abuse to deprive children of social contact as they are developing. Not going to school is one thing but also not being allowed to mix with other kids is quite another. If I locked my child inside for months on end and stopped them seeing other kids in normal circumstances i'd be reported to social services. Time for the Tories to face the law.
94
sw
18/02/2021 15:43:26 5 2
bbc
Why are the covid rates for young children going up, if they are not mingling with other children.
334
18/02/2021 20:03:10 1 1
bbc
Utter nonsense. Schooling is a short tiny part of human existence, we all got social contact and development far better in natural family and local situations. Schooling is the worst possible forced age restricted social environment possible to be created.
60
Bob
18/02/2021 15:27:57 12 6
bbc
I see this head's union leader has failed to read the part about testing being an ongoing affair and not a one-off, rendering his staggering process of return pointless.

No doubt sowing some seeds for post-announcement.
77
18/02/2021 15:38:09 4 1
bbc
Sadly, that's not the guidance to schools. We are told to test twice (3 days apart) and then never again.
We've ignored that advice and have tested key worker & vulnerable children working on-site weekly since 4 Jan.
177
Bob
18/02/2021 16:22:40 1 0
bbc
Currently, yes perhaps - but the forthcoming announcements on school return is expected to routine testing for everyone.
4
18/02/2021 14:49:03 63 9
bbc
If they do undergo a staggered return, it would probably make most sense to prioritize the younger age groups, as they are the ones that are hardest to teach remotely.

It will also mean that more people can get back to work once the burden of home schooling has been lifted, and help recover our decimated economy.
78
18/02/2021 15:38:38 8 10
bbc
Get 'em all back.
52
18/02/2021 15:22:21 22 13
bbc
Has the only metric now become Covid infection rates, without any consideration for the importance of education, the economy, mental health of the nation, etc? It seems like we're subordinating everything else to this singular goal, as if there are no costs and nothing else matters.
Am I the only one who sees this as a bit crazy?
79
VoR
18/02/2021 15:38:40 13 8
bbc
You are in a (fairly large) minority who see the things you mention as being of greater weight than the impact of Covid. Don't forget, if there were no restrictions, the economy would be badly hit (because of lack of public confidence to go out), the health service would have collapsed (meaning things like heart attacks can't be dealt with properly). That would not have been good mentally either
148
18/02/2021 16:10:18 3 4
bbc
Yes even without restrictions the economy would probably have taken a fair hit, but I think it would definitely not have been as bad as it is now (just look at how activity bounced once restrictions were released, despite Covid still circulating without vaccines). Plus you could have actually enjoyed life then, instead of this indefinite prison sentence we're in now.
67
18/02/2021 15:31:26 17 21
bbc
There is hardly a day goes by without some teacher or headmaster on the news bleating and whining. They 100% not 'can do' people!
80
18/02/2021 15:38:56 8 1
bbc
And there are always those like Terry, who know nothing about education and the practicalities imvolved
66
18/02/2021 15:29:11 9 10
bbc
Vaccinate the Teachers and then no need for testing
81
18/02/2021 15:39:19 7 1
bbc
Why? Just because a teacher has been vaccinated it doesn't mean they can't infect pupils.
82
18/02/2021 15:39:23 5 12
bbc
Nobody seems prepared to fight for our young people in all this. You are pathetic specimens of humans!!!
93
18/02/2021 15:43:12 2 2
bbc
Would you like us "To fight like hell"? I already volunteered my nephew Sid "Vicious" Bass-Tard for the trial on youngsters - even offered to sign the consent form - what more can I do?
7
18/02/2021 14:51:16 56 26
bbc
I still don't understand why vaccines aren't being prioritized for school staff.
If it is the government ambition to get schools back ASAP, it would make most sense to protect the frontline adults who work there.
83
18/02/2021 15:36:10 17 13
bbc
Because it is not teachers at risk anymore than most. This is just political posturing by the Labour party to help keep the union funds flowing. Starmer says follow the science. Scientists say dont prioritise teachers. Which dont they or you understand
96
18/02/2021 15:43:52 8 2
bbc
That is because the scientists are single issue warriors who only care about one thing which is preventing COVID infections/deaths.

The government in the other hand have to think about the whole of society in both the short and long term which is why they will reopen schools knowing that it will increase infections.

Even if they won't admit it they will proitise the children over lives of OAPs.
115
18/02/2021 15:51:34 12 0
bbc
And the Labour government in wales is also not following the teachers first policy, nor the SNP in Scotland.
All are prioritising (correctly) those at highest risk
274
18/02/2021 17:25:32 3 2
bbc
"This is just political posturing by the Labour party to help keep the union funds flowing."

