Warnings inflation could breach 2% target as prices rise
17/02/2021 | news | business | 701
Prices rose 0.7% in January in what some economists said could mark a first step in rising costs post-lockdown.
1
17/02/2021 10:10:41 85 44
bbc
inflation rose by 0.7% or to 0.7%?

This article makes it sound like a rise of 0.7%. Bad journalism again BBC
54
17/02/2021 10:27:32 63 46
bbc
“Inflation rose 0.7% in the 12 months to January”.

How is that difficult to read? Unless you’re one of those Project Reality denying BBC haters.
59
17/02/2021 10:28:10 18 9
bbc
"Inflation rose 0.7% in the 12 months to January, up from December's 0.6%, the Office for National Statistics said."

Literally the second line of the article, maybe try reading past the headline next time
124
17/02/2021 10:47:59 10 9
bbc
It just shows how many trolls come on here to hate the BBC without understanding English.
133
17/02/2021 10:49:32 2 9
bbc
or maybe its YOU
236
17/02/2021 11:10:53 5 10
bbc
Deliberately misleading. Part of the BBC's anti-government campaign.
282
17/02/2021 11:37:12 4 2
bbc
Yes they are wrong to word it like that as inflation is already a derivative - a rate of change of prices. Should be 'inflation is 0.7%' OR 'prices rise by 0.7% over the year'. They're making it into a second derivative, effectively! Very misleading.

Don't their economics reporters have to have at least a basic understanding of the maths behind these things?
673
17/02/2021 22:48:42 0 0
bbc
If you don’t like it why are you here? Masochism your thing?
2
17/02/2021 10:12:19 8 13
bbc
Food and furniture have not gone up in price, this is a pointless story.
Maybe if one specifically looks for high end items, but definitely not standard food and furniture.
3
17/02/2021 10:12:40 46 40
bbc
And the rate of inflation will get worse as prices increase due to the new indirect taxation the UK Gov has implemented for all EU imports. Customs duty is gong to cost us consumers a shed load. The cost of all that extra paperwork will be passed on to us. Thanks Brexiters, you claim you knew what you were voting for. Fact is you didn't know the difference between a FTA and the SM & CU.
Congratulations, on making yourself look a total pillock.

Keep crying those salty remoaner tears you loser.
Removed
56
17/02/2021 10:27:47 16 7
bbc
Good to see remoaners still moaning...
64
17/02/2021 10:28:56 9 1
bbc
"Some analysts warned on Wednesday that inflation could exceed the Bank of England's 2% target by the end of 2021."

And there you have it, MAYBE to 2% by the end of the year
68
17/02/2021 10:30:46 11 5
bbc
The increase in international shipping costs significantly outweighs any paperwork / Brexit effect, but don't let that get in the way of your blinkered vision...
69
17/02/2021 10:30:52 10 11
bbc
I thought it was all Project Fear? Who’d have thunk that increasing red tape and bureaucracy would lead to increased inflation EVEN during the greatest pandemic this country’s ever seen? Be proud, berxits!
149
17/02/2021 10:54:05 14 2
bbc
We Export more than 8 Artics of equipment a week to france and 3 To Germany - Do not belive this Rubbish - Yes they is a bit of paperwork but its a bit and takes about 10min per wagon - Total Scare tatics and voted to stay in
156
17/02/2021 10:56:14 8 0
bbc
As uncertainty around BREXIT has reduced, the Sterling exchange rates are improving from the point of view of UK consumers buying imported goods. This will slow inflation. The only real barriers between UK&EU for UK or EU origin materials are "technical" paperwork, not any changes in custom duties.
4
17/02/2021 10:12:41 15 8
bbc
If you were in NI you would have seen food prices rising approx. 10% between Dec and Jan (as well as a whole raft of supply issues). Many items which are still available have in fact doubled in price.
12
17/02/2021 10:18:06 6 28
bbc
Most English don’t even know where NI is, or care.
566
17/02/2021 15:32:16 0 0
bbc
can you give some examples then, I checked the supermarket online prices in NI and it didnt reflect this.
5
17/02/2021 10:12:54 16 20
bbc
So food went up in January? Stand up anyone who didn't see that one coming? Sit down Boris!

Furniture offering smaller than usual discounts? Didn't notice on the DFS ads, but I wasn't really paying attention, as I was focused more on the total mess Boris was making of Covid & Brexit again !

Still waiting for my G&T with peanuts, Mr Gove????
Poor bitter remoaner, get over yourself Removed
6
17/02/2021 10:13:03 56 14
bbc
No surprise fuel is going up, as there are more cars on the road than ever. Lockdown!! Where?
19
17/02/2021 10:19:53 34 6
bbc
Certainly no lockdown in Surrey, the roads are rammed
45
17/02/2021 10:25:38 4 4
bbc
So what are YOU doing on the roads then ?
72
17/02/2021 10:31:22 5 4
bbc
My morning commute has gone from 30-40 mins pre-covid to 15 mins. not sure where you are but there's no traffic here
181
Bob
17/02/2021 11:05:08 4 0
bbc
Traffic levels during the pandemic is being continually published.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/transport-use-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-pandemic

Latest data shows 53% of normal volume for car traffic.
375
17/02/2021 11:56:52 0 1
bbc
switch to EV
7
17/02/2021 10:13:09 26 28
bbc
Wait until the effects of Brexit start properly kicking in because of increased trading costs.
21
17/02/2021 10:20:16 1 5
bbc
Yes, by all means wait.

"Some analysts warned on Wednesday that inflation could exceed the Bank of England's 2% target by the end of 2021."
Cry me a salty river you poor bitter remoaner Removed
49
mjb
17/02/2021 10:26:35 3 0
bbc
and the strengthening pound will take care of that....
8
17/02/2021 10:13:29 6 7
bbc
Must be a mirage.

We had the "economists" telling us no chance of inflation for years due to situation and hence interest rates etc.

Despite the massive fiddling that has gone on and ignoring it to boost house prices we all know inflation is bigger due to our own experience over the past year.

Doesn't matter if it goes above BOE target it was for 2 years and they just ignore it.
27
17/02/2021 10:21:23 3 1
bbc
No they don't! The Governor of the BoE has to write a letter to the Chancellor explaining why it's above target, what the Bank is doing to bring it down & how long it will take!??
9
PJB
17/02/2021 10:14:27 11 10
bbc
Inflation up, GDP down, the perfect recipe for stagflation a la 1970's - watch out Rishi (and the rest of us).
39
mjb
17/02/2021 10:24:48 5 4
bbc
no, stagflation was caused as Unions demanding wage increases outstripping productivity gains. Hence more money, less product, hence Stagflation.
your welcome......
61
17/02/2021 10:28:20 1 1
bbc
We've been in stagflation since 2008. However hard the govt try to hide that, we all feel it in the weekly shop. And try buying a house...
10
17/02/2021 10:16:24 35 9
bbc
So, we are 65% BELOW the BoE plan for inflation...
18
17/02/2021 10:19:51 10 19
bbc
No, it's the Govt's inflation target, not the BoE's! ??
11
17/02/2021 10:17:53 158 50
bbc
Using a 1 month data point & then calling it a driver of a bigger issue is not only inaccurate it’s misleading. Prices go up & down all the time, especially in a crisis & over the festive period, it’s the trend over several months / years that matters. Where are the numbers for Jul thro’ Nov, include those in the analysis & it might well show something completely different.

Sloppy journalism BBC!
154
17/02/2021 10:55:19 63 31
bbc
The cost of shipping is going through the roof, all governments are printing monopoly money to cover rocketing debt, consumers locked at home have a built the largest treasure chest of savings ever seen.....

