Covid vaccine impact revealed in over-80s blood tests
16/02/2021 | news | health | 2,625
More people in this age group in England now have detectable antibodies that can fight the virus.
1
16/02/2021 10:52:28 4 30
bbc
Hardly a shock- they are all vaccinated
33
16/02/2021 11:01:37 20 4
bbc
Did anyone say it was a shock? It is good news but there is always some numpty who isn't happy about that and has to criticise. Try being grateful for that good news and proud of what has been done by this country
just checking if they vaccines work or not...EU says the AZ one doesn't Removed
2
16/02/2021 10:52:42 134 13
bbc
Excellent news!
503
16/02/2021 11:48:25 42 3
bbc
Agreed.
3
Hex
16/02/2021 10:52:56 383 25
bbc
Excellent, vaccines kicking in.
43
16/02/2021 11:02:33 502 51
bbc
who on earth is voting down? there are some strange people out there.
well they have to post this as the deadline nears Removed
164
16/02/2021 11:16:20 16 87
bbc
England's vaccination programme is starting to pay off, with over-80s now the most likely to buy Microsoft products.

__________
935
16/02/2021 12:26:26 5 2
bbc
Crazy anti Vaccine people.....It's your Choice if you have it or not but there's only positive things to say about it, bring on the Protection of lives and normality !!
4
16/02/2021 10:54:19 37 42
bbc
Well done Boris
27
16/02/2021 11:00:50 25 19
bbc
He hasn’t done anything.
55
MDK
16/02/2021 11:04:49 14 12
bbc
Take your blinkers off. PPE fiasco?Track and trace fiasco? Meanwhile his Brexit deal is destroying countless lives... the man’s a fool and guided by greed.
yeah well done Boris kept borders with EU open except Portugal Removed
302
16/02/2021 11:30:51 10 7
bbc
Yes well done Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson, only 117k dead.
16/02/2021 12:56:50 4 2
bbc
For what? The highest covid-related death rate in the world? For giving £Billions worth of covid contracts to cronies who had no experience in health matters? For ignoring scientific advice? For not closing the borders for months? Which of those do you suggest he should be congratulated?
16/02/2021 14:39:52 1 0
bbc
My comment was tongue in cheek. He has killed more British civilians than Hitler.
5
16/02/2021 10:54:30 18 15
bbc
Ok, so this is expected
What’s more important is long term immunity
What I don’t understand however, is according to the ONS, 6million people had the virus in the last 3months

So, there should be high levels of antibodies across all age groups

Unless those figures aren’t correct?
20
16/02/2021 10:59:29 21 4
bbc
The report was about levels in the OVER 80's not all age groups. Actually reading the article properly helps, which is something so many people don't bother to do. Long term immunity - how would we know that since we only started 2 months ago - doh!
AZ vaccine doesn't work. UK has new variants plus borders are still open with EU except Portugal Removed
6
16/02/2021 10:55:05 119 10
bbc
This is extremely encouraging, just need to continue the rollout and get back to normal - sensibly and without rushing.
34
CG
16/02/2021 11:01:39 15 99
bbc
Normal is what got us here.
the have to post this don't they a week before Removed
140
16/02/2021 11:14:08 6 26
bbc
Yes let's get back to casual racism, underpaid staff, divisive politics, terrible transport infrastructure, unstable economy, fat cat CEO's, housing shortages, the EU, Prince Andrew, climate change, royal babies, large corps paying no tax, environmental damage and pollution, corrupt MP's, Scottish Indy Ref..etc etc..
16/02/2021 17:47:24 0 0
bbc
No more Normal, get used to it
7
16/02/2021 10:55:17 620 15
bbc
Congratulations to all those who have made this possible. Well done and thank you.
65
jon
16/02/2021 11:06:27 398 42
bbc
Yes indeed. It’s also good that our vaccine strategy has the backing of the WHO which says the rest of the world can learn from Britain.
The vaccination regime promoted by the desperate Conservative government and injected as a panacea into the minds and bodies of the gullible British will be proven to be a about as efficacious as being injected with waste water from a vase of daffodils.

One dose is useless on its own. The UK is riddled with variants. Many thousands will die unnecessarily if lockdown ends before the 2nd dose!
Removed
953
16/02/2021 12:27:51 5 4
bbc
Only in BBC comments do you get downvotes on a sentiment like this. I mean...what?
16/02/2021 13:00:50 3 2
bbc
"Who needs experts!" an idiot said some time ago. Let him invent a vaccine all by himself.

Well done experts, we do need you!
16/02/2021 13:22:58 1 4
bbc
Brexit made it possible.
16/02/2021 15:55:14 0 0
bbc
Pfizer in the USA
8
16/02/2021 10:55:23 28 10
bbc
Great news, but we need to ensure the second vaccine is rolled out as fast, otherwise we will be back in lockdown in the Autumn.
16
16/02/2021 10:58:22 12 33
bbc
12-week gap is against the advice of vaccine producers.
22
16/02/2021 10:59:31 4 4
bbc
No we won't as summer will keep the hospital admissions low.
Will be the new variant by Autumn plus orders with EU still open Removed
9
16/02/2021 10:55:25 158 17
bbc
Light at the end of the tunnel, some way to go yet, now please everyone be sensible, that's the public and the government!
274
16/02/2021 11:28:07 42 76
bbc
More hope of the first than the second.
Covid here to stay Removed
10
16/02/2021 10:56:13 10 46
bbc
Half vaccinated. Google it. The UK is way behind with fully vaccinated people.
Gambling and propaganda. This is modern UK
18
CJR
16/02/2021 10:58:30 29 8
bbc
Better to be half vaccinated then the shambles that’s happening in Europe.
19
16/02/2021 10:59:01 13 5
bbc
The 12 week gap was actually the right way to go as proved by Scientists. But continue to slag off the UK if it makes you feel better.
Boris just feeds bs to the public

He has kept borders open with EU too for more covid variants..just ban on Portugal
Removed
11
W 6
16/02/2021 10:56:21 851 32
bbc
The data from Israel is nothing short of miraculous. Of the 500k odd fully vaccinated there, only 500 or so tested positive, four of which had severe symptoms and none of them died. Four months ago people were seriously questioning whether we'd ever have a vaccine, and now we've multiple effective ones. They are the way out.
37
16/02/2021 11:02:02 447 15
bbc
It’s actually one of those rare things that somewhat restores your faith in humanity
38
16/02/2021 11:02:06 12 139
bbc
They have done much better than the UK.
49
16/02/2021 11:03:36 17 101
bbc
Agreed, but what is that path? I,m not sure our government have any sort of plan.
54
16/02/2021 11:04:39 78 9
bbc
Nothing miraculous.

Just science/scientists and experts doing their job.
83
Bob
16/02/2021 11:08:32 13 2
bbc
This graph is the best graph to show the impact. https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/israel-covid-19-cases-by-age?tab=chart&stackMode=absolute&time=2020-10-03..latest®ion=World

It shows levels relative to the start of the vaccination programme, by age groups. You can clearly see a greater reduction in the elder age groups. Though not quite yet as stark as you might imagine.
Why did Israel get the vaccine first? nothing to do with Pfizer bosses background

AZ vaccine doesn't work btw according to EU
Removed
134
16/02/2021 11:13:17 15 90
bbc
God bless Israel,. Gods decedents.
369
16/02/2021 11:36:40 19 6
bbc
Now let's see if they rush and vaccinate the Palestinians?
389
AJ
16/02/2021 11:38:45 3 8
bbc
Tell that to the BAME community
391
16/02/2021 11:39:00 4 1
bbc
Yeah but an "expert" says it makes you infertile... So my nan says she doesn't want it, just in case! ho ho ho
394
16/02/2021 11:39:14 17 3
bbc
Israel has done a fantastic job & is providing invaluable data. Worth noting Israel has, thus far, solely used the Pfizer / BioNtech vaccine, with over 90% efficacy. Seems to work very well indeed. Did you spot the other key bit of news from Israeli results. Pfizer vaccine efficacy is negatively impacted by extending the gap between jabs beyond the recommended 3-6 wks, as developer confirmed.
422
16/02/2021 11:42:17 6 17
bbc
Israel is exclusively using Pfizer, the U.K. is largely using Oxford AZN. Categorically NOT the same thing.

Until the U.K. population (VERY begrudgingly) wakes up to this fact once people start mixing and infections rise after lockdown (and assuming the data isn’t suppressed by Boris) they will continue to live in denial, believing all vaccines to be equal. Bizarre.
431
Ian
16/02/2021 11:43:06 4 2
bbc
absolutely but ALL need it, not just the mythical first 4 groups (and I'm actually in one of those groups, so will vaccine). I might be immune, maybe, but, might still catch it and pass it onto someone who isn't. Either accept deaths in large numbers going forward or not.
445
16/02/2021 11:43:42 3 5
bbc
Israel isn't a fair comparison to the UK. Johnson didn't lockdown the UK quickly enough from the start thus made the virus endemic in the UK.

1: Socially, Israel is a mature society. It complies with government requests for order.

2: It isn't riddled with variants of the virus, unlike the UK, since it has No 1 in place.

3: Israel isn't the new Sweden! Sorry CRG!
485
16/02/2021 11:47:24 4 5
bbc
Who are the 10 idiots that marked your post DOWN?
619
16/02/2021 11:58:22 0 3
bbc
The way out until resistant strains evolve. The SA variants are part way there. It is only a matter of time.
634
16/02/2021 11:59:20 1 4
bbc
Or at least that’s what we’re told
738
16/02/2021 12:07:05 2 4
bbc
Thats very true BUT so far all the results that have been collected re: the different vaccines suggest that the one they are using (Pfizer) is a lot more effective than the AZ one that most people are being vaccinated with here. I'll wait until we see similar results in the UK to Israel before I start to really believe that we are well on the way back to some sort of normality.
12
16/02/2021 10:56:51 173 41
bbc
How can anyone vote this down, great news!
216
16/02/2021 11:23:36 150 226
bbc
The remoaners are just bitter that Britain is doing well!
339
16/02/2021 11:34:17 29 6
bbc
I fail to see the supposed negativity in the article.
It is good news.
727
16/02/2021 12:06:12 13 1
bbc
To those saying it is those who voted remain / leave - get a life. This has absolutely nothing to do with brexit. Stop trying to stoke division. If anything, it's the gullible who believe anything they read in Twitter and the gutter press.
It's great news.
Britain is doing well on vaccination, not so much otherwise.
I'd take any approved vaccine I was offered. Any protection is better than none.
16/02/2021 12:56:32 5 3
bbc
Because there are people who come on here just to click on the thumbs down.
I think they get some kind of pleasure from irritating others. Or perhaps they need to get a life.
16/02/2021 12:58:03 3 1
bbc
Anit-vaxers of course!
13
Jo
16/02/2021 10:57:25 5 8
bbc
Surely they should all have antibodies.
401
16/02/2021 11:40:09 4 1
bbc
Well, the one's who haven't had the vaccine of an infection haven't. Also there is a lag between getting the vaccine and the immune system starting to produce large quantities of antibodies. The body has a sort of trial and error system to work out the best antibody to produce and it takes time.
14
16/02/2021 10:57:28 275 25
bbc
Say yes to vaxx
not to the AZ until it gets updated Removed
510
16/02/2021 11:48:59 33 4
bbc
Can we just use the term vaccination or vaccine please? Vaxx makes it look like a vacuum brand and the extra 'x' makes it look like some sort of porno. Spelling it like this is more dumb than being 'anti-vax'.
545
16/02/2021 11:51:38 9 3
bbc
Frankie says ‘get vax’
djf
16/02/2021 12:38:43 3 1
bbc
Other domestic appliances are available.
16/02/2021 12:40:25 0 9
bbc
Nope
16/02/2021 14:43:24 0 1
bbc
Say yes to protecting the life, health & independence of my young, but clinically extremely vulnerable husband, my best friends' son, 6 years old, born prematurely & already had to fight for his life, my parents, my in laws, my work colleagues, my neighbours. All these people I care about many of whom I know have medical issues or have someone at home who does.
15
16/02/2021 10:57:45 277 83
bbc
This is good news right? So, why do you always make it look like bad news?