So much wrong with this quote:

The teaching unions are not affiliated to the Labour Party and don't fund the Labour Party.

If teachers are the reason schools aren't open until March 8th why are they opening in Scotland & Wales on 22nd Feb? They're the same Unions?

Schools are shut because Govt says so.
376
19/02/2021 14:21:35 0 0
bbc
Neither the NEU nor the NASUWT donate to the Labour or are affiliated with it.
59
18/02/2021 15:27:52 6 24
bbc
You're the winner SouthCoaster, on HYS at 15.02 on a school day!
84
18/02/2021 15:40:03 18 0
bbc
In a half term when I worked Monday to Wednesday.
59
18/02/2021 15:27:52 6 24
bbc
You're the winner SouthCoaster, on HYS at 15.02 on a school day!
85
18/02/2021 15:37:31 14 0
bbc
It's half term
5
18/02/2021 14:50:21 51 21
bbc
With reports today of growing infections in under 12's they need to be very careful with schools or we will be back to stop, start all over again.
86
Bob
18/02/2021 15:40:34 8 0
bbc
Source of your claim?

It goes against the ONS infection survey and the case heatmap on the GOV.UK website.

No group is rising and that age group isn't topping the charts either as someone else claimed.
31
18/02/2021 15:10:23 13 4
bbc
Yes, which is why we need a staggered start. The logistics of testing 1200 people twice whilst maintaining a blend of face-to-face and online lessons is not easy.
87
sw
18/02/2021 15:40:46 2 2
bbc
Hire unemployed young people to do the tests. Ask Sunak for extra money for them. 2 Wins, Teachers not doing testing, young people employed.
105
18/02/2021 15:47:38 4 2
bbc
Do you honestly think this joke of a government will fund that , not to mention the fact that they would need to be DBS checked and trained by the 8th March -good idea though !
88
18/02/2021 15:40:58 13 9
bbc
Oh hurrah, another comment section on education, so daily mail readers can remind the world how lazy and selfish teachers are...
124
18/02/2021 15:52:21 3 11
bbc
If the cap fits ...
89
18/02/2021 15:41:51 13 2
bbc
Working in a SEN school we've had nearly 50% of our kids in throughout lockdown. Home learning for some children just isn't feasible, they need to be back at school. We put in as much as we can social distance / hand washing wise but we can't manage what families do at home so that can still bring the virus in. Getting the vaccine doesn't stop transmission so restrictions need to stay in place.
152
18/02/2021 16:11:46 8 0
bbc
Actually the early evidence is clearly showing that being vaccinated DOES prevent transmission.
347
19/02/2021 01:23:13 0 0
bbc
If you are at a SEN you can get your jab now.

As specialists social care worker.
67
18/02/2021 15:31:26 17 21
bbc
There is hardly a day goes by without some teacher or headmaster on the news bleating and whining. They 100% not 'can do' people!
90
18/02/2021 15:41:55 4 1
bbc
And even fewer without people moaning about teachers moaning...
62
01
18/02/2021 15:22:47 15 10
bbc
So we can look forward to another devastating wave when schools reopen.
91
18/02/2021 15:42:06 5 4
bbc
Just so long as you are safe and your needs are met. That's all that matters.
130
18/02/2021 15:55:15 3 3
bbc
I take it your kids are cramping your style?
165
18/02/2021 16:19:31 1 5
bbc
Got the tech to be posting on here but can't be bothered to teach your own children? Children of good parents have soared ahead not bing dumped in schools. Hence the nonsense about the few 'deprived' to maintain a bad schooling system's continuation, wanted for child dumping by bad parents. Wanted for fat salaries by those inside the system.
24
18/02/2021 15:06:25 11 13
bbc
All the state schools will open first. Then if it is safe the posh schools like Eton and Harrow will be the last to open. Can't have the little darlings of our great leaders and business leaders being exposed. I do hope the parents are not paying full fees? Can't be treating them like university students.
92
VoR
18/02/2021 15:42:20 3 0
bbc
I'd actually expect them to be about the first to open.
1. They tend to have boarders, so can reduce contact with the outside world. (Effectively forming a bubble.)
2. They have smaller class sizes, and more space per student.
3. They tend to be more flexible in terms of spreading classes out over different times of day, since teachers tend to live "on campus".
4. They want the fee income.
82
18/02/2021 15:39:23 5 12
bbc
Nobody seems prepared to fight for our young people in all this. You are pathetic specimens of humans!!!
93
18/02/2021 15:43:12 2 2
bbc
Would you like us "To fight like hell"? I already volunteered my nephew Sid "Vicious" Bass-Tard for the trial on youngsters - even offered to sign the consent form - what more can I do?
99
18/02/2021 15:45:46 3 2
bbc
Jesus. What a freak.
76
18/02/2021 15:37:02 6 7
bbc
Someone should tell the Government that it's child abuse to deprive children of social contact as they are developing. Not going to school is one thing but also not being allowed to mix with other kids is quite another. If I locked my child inside for months on end and stopped them seeing other kids in normal circumstances i'd be reported to social services. Time for the Tories to face the law.
94
sw
18/02/2021 15:43:26 5 2
bbc
Why are the covid rates for young children going up, if they are not mingling with other children.
100
18/02/2021 15:46:08 2 1
bbc
They are not going up. You do not understand statistics.
103
18/02/2021 15:46:56 0 6
bbc
Maybe some parents are seeing their kids mental health disintegrate in front of their very eyes and have decided THEY know what is best for them. Not the Government and their child cruelty Covid policies.
60
Bob
18/02/2021 15:27:57 12 6
bbc
I see this head's union leader has failed to read the part about testing being an ongoing affair and not a one-off, rendering his staggering process of return pointless.