Inflation is coming big style and the only tool to beat it is high interest rates. Buy gold, sell housing, step away from the markets.
165
Bob
17/02/2021 11:01:40 8 2
bbc
Inflation is year-on-year, but reported monthly. So festive periods and the sales that ensue are accounted for.

And as for crises, that's exactly why monthly reporting is useful as you see the effect sooner.
175
17/02/2021 10:58:40 20 1
bbc
If you bother to read the article, it clearly says "Inflation rose 0.7% in the 12 months to January, up from December's 0.6%, the Office for National Statistics said."

The BBC Journalists are QUOTING what the OFFICE FOR NATIONAL STATISTICS have said.

So I would suggest you take your gripe up with the ONS not the BBC who have accurately quoted what the ONS has said.
200
17/02/2021 11:08:59 4 16
bbc
Not sloppy. Deliberately misleading.
203
17/02/2021 11:10:53 21 5
bbc
0.7% inflation, luxury.

Try 25% as it was in the 70s but when you tell the youth of today, they won't believe you.
259
17/02/2021 11:28:02 3 0
bbc
Prices may go up and down... but there has been a marked reduction in promotional activity and price competition in the Supermarkets correlated with their increased significance in all our lives and many competitors unable to open.

No wonder they are making record profits and had to be shamed into returning Rates Holiday money and now are asking for reductions 'to save bricks retail'.
285
17/02/2021 11:38:40 1 6
bbc
Sloppy journalism that sounds like the BBC
334
17/02/2021 11:43:23 2 1
bbc
Biden first week in office he stoped a vital oil pipeline being built and stoped fracking.

Oil prices around the world have risen since and prices at the pumps.

This is reason bbc could report truth for once.

Americans are suffering the most but you get what vote for.

They are currently using chemicals made from oil to try de ice wind turbines in texas America were there minus 18.
343
17/02/2021 11:56:02 4 1
bbc
There are real supply side issues, huge national debt, massive unemployment looming and the printing of money. We face a serious risk of stagflation. I would love to be optimistic but the future is not bright.
376
17/02/2021 11:57:21 1 3
bbc
it is called 'spin'. The concern I have is, who is behind this?
512
17/02/2021 13:47:44 4 0
bbc
As others are pointing out, inflation figures year-on-year, but reported monthly. Neither the BBC nor other news outlets, nor the ONS are saying prices rose 0.7% in January.

If you must comment on here, try to do so from a position of knowledge, not ignorance.

Sloppy thinking, PF!
528
17/02/2021 14:02:36 3 0
bbc
Not surprised you were only a Private - zero understanding of inflation calculation .God help us .
556
17/02/2021 15:01:05 0 0
bbc
“Inflation rose 0.7% in the 12 months to January, up from December's 0.6%.”

—-

Using a single decimal place that’s the smallest fluctuation possible. And it does fluctuate from month to month.
632
17/02/2021 18:13:27 0 2
bbc
Greater inflation is the consequence of the additional costs imposed by Brexit.
I'm afraid you believed what was on the side of the Bus.
PS Look at the graph for the answer to your question.
4
17/02/2021 10:12:41 15 8
bbc
If you were in NI you would have seen food prices rising approx. 10% between Dec and Jan (as well as a whole raft of supply issues). Many items which are still available have in fact doubled in price.
12
17/02/2021 10:18:06 6 28
bbc
Most English don’t even know where NI is, or care.
62
17/02/2021 10:28:32 4 0
bbc
Speak for yourself.
3
17/02/2021 10:12:40 46 40
bbc
And the rate of inflation will get worse as prices increase due to the new indirect taxation the UK Gov has implemented for all EU imports. Customs duty is gong to cost us consumers a shed load. The cost of all that extra paperwork will be passed on to us. Thanks Brexiters, you claim you knew what you were voting for. Fact is you didn't know the difference between a FTA and the SM & CU.
Congratulations, on making yourself look a total pillock.

Keep crying those salty remoaner tears you loser.
Removed
57
17/02/2021 10:27:54 8 2
bbc
Why? It is a matter of public record that importers may be trading without quota or tariffs, but they are now subject to import duties and customs charges. The UK Gov is the sole beneficiary of that income. For that the haulers have to fill out a shed load of paperwork which costs a shed load of money and the time to process has shot up. All that will ultimately be paid for by the consumer.
14
17/02/2021 10:18:43 27 8
bbc
So inflation MIGHT get over 2%.

Not exactly hyper-inflation, as some on here 'predicted'.
29
17/02/2021 10:21:57 24 8
bbc
Exactly.

Yet another "prediction" that's failed to happen. These bitter removers are really being made to look pathetic
55
17/02/2021 10:27:34 3 3
bbc
Not hyper-inflation in the official numbers. But look at how house prices and share prices have gone up. By FAR more than the official inflation numbers suggest.
15
17/02/2021 10:18:57 14 4
bbc
Inflation might rise - or it might not.
677
17/02/2021 22:54:38 0 0
bbc
To keep the capitalist system going it’s twin catalysts of inflation and greed continuously need to be there. It doesn’t work otherwise.
5
17/02/2021 10:12:54 16 20
bbc
So food went up in January? Stand up anyone who didn't see that one coming? Sit down Boris!

Furniture offering smaller than usual discounts? Didn't notice on the DFS ads, but I wasn't really paying attention, as I was focused more on the total mess Boris was making of Covid & Brexit again !

Still waiting for my G&T with peanuts, Mr Gove????
Poor bitter remoaner, get over yourself Removed
17
17/02/2021 10:19:39 9 15
bbc
Brexit comes at a cost. Expect inflation to rise.
33
17/02/2021 10:22:58 8 3
bbc
Still waiting for your bitter removers predictions to come true. Guess I will have a long time to wait
51
17/02/2021 10:26:50 1 0
bbc
It's clearly come at a cost to some people regarding their ability to think rationally, rather than hysterically.
Brexit Derangement Syndrome is certainly debilitating in that manner.
10
17/02/2021 10:16:24 35 9
bbc
So, we are 65% BELOW the BoE plan for inflation...
18
17/02/2021 10:19:51 10 19
bbc
No, it's the Govt's inflation target, not the BoE's! ??
37
17/02/2021 10:24:41 7 0
bbc
The government set the target, the BoE attempt to meet the target
6
17/02/2021 10:13:03 56 14
bbc
No surprise fuel is going up, as there are more cars on the road than ever. Lockdown!! Where?
19
17/02/2021 10:19:53 34 6
bbc
Certainly no lockdown in Surrey, the roads are rammed
209
17/02/2021 11:13:15 1 0
bbc
They have plenty of moner down in Surrey. Not so many cruising the streets where I live.
20
17/02/2021 10:20:06 105 5
bbc
"Inflation: Food and furniture costs drive inflation higher"

That's because all there is to do now is sit on your settee and eat.
315
17/02/2021 11:47:51 14 48
bbc
Inflation is good.
7
17/02/2021 10:13:09 26 28
bbc
Wait until the effects of Brexit start properly kicking in because of increased trading costs.
21
17/02/2021 10:20:16 1 5
bbc
Yes, by all means wait.