Please can we have some positivity from the media.....
95
Bob
16/02/2021 11:10:12 130 23
bbc
I'm not sure I see the same doomsaying you're seeing.

Though, you should still treat the news with caution. Having some antibodies is good news, but the true test isn't having detectable antibodies it is not needing hospital or a casket.
233
16/02/2021 11:24:43 19 3
bbc
When positives occur, certainly.
When I lived in the USA, some US Tv and radio stations had positivity news channels.
No bad news. no reality.
Some even had 24 hour live views of aquaria.
Set your own up if you wish.
But in the meantime, please let those of us in the real world get all the news.
236
16/02/2021 11:25:11 12 2
bbc
I think you should read the article again.
484
16/02/2021 11:47:22 17 1
bbc
Funny how you yourself got the impression that this was good news from reading the article, but still insist that the BBC has made it look like bad news. It's almost like you have an axe to grind.

Personally I'm glad that the BBC reports news as it is, without making it in to some comic book style jingoistic nonsense. If you want that you're looking in the wrong place. Go read the Daily Mail.
782
16/02/2021 12:10:43 7 2
bbc
Well you seem to be wearing the opposite of Rose tinted spectacles if your view is that this article is not being presented as good news.
983
16/02/2021 12:29:58 3 1
bbc
What a crock! This is good news, you cannot say that this article is anything but good news and factual comment, unless of course you can't understand it.
16/02/2021 17:48:46 1 0
bbc
Unbiased news reporting tends to come off as negative, just because its neutral. This is good news, but the BBC cant hype it up because its not over yet. If they over-hyped it, these comments would be full of people saying "Biased BBC pushing their vax agenda!"
16/02/2021 23:34:13 0 0
bbc
What on earth are you on about? This is clearly a positive article reporting on positive news. And why on earth are people upvoting this nonsense? Read the article!
8
16/02/2021 10:55:23 28 10
bbc
Great news, but we need to ensure the second vaccine is rolled out as fast, otherwise we will be back in lockdown in the Autumn.
16
16/02/2021 10:58:22 12 33
bbc
12-week gap is against the advice of vaccine producers.
310
16/02/2021 11:31:46 16 3
bbc
12 week gap has now been backed by studies and the world health organisation.
Gap in trials was low as they wanted quicker results in race to market. Manufacturers then cannot recommend anything different to the trial protocol, as that is what they know works.
It doesn't mean 12 weeks is worse.
685
16/02/2021 12:03:05 8 1
bbc
That changed;, affter more research.
736
16/02/2021 12:06:41 6 2
bbc
the recommended gap for the AZ vaccine is 8-12 weeks. always has been, ever since approval. it's only the Pfizer one that we are taking a calculated risk on.
16/02/2021 14:45:59 2 1
bbc
No it's not. Where did you pick up that bit of disinformation. Wherever, it's very irresponsible of you to spread it
16/02/2021 22:16:20 0 0
bbc
I had mine today and was told it would be between 3 and 10 weeks for the 2nd jab..
17
16/02/2021 10:58:22 158 17
bbc
Covid vaccine impact revealed in over-80s blood tests.

Absolutely brilliant news that the vaccine is proven to be working and also the fact that a huge number of the vaccines administered are the AstraZeneca. It has to be said the Government has done an incredible job of rolling out the vaccine.We are ahead of the game and ramping up by the day with the over 50's being done by April. Great news.
56
16/02/2021 11:05:03 50 15
bbc
Great news but before anyone else comments it is likely this sample had the Pfizer - BioTech vaccine. No matter, the AZ one will give us a similar response.
EU says the AZ vaccine doesn't work Removed
16/02/2021 12:32:24 8 1
bbc
AZN deserve a lot of credit here... they must be working flat out on production plus already tailoring the vaccine for emerging strains. And doing so without profiteering which is unusual for pharmaceutical giant.
16/02/2021 12:55:02 5 5
bbc
A public private partnership developed the vaccines and the NHS supported by the Armed Forces and local volunteers made the roll out work so well. The government largely stood back and didn't interfere or give the task to a dodgy mate of D Cummings. If only they had left Track and Trace to local government EHOs and NHS specialists we would never have had such a wide spread of this disease.
16/02/2021 13:03:42 3 3
bbc
At last they are getting something right first time ... mind you it is the army of the NHS, pharmacies, Local Authorities, local doctors and the volunteers as well as the many Army and Navy medics too that are really pushing this and getting the results. Hopefully they will continue to get better and get the roll out completed earlier than expected.
16/02/2021 17:39:19 0 1
bbc
Its nothing to do with the Government, It the NHS that has achieved this miracle
I doubt the government thought they could get away with giving a contract to someone mate or serco
10
16/02/2021 10:56:13 10 46
bbc
Half vaccinated. Google it. The UK is way behind with fully vaccinated people.
Gambling and propaganda. This is modern UK
18
CJR
16/02/2021 10:58:30 29 8
bbc
Better to be half vaccinated then the shambles that’s happening in Europe.
29
16/02/2021 11:00:56 3 11
bbc
Google it. There are more fully vaccinated people in Europe than in the UK. The EU will finish quicker. Watch this space.
Johnson was desperate for the worst tdeath rate in the world and went for the 1 jab policy
10
16/02/2021 10:56:13 10 46
bbc
Half vaccinated. Google it. The UK is way behind with fully vaccinated people.
Gambling and propaganda. This is modern UK
19
16/02/2021 10:59:01 13 5
bbc
The 12 week gap was actually the right way to go as proved by Scientists. But continue to slag off the UK if it makes you feel better.
53
16/02/2021 11:04:29 4 5
bbc
Not according to the pfizer manufacturers. Don't forget that our scientists are the same that wanted to go for the herd immunuty
16/02/2021 13:41:02 1 1
bbc
Only for the AZ vaccine if you care to actually look at the scientific data. Not all the vaccines work the same and the gap is not justifiable for the Pfizer vaccine. After one dose of the Pfizer vaccine you hardly generate neutralizing antibodies. The second dose needs to be after 3 weeks. There are no data on the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines to back government policy.
5
16/02/2021 10:54:30 18 15
bbc
Ok, so this is expected
What’s more important is long term immunity
What I don’t understand however, is according to the ONS, 6million people had the virus in the last 3months

So, there should be high levels of antibodies across all age groups

Unless those figures aren’t correct?
20
16/02/2021 10:59:29 21 4
bbc
The report was about levels in the OVER 80's not all age groups. Actually reading the article properly helps, which is something so many people don't bother to do. Long term immunity - how would we know that since we only started 2 months ago - doh!
76
16/02/2021 11:07:31 5 9
bbc
It says more in comparison to other age groups
It says it in the article, the first line even.
Always find it amusing when people ignore your point try to make you look stupid and end up looking ridiculous

The point is that the ONS data cannot be correct if 10% of the entire population had it in the last 3months, given that 24% of 16-24 yr olds represent the most infected group.
21
16/02/2021 10:59:30 11 16
bbc
Proud to be British. God Bless.
32
16/02/2021 11:01:24 18 5
bbc
Well done on being British mate. Some achievement that.
EU says the AZ vaccine doesn't work Removed
16/02/2021 12:43:06 0 1
bbc
Good for you.

I used to be proud, now I'm thoroughly embarrassed
8
16/02/2021 10:55:23 28 10
bbc
Great news, but we need to ensure the second vaccine is rolled out as fast, otherwise we will be back in lockdown in the Autumn.
22
16/02/2021 10:59:31 4 4
bbc
No we won't as summer will keep the hospital admissions low.
16/02/2021 13:38:22 0 2
bbc
Like in South Africa, you mean?
23
16/02/2021 10:59:51 6 10
bbc
It’s clear the vaccines will work, we just need time now...which is weird as Johnson wants to replay his two previous failed plans, when he’s dithered and delayed on everything else.

Daily infections will fall dramatically shortly, then this will filter through.
24
16/02/2021 10:59:52 45 16
bbc
What a brilliant job the nhs has done so far. The more people who are vaccinated the less chance of getting the virus, keep it up, and thank you to all the scientists and nhs and volunteers for their efforts. But why finish on a negative re above average deaths?
41
16/02/2021 11:02:23 35 19
bbc
Because it's the BBC.
145
16/02/2021 11:14:40 6 3
bbc
Because it’s a fact.
yeah noticed they vaccinate people with no gloves on and touch hundreds of arms with the same hand Removed
320
16/02/2021 11:32:53 5 1
bbc
Probably to try to stop a group of the population immediately going out and licking windows again. It's great news, but it's clear we aren't out of the woods yet...hence the note of caution.
424
16/02/2021 11:42:22 6 1
bbc
I think they're just trying to keep expectation in check - and remind us that the rules are still important despite the progress.
488
16/02/2021 11:47:35 6 3
bbc
Because it's news.
Positive, or negative. it's news.
If you don't wNt bad news, watch CBBC.
686
16/02/2021 12:03:16 3 2
bbc
Perhaps because it’s highly relevant? Deaths haven’t gone down yet so we aren’t out of the woods.
Shall we just ignore all the people dying?
773
16/02/2021 12:09:26 2 3
bbc
So that Boris et al. can't just shout about THIS success, and hope that everyone forgets about the many and varied ways that they have SO spectacularly messed up over the last year and a bit! It's called adding a bit of context.
16/02/2021 12:38:38 1 1
bbc
and thank the manufacturers making the equipment etc...might not be glamourous, but without manufacturing workers we'd be stuffed. The range of jobs and how they all connect with each other shows what humanity can do when everyone works towards a common goal and how interdependent we are. Time to end the snobbishness towards certain sectors
16/02/2021 14:08:40 0 1
bbc
The vaxx doesn't stop you from getting the Virus or from transmitting it.
16/02/2021 14:41:17 1 1
bbc
Because, however great the vaccine rollout is, we still have to observe lockdown, distancing etc. It's responsible journalism to remind people rather than give the false impression that the pandemic is over.
16/02/2021 14:59:03 1 1
bbc
Yes, let us thank the scientists, the NHS and the volunteers. It may stick in the throat, but we must also thank the government. They may not have handled every aspect of the pandemic well, but they deserve praise for having the foresight to bulk order several different vaccines (well before it was even known if they would work).
16/02/2021 18:47:44 0 0
bbc
Look at the survival rates.... 5th in the world... as in the 5th worse survival rates in the whole wide world, way below those of any other western country
25
kay
16/02/2021 10:59:58 72 4
bbc
Fabulous - but remember to get your 2nd jab!
Removed
16/02/2021 12:51:21 2 13
bbc
I'm not having my first jab so I'm sure not getting a second
26
16/02/2021 11:00:41 152 10
bbc
Excellent news -this rollout will no doubt lead to a gradual release from lockdown!
58
16/02/2021 11:05:16 55 264
bbc
Doesn't need to be gradual though
465
Ian
16/02/2021 11:45:49 19 27
bbc
why is the easing of lockdown so essential. Pretty sure I've been able to work just as effectively sitting in my kitchen for the last 12 months or so, than being in a office full.