No doubt sowing some seeds for post-announcement.
95
18/02/2021 15:43:29 2 1
bbc
We used to have to test kids once a week, the government then changed this to twice since their return to school...the tests may not be brilliant but they still do catch cases. Why test staff bi-weekly and not the kids at all?
83
18/02/2021 15:36:10 17 13
bbc
Because it is not teachers at risk anymore than most. This is just political posturing by the Labour party to help keep the union funds flowing. Starmer says follow the science. Scientists say dont prioritise teachers. Which dont they or you understand
96
18/02/2021 15:43:52 8 2
bbc
That is because the scientists are single issue warriors who only care about one thing which is preventing COVID infections/deaths.

The government in the other hand have to think about the whole of society in both the short and long term which is why they will reopen schools knowing that it will increase infections.

Even if they won't admit it they will proitise the children over lives of OAPs.
119
18/02/2021 15:53:03 2 2
bbc
I think it's quite clear that the lives of OAPs have so far been prioritised over everything.
Such a strange allegation to make.
13
18/02/2021 14:55:03 84 13
bbc
How about the house of commons returns with the same mitigations as schools. A few bottles of hand sanitiser & the odd mask in the lobbies and all will be fine.
97
18/02/2021 15:45:16 3 6
bbc
How about the House of Commons are furloughed on 80% wage and then let’s see how quickly restrictions are lifted.
190
18/02/2021 16:29:09 3 1
bbc
Wish I got 80% of pay with no travel expenses and lunch expenses I would be better of and get some nice rest days.
367
19/02/2021 13:41:41 0 0
bbc
the teachers aren't furloughed they are just being paid the same to do less work - not quite the same comparison youre drawing is it
64
Bob
18/02/2021 15:28:59 18 4
bbc
The curriculum hasn't changed, so teachers should be continuing to teach that to the students.

Whether or not an exam takes place at the end is irrelevant.
98
18/02/2021 15:45:23 6 1
bbc
The teaching stays the same, but the hoops the teaching staff have to jump through behind the scenes varies widely depending on what evidence the government want to back up grade predictions. The March series exams haven't been cancelled so some kids will be sitting them next week having had no face to face teaching since Xmas!
127
Bob
18/02/2021 15:56:32 1 6
bbc
So what? If you are student why would you care? Prepare for the exam and if it doesn't take place consider it a bonus.
93
18/02/2021 15:43:12 2 2
bbc
Would you like us "To fight like hell"? I already volunteered my nephew Sid "Vicious" Bass-Tard for the trial on youngsters - even offered to sign the consent form - what more can I do?
99
18/02/2021 15:45:46 3 2
bbc
Jesus. What a freak.
108
18/02/2021 15:48:19 2 2
bbc
That has to be Blasphemy - you'll get Moderated!
94
sw
18/02/2021 15:43:26 5 2
bbc
Why are the covid rates for young children going up, if they are not mingling with other children.
100
18/02/2021 15:46:08 2 1
bbc
They are not going up. You do not understand statistics.
137
sw
18/02/2021 16:02:33 2 0
bbc
Today, "higher prevalence of covid in 5-11 year olds."