"Some analysts warned on Wednesday that inflation could exceed the Bank of England's 2% target by the end of 2021."
7
17/02/2021 10:13:09 26 28
bbc
Wait until the effects of Brexit start properly kicking in because of increased trading costs.
Cry me a salty river you poor bitter remoaner Removed
23
17/02/2021 10:20:26 6 5
bbc
The coming boom already signalled by the Bank of England will push inflation up sharply. Our manufacturing base is now so small that we depend upon imports for most of our needs. If only we could live off the fruits of financial advisers . . . but we can't.
Once the boomlet turns to bust next year, chickens are really coming going to flock home to roost.
47
17/02/2021 10:25:50 3 0
bbc
Down ere in the West Contry oi don' know if moi 'ens are comin' or goin' either.
113
17/02/2021 10:43:38 1 0
bbc
UK is the 7th largest manufacturing economy in the world.

That's something the left refuses to acknowledge.
24
17/02/2021 10:20:46 35 5
bbc
Food prices have risen dramatically since the start of the pandemic. Supermarkets are providing less choice and charging much more particularly for the basics of dairy, vegetables and meat. Also we are seeing the disgraceful conduct of manufacturers keeping container sizes the same but having less in them. This is particularly the case with washing liquid and fabric conditioner.
114
17/02/2021 10:45:01 18 3
bbc
I've seen no such thing. If anything, some items are even cheaper (broccoli 49p vs 70p all last year, cucumbers 39p vs 60p).
263
17/02/2021 11:28:55 3 0
bbc
Certainly appear to be far fewer offers around in supermarkets
331
17/02/2021 11:53:13 1 0
bbc
Some things have gone up, some things have gone down.
It depends what your buying.
430
17/02/2021 12:28:19 0 0
bbc
What's fabric conditioner for?
644
17/02/2021 18:37:00 0 0
bbc
Vegetables more competitive; don’t eat dairy or red meat. I have had to buy a smaller, and therefore, poorer value, bottle of w/up liquid, possibly because manufacture of some goods was switched to deal with shortages.
25
17/02/2021 10:21:01 5 1
bbc
0.7% inflation isn't a worry, below 2% isn't worrying.

BUT, I am getting nervous. At an age where retirement is on the horizon I will be dependent on pension/savings I worry a bit that inflation take off, will make me poor in retirement, rather like it did for people born early 20th century who were dependent on savings and retired before the 70s inflation.

Hopefully it won't.
48
17/02/2021 10:26:05 4 1
bbc
Inflation took off over 10 years ago when the printing presses were put into overdrive. You only feel it in the cost of living, not within the official numbers.
26
17/02/2021 10:21:20 12 5
bbc
CPI is deliberately manipulated to be low by the government/ONS it does no represent inflation for the average person which is much higher.
128
17/02/2021 10:49:07 5 4
bbc
Utter nonsense.
CPI is EXACTLY what the average person sees minus housing costs - it's the inflation seen when shopping.
8
17/02/2021 10:13:29 6 7
bbc
Must be a mirage.

We had the "economists" telling us no chance of inflation for years due to situation and hence interest rates etc.

Despite the massive fiddling that has gone on and ignoring it to boost house prices we all know inflation is bigger due to our own experience over the past year.

Doesn't matter if it goes above BOE target it was for 2 years and they just ignore it.
27
17/02/2021 10:21:23 3 1
bbc
No they don't! The Governor of the BoE has to write a letter to the Chancellor explaining why it's above target, what the Bank is doing to bring it down & how long it will take!??
28
17/02/2021 10:18:42 3 8
bbc
Dont forget the price of everything bought outside of the uk has increased 20% now
130
17/02/2021 10:49:23 0 1
bbc
No it hasn't.
14
17/02/2021 10:18:43 27 8
bbc
So inflation MIGHT get over 2%.

Not exactly hyper-inflation, as some on here 'predicted'.
29
17/02/2021 10:21:57 24 8
bbc
Exactly.

Yet another "prediction" that's failed to happen. These bitter removers are really being made to look pathetic
311
17/02/2021 11:46:29 1 2
bbc
It's a January figure. Since Leavers love WWII analogies, that's like saying there was no problem for the UK during the "phoney war" of late 1939.
540
Pip
17/02/2021 14:24:23 1 0
bbc
Just a tad early for that assumption, methinks............?
30
mjb
17/02/2021 10:22:11 15 8
bbc
food prices rose by 0.7% ?
That's not what the 'experts' predicted is it...
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-46439969
another Project Fear Pillar knocked down.....
96
17/02/2021 10:38:17 3 1
bbc
Read the article you linked to. Negotiating a deal before we before (the one agreed on xmas eve) is not a 'disorderly Brexit'.
31
17/02/2021 10:22:11 32 6
bbc
Every day I view items online coming from quality companies and see spelling or keying errors. The first chart in this article has an absurd and very obvious error. The originator has done a poor job as has the proof reader and neither of them seem to be aware that mistakes of this nature are always highlighted by spell checkers. Poor work BBC.
98
17/02/2021 10:38:48 4 6
bbc
Explain please
153
17/02/2021 10:42:58 3 1
bbc
dont think the beeb have proof readers.
32
17/02/2021 10:22:35 3 8
bbc
If you believe what comes out of ONS then you must believe in flying elephants or for that matter pigs.
ONS figures have no bearing on the reality, figures are made up to suite the government in power.
44
17/02/2021 10:25:32 7 2
bbc
I sincerely hope tin foil doesn't end up costing too much - you'll just have to stay under your bed without the hat
58
17/02/2021 10:27:56 4 0
bbc
Yeah, like all experts, they're a waste of time. Better to get Fred down the pub to do your dentistry and Mavis next door to rewire your home.
17
17/02/2021 10:19:39 9 15
bbc
Brexit comes at a cost. Expect inflation to rise.
33
17/02/2021 10:22:58 8 3
bbc
Still waiting for your bitter removers predictions to come true. Guess I will have a long time to wait
34
17/02/2021 10:23:07 9 6
bbc
Speak to anyone in logistics and the cost of shipping is now more than 4x prices in 2019. The shipping cost has not been passed on as shipping companies are still running old contracts. But as sure as night follows day the cost of most things will steadily increase over next month's/ years. I wouldn't be surprised to see inflation over 5% within couple of years
85
17/02/2021 10:35:35 2 1
bbc
Excellent
93
17/02/2021 10:37:25 1 2
bbc
I agree, Brexiters failed to realize the difference between an FTA & the Single Market & Customs Union. Even now, they are in denial & will continue to be so. Some have now gone from saying its teething troubles & they were expected for the first few weeks, to saying that we won't really see any benefits for several years. What happened to the easiest deal in history, was it just a Liam Fox lie?
94
17/02/2021 10:37:42 2 0
bbc
No it isn't. We are paying similar rates now to what we paid in 2019.
35
17/02/2021 10:23:37 13 5
bbc
Food is rising also by, reduced packaging. Many items reduced in weight. The 10/15 gram reductions add up. Ultimately buying more frequently. Does that come into the equation?
102
17/02/2021 10:34:07 8 2
bbc
no.thats called capitalism.taking advantage of the situation.same old.same old.
106
17/02/2021 10:40:30 0 0
bbc
Yes, the ONS takes so-called "shrinkflation" into account.
302
17/02/2021 11:43:36 0 0
bbc
A few minutes on Google would have told you that the answer is yes, the ONS takes "shrinkflation" into account.
36
17/02/2021 10:24:14 10 2
bbc
Can we clear up what look like two popular misconceptions already?

1. It's the Govt's inflation target, not the BoE's!

2. If inflation goes above the 2% target, the Governor of the BoE has to write a letter to the Chancellor explaining why it's above target, what the Bank is doing to bring it down & how long it will take!
63
17/02/2021 10:28:50 10 0
bbc
Actually the Governor has to write a letter if the inflation rate is more than 1% from target be it up or down
18
17/02/2021 10:19:51 10 19
bbc
No, it's the Govt's inflation target, not the BoE's! ??
37
17/02/2021 10:24:41 7 0
bbc
The government set the target, the BoE attempt to meet the target
38
17/02/2021 10:24:46 75 20
bbc
Inflation is 1.3% BELOW the BoE target rate.