Give us all the vaccine first, then open the offices, otherwise, we'll just see cases sparking up again.
959
16/02/2021 12:28:19 1 0
bbc
We live in hope
Covid here to stay and will be seasonal Removed
16/02/2021 12:47:32 5 5
bbc
Why gradual? The hospitals are no longer full and the infection rate is less than 1. Is that not meeting the criteria for lifting the lockdown completely?
16/02/2021 14:01:58 0 3
bbc
Lockdown will not end fully... ever. We have accepted this and it will be imposed on us in some form for years to come. Full lockdown come autumn again I reckon.
4
16/02/2021 10:54:19 37 42
bbc
Well done Boris
27
16/02/2021 11:00:50 25 19
bbc
He hasn’t done anything.
52
16/02/2021 11:04:28 12 11
bbc
Procurement of the Vaccine
Distribution of the Vaccine
Administration of the Vaccine

These have all been organised by the government

Like him or loathe hime he has done something here
16/02/2021 12:49:08 2 2
bbc
That's right. He's done nothing at all through this entire ordeal. He should be locked up
28
16/02/2021 11:00:52 15 8
bbc
I am much more interested in the evidence that the vaccine works and whether it reduces transmission.

We all know deaths in total are high - this is pointless negative piece of journalism which fails to inform anythhing of use!
61
stu
16/02/2021 11:06:03 6 2
bbc
sometimes you have to trust the experts who are qualified to assess the results.

and, at the end of the day, the numbers are dropping off a cliff so is that not enough?
https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/uk/
125
16/02/2021 11:08:43 1 2
bbc
".....this is pointless negative piece of journalism which fails to inform anything of use!"

Well, that's BBC journalism for you.....
16/02/2021 17:52:47 0 0
bbc
Thats the BBC.... only positive about women getting promoted, arts and actresses. Engineering, science, economics, politics are all way above their little heads
18
CJR
16/02/2021 10:58:30 29 8
bbc
Better to be half vaccinated then the shambles that’s happening in Europe.
29
16/02/2021 11:00:56 3 11
bbc
Google it. There are more fully vaccinated people in Europe than in the UK. The EU will finish quicker. Watch this space.
Johnson was desperate for the worst tdeath rate in the world and went for the 1 jab policy
74
16/02/2021 11:07:05 5 2
bbc
It was on the advice of scientists, it would be the same advice regardless of who was Prime Minister. Has Nicola Sturgeon advised a different strategy?
205
16/02/2021 11:22:22 5 2
bbc
Johnson has not gone for a 1 jab policy - please stop spreading misinformation.

The policy has always been 2 jabs, it is just the spacing between them that has changed. This policy has subsequently been proved by scientists as the best way to go.
775
16/02/2021 12:09:54 0 1
bbc
Europe (by which i assume you mean EU) has a population of >300million, of course there will be more people vaccinated compared to the UK. there's no evidence that protection drops off a cliff between 3 and 12 weeks, but by delaying, twice as many people get some protection quickly. There's an element of risk, sure, but it's backed by many experts so it's not just a massive punt.
30
16/02/2021 11:00:57 4 12
bbc
95% take up but 41% antibodies...... that's worrying because most over 85s had been vaccinated a few weeks ago.
16/02/2021 12:43:54 1 1
bbc
Don't talk sense. People don't like sense
16/02/2021 13:01:46 0 0
bbc
Did you actually read the article, where it points out it takes time for resistance to build, or did you just pick one number that you could try and look lever by complaining...
16/02/2021 17:50:37 0 0
bbc
Not especially. As pointed out it does take time for the antibodies to arrive and then they disappear leaving behind t-cell system that maintains a level of protection.
31
Me
16/02/2021 11:00:57 59 25
bbc
"For 90% of these deaths, Covid was the main underlying cause"

What does "main underlying cause" mean? "Main" cause, or "underlying" cause?

Why is it so difficult to articulate this clearly -it would be good to know precisely.
57
16/02/2021 11:05:04 78 7
bbc
If you have a weak heart and you get flu and you die. The cause of death is flu. Flu caused the death. A weak heart made it easier for flu to attack the respiratory system, less oxygen - heart says - I'm toast. CU
98
16/02/2021 11:10:22 7 25
bbc
it means if you get hit by a bus can u have covid then covid killed you.
Covid is going to stay in the population thanks to Boris. So each year covid with join flu Removed
788
16/02/2021 12:11:21 2 5
bbc
ONS has a list of the ONE or MORE co-morbidities that 91% of UK covid deaths (similar world-wide) had. Alzeheimers, Dementia, Hypertension, Flu (yes flu!!) pneumonia - I could go on BUT every one of those is a major killer in their own right in any Flu season & sometimes out, yet, they are all 'covid' deaths. Go figure as SAGE might NOT want you to do.
995
16/02/2021 12:31:11 2 1
bbc
What is your real beef? This is the way cause of death is established all over the world. There maybe one or more causes, with different contribution to outcome.
16/02/2021 12:37:28 1 3
bbc
hospitals and governments are reliant on covid figures - though the figures here are suspicious due to the facts (check it, that deaths per month are with in the parameters of a normal year) or will this be removed
21
16/02/2021 10:59:30 11 16
bbc
Proud to be British. God Bless.
32
16/02/2021 11:01:24 18 5
bbc
Well done on being British mate. Some achievement that.
1
16/02/2021 10:52:28 4 30
bbc
Hardly a shock- they are all vaccinated
33
16/02/2021 11:01:37 20 4
bbc
Did anyone say it was a shock? It is good news but there is always some numpty who isn't happy about that and has to criticise. Try being grateful for that good news and proud of what has been done by this country
6
16/02/2021 10:55:05 119 10
bbc
This is extremely encouraging, just need to continue the rollout and get back to normal - sensibly and without rushing.
34
CG
16/02/2021 11:01:39 15 99
bbc
Normal is what got us here.
219
16/02/2021 11:23:53 16 2
bbc
Only if your normal is bat supper with a side order of pangolin.
344
16/02/2021 11:34:50 16 2
bbc
Not sure that the fact I used to be able to have a picnic without being arrested led to a bat coronavirus making the transition to humans in China
359
16/02/2021 11:36:17 14 4
bbc
No, normal is what we had before covid.
Covid got us here.
And even the old normal needed improvement.
404
16/02/2021 11:40:23 15 1
bbc
How many thousands of years have we lived in close proximity to others? I hope you're not suggesting that we suddenly re-write the book?
558
16/02/2021 11:52:52 9 8
bbc
Well, I think Boris, Gollum, Wormtongue etc. all had more than a bit to do with the excessive number of deaths, and the ridiculous length of time we've all spent in lockdown! I think I'd struggle to call any of THEM 'Normal'!
998
16/02/2021 12:31:31 4 1
bbc
No , it was a virus
16/02/2021 13:07:35 0 3
bbc
To some extent I agree, we need to not be going back to doing the same old things before. We need to tackle issues of climate change, wildlife habitat destruction (that helps these viruses cross species) as well as looking for more justice and fairness, with no-one being overlooked or forgotten. We need to change the old normal is not working - look at all the food banks, homeless etc.
OwO
16/02/2021 13:37:37 1 1
bbc
No, China got us here. Best have a word with them.
16/02/2021 16:40:00 0 0
bbc
CG - normal in China maybe.
35
16/02/2021 11:01:49 3 21
bbc
I do find these figures amazing as a quick check on all the people that had the jab near me (at least 3 weeks ago ), none has had a blood test since.
I believe we are on a government mission to tell us good news even if it is not.
Lies are fair game.
36
16/02/2021 11:02:01 22 12
bbc
I'm expecting that by the end of February it will become apparent the the NHS is no longer at risk. There should be very few cases and very few deaths by this point. The public mood will change quickly when it becomes apparent that the pandemic is under control.
252
16/02/2021 11:26:12 8 4
bbc
That does not mean remove all restrictions and let the virus run through the remaining population unhindered.
It should mean
schools open
shops open
meeting people outside is OK
16/02/2021 12:38:16 0 0
bbc
I know we are all desperate for the public mood to change and the pandemic to be brought under control.
However in our relief that it seems to be happening, we must NEVER forget how long it has taken a shambolic Govt and our incompetent, bumbling excuse for a Prime Minister to get us here.
Credit for the vaccine? No, it's down to science and the NHS.
As for Bozo?
140000 dead.
Blood on his hands!
11
W 6
16/02/2021 10:56:21 851 32
bbc
The data from Israel is nothing short of miraculous. Of the 500k odd fully vaccinated there, only 500 or so tested positive, four of which had severe symptoms and none of them died. Four months ago people were seriously questioning whether we'd ever have a vaccine, and now we've multiple effective ones. They are the way out.
37
16/02/2021 11:02:02 447 15
bbc
It’s actually one of those rare things that somewhat restores your faith in humanity
78
16/02/2021 11:08:01 9 16
bbc
That and Celebs Go Dating: The Mansion...
467
16/02/2021 11:45:53 5 3
bbc
In science, yes. Humanity? No.
ajackson replied:
It’s actually one of those rare things that somewhat restores your faith in humanity
Reply

It would once they give the vaccination offer to the Palestinians
Removed
11
W 6
16/02/2021 10:56:21 851 32
bbc
The data from Israel is nothing short of miraculous. Of the 500k odd fully vaccinated there, only 500 or so tested positive, four of which had severe symptoms and none of them died. Four months ago people were seriously questioning whether we'd ever have a vaccine, and now we've multiple effective ones. They are the way out.
38
16/02/2021 11:02:06 12 139
bbc
They have done much better than the UK.
85
stu
16/02/2021 11:08:44 69 5
bbc
they also have about 1/7th of the population to deal with and I'm only guessing but im thinking their border control policies were already pretty strict even before covid?
201
16/02/2021 11:22:06 60 12
bbc
They have done well, but the UK is well ahead of all other large countries in vaccinating. You need to give the government credit where it is due, rather than constantly carping.
643
16/02/2021 11:59:55 8 3
bbc
And the UK has done much better the the rest of the EU, praise where praise is due, stop being so negative.
39
16/02/2021 11:02:08 30 7
bbc
Looks like this &%$? is finally over.

I predict no further large waves based on how other epidemics in the 20th/21st centuries have tended to taper off after year 1. May not even be any other waves if mutations are closely watched.
48
16/02/2021 11:03:27 28 120
bbc
Oh I'm sure they'll find some excuse for keeping us locked up.
mutations won't be stopped aslong as people fly to different countries and no testing at borders Removed
133
16/02/2021 11:13:14 1 5
bbc
Mutations closely watched and what, exactly?

Mutations then avoided ? Ignored?
199
16/02/2021 11:21:39 7 1
bbc
The last major pandemic, the 1918 flu, lasted close to 2 years from spring 1918. The first wave was ending by summer, the second wave started ~ August 2018. After measures were taken, it died down by November, only for the third wave (after measures were relaxed) to hit in winter/spring 1919 & it's believed a fourth hit in winter 1920. The H2N2 flu of 1957-58 mutated to cause the H3N2 1968 flu
408
16/02/2021 11:40:40 2 0
bbc
Were you around for the last big one?
1918?
Hope covid is listening to your predictions.
900
16/02/2021 12:22:40 1 1
bbc
Lots of chickens being counted in here I see! Yes, things are looking promising but to declare "this &%$? is finally over" at this stage is ridiculous! No-one has any definitive results yet of how well the AZ vaccine is working (Israel uses Pfizer which has been shown when it was approved, to give much better protection than AZ) & then there's the variants to consider too.Patience is the key word.
16/02/2021 17:49:15 0 0
bbc
Only the 1917 'spanish' flu had 3 distinct peaks, smallest, largest and a mid sized one at the end which was many times the size of the 3rd peak. Basically different variations of the original virus attacking different age groups.
Bring in the birch for the partygoers, etc. Clowns the lot of them , a soar backside will stop it Removed
108
16/02/2021 11:06:58 10 2
bbc
Funnily enough, my wife would enjoy it.
112
16/02/2021 11:11:39 1 0
bbc
soar?
186
16/02/2021 11:20:06 5 0
bbc
Why would the birch make a backside soar, does wood have some anti gravity property?
383
16/02/2021 11:38:10 0 0
bbc
Really don't want my old headmaster back.
387
16/02/2021 11:38:33 0 0
bbc
Authoritarianism has already failed in Europe I'm afraid so your idea is a non-starter.
24
16/02/2021 10:59:52 45 16
bbc
What a brilliant job the nhs has done so far. The more people who are vaccinated the less chance of getting the virus, keep it up, and thank you to all the scientists and nhs and volunteers for their efforts. But why finish on a negative re above average deaths?
41
16/02/2021 11:02:23 35 19
bbc
Because it's the BBC.
150
16/02/2021 11:14:56 5 6
bbc
Upset? Feelings hurt? Don’t like the truth?
343
16/02/2021 11:34:47 5 9
bbc
The BBC will always drag a negative out of the fire from even the most positive of stories. Seems to be in their DNA.
16/02/2021 13:05:04 0 2
bbc
Yep. BBC; "Here, try our new cake pecipe. It's delicious. ............ It's full of fat and sugar that will clog your arteries, make you obese, and you'll die a horrible death".
16/02/2021 15:06:36 1 1
bbc
Can't help yourself can you?

HYS must be like a first psychiatrists appointment.

'OK read this headline & type the first thing that pops into your head'.
42
16/02/2021 11:02:24 3 53
bbc
Should have vaccinated tax paying wage earners first.

The OAPS haven’t anything to contribute, just a tax burden.

It’s the youngsters and the working age population whose tax is paying for the OAPS to do very little except foreign holidays.
51
stu
16/02/2021 11:03:48 12 3
bbc
yep let's protect the least vulnerable first, that seems like a reasonable response
59
16/02/2021 11:05:21 13 1
bbc
Plenty of older people still paying tax, income tax, VAT, IPT, fuel duty, alcohol duty, etc
68
16/02/2021 11:06:37 13 1
bbc
Silly Billy - Pensioners also pay tax...
80
16/02/2021 11:08:12 11 1
bbc
What are you planning to do when you reach the "tax burden" stage of your life? Show some compasion, for goodness sake!
87
16/02/2021 11:08:53 12 0
bbc
I hope you’re not really as thick as you write, it is the people of senior years, along with various other nationalities that are the most vulnerable to this virus and therefore highly likely to require specialist hospital care which prevents younger aged people with other serious illnesses from getting the care they need.
96
16/02/2021 11:10:13 3 1
bbc
Plenty of healthy retired people in their early 60s have already been vaccinated yet are staying at home.

Meanwhile carers and other public-facing workers have to wait.
These OAP’s as you call the paid through their taxes you schooling, your hospital costs, the roads you drive on and your life as many fought in the war. What an ungrateful idiot you are. Removed
100
16/02/2021 11:10:28 14 0
bbc
The OAPs mostly paid tax for all their working lives - tax that built the NHS hospitals, the roads and everything else that the younger generations take for granted. Or did you think that all this infrastructure magically appeared when you were born?
101
16/02/2021 11:10:34 11 1
bbc
What a selfish, arrogant & heartless post.
106
16/02/2021 11:11:10 12 0
bbc
Actually most OAPs have already paid their taxes to fund their retirement. In many ways you could argue they have earned their right to be protected more than the working age group.
Aside from the obvious fact that the younger population are at less risk anyway...
110
16/02/2021 11:07:18 10 0
bbc
Wow - is that really your view? Unbelievable!
123
16/02/2021 11:12:28 7 0
bbc
Wonderful degree of social responsibility - not!
The concept of reducing hospitalisations and deaths is obviously lost on you.
In a less virulent virus the best way to vaccinate is to do the vectors first, i.e Healthcare, shopworkers, emergency services.
The statement on OAP contribution to society is risible, I'm one and do pay taxes, direct and indirect.
135
16/02/2021 11:13:21 8 0
bbc
If you are hoping not to pay tax when you are a pensioner then you will be sadly disappointed. Most pensioners pay income tax , council tax, VAT etc and those who have sufficient funds left over also spend and pay VAT. Many work as volunteers for charities, provide care for more elderly relatives or for grandchildren while their parents work. If you think that's a tax burden then you are wrong.
They are testing vaccine on OAP

mRNA vaccines can causes infertility
Removed
299
16/02/2021 11:30:41 1 0
bbc
Wow, I mean wow.
548
16/02/2021 11:51:57 2 1
bbc
There is an argument to protect wage earners first: this is the route Indonesia has chosen. But your comments on OAPs are ill-informed. Many pensioners pay income tax, and many over 60s are full-time unpaid carers for their own parents in their 80s or 90s, or child-minding for their grand-children while the parents work. At least, this is the case in my family.
830
16/02/2021 12:16:16 2 0
bbc
Yes, 'cos we'd need their taxes to pay for the all the EXTRA care needed by those OAPs as they got sick with Covid19 . . . ! Grow up you pathetic [insert appropriate very rude description]!
Cam
16/02/2021 12:48:14 2 0
bbc
To add to what other have stated, OAPs & the vulnerable are statistically the ones most likely to stress the NHS with Covid, at a huge cost to the tax payer & to the health of others needing services delayed due to said NHS overload.

Not seeing the big picture at all, are you!
16/02/2021 17:44:06 0 0
bbc
You mean not pay for those who paid for you to be educated, to have a health service, roads, trains, electric, gas etc etc etc etc Who do you think paid for all of that - you didnt. I know the electric/gas/water was sold by Thatcher to her mates but it existed because of the OAPs paying for it. Not only this but WW1&2 were won for your freedom by them and their parents
3
Hex
16/02/2021 10:52:56 383 25
bbc
Excellent, vaccines kicking in.
43
16/02/2021 11:02:33 502 51
bbc
who on earth is voting down? there are some strange people out there.
246
16/02/2021 11:26:07 66 5
bbc
attention seekers
277
16/02/2021 11:28:49 96 5
bbc
Just the same strange people who wanted to pretend the virus was a hoax or that everyone was going to be microchipped when vaccinated. There's no accounting for the crazy things that go through some people's heads, and the high uptake of the vaccine in spite of their scaremongering seems to have maddened them.
285
16/02/2021 11:29:30 5 78
bbc
voted you down because, well, because you're asking for it . . .
477
16/02/2021 11:46:41 16 2
bbc
Oh no! Covid19 has somehow managed to get a BBC account and is commenting on HYS! AAAAAAaaaaaaaargh!
653
16/02/2021 12:00:52 22 5
bbc
Anti-vaxxers may also believe that these statistics are also fake. There's no hope really: eventually they come to doubt their own existence and disappear in puff of smoke.
742
16/02/2021 12:07:19 8 5
bbc
Trolls and those with malicious intent.
767
16/02/2021 12:09:10 6 4
bbc
yes and they all on here sadly
946
16/02/2021 12:27:38 3 16
bbc
I'll down vote anyone who comments about being down voted, just to annoy them.
968
16/02/2021 12:28:46 8 1
bbc
There are indeed a percentage of the population Darwinian theory yet to touch
978
16/02/2021 12:27:46 5 8
bbc
they are called remainers -they want every thing to fail
16/02/2021 12:35:25 2 12
bbc
I am voting it down , because you will be vaccining every 3 months for the rest of your life for an infection will a minute death rate. Please think about the real deadly diseases.
16/02/2021 12:38:06 3 2
bbc
As I post this reply, 24 people have downvoted your message. Why?
16/02/2021 12:44:35 2 4
bbc
who on earth is voting down?

Those enjoying furlough payments, those that have an easier life working from home and those whose business is booming as a result of covid.
16/02/2021 12:51:52 2 2
bbc
Yes, mostly anti-vaxers I would say and the gullible who follow them!
16/02/2021 13:00:35 1 2
bbc
I was about to write the same thing, there must be some very strange and sad people out there
16/02/2021 13:27:54 1 2
bbc
Called antivaxxers, I believe. Don't like being confused by facts and - to be blunt - some are guilty of manslaughter by twaddle.
16/02/2021 13:40:27 1 2
bbc
Maybe certain European politicians!
16/02/2021 13:44:49 0 2
bbc
Not strange. Just low IQ
16/02/2021 13:46:06 1 1
bbc
Unfortunately, there are, always will be, people who will vote anything down simply because they can. That's obviously what floats their boat so just ignore them. Saying that, I've probably baited them with this post so watch this space! lol
16/02/2021 13:55:05 1 1
bbc
I know - it's like 'hey, people are being saved from death and serious illness, and we have the key to a better future' and they give it a thumbs down?!!!!!
44
Kaz
16/02/2021 11:02:56 2 2
bbc
Is it not because more over 80s have had the jab?
63
16/02/2021 11:06:19 1 7
bbc
What a Karen
45
16/02/2021 11:03:00 105 58
bbc
Is it time we accept that old age is a major factor of death in those over 80?