Still nothing to see here.
380
17/02/2021 12:08:44 10 3
bbc
Not quite nothing. As stated in the article, governments like some inflation to help stimulate growth. It also reduces the size of its debt pile. The current rate is well below the target. Currently under-achieving whereas the article is warning of going over the target.
9
PJB
17/02/2021 10:14:27 11 10
bbc
Inflation up, GDP down, the perfect recipe for stagflation a la 1970's - watch out Rishi (and the rest of us).
39
mjb
17/02/2021 10:24:48 5 4
bbc
no, stagflation was caused as Unions demanding wage increases outstripping productivity gains. Hence more money, less product, hence Stagflation.
your welcome......
66
PJB
17/02/2021 10:29:44 0 1
bbc
Actually it's probably worse because the above figures indicate demand for essentials remains strong so prices will continue to rise.
40
17/02/2021 10:24:55 9 5
bbc
Money printing (QE) drives inflation higher. Official measures (CPI, RPI) try to pretend that isn't really the case.
131
17/02/2021 10:49:29 5 0
bbc
In textbook theory, maybe.
In practice, since 2008 QE has "printed" a staggering £875 billion (nearly half of UK annual income) without inflation taking off.
Even if you don't believe the obscuring averages of CPI/RPI, the prices of bread bananas beer or barbers haven't moved much.
167
17/02/2021 11:01:55 1 2
bbc
'Money printing (QE) drives inflation higher.' ah that old chestnut. No it doesnt.
41
17/02/2021 10:25:05 57 5
bbc
You might think this is bad but wait until you get your Council Tax bill as it is rumoured there are going to be huge increases. They recon a Band D property on average is going to see a £250 increase over the year. The pound in our pocket is gets smaller by the day.
100
17/02/2021 10:39:06 29 3
bbc
Where I live Band D gone up by £184, a 4.99% increase.
132
17/02/2021 10:49:31 8 1
bbc
Yes
As certain as the annual income tax bill is the rise in council tax.
Hard as I try, I cannot see any improvements in service over and above inflationary costs.
My council (district in particular) come up with inventive ways to beat tax caps.
The latest was a whopping £65 per annum charge to cut council owned grass.
I'll never forget the 19% increase imposed some years ago.
Legalised robbery.
316
17/02/2021 11:48:10 9 0
bbc
I've never seen a council tax bill be lowered but the services actually offered (unless you're Billy or Betty Benefit and brood) disappear every year. Where in God's name does the money go?
346
17/02/2021 11:58:18 6 0
bbc
£2k from net pay is a huge tax burden now, plus they seem to have authority to bolt on another 5% every year now.
369
17/02/2021 11:56:40 2 1
bbc
council tax the big mansions
579
17/02/2021 15:57:50 2 0
bbc
Council tax increase = pay more, get less, a lot less.
42
PJB
17/02/2021 10:25:07 129 8
bbc
Just wait for your council tax letter to drop onto the mat and see how much they think inflation is - and then sit down to recover.
76
17/02/2021 10:32:39 123 17
bbc
My council tax (last year) was £1400 (and that's with single person discount). 30 years ago rates £200. 7 fold increase. Roughly 3 fold increase in wages.

Its a big barrier to retirement. A big chunk out of many people's pensions.

Its a very unfair tax, disproportionate on the low paid. Be far better to add 2p or so to income tax.
218
17/02/2021 11:16:08 9 2
bbc
PJB,

The problem isn't Council Tax per se, it is the lack of realistic upward banding. Band H, the highest band includes large executive homes all the way up to mansions and palatial estates. If there were bands above Band H then the very few most wealthy would make a larger contribution but the Tory Party is funded by those people who own those mansions so don't expect a change.
365
17/02/2021 11:55:16 1 4
bbc
watch the BBC tv licence cost more
492
17/02/2021 13:16:00 1 0
bbc
And then look at the breakdown of where its spent, that will make you cry. We can all vote with our feet and live as travellers if we wish with no fixed abode - no council tax then!
43
17/02/2021 10:25:16 42 8
bbc
Cauliflower prices rose after Christmas.
Well there's a shock, as they always rise after a spell of hard frost ruins some of the crop.
No discounts on furniture is no surprise either, as profit margins need to be maintained due to significant reductions in turnover.

Wake me up when there's a SIGNIFICANT movement in inflation, not 0.1%...
208
17/02/2021 11:12:31 8 3
bbc
Here in France cauliflower prices have gone down since Christmas.
215
17/02/2021 11:14:53 0 0
bbc
Seven times that - 0.7%.
32
17/02/2021 10:22:35 3 8
bbc
If you believe what comes out of ONS then you must believe in flying elephants or for that matter pigs.
ONS figures have no bearing on the reality, figures are made up to suite the government in power.
44
17/02/2021 10:25:32 7 2
bbc
I sincerely hope tin foil doesn't end up costing too much - you'll just have to stay under your bed without the hat
6
17/02/2021 10:13:03 56 14
bbc
No surprise fuel is going up, as there are more cars on the road than ever. Lockdown!! Where?
45
17/02/2021 10:25:38 4 4
bbc
So what are YOU doing on the roads then ?
46
17/02/2021 10:25:40 10 5
bbc
'...sellers of furniture and other household goods offered smaller-than-usual New Year discounts.'

The devil's in the detail but don't let it get in the way of a good story.
As usual.
53
Bob
17/02/2021 10:27:26 2 0
bbc
I could buy furniture for less money during the same period last year than this year - yes or no?
23
17/02/2021 10:20:26 6 5
bbc
The coming boom already signalled by the Bank of England will push inflation up sharply. Our manufacturing base is now so small that we depend upon imports for most of our needs. If only we could live off the fruits of financial advisers . . . but we can't.
Once the boomlet turns to bust next year, chickens are really coming going to flock home to roost.
47
17/02/2021 10:25:50 3 0
bbc
Down ere in the West Contry oi don' know if moi 'ens are comin' or goin' either.
25
17/02/2021 10:21:01 5 1
bbc
0.7% inflation isn't a worry, below 2% isn't worrying.

BUT, I am getting nervous. At an age where retirement is on the horizon I will be dependent on pension/savings I worry a bit that inflation take off, will make me poor in retirement, rather like it did for people born early 20th century who were dependent on savings and retired before the 70s inflation.

Hopefully it won't.
48
17/02/2021 10:26:05 4 1
bbc
Inflation took off over 10 years ago when the printing presses were put into overdrive. You only feel it in the cost of living, not within the official numbers.
7
17/02/2021 10:13:09 26 28
bbc
Wait until the effects of Brexit start properly kicking in because of increased trading costs.
49
mjb
17/02/2021 10:26:35 3 0
bbc
and the strengthening pound will take care of that....
80
17/02/2021 10:33:45 0 0
bbc
The strengthening pound will make whatever we try to sell even more expensive.
97
17/02/2021 10:38:36 0 0
bbc
Indeed.
Up by 6% against the Euro in 2 months.