It's right that we protect as many as possible through vaccination but death is an inevitability in old age.
115
16/02/2021 11:11:55 203 14
bbc
Statistically, someone who is a man, aged 80 today, has an average life expectancy of 90; a woman who is 85 today has an average chance to live to 92. Why should they lose the chance of all those years of life? Death is always inevitable, doesn't mean we should take actions that might hasten it
146
16/02/2021 11:14:43 18 4
bbc
Shall we just kill them now? Save us the trouble
167
16/02/2021 11:17:00 22 3
bbc
It's not the fact that people die which is a problem, but the fact that with a virus 100,000s could die together, overwheming both the NHS and society as we know it., hence the restrictions.
183
16/02/2021 11:19:32 33 2
bbc
Yes, but many over-80's wouldn't mind getting to be over-100's.
Are you going to choose who fails?
they just use that age to test the vaccine Removed
242
16/02/2021 11:25:53 34 1
bbc
Go back 100 years and you could have said the same about people over 60. Why bother with any medication for anything if death is inevitable??
376
16/02/2021 11:37:19 28 3
bbc
My mother and grandmother and 2 of my aunts all lived into their 90s, if they'd been alive today they'd all have wanted to be vaccinated so they could live a bit longer. I can't understand why age is brought up as a reason to accept death as always hovering just round the corner, I know people in their 80s who're making plenty of plans for the future and that's as it should be.
525
16/02/2021 11:47:33 11 1
bbc
Death is an inevitability for all ages not jut the old.
605
16/02/2021 11:56:55 7 4
bbc
There is a difference in dying of other causes but with covid and dying of covid.
Unfortunately even someone dying of terminal cancer is classed as a covid death if tested positive within the preceding 28 days.
964
16/02/2021 12:28:38 0 0
bbc
So what?
16/02/2021 14:02:59 5 0
bbc
I wish you were over 80 and vulnerable. Just for you to see how wrong you are.
16/02/2021 14:19:57 3 0
bbc
Or at any age really as it is for you. Do you fancy dying right now? Neither do any of those 'old people' who likely have many more enjoyable years ahead of them. Saw a couple in their 80s doing the chachacha on TV last night- got plenty of life left in them. You're very small minded
16/02/2021 15:24:49 1 0
bbc
The older we get the longer our overall life expectancy gets, because the years we’ve already lived through have turned out to give us 100% survival.

At birth we may be expected to live to our early 80s.

At 80 we may be expected to live to our late 80s.

At 90 we may be expected to live to our mid 90s.

At 100 we may be expected to live to our early 100s.
46
16/02/2021 11:03:05 8 3
bbc
Can somebody smarter than me please explain

If you receive an mRNA vaccine, why would you have antibodies in your blood, if you hadn’t had the virus. My understanding is that it will trigger an immune response once the virus is detected
With the AZ vaccine I can understand more given its nature

Or am I completely wrong and both produce antibodies upon vaccination?
66
16/02/2021 11:06:27 12 1
bbc
the mRNA codes for the COVID 19 spike protein. Your body uses the mRNA to make the spike protein which your immune system responds to by producing antibodies (and T-cells)
73
16/02/2021 11:07:04 2 1
bbc
Both
93
16/02/2021 11:10:04 3 0
bbc
When you're infected, your immune system works out and produces the antibodies needed to fight the infection. When you're immunised, your immune system thinks you've been infected and works out the antibodies needed to fight the infection.

The 2 types of vaccine have slightly different methods of triggering the immune system but both (should) result in the immune system producing the antibodies.
94
16/02/2021 11:10:10 2 0
bbc
The mRNA causes some cells to produce the protein spike that is present on the surface of the virus. The immune system produces anti-bodies to the spike, and so produces anti-bodies to the virus.
141
16/02/2021 11:14:12 2 0
bbc
The mRNA does what its meant to do which is produce protein inside the cells. The protein is then presented to B cells via MHC which in turn make antibodies......
they must have been exposed to covid after the vaccine Removed
16/02/2021 15:01:48 0 0
bbc
But the antibodies dont stop you getting the virus, they reduce the symptoms of the virus which stops you getting ill
47
16/02/2021 11:03:14 3 6
bbc
Unfortunately a facet of human ageing is a significant decrease in the number of lymphocytes (or white blood cells). Some immunity in over-80s might not be sufficient to fight off infection. That could explain higher levels of deaths in over-80s after they have the single (and eventually double) dose of COVID-19 vaccines in the UK.
39
16/02/2021 11:02:08 30 7
bbc
Looks like this &%$? is finally over.

I predict no further large waves based on how other epidemics in the 20th/21st centuries have tended to taper off after year 1. May not even be any other waves if mutations are closely watched.
48
16/02/2021 11:03:27 28 120
bbc
Oh I'm sure they'll find some excuse for keeping us locked up.
196
16/02/2021 11:21:28 16 6
bbc
No justification for this comment.
The government have been slower than most other nations to lockdown every time, their instinct is liberty and economy over safety.
They are also completely incapable of preventing leaks from cabinet discussions ahead of official announcements.
Anyone who thinks they are capable of some grand conspiracy to keep everyone locked down has taken too many drugs.
202
16/02/2021 11:22:12 14 0
bbc
And why would they do that? You need at least to suggest a motive if you're going to make up these theories.
228
16/02/2021 11:24:14 14 0
bbc
Why would they want to do that?...no logic in keeping us in lockdown. It's in No-ones interest.
16/02/2021 12:32:50 1 1
bbc
I hope you have observed the controls and your conscience is clear over the 110,000 deaths.
16/02/2021 12:45:17 1 2
bbc
They already have an excuse in the works - it's the Kent variant. After that there'll be something else.

Now we've given them so much power they won't be in a rush to return it
16/02/2021 13:02:39 3 1
bbc
what is this obsession people have that the government wants to keep us locked up. It serves no tangible purpose other than to save lives and stop our health resources being overrun.
Lockdown does nothing for tax receipts , reducing benefits andcurtails ongoing government projects .
16/02/2021 13:11:32 0 0
bbc
They don't -need- an excuse - just ask the Myanmar military.

But if you think it suits the rich and powerful shadowy figures behind BoJo to keep us all locked up and trash the economy they make money from, I've got this bridge I can sell you....
Phi
16/02/2021 14:16:04 0 0
bbc
Well you can't complain about being told what to do by elected UK officials right?

Irony if you voted not to be told what to do by the EU but complain now
11
W 6
16/02/2021 10:56:21 851 32
bbc
The data from Israel is nothing short of miraculous. Of the 500k odd fully vaccinated there, only 500 or so tested positive, four of which had severe symptoms and none of them died. Four months ago people were seriously questioning whether we'd ever have a vaccine, and now we've multiple effective ones. They are the way out.
49
16/02/2021 11:03:36 17 101
bbc
Agreed, but what is that path? I,m not sure our government have any sort of plan.
50
16/02/2021 11:03:40 24 13
bbc
They keep feeding us these facts and figures, which really leave Boris with very few excuses to not return to normal life in the summer as those at risk of severe illness and hospitalisation will be in the vast majority protected... Immunity lasts around 6-8 months which gives us time to tweak the vaccine for the "winter variant" the government are already talking about...
132
16/02/2021 11:13:02 45 2
bbc
The PM is not looking for excuses not to lift restrictions - he has stated that he wants to lift them. But he is only prepared to lift them when the data shows that it is safe to do so. While infections remain high we need to remain cautious as any small change could see cases, hospitalisations and deaths start to rise again.
280
16/02/2021 11:29:08 2 1
bbc
I think he's an absolute clown, but I welcome a cautious approach this time. We've had too many false dawns, that end up just leaving us feeling let down and fed up (Christmas anyone?)

I'd prefer that they promise nothing, so we don't get our hopes up. And hopefully we can make this the last lockdown too.
919
16/02/2021 12:25:09 2 0
bbc
Look, we need to have the majority of people to have been vaccinated AND for the R number to be pretty low before we can really start getting back to some sort of normal. If the R number is still too high then there's a real chance that yet more variants may start popping up that are far more serious and maybe less susceptible to the vaccines.
16/02/2021 14:44:47 0 0
bbc
Has he made any excuses? Has he said he won't lift lockdown restrictions by the summer? No he hasn't - so why are you whinging about it. Is it because you haven't heard what's been said? Is it your hearing at fault or your comprehension - I'm betting on the latter
42
16/02/2021 11:02:24 3 53
bbc
Should have vaccinated tax paying wage earners first.

The OAPS haven’t anything to contribute, just a tax burden.

It’s the youngsters and the working age population whose tax is paying for the OAPS to do very little except foreign holidays.
51
stu
16/02/2021 11:03:48 12 3
bbc
yep let's protect the least vulnerable first, that seems like a reasonable response
185
16/02/2021 11:19:57 0 4
bbc
The most vulnerable haven’t gotten anything to do anyway. We could re open society and economy quicker
thepowerwins is patently an Idiot ! Removed
27
16/02/2021 11:00:50 25 19
bbc
He hasn’t done anything.
52
16/02/2021 11:04:28 12 11
bbc
Procurement of the Vaccine
Distribution of the Vaccine
Administration of the Vaccine

These have all been organised by the government

Like him or loathe hime he has done something here
166
16/02/2021 11:16:47 12 8
bbc
The civil service organised all that
284
16/02/2021 11:29:26 10 9
bbc
Missed the first FIVE Cobra meetings cos he was too busy trying to sort out a divorce settlement so he could marry his pregnant mistress. Shook hands with covid patients despite knowing covid had a 'grave threat' to human lives. The list goes on. The guy isn;t remotely qualified to be in the position he is in, but thankfully for him his privileges far outweigh his competencies.
19
16/02/2021 10:59:01 13 5
bbc
The 12 week gap was actually the right way to go as proved by Scientists. But continue to slag off the UK if it makes you feel better.
53
16/02/2021 11:04:29 4 5
bbc
Not according to the pfizer manufacturers. Don't forget that our scientists are the same that wanted to go for the herd immunuty
11
W 6
16/02/2021 10:56:21 851 32
bbc
The data from Israel is nothing short of miraculous. Of the 500k odd fully vaccinated there, only 500 or so tested positive, four of which had severe symptoms and none of them died. Four months ago people were seriously questioning whether we'd ever have a vaccine, and now we've multiple effective ones. They are the way out.
54
16/02/2021 11:04:39 78 9
bbc
Nothing miraculous.

Just science/scientists and experts doing their job.
4
16/02/2021 10:54:19 37 42
bbc
Well done Boris
55
MDK
16/02/2021 11:04:49 14 12
bbc
Take your blinkers off. PPE fiasco?Track and trace fiasco? Meanwhile his Brexit deal is destroying countless lives... the man’s a fool and guided by greed.
17
16/02/2021 10:58:22 158 17
bbc
Covid vaccine impact revealed in over-80s blood tests.

Absolutely brilliant news that the vaccine is proven to be working and also the fact that a huge number of the vaccines administered are the AstraZeneca. It has to be said the Government has done an incredible job of rolling out the vaccine.We are ahead of the game and ramping up by the day with the over 50's being done by April. Great news.
56
16/02/2021 11:05:03 50 15
bbc
Great news but before anyone else comments it is likely this sample had the Pfizer - BioTech vaccine. No matter, the AZ one will give us a similar response.
792
16/02/2021 12:11:53 7 3
bbc
I hope you are correct but ALL results published since the vaccines have been tested and approved have shown that the AZ one is NOT as effective as the Pfizer one, so we need to wait a bit yet for more definite data before people start celebrating.
866
16/02/2021 12:19:26 0 3
bbc
Not necessarily
16/02/2021 13:01:12 1 1
bbc
It may be it was a mix of both, the results are often from random samples.
16/02/2021 17:40:57 0 0
bbc
We are discussing the strategy not the vaccine
31
Me
16/02/2021 11:00:57 59 25
bbc
"For 90% of these deaths, Covid was the main underlying cause"

What does "main underlying cause" mean? "Main" cause, or "underlying" cause?

Why is it so difficult to articulate this clearly -it would be good to know precisely.
57
16/02/2021 11:05:04 78 7
bbc
If you have a weak heart and you get flu and you die. The cause of death is flu. Flu caused the death. A weak heart made it easier for flu to attack the respiratory system, less oxygen - heart says - I'm toast. CU
197
16/02/2021 11:21:30 6 1
bbc
If you have a weak heart, get Flu and die of heart failure, because your heart cannot cope, I think there is a substantial chance that your Death Certificate will show Heart Failure as the cause of death.
805
16/02/2021 12:13:33 0 9
bbc
So Pfizer's vaccine killed 33+ Norwegians, because the 'tipping over' the vaccine side effects produced being what covid does to people with one or more co-morbidities. So why did they say it didn't kill them but Covid kills everyone with one or more co-morbidities?
26
16/02/2021 11:00:41 152 10
bbc
Excellent news -this rollout will no doubt lead to a gradual release from lockdown!
58
16/02/2021 11:05:16 55 264
bbc
Doesn't need to be gradual though
265
16/02/2021 11:27:17 35 16
bbc
Does
447
16/02/2021 11:44:05 37 7
bbc
It does really. If we open up to fast infections will increase again before the vaccine has been distributed widely enough to prevent it.
474
Ian
16/02/2021 11:46:29 21 10
bbc
i'm sure you have your reasons, but, clearly you are of quite limited intellect. Eat out to help out, quick opening, how many did that actually cause to die.
476
16/02/2021 11:46:34 32 7
bbc
Yeah it does, or the virus infects millions again and mutations happening, popping us all back into lockdown again. Here's an idea, listen to the scientists.
786
16/02/2021 12:11:14 11 6
bbc
Are you serious?
16/02/2021 12:48:49 4 2
bbc
silly comment
16/02/2021 12:50:34 4 0
bbc
Not for everyone no, a gradual release for the general population but preferably no release at all for the hard of thinking.
16/02/2021 12:55:46 3 0
bbc
Oh yes it does .. belt and braces never hurt anyone! Don't forget majority of population not had first jab yet so plenty of people to still get infected and spreading it. I'd sooner get a gradual relaxation over the next couple of months or so and have a much lower chance of another raft of restrictions in June and July!
16/02/2021 13:43:15 1 1
bbc
And what qualifications do you have for this ridiculous statement? Of course it needs to be gradual; highly qualified scientists have explained why time and time again. Perhaps the words they used were too big for you to understand - as in having more than four letters
16/02/2021 14:55:51 2 0
bbc
It does! Too many numpties about. We don’t want to go straight back into lockdown. Moving slowly is the key. Don’t run before you can walk or you’ll end up flat on your face.
42
16/02/2021 11:02:24 3 53
bbc
Should have vaccinated tax paying wage earners first.

The OAPS haven’t anything to contribute, just a tax burden.

It’s the youngsters and the working age population whose tax is paying for the OAPS to do very little except foreign holidays.
59
16/02/2021 11:05:21 13 1
bbc
Plenty of older people still paying tax, income tax, VAT, IPT, fuel duty, alcohol duty, etc
60
16/02/2021 11:05:21 343 35
bbc
The UK strategy of delaying the second jab is working. It means that twice as many folk can get the first jab early.

To those that say they'd rather have the 2 jabs 4 weeks apart as originally planned, I say, OK, no problem, we can delay your first jab for 8 weeks if you like, so that it's 4 weeks before when your second one is due.
77
16/02/2021 11:07:35 320 15
bbc
exactly. Waiting for a fist dose is far more risky than waiting for a second dose
176
Bob
16/02/2021 11:18:37 32 9
bbc
Remember when comments like this would get downvoted into oblivion and left-leaning politicians and media would cry about the delay?
210
16/02/2021 11:12:38 25 36
bbc
According to remoaners, the delay will cause endless problems. lol.
they have supply issues clearly Removed
Confirm that with us in 10 weeks time chris
586
16/02/2021 11:54:49 10 4
bbc
It was a gamble, but based on the data so far, it seems to have paid off.
However, we don't know what the impact of this will be for long term efficacy.
679
16/02/2021 12:02:37 7 3
bbc
The delay to the 2nd dose has worked in that the high risk groups will get their 1st dose sooner, but the lower risk groups will not because the high risk groups have to start having their 2nd dose now/very soon and therefore the lower risk groups will not get their 1st jab any sooner, unless the system manages to roll out twice as many vaccinations per day as they are currently doing.
925
16/02/2021 12:25:53 4 5
bbc
At the risk of being shot up by everyone, I believe it was the Much Reviled Tony Blair, Demon of the Left, who was the first public figure to endorse the One Dose First strategy, and he was laughed at by most people. We can all have a view on Tony, but he's well informed.
16/02/2021 12:44:32 7 0
bbc
Exactly. Just seen an article saying the astrazeneca jab is better for being delayed! See https://theconversation.com/astrazeneca-vaccine-delaying-the-second-dose-increases-protection-according-to-new-data-154617

I agree with the others you shouldn't be picky what vaccine you get offered on the day, just go for it and get it!!
16/02/2021 12:42:00 0 3
bbc
you are funny
16/02/2021 13:00:44 1 0
bbc
What will be interesting is when the over 50s are done fairly soon, will we need to keep this "first dose for more people" strategy. Or should we then switch emphasis to give all these people their second dose 3-4 weeks later. At that point, the original logic goes out the window because it is the non-vulnerable who are remaining to be jabbed. Better to fully vaccinate the vulnerable.
16/02/2021 13:19:03 4 0
bbc
For a 'standard' vaccine like AZs the longer delay is beneficial as the body creates better primer antibodies with a longer gap. Because the Pfizer vaccine is an RNA type there is little data other than their own trial, but since the bodies response is the same then it was a strategy which was likely to work. The UK was following good science.
16/02/2021 16:07:50 0 0
bbc
Fine by me , and better for my 93 year old father in law and 83 year old mother
16/02/2021 16:53:25 0 0
bbc
Good words, I may have to copy and paste
28
16/02/2021 11:00:52 15 8
bbc
I am much more interested in the evidence that the vaccine works and whether it reduces transmission.

We all know deaths in total are high - this is pointless negative piece of journalism which fails to inform anythhing of use!
61
stu
16/02/2021 11:06:03 6 2
bbc
sometimes you have to trust the experts who are qualified to assess the results.

and, at the end of the day, the numbers are dropping off a cliff so is that not enough?
https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/uk/
270
16/02/2021 11:27:53 0 0
bbc
It's likely most of that effect is due to lockdown, with a small part due to the vaccine. Vaccinated numbers are still relatively low
409
16/02/2021 11:33:30 1 1
bbc
don't forget the experts built the titanic.
16/02/2021 12:53:33 0 0
bbc
The numbers dropped off a cliff last April, in fact the most fascinating aspect of the early months is the very narrow very massive spike. I'm curious no one is investigating that, it suggests a massive 'infection event' on a limited but vulnerable population. Common across a number of European countries - which had in common? Other than covid, the emptying of hospitals into care homes?
62
16/02/2021 11:06:08 4 12
bbc
Great. So just keep jabbing the elderly and medically vulnerable and let the rest of us who wiil have little or no complications from COVID build up natural immunity.
82
16/02/2021 11:08:15 16 5
bbc
Evidence shows that plenty of people who aren't elderly or medically vulnerable can have severe complications from covid
129
16/02/2021 11:12:37 3 0
bbc
You mean catch it and cough for 2 weeks? I'd rather have a vaccine please.....
44
Kaz
16/02/2021 11:02:56 2 2
bbc
Is it not because more over 80s have had the jab?
63
16/02/2021 11:06:19 1 7
bbc
What a Karen
651
Kaz
16/02/2021 12:00:48 0 0
bbc
Rude - And it’s Katherine
64
16/02/2021 11:01:32 82 17
bbc
The deaths we are now seeing are already baked in, so to speak, from infections acquired prior to the start of the vaccination program. As such they should have absolutely no influence on the decision to lift lockdown.

Take a look look at the slope of the total number of hospitalisations. This shows that the RATE of hospitalisations is plummeting, and this is the ONLY important number.
218
16/02/2021 11:23:46 37 8
bbc
The rate of hospitalisations is not falling faster than the rate of infections though. I would expect we would start seeing hospital admissions falling faster than infections by now, as the vulnerable are gaining protection against serious outcomes.
494
Ian
16/02/2021 11:48:05 2 1
bbc
interesting, I vaguely remember vaccine being seen as panacea 2nd week in December. Given deaths are only reported for those within 28 days of infection those numbers don't tally do they.
647
16/02/2021 12:00:10 9 16
bbc
We're nearing the end of a long national lockdown. That's why hospitalisations are plummeting!

End lockdown too early and the hospitalisations will increase rapidly as will proliferations of new variants and most importantly a vaccine that will become useless against them.