I note the BBC is now removing comments noting the obsessive behaviour of Remoaners (not remainers), WITHOUT notifying the person making the post, thus removing any means of appeal.
This is blatantly taking a political position by a supposedly neutral news source.
50
17/02/2021 10:26:47 2 10
bbc
Just another Brexit bonus...
65
17/02/2021 10:29:34 7 0
bbc
Nothing to do with Brexit. QE. Has been since 2008. Just most people are too blind to see it.
17
17/02/2021 10:19:39 9 15
bbc
Brexit comes at a cost. Expect inflation to rise.
51
17/02/2021 10:26:50 1 0
bbc
It's clearly come at a cost to some people regarding their ability to think rationally, rather than hysterically.
Brexit Derangement Syndrome is certainly debilitating in that manner.
52
17/02/2021 10:27:02 4 7
bbc
Impact of Brexs*it is highly likely to push up inflation due to increased shipping rela tedcosts/delays etc as well as reduction in suppliers in the market. Expect it to be around 1.5%/2% by the end of the year.
78
17/02/2021 10:32:51 1 0
bbc
So expect it to be around the BoE target then?
502
17/02/2021 13:29:24 0 0
bbc
The impact of Remains*it would have ensured the deaths of many thousands due to the execrable mess they made of securing & distributing vaccines.
Shipping cost increases are global, nothing to do with leaving the EU.
There's been an INCREASE in suppliers, as several African companies are taking advantage of no longer being blocked by the EU.
46
17/02/2021 10:25:40 10 5
bbc
'...sellers of furniture and other household goods offered smaller-than-usual New Year discounts.'

The devil's in the detail but don't let it get in the way of a good story.
As usual.
53
Bob
17/02/2021 10:27:26 2 0
bbc
I could buy furniture for less money during the same period last year than this year - yes or no?
1
17/02/2021 10:10:41 85 44
bbc
inflation rose by 0.7% or to 0.7%?

This article makes it sound like a rise of 0.7%. Bad journalism again BBC
54
17/02/2021 10:27:32 63 46
bbc
“Inflation rose 0.7% in the 12 months to January”.

How is that difficult to read? Unless you’re one of those Project Reality denying BBC haters.
Because it should read "rose to 0.7%". Just wanting the BBC to write in decent English so it can be clearly understood.

Just because someone highlights the falling standards at the BBC doesn't make them a hater!
117
17/02/2021 10:45:25 7 6
bbc
As the inflation rate in January 2020 was 1.8% if it rose by 0.7% in 12 months to January 2021 current rate would be 2.5%
121
17/02/2021 10:47:00 2 1
bbc
So much bitching! Politeness costs nothing?
235
17/02/2021 11:10:21 4 4
bbc
You obviously have a limited grasp of English.
700
18/02/2021 15:55:58 0 0
bbc
Or one of the BBC EU-loving Remoaners.
14
17/02/2021 10:18:43 27 8
bbc
So inflation MIGHT get over 2%.

Not exactly hyper-inflation, as some on here 'predicted'.
55
17/02/2021 10:27:34 3 3
bbc
Not hyper-inflation in the official numbers. But look at how house prices and share prices have gone up. By FAR more than the official inflation numbers suggest.
110
17/02/2021 10:41:58 4 0
bbc
What part do share prices play in RPI/CPI?

I suggest a quick, remedial course in economics.
3
17/02/2021 10:12:40 46 40
bbc
And the rate of inflation will get worse as prices increase due to the new indirect taxation the UK Gov has implemented for all EU imports. Customs duty is gong to cost us consumers a shed load. The cost of all that extra paperwork will be passed on to us. Thanks Brexiters, you claim you knew what you were voting for. Fact is you didn't know the difference between a FTA and the SM & CU.
56
17/02/2021 10:27:47 16 7
bbc
Good to see remoaners still moaning...
Congratulations, on making yourself look a total pillock.

Keep crying those salty remoaner tears you loser.
Removed
57
17/02/2021 10:27:54 8 2
bbc
Why? It is a matter of public record that importers may be trading without quota or tariffs, but they are now subject to import duties and customs charges. The UK Gov is the sole beneficiary of that income. For that the haulers have to fill out a shed load of paperwork which costs a shed load of money and the time to process has shot up. All that will ultimately be paid for by the consumer.
70
17/02/2021 10:31:00 5 2
bbc
No they're not. Stop posting nonsense. Import duties ARE tariffs...
32
17/02/2021 10:22:35 3 8
bbc
If you believe what comes out of ONS then you must believe in flying elephants or for that matter pigs.
ONS figures have no bearing on the reality, figures are made up to suite the government in power.
58
17/02/2021 10:27:56 4 0
bbc
Yeah, like all experts, they're a waste of time. Better to get Fred down the pub to do your dentistry and Mavis next door to rewire your home.
1
17/02/2021 10:10:41 85 44
bbc
inflation rose by 0.7% or to 0.7%?

This article makes it sound like a rise of 0.7%. Bad journalism again BBC
59
17/02/2021 10:28:10 18 9
bbc
"Inflation rose 0.7% in the 12 months to January, up from December's 0.6%, the Office for National Statistics said."

Literally the second line of the article, maybe try reading past the headline next time
290
17/02/2021 11:40:04 2 2
bbc
that line was not in the original release of the article when i commented
545
Bob
17/02/2021 14:34:54 2 0
bbc
You realise that line is the very line they are questioning?

It *is* an ambiguous sentence. It can easily be read in many different ways. It can be read as increasing 0.7% from the previous position of 0.6%, meaning either it is now 1.3% (0.7+0.6) or 0.6042% (0.7% of 0.6% added to 0.6%).

Alternatively it can mean it rose *to* 0.7%. Which is the actual answer.
60
17/02/2021 10:28:16 12 1
bbc
Well if they include a bunch of roses in the February data, expect a surge in inflation. Then a massive drop in March.
91
NGB
17/02/2021 10:37:12 2 1
bbc
No,as it's a year on year change.
9
PJB
17/02/2021 10:14:27 11 10
bbc
Inflation up, GDP down, the perfect recipe for stagflation a la 1970's - watch out Rishi (and the rest of us).
61
17/02/2021 10:28:20 1 1
bbc
We've been in stagflation since 2008. However hard the govt try to hide that, we all feel it in the weekly shop. And try buying a house...
81
PJB
17/02/2021 10:33:49 0 1
bbc
Not comparable yet to the 70's when the annual rate climbed to well above 20%, but your point is valid.
105
17/02/2021 10:39:59 0 0
bbc
I suggest you check the UK's productivity in that time - we have assuredly NOT been in stagflation.
12
17/02/2021 10:18:06 6 28
bbc
Most English don’t even know where NI is, or care.
62
17/02/2021 10:28:32 4 0
bbc
Speak for yourself.
36
17/02/2021 10:24:14 10 2
bbc
Can we clear up what look like two popular misconceptions already?

1. It's the Govt's inflation target, not the BoE's!

2. If inflation goes above the 2% target, the Governor of the BoE has to write a letter to the Chancellor explaining why it's above target, what the Bank is doing to bring it down & how long it will take!
63
17/02/2021 10:28:50 10 0
bbc
Actually the Governor has to write a letter if the inflation rate is more than 1% from target be it up or down
628
17/02/2021 17:47:43 0 0
bbc
I can remember back to the early 70's, Government or BoE has always been crap at managing inflation. We don't seem to have the boom bust phases anymore though. odd?
3
17/02/2021 10:12:40 46 40
bbc
And the rate of inflation will get worse as prices increase due to the new indirect taxation the UK Gov has implemented for all EU imports. Customs duty is gong to cost us consumers a shed load. The cost of all that extra paperwork will be passed on to us. Thanks Brexiters, you claim you knew what you were voting for. Fact is you didn't know the difference between a FTA and the SM & CU.
64
17/02/2021 10:28:56 9 1
bbc
"Some analysts warned on Wednesday that inflation could exceed the Bank of England's 2% target by the end of 2021."