End lockdown ONLY when the second dose is administered to all.
16/02/2021 13:34:51 4 2
bbc
Yes, the rates are down, but that's because of lockdown. We are several months away from saying good bye to public health measures. There are still opportunities to double our casualties with a stiff dose of complacency.
7
16/02/2021 10:55:17 620 15
bbc
Congratulations to all those who have made this possible. Well done and thank you.
65
jon
16/02/2021 11:06:27 398 42
bbc
Yes indeed. It’s also good that our vaccine strategy has the backing of the WHO which says the rest of the world can learn from Britain.
WHO said people can learn from China and its testing at borders Removed
273
16/02/2021 11:28:04 4 54
bbc
Yes, the WHO said it is a good idea so it must be. Half-doses of last years vaccine?
405
16/02/2021 11:40:28 28 26
bbc
I’m not inclined to take the considered opinions of the WHO as sacrosanct, After all in the beginning stages of the pandemic they facilitated China’s deceit lies and manipulation of the facts, Oxford Astrazeneca from the very beginning of their clinical trials found by error that a longer period before doses was clinically advantageous, WHO jumped on. and confirmed what our great Scientists knew
703
16/02/2021 12:04:21 0 11
bbc
Slow down Cochise and have a look at these:

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/covid-vaccines-uk-doses-world-b1798362.html

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/coronavirus-vaccine-uk-who-eu-b1795125.html

The UK is one of the offenders when it comes to hoarding vaccines from the rest of the world.
941
16/02/2021 12:27:06 2 2
bbc
we should be mindful that the scientific advances were spearheaded by UK but were all about international cooperation - the last few years since 2015 have poured scorn on internationalism - most notably by Trump but notable areas of the UK politics/media also cast doubts and aspersions - we need to remember that in the future!
970
16/02/2021 12:28:58 1 14
bbc
Pompous flag worship, that's the important thing to you people in this pandemic isn't it? Just to say "we're the best" instead of coming together. Not a competition.
16/02/2021 12:35:21 2 12
bbc
I dont think too many countries will be taking their lead from England......after all we have the highest death rate in Europe and when the true figures are known ..it will be one hell of a shock
16/02/2021 12:48:23 0 2
bbc
Why thumbs down from 25 people ????
16/02/2021 12:54:04 2 4
bbc
And why on earth should any credibility be given to any endorsement that the WHO gives. They are a joke and in Chinas pocket and have done more u turns that Johnson has
16/02/2021 13:05:12 0 2
bbc
How not to Govern
16/02/2021 13:44:01 0 4
bbc
Maybe on vaccines but we still have a much higher death toll than most, despite only counting those with a positive test in the last 4 weeks.
16/02/2021 17:22:44 0 0
bbc
The British NHS has shown its true worth with the vaccine roll out. Pity they weren’t given the responsibility for track and trace.
46
16/02/2021 11:03:05 8 3
bbc
Can somebody smarter than me please explain

If you receive an mRNA vaccine, why would you have antibodies in your blood, if you hadn’t had the virus. My understanding is that it will trigger an immune response once the virus is detected
With the AZ vaccine I can understand more given its nature

Or am I completely wrong and both produce antibodies upon vaccination?
66
16/02/2021 11:06:27 12 1
bbc
the mRNA codes for the COVID 19 spike protein. Your body uses the mRNA to make the spike protein which your immune system responds to by producing antibodies (and T-cells)
67
16/02/2021 11:06:34 78 8
bbc
We’re getting there. Be patient.
888
16/02/2021 12:21:24 38 3
bbc
And don't become a patient! ??
42
16/02/2021 11:02:24 3 53
bbc
Should have vaccinated tax paying wage earners first.

The OAPS haven’t anything to contribute, just a tax burden.

It’s the youngsters and the working age population whose tax is paying for the OAPS to do very little except foreign holidays.
68
16/02/2021 11:06:37 13 1
bbc
Silly Billy - Pensioners also pay tax...
188
16/02/2021 11:20:14 0 1
bbc
On their pittance of handouts?
69
SP
16/02/2021 11:06:38 62 22
bbc
So now its clear that France and other EU nations banned Oxford vaccine to above 65s purely for political reasons
118
16/02/2021 11:12:06 29 1
bbc
Their problem not ours...... all the more Oxford/AZ for us. The french will be waiting a long time for their Sinoffi version.

however it doesn't say what version the people in this story got. In the over 80s odd are it was the Pfizer/BioNTech version.
153
16/02/2021 11:15:47 7 9
bbc
At the time there wasn’t enough evidence.

It’s quite simple. We’ve gambled
155
16/02/2021 11:16:06 8 4
bbc
That, and the figures they had at the time didn't justify using it on over 65s. AZ's own trial didn't have enough participants of that age to prove efficacy, another reason why it took other countries so long to approve its use at all.
Yet UK has kept borders open with no test or quarantine for most EU nationals except Portugal

Netherlands is full of the South African strain
Removed
675
16/02/2021 12:02:17 2 1
bbc
Why are you so desperate to be oppressed and down trodden?
70
16/02/2021 11:06:40 5 10
bbc
Amazing stats that are dug out and the spin put on them. Panic, stay at home half the deaths are covid. Well look at other countries, apart from 4 others they arent going to thie health service and ending dead in such numbers. More over 'excess deaths' are in large part from the NHS refusing to treat cancer and other ailments in case it has to treat covid. Its a mess but no one has been sacked
158
16/02/2021 11:16:12 1 1
bbc
Not true
423
16/02/2021 11:42:21 0 0
bbc
The majority of excess deaths are those dying with covid not because lack of treatment in other areas.
The NHS is not reducing other treatments as part of lockdown, but because they are overwhelmed with covid cases.
Arguing to remove restrictions and allow more virus spread can only impede the ability of the NHS to deliver all treatments.
71
16/02/2021 11:06:54 30 10
bbc
Ironic that we are not allowed a HYS on an article about free speech.
102
16/02/2021 11:10:43 37 19
bbc
To many people confusing free speech with a reason for hate and bigotry. Actually its about stopping the insecure shouting trash.
139
16/02/2021 11:14:04 1 3
bbc
Why has free speech been restricted under consecutive Tory governments?
165
16/02/2021 11:16:29 5 2
bbc
Not really. HYS isn’t a prerequisite of free speech. It’s one of millions of platforms.

I bet you think that if you’re banned of FB then you’ve had your free speech impinged
222
16/02/2021 11:24:10 2 0
bbc
I fail to see the connection between this item and free speech, especially as you use the word "ironic" to describe your feelings.
606
16/02/2021 11:57:00 2 0
bbc
Free speech comes with responsibility. It should be called "open speech". "Free" suggests there are no consequences.
16/02/2021 12:55:20 2 0
bbc
Some people call hate speech 'free speech'.
16/02/2021 13:24:05 0 0
bbc
not ironic just one of the freedoms we have
Perhaps you mean the 'freedom' to insist that vaccines modify your DNA, Covid is a hoax, that nobody has died, well except maybe a few ethnics and if so that should be encouraged ? As opposed to the freedom to broadcast sensible researched truths without harm to other people or society ? Removed
16/02/2021 15:11:43 1 0
bbc
'We' as in you and a few tickers obviously.

I'm sure your time will come.

Savour it when it does

And do stop off topic Moaning please.
72
16/02/2021 11:07:02 3 5
bbc
Why has a 55 year old DG, aka Jo Wiley been offered the vaccination?
92
16/02/2021 11:10:02 1 2
bbc
DJ. Disc Jockey.

Why shouldn't she? She pays quite a bit of tax and we've already dosed 1 in 4 of all adults once. hell.. ROSE WEST!!! had the vaccine, basically because she's fat!
116
16/02/2021 11:11:58 1 0
bbc
She discovered music in 1828 and therefore deserves special treatment.
149
MDK
16/02/2021 11:14:55 2 0
bbc
Read the article:

The DJ added that she didn't know why she had been invited to get the jab, but said it was possibly because she was deemed a carer for her sister, who is 53 and has the rare Cri du Chat genetic syndrome.
"I would give up my vaccine in a heartbeat, if I could, for my sister and any of the residents in her house to have their vaccine… it does not feel right," she said.
46
16/02/2021 11:03:05 8 3
bbc
Can somebody smarter than me please explain

If you receive an mRNA vaccine, why would you have antibodies in your blood, if you hadn’t had the virus. My understanding is that it will trigger an immune response once the virus is detected
With the AZ vaccine I can understand more given its nature

Or am I completely wrong and both produce antibodies upon vaccination?
73
16/02/2021 11:07:04 2 1
bbc
Both
86
16/02/2021 11:08:52 2 0
bbc
Ah ok, perfect.
Thanks for that!
29
16/02/2021 11:00:56 3 11
bbc
Google it. There are more fully vaccinated people in Europe than in the UK. The EU will finish quicker. Watch this space.
Johnson was desperate for the worst tdeath rate in the world and went for the 1 jab policy
74
16/02/2021 11:07:05 5 2
bbc
It was on the advice of scientists, it would be the same advice regardless of who was Prime Minister. Has Nicola Sturgeon advised a different strategy?
75
16/02/2021 11:07:17 26 8
bbc
Anyone sent the results to Micron yet?
316
sw
16/02/2021 11:32:36 1 6
bbc
Who is Micron?
16/02/2021 12:35:31 4 0
bbc
That little guy who is in charge of France, supposedly.
16/02/2021 12:54:39 4 0
bbc
Tiny French bloke.
16/02/2021 13:35:35 1 0
bbc
Don't need to, he can look them up on ONS website (which I am sure his people are doing)
16/02/2021 15:07:58 0 0
bbc
Are we talking about the size of Macron's IQ???
A micron is one thousandth of a millimetre.
20
16/02/2021 10:59:29 21 4
bbc
The report was about levels in the OVER 80's not all age groups. Actually reading the article properly helps, which is something so many people don't bother to do. Long term immunity - how would we know that since we only started 2 months ago - doh!
76
16/02/2021 11:07:31 5 9
bbc
It says more in comparison to other age groups
It says it in the article, the first line even.
Always find it amusing when people ignore your point try to make you look stupid and end up looking ridiculous

The point is that the ONS data cannot be correct if 10% of the entire population had it in the last 3months, given that 24% of 16-24 yr olds represent the most infected group.
646
16/02/2021 12:00:08 0 2
bbc
10% of the population haven't had covid in the last 90 days afaik. that would be 70k new cases a day, every day, which is high. Where are you getting that figure from?
60
16/02/2021 11:05:21 343 35
bbc
The UK strategy of delaying the second jab is working. It means that twice as many folk can get the first jab early.

To those that say they'd rather have the 2 jabs 4 weeks apart as originally planned, I say, OK, no problem, we can delay your first jab for 8 weeks if you like, so that it's 4 weeks before when your second one is due.
77
16/02/2021 11:07:35 320 15
bbc
exactly. Waiting for a fist dose is far more risky than waiting for a second dose
209
16/02/2021 11:23:09 53 1
bbc
I thought a "fist dose" was reserved for anti-vaxers.
16/02/2021 14:26:15 0 0
bbc
Totally agree with your comment but isn't it annoying when we type a really good comment and then re-read it theres a glaring typo in it and no chance of editing.

Its a real Arghhh moment that I have suffered as well.

'Fist Dose' sounds awfully painful but don't worry, we know what you really meant.
37
16/02/2021 11:02:02 447 15
bbc
It’s actually one of those rare things that somewhat restores your faith in humanity
78
16/02/2021 11:08:01 9 16
bbc
That and Celebs Go Dating: The Mansion...
79
16/02/2021 11:08:12 15 16
bbc
Keep up lockdown until over 50's have a been vaccinated - kill the virus!
Easing lockdown is throwing the survivors of the Titanic back in the water
215
16/02/2021 11:23:35 2 0
bbc
We will never kill this virus. It is here to stay. We have to learn to live with it and manage it.
332
16/02/2021 11:33:53 0 0
bbc
Indeed, just because they have stopped drowning doesn't mean you can throw them back in the water.
42
16/02/2021 11:02:24 3 53
bbc
Should have vaccinated tax paying wage earners first.

The OAPS haven’t anything to contribute, just a tax burden.