And there you have it, MAYBE to 2% by the end of the year
50
17/02/2021 10:26:47 2 10
bbc
Just another Brexit bonus...
65
17/02/2021 10:29:34 7 0
bbc
Nothing to do with Brexit. QE. Has been since 2008. Just most people are too blind to see it.
39
mjb
17/02/2021 10:24:48 5 4
bbc
no, stagflation was caused as Unions demanding wage increases outstripping productivity gains. Hence more money, less product, hence Stagflation.
your welcome......
66
PJB
17/02/2021 10:29:44 0 1
bbc
Actually it's probably worse because the above figures indicate demand for essentials remains strong so prices will continue to rise.
67
17/02/2021 10:29:53 84 12
bbc
I don't have much to add to the topic as economics isn't my strong suit.

What I think I CAN predict with some accuracy, is that by this afternoon this thread will have descended into the usual borefest in which half the comments are either "Thanks Brexiteers :(" followed up by "stop crying Remoaner", or something involving "bungling Boris/BoJo the Clown".

HYS should stand for Have Your Strop!
75
17/02/2021 10:32:35 47 16
bbc
Ironically you are complaining as well!
83
17/02/2021 10:35:02 5 6
bbc
thank for contributing with your personal brand of strop.
84
17/02/2021 10:35:24 9 0
bbc
I suspect you are right - certainly wouldn't bet against it........
92
17/02/2021 10:31:36 8 0
bbc
already started john
95
MVS
17/02/2021 10:38:05 12 0
bbc
I believe the BBC could do a much better job of moderating those puerile comments, so that these streams actually provided forums for grown -up discussions.
Removed
144
17/02/2021 10:51:53 5 5
bbc
Brexit has massively divided our country, the UK will be coughing and spluttering politically, economically and socially for many years to come.
166
17/02/2021 11:01:47 9 3
bbc
The moderators don't understand how offensive most of us find the comments you describe, I wish they'd delete the lot of them as they are absolutely useless and normally irrelevant.
206
17/02/2021 11:11:42 2 1
bbc
People need an outlet to vent their Ire.
367
17/02/2021 11:56:16 1 1
bbc
British economics is easy. inflate property prices. pay low wages and print money. Invest only in London
522
Pip
17/02/2021 14:01:48 0 0
bbc
This is the first one I've seen mention either, and that only in passing........?
3
17/02/2021 10:12:40 46 40
bbc
And the rate of inflation will get worse as prices increase due to the new indirect taxation the UK Gov has implemented for all EU imports. Customs duty is gong to cost us consumers a shed load. The cost of all that extra paperwork will be passed on to us. Thanks Brexiters, you claim you knew what you were voting for. Fact is you didn't know the difference between a FTA and the SM & CU.
68
17/02/2021 10:30:46 11 5
bbc
The increase in international shipping costs significantly outweighs any paperwork / Brexit effect, but don't let that get in the way of your blinkered vision...
3
17/02/2021 10:12:40 46 40
bbc
And the rate of inflation will get worse as prices increase due to the new indirect taxation the UK Gov has implemented for all EU imports. Customs duty is gong to cost us consumers a shed load. The cost of all that extra paperwork will be passed on to us. Thanks Brexiters, you claim you knew what you were voting for. Fact is you didn't know the difference between a FTA and the SM & CU.
69
17/02/2021 10:30:52 10 11
bbc
I thought it was all Project Fear? Who’d have thunk that increasing red tape and bureaucracy would lead to increased inflation EVEN during the greatest pandemic this country’s ever seen? Be proud, berxits!
57
17/02/2021 10:27:54 8 2
bbc
Why? It is a matter of public record that importers may be trading without quota or tariffs, but they are now subject to import duties and customs charges. The UK Gov is the sole beneficiary of that income. For that the haulers have to fill out a shed load of paperwork which costs a shed load of money and the time to process has shot up. All that will ultimately be paid for by the consumer.
70
17/02/2021 10:31:00 5 2
bbc
No they're not. Stop posting nonsense. Import duties ARE tariffs...
135
17/02/2021 10:50:49 5 5
bbc
Duties are not Quota limiting Tariffs. I suggest you read this: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claiming-preferential-rates-of-duty-between-the-uk-and-eu

The FTA signed by Johnson ensure Tariff Free Quota Free trade. It did not negate Customs Duties. This is why Brexiters can now get Duty Free on the ferry and think they're getting a good deal. More fool them.
71
17/02/2021 10:31:20 3 2
bbc
I'd like to see inflation rise dramatically to stop monetarist QE interference
6
17/02/2021 10:13:03 56 14
bbc
No surprise fuel is going up, as there are more cars on the road than ever. Lockdown!! Where?
72
17/02/2021 10:31:22 5 4
bbc
My morning commute has gone from 30-40 mins pre-covid to 15 mins. not sure where you are but there's no traffic here
630
17/02/2021 18:04:27 0 0
bbc
similar, early lockdown, commute was 60 mins and now could do it in 35mins, but go out during the day for shopping and the roads are crazy!! yes in Surrey
73
17/02/2021 10:31:34 26 7
bbc
Andy W
10:27
"Impact of Brexs*it is highly likely to push up inflation due to increased shipping rela tedcosts/delays etc as well as reduction in suppliers in the market. Expect it to be around 1.5%/2% by the end of the year."

So either under or on target then.
82
17/02/2021 10:33:49 17 15
bbc
But...but I thought we can produce anything we need here...we're self sufficient...we'll show them...
513
17/02/2021 13:50:51 1 3
bbc
Inflation is normally an indicator of heathly demand in an economy but in this case it would mostly be a direct impact of Brexs*it.
74
17/02/2021 10:32:21 6 4
bbc
The cost of shipping is going through the roof, all governments are printing monopoly money to cover rocketing debt, consumers locked at home have a built the largest treasure chest of savings ever seen.....

Inflation is coming big style and the only tool to beat it is high interest rates. Buy gold, sell housing, step away from the markets.
79
17/02/2021 10:33:41 2 1
bbc
Bring it on
342
17/02/2021 11:55:55 0 0
bbc
And if you take investment advice from "Big JC" on the Internet, you must be one smart investor.
67
17/02/2021 10:29:53 84 12
bbc
I don't have much to add to the topic as economics isn't my strong suit.

What I think I CAN predict with some accuracy, is that by this afternoon this thread will have descended into the usual borefest in which half the comments are either "Thanks Brexiteers :(" followed up by "stop crying Remoaner", or something involving "bungling Boris/BoJo the Clown".

HYS should stand for Have Your Strop!
75
17/02/2021 10:32:35 47 16
bbc
Ironically you are complaining as well!
42
PJB
17/02/2021 10:25:07 129 8
bbc
Just wait for your council tax letter to drop onto the mat and see how much they think inflation is - and then sit down to recover.
76
17/02/2021 10:32:39 123 17
bbc
My council tax (last year) was £1400 (and that's with single person discount). 30 years ago rates £200. 7 fold increase. Roughly 3 fold increase in wages.

Its a big barrier to retirement. A big chunk out of many people's pensions.

Its a very unfair tax, disproportionate on the low paid. Be far better to add 2p or so to income tax.
88
PJB
17/02/2021 10:36:26 16 3
bbc
Fair point but then try to keep councils on the straight and narrow - little or no accountability.
99
17/02/2021 10:38:58 35 4
bbc
The single person discount always makes me wonder. Council tax (according to the blurb on the website) is based on two people sharing a house. Why then, is the single person discount only 25%? Going further, if it is based on two people why does it not increase if more than two live in the house?
125
17/02/2021 10:48:24 10 8
bbc
Should taxes be based upon the ability to pay as opposed to 'Ransom' taxes?
179
17/02/2021 11:04:50 22 0
bbc
Maggie T tried the Poll Tax - and look what happened to that.
192
17/02/2021 11:06:59 14 1
bbc
Too many old people having to be looked after out of the Councils coffers. It's only going to get worse as the over 66's increase as a proportion of the population. Council cost of Social Services also rising faster than general inflation.
299
17/02/2021 11:42:31 5 1
bbc
Council tax income accounts for less than 15% of local spending . Local income tax would be fairer.
405
17/02/2021 12:20:10 2 3
bbc
That's because allot of the council tax rise is going to pay for the pensions of the council employees.
511
17/02/2021 13:47:29 0 1
bbc
The issue is local authority workers & bosses.highly inefficient at best.loads of old people too long in the tooth to accept change and sitting hoovering up tax payers money for doing a poor job.In the private sector they simply would not get away with it.Local authority should be run as if u are providing profit not hoarding cash till the year end then,wasting it so you get the same the next year
530
17/02/2021 14:04:17 0 0
bbc
Need to cut out the billions wasted by the public sector .
533
17/02/2021 14:11:30 0 0
bbc
Some years ago, before they entered a coalition govt with 'call me Dave' Cameron, the Lib Dems had a proposal for a local income tax based on income as opposed to property. Seemed a much fairer idea @ the time...Then along came Nick Clegg & sold it down the river, along with much else.
544
17/02/2021 14:32:29 0 0
bbc
When a new tax is introduced it's always at a lower level so it can be increased later. This causes less revolt people than if it were initially brought in at a higher rate. So it's not really a measure of inflation.
601
17/02/2021 17:01:30 1 0
bbc
Why is it "unfair" - does someone earning more get their bins emptied more frequently, do they get a nicer pavement to walk on, more books to take out of the library or do more police come round their house?

As it is CTax already only covers around half of council expenditure with the rest coming from income taxes etc.
617
17/02/2021 17:31:40 0 0
bbc
you pay more than me and I'm paying for 2, you must have a big house or be getting great services (ours aren't great)
639
17/02/2021 18:32:32 0 0
bbc
7-fold increase? Property prices have also risen by about this amount.
701
18/02/2021 16:00:47 0 0
bbc
Its based on your home NOT services used & those in more expensive homes pay a lot more for the same services a complete reversal of the initial concept that everyone should pay for the services they use. Low paid already massively subsidised in terms of public services paid for with tax as over 60% of UKs total income tax comes from those paying 40% (+) tax SOURCE HMRC & O.N.S.
77
17/02/2021 10:26:11 3 4
bbc
can see a real spike coming down the line.
52
17/02/2021 10:27:02 4 7
bbc
Impact of Brexs*it is highly likely to push up inflation due to increased shipping rela tedcosts/delays etc as well as reduction in suppliers in the market. Expect it to be around 1.5%/2% by the end of the year.
78
17/02/2021 10:32:51 1 0
bbc
So expect it to be around the BoE target then?
74
17/02/2021 10:32:21 6 4
bbc
The cost of shipping is going through the roof, all governments are printing monopoly money to cover rocketing debt, consumers locked at home have a built the largest treasure chest of savings ever seen.....

Inflation is coming big style and the only tool to beat it is high interest rates. Buy gold, sell housing, step away from the markets.
79
17/02/2021 10:33:41 2 1
bbc
Bring it on
49
mjb
17/02/2021 10:26:35 3 0
bbc
and the strengthening pound will take care of that....
80
17/02/2021 10:33:45 0 0
bbc
The strengthening pound will make whatever we try to sell even more expensive.
61
17/02/2021 10:28:20 1 1
bbc
We've been in stagflation since 2008. However hard the govt try to hide that, we all feel it in the weekly shop. And try buying a house...
81
PJB
17/02/2021 10:33:49 0 1
bbc
Not comparable yet to the 70's when the annual rate climbed to well above 20%, but your point is valid.
73
17/02/2021 10:31:34 26 7
bbc
Andy W
10:27
"Impact of Brexs*it is highly likely to push up inflation due to increased shipping rela tedcosts/delays etc as well as reduction in suppliers in the market. Expect it to be around 1.5%/2% by the end of the year."

So either under or on target then.
82
17/02/2021 10:33:49 17 15
bbc
But...but I thought we can produce anything we need here...we're self sufficient...we'll show them...
162
17/02/2021 10:49:15 3 3
bbc
"we,ll show em"vaccine rollout.
253
17/02/2021 11:26:58 4 1
bbc
Yes, the banana crop in Yorkshire is going to be particularly good 5his year, apparently.....
597
17/02/2021 16:46:51 1 0
bbc
I was quite surprised to read the other day that the UK exports coal
67
17/02/2021 10:29:53 84 12
bbc
I don't have much to add to the topic as economics isn't my strong suit.

What I think I CAN predict with some accuracy, is that by this afternoon this thread will have descended into the usual borefest in which half the comments are either "Thanks Brexiteers :(" followed up by "stop crying Remoaner", or something involving "bungling Boris/BoJo the Clown".

HYS should stand for Have Your Strop!
83
17/02/2021 10:35:02 5 6
bbc
thank for contributing with your personal brand of strop.
67
17/02/2021 10:29:53 84 12
bbc
I don't have much to add to the topic as economics isn't my strong suit.

What I think I CAN predict with some accuracy, is that by this afternoon this thread will have descended into the usual borefest in which half the comments are either "Thanks Brexiteers :(" followed up by "stop crying Remoaner", or something involving "bungling Boris/BoJo the Clown".

HYS should stand for Have Your Strop!
84
17/02/2021 10:35:24 9 0
bbc
I suspect you are right - certainly wouldn't bet against it........
34
17/02/2021 10:23:07 9 6
bbc
Speak to anyone in logistics and the cost of shipping is now more than 4x prices in 2019. The shipping cost has not been passed on as shipping companies are still running old contracts. But as sure as night follows day the cost of most things will steadily increase over next month's/ years. I wouldn't be surprised to see inflation over 5% within couple of years
85
17/02/2021 10:35:35 2 1
bbc
Excellent
86
MVS
17/02/2021 10:36:06 14 3
bbc
Reading this article one could be led to believe that inflation reaching 2% this year is a bad thing. Isn't it actually the target at which the B of E would like to maintain inflation? Too little inflation at 0.7% is as bad as too much inflation at say 2.7%
87
ken
17/02/2021 10:36:17 2 2
bbc
Companies need to get their money back hence increases will gradually creep up
76
17/02/2021 10:32:39 123 17
bbc
My council tax (last year) was £1400 (and that's with single person discount). 30 years ago rates £200. 7 fold increase. Roughly 3 fold increase in wages.

Its a big barrier to retirement. A big chunk out of many people's pensions.

Its a very unfair tax, disproportionate on the low paid. Be far better to add 2p or so to income tax.
88
PJB
17/02/2021 10:36:26 16 3
bbc
Fair point but then try to keep councils on the straight and narrow - little or no accountability.
161
17/02/2021 11:00:00 11 0
bbc
Croydon being a case in point, having bungled refurbishment of our concert hall, a building co, and purchase of a hotel, they now expect us to pay up for the debt they incurred before going bankrupt.
89
17/02/2021 10:36:40 2 5
bbc
Yet another 'benefit' of Brexit.

We'll just have to get used to these 'benefits' as they're coming thick and fast since we left.

We are so lucky, aren't we?
142
17/02/2021 10:40:22 2 1
bbc
Inflation at 0.7%.....I’ll take that. Some what less than the Remain lie prediction of double digits.....??
90
17/02/2021 10:36:50 3 3
bbc
We ain't seen nothing yet. Prices paid in UK must double within 5 years. ( Currency sink half in value within a decade) This is because VAT is the most powerful tax to help restore the huge hole in public finances caused by the pandemic. To restore balance to the economy those who received state hand outs will have to spend the cash so the Gov " cream off" and recoup 20 % each time they do.
101
17/02/2021 10:39:09 0 0
bbc
So Sunak's massive handout wasn't to support people in need, but was designed to boost their cash hoard?
260
17/02/2021 11:28:05 0 0
bbc
Nonsense.
£ has risen 6% against both Euro & $ since mid December.
60
17/02/2021 10:28:16 12 1
bbc
Well if they include a bunch of roses in the February data, expect a surge in inflation. Then a massive drop in March.
91
NGB
17/02/2021 10:37:12 2 1
bbc
No,as it's a year on year change.
67
17/02/2021 10:29:53 84 12
bbc
I don't have much to add to the topic as economics isn't my strong suit.

What I think I CAN predict with some accuracy, is that by this afternoon this thread will have descended into the usual borefest in which half the comments are either "Thanks Brexiteers :(" followed up by "stop crying Remoaner", or something involving "bungling Boris/BoJo the Clown".

HYS should stand for Have Your Strop!
92
17/02/2021 10:31:36 8 0
bbc
already started john
34
17/02/2021 10:23:07 9 6
bbc
Speak to anyone in logistics and the cost of shipping is now more than 4x prices in 2019. The shipping cost has not been passed on as shipping companies are still running old contracts. But as sure as night follows day the cost of most things will steadily increase over next month's/ years. I wouldn't be surprised to see inflation over 5% within couple of years
93
17/02/2021 10:37:25 1 2
bbc
I agree, Brexiters failed to realize the difference between an FTA & the Single Market & Customs Union. Even now, they are in denial & will continue to be so. Some have now gone from saying its teething troubles & they were expected for the first few weeks, to saying that we won't really see any benefits for several years. What happened to the easiest deal in history, was it just a Liam Fox lie?
34
17/02/2021 10:23:07 9 6
bbc
Speak to anyone in logistics and the cost of shipping is now more than 4x prices in 2019. The shipping cost has not been passed on as shipping companies are still running old contracts. But as sure as night follows day the cost of most things will steadily increase over next month's/ years. I wouldn't be surprised to see inflation over 5% within couple of years
94
17/02/2021 10:37:42 2 0
bbc
No it isn't. We are paying similar rates now to what we paid in 2019.
67
17/02/2021 10:29:53 84 12
bbc
I don't have much to add to the topic as economics isn't my strong suit.

What I think I CAN predict with some accuracy, is that by this afternoon this thread will have descended into the usual borefest in which half the comments are either "Thanks Brexiteers :(" followed up by "stop crying Remoaner", or something involving "bungling Boris/BoJo the Clown".

HYS should stand for Have Your Strop!
95
MVS
17/02/2021 10:38:05 12 0
bbc
I believe the BBC could do a much better job of moderating those puerile comments, so that these streams actually provided forums for grown -up discussions.
147
17/02/2021 10:40:37 7 3
bbc
very true mvs.sadly the beeb likes to set the cat amongst the pigeons it would seem.
370
17/02/2021 12:06:36 0 0
bbc
That would take all the fun out of it.
30
mjb
17/02/2021 10:22:11 15 8
bbc
food prices rose by 0.7% ?
That's not what the 'experts' predicted is it...
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-46439969
another Project Fear Pillar knocked down.....
96
17/02/2021 10:38:17 3 1
bbc
Read the article you linked to. Negotiating a deal before we before (the one agreed on xmas eve) is not a 'disorderly Brexit'.
49
mjb
17/02/2021 10:26:35 3 0
bbc
and the strengthening pound will take care of that....
97
17/02/2021 10:38:36 0 0
bbc
Indeed.
Up by 6% against the Euro in 2 months.

I note the BBC is now removing comments noting the obsessive behaviour of Remoaners (not remainers), WITHOUT notifying the person making the post, thus removing any means of appeal.
This is blatantly taking a political position by a supposedly neutral news source.
31
17/02/2021 10:22:11 32 6
bbc
Every day I view items online coming from quality companies and see spelling or keying errors. The first chart in this article has an absurd and very obvious error. The originator has done a poor job as has the proof reader and neither of them seem to be aware that mistakes of this nature are always highlighted by spell checkers. Poor work BBC.
98
17/02/2021 10:38:48 4 6
bbc
Explain please
76
17/02/2021 10:32:39 123 17
bbc
My council tax (last year) was £1400 (and that's with single person discount). 30 years ago rates £200. 7 fold increase. Roughly 3 fold increase in wages.

Its a big barrier to retirement. A big chunk out of many people's pensions.

Its a very unfair tax, disproportionate on the low paid. Be far better to add 2p or so to income tax.
99
17/02/2021 10:38:58 35 4
bbc
The single person discount always makes me wonder. Council tax (according to the blurb on the website) is based on two people sharing a house. Why then, is the single person discount only 25%? Going further, if it is based on two people why does it not increase if more than two live in the house?
118
PJB
17/02/2021 10:45:33 16 1
bbc
Think about it - they use resources more than half of a couple (eg weekly refuse collection is the same). You may as well say people without school age children should ge a discount as they don't use schools.
198
17/02/2021 11:09:35 17 2
bbc
They tried it - it was called Poll Tax - but was so unpopular that it failed. As per Brexit - The people got what they wanted - and now we're stuck with it.
Law of unintendied consequences.
212
17/02/2021 11:14:00 11 1
bbc
The single childless person is systematically distriminated against by the tax and welfare system.

When I was young I was discriminated against for being a woman. In the 21st century that has declined somewhat.

As average income single childless it is not easy. I feel very sorry for low income single childless - if they can't live with family forever stuck in multi occupancy/rented spare room.
509
mc
17/02/2021 13:37:20 0 0
bbc
eh thatcher tried that one
535
17/02/2021 14:15:00 2 0
bbc
Sadly there we had a tax that did just that in the 90s but all the left wing loonies rioted and the govt backed down. As much as it was shown to be unpopular in the press the Poll Tax was far fairer than Council Tax with multi occupants each paying their share for the services provided to all
560
17/02/2021 15:03:21 1 0
bbc
Poll tax needed... Oh wait!
620
17/02/2021 17:34:05 0 0
bbc
single person on high earnings get a discount but 2 people, one working on low or average income subsidises them, seems odd?
41
17/02/2021 10:25:05 57 5
bbc
You might think this is bad but wait until you get your Council Tax bill as it is rumoured there are going to be huge increases. They recon a Band D property on average is going to see a £250 increase over the year. The pound in our pocket is gets smaller by the day.
100
17/02/2021 10:39:06 29 3
bbc
Where I live Band D gone up by £184, a 4.99% increase.
239
17/02/2021 11:12:58 4 0
bbc
No doubt your council proudly announced that it is under 5%.
452
17/02/2021 12:36:42 4 0
bbc
Most Council tax rises will be the same as under 5% no scrutiny
529
Pip
17/02/2021 14:07:31 2 0
bbc
It's the other additions to your Council Tax, last year the Police precept where I live Band 'D', rose by 4.4%, this year it's 6.7%, next year who knows. CC is now by far our biggest outgoing..........?

Inflation at 0.7%, I don't think so.......?