It’s the youngsters and the working age population whose tax is paying for the OAPS to do very little except foreign holidays.
80
16/02/2021 11:08:12 11 1
bbc
What are you planning to do when you reach the "tax burden" stage of your life? Show some compasion, for goodness sake!
192
16/02/2021 11:20:32 1 1
bbc
I won’t be moaning about having to pay for a tv license.
81
kay
16/02/2021 11:08:13 592 30
bbc
This news is proving vax works, and shows up anti-vax agitprop as the (at best) vacuous and (at worst) socially divisive, malicious junk it is. Shame on those anti-vaxxers trying to keep vaccination away from the ethnic groups most at risk of covid.
433
16/02/2021 11:43:06 261 26
bbc
Shame on these groups for making a conscious decision to believe the nonsense they read...
523
16/02/2021 11:49:49 15 22
bbc
Vax is a floor cleaner fgs!
815
16/02/2021 12:14:46 17 54
bbc
Maybe you should actually consider what the so-called "anti-vaxxers" are concerned about. Most believe the vaccine will have good efficacy. What they care about are long term side effects that we won't know about for years (e.g. with the Pandemrix swine flu vaccine).
The people voting down are clearly the vacuous morons that Kay refers to. I added morons. Removed
well the mRNA vaccine work. AZ one needs updating though before autumn Removed
Tell that to the, already thousands of people killed and seriously harmed by the experimental vaccines. Removed
Lets experiment and harm ethnic minorities first!?... there's a word for that. Removed
16/02/2021 13:53:46 0 0
bbc
Well said.
16/02/2021 15:59:49 0 0
bbc
What ever your view there are still many not taking up the vaccine when offered. Your comments are not likely to change their minds. We need to ask why they don’t want the vaccine and go from there. Not basically label them as foolish
16/02/2021 16:35:13 1 0
bbc
Whilst readily agreeing there are a lot of ignorant antivaxers confusing the issue, If you care to investigate, you will find plenty of high level professionals with a very different view supplying hard facts.
62
16/02/2021 11:06:08 4 12
bbc
Great. So just keep jabbing the elderly and medically vulnerable and let the rest of us who wiil have little or no complications from COVID build up natural immunity.
82
16/02/2021 11:08:15 16 5
bbc
Evidence shows that plenty of people who aren't elderly or medically vulnerable can have severe complications from covid
91
16/02/2021 11:10:01 2 1
bbc
Its hard getting through to some
11
W 6
16/02/2021 10:56:21 851 32
bbc
The data from Israel is nothing short of miraculous. Of the 500k odd fully vaccinated there, only 500 or so tested positive, four of which had severe symptoms and none of them died. Four months ago people were seriously questioning whether we'd ever have a vaccine, and now we've multiple effective ones. They are the way out.
83
Bob
16/02/2021 11:08:32 13 2
bbc
This graph is the best graph to show the impact. https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/israel-covid-19-cases-by-age?tab=chart&stackMode=absolute&time=2020-10-03..latest®ion=World

It shows levels relative to the start of the vaccination programme, by age groups. You can clearly see a greater reduction in the elder age groups. Though not quite yet as stark as you might imagine.
84
16/02/2021 11:08:43 0 13
bbc
So are we looking for antibodies or a reduction in deaths? It's strange that deaths in the over 80s have increased throughout January, yet other age groups have either stayed consistent or seen a decrease. Even stranger that none of the experts are trying to reassure why that is happening with a vaccine and a month and a half in lockdown!
105
16/02/2021 11:11:06 4 0
bbc
Vaccine takes three weeks to start working. Deaths occur more than two weeks after infection. Do the maths.
114
16/02/2021 11:11:53 2 1
bbc
You catch COVID and drop dead.

There is a process of weeks from point of infection, deterioration, hospitalisation and potentially death.

The body needs to react to the vaccine and create the antibodies. Expect to start see the impact of vaccination at the end of Feb.
38
16/02/2021 11:02:06 12 139
bbc
They have done much better than the UK.
85
stu
16/02/2021 11:08:44 69 5
bbc
they also have about 1/7th of the population to deal with and I'm only guessing but im thinking their border control policies were already pretty strict even before covid?
73
16/02/2021 11:07:04 2 1
bbc
Both
86
16/02/2021 11:08:52 2 0
bbc
Ah ok, perfect.
Thanks for that!
42
16/02/2021 11:02:24 3 53
bbc
Should have vaccinated tax paying wage earners first.

The OAPS haven’t anything to contribute, just a tax burden.

It’s the youngsters and the working age population whose tax is paying for the OAPS to do very little except foreign holidays.
87
16/02/2021 11:08:53 12 0
bbc
I hope you’re not really as thick as you write, it is the people of senior years, along with various other nationalities that are the most vulnerable to this virus and therefore highly likely to require specialist hospital care which prevents younger aged people with other serious illnesses from getting the care they need.
They have to post this news as we near opening stuff back

EU says the AZ vaccine doesn't work
Removed
103
16/02/2021 11:11:00 11 3
bbc
The facts show the EU is wrong. Stop scare mongering!
119
16/02/2021 11:12:15 1 1
bbc
No they don't. They are saying there is not enough data yet to be sure.
154
16/02/2021 11:15:48 4 1
bbc
EMA says it works.... some EU countries with a grump on say it doesn't.
170
16/02/2021 11:17:33 1 1
bbc
No they didn’t
230
16/02/2021 11:24:26 1 0
bbc
The fact that they can't get the AZ vaccine in the numbers they want isn't perhaps making them claim lies.
468
16/02/2021 11:46:07 0 0
bbc
The EU are not saying the AZ vaccine doesn't work. The WHO has approved the AZ vaccine and added it to the covax programme.
11
W 6
16/02/2021 10:56:21 851 32
bbc
The data from Israel is nothing short of miraculous. Of the 500k odd fully vaccinated there, only 500 or so tested positive, four of which had severe symptoms and none of them died. Four months ago people were seriously questioning whether we'd ever have a vaccine, and now we've multiple effective ones. They are the way out.
Why did Israel get the vaccine first? nothing to do with Pfizer bosses background

AZ vaccine doesn't work btw according to EU
Removed
172
16/02/2021 11:17:56 14 16
bbc
intresting given that they couldn't recieve the ammount they wanted. EU is lying
204
16/02/2021 11:22:21 49 5
bbc
Israel paid the full asking price early and agreed to share their data - effectively making the whole country a large scale clinical test.
Also Pfizer's CEO is Greek-American but don't let your racism get in the way of the truth.
206
16/02/2021 11:22:39 24 2
bbc
Rubbish. The European Medicines Agency has approved the AZ vaccine for use in all adults.

https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/news/ema-recommends-covid-19-vaccine-astrazeneca-authorisation-eu
220
16/02/2021 11:23:59 52 4
bbc
Well done - casual antisemitism AND lying about the EU's position in a single comment!

Definite 'Sad Little Troll of the Day' award candidate :-)
261
16/02/2021 11:26:52 16 1
bbc
Netanyahu has repeatedly brought up his close relationships with the chief executives of Pfizer and Moderna, suggesting his connections helped secure millions of doses and did say that Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla is "a great friend" of Israel.
Israel also came to a deal to provide loads of medical data to the company.
293
16/02/2021 11:30:34 17 3
bbc
Engage brain before allowing fingers near a keypad!
373
16/02/2021 11:36:59 7 3
bbc
I think we know your agenda!
631
16/02/2021 11:58:55 4 1
bbc
Israel's methods of recording health data means it can track vaccinations and review data fast. They are a test case for the rest of us. The AZ vaccine is less effective against the SA variant but effective on the dominant UK variant and doing its job. The EU aren't giving it to over 65's only because they weren't included in the original trials. If you're going to comment, do your homework.
3
Hex
16/02/2021 10:52:56 383 25
bbc
Excellent, vaccines kicking in.
well they have to post this as the deadline nears Removed
82
16/02/2021 11:08:15 16 5
bbc
Evidence shows that plenty of people who aren't elderly or medically vulnerable can have severe complications from covid
91
16/02/2021 11:10:01 2 1
bbc
Its hard getting through to some
72
16/02/2021 11:07:02 3 5
bbc
Why has a 55 year old DG, aka Jo Wiley been offered the vaccination?
92
16/02/2021 11:10:02 1 2
bbc
DJ. Disc Jockey.

Why shouldn't she? She pays quite a bit of tax and we've already dosed 1 in 4 of all adults once. hell.. ROSE WEST!!! had the vaccine, basically because she's fat!
46
16/02/2021 11:03:05 8 3
bbc
Can somebody smarter than me please explain

If you receive an mRNA vaccine, why would you have antibodies in your blood, if you hadn’t had the virus. My understanding is that it will trigger an immune response once the virus is detected
With the AZ vaccine I can understand more given its nature

Or am I completely wrong and both produce antibodies upon vaccination?
93
16/02/2021 11:10:04 3 0
bbc
When you're infected, your immune system works out and produces the antibodies needed to fight the infection. When you're immunised, your immune system thinks you've been infected and works out the antibodies needed to fight the infection.

The 2 types of vaccine have slightly different methods of triggering the immune system but both (should) result in the immune system producing the antibodies.
46
16/02/2021 11:03:05 8 3
bbc
Can somebody smarter than me please explain

If you receive an mRNA vaccine, why would you have antibodies in your blood, if you hadn’t had the virus. My understanding is that it will trigger an immune response once the virus is detected
With the AZ vaccine I can understand more given its nature

Or am I completely wrong and both produce antibodies upon vaccination?
94
16/02/2021 11:10:10 2 0
bbc
The mRNA causes some cells to produce the protein spike that is present on the surface of the virus. The immune system produces anti-bodies to the spike, and so produces anti-bodies to the virus.
144
16/02/2021 11:14:28 5 0
bbc
Thanks Serendipo
Makes sense

I expect I’ll still get downvoted for asking a question but if I learnt something sure others will too
15
16/02/2021 10:57:45 277 83
bbc
This is good news right? So, why do you always make it look like bad news?

Please can we have some positivity from the media.....
95
Bob
16/02/2021 11:10:12 130 23
bbc
I'm not sure I see the same doomsaying you're seeing.

Though, you should still treat the news with caution. Having some antibodies is good news, but the true test isn't having detectable antibodies it is not needing hospital or a casket.
207
RM
16/02/2021 11:22:40 11 3
bbc
I always thought that not becoming infected and poorly and not spreading/infecting others is the gold standard good news.
Is that achieved yet?
Can you quote where in this article that the data released by the ONS is "made to look like bad news"?
413
JP
16/02/2021 11:41:05 5 5
bbc
Bob is in that 'very hard to please' category
550
16/02/2021 11:52:05 1 12
bbc
not for the Government and SAGE it wasn't, otherwise we wouldn't have lock-down the young and basically immune.
16/02/2021 12:59:21 2 2
bbc
I do have a little bit of sympathy with those that work for the BBC. The media used to require journalists but these days all they want is entertainers so the actual facts seem to be less and less important when doing their job.

Maybe we should be looking at the "consumers" of media rather than the producers to see where the problems lie?
OwO
16/02/2021 13:33:23 0 4
bbc
Which we all will, eventually? Just look at those goalposts, running off into the distance!
42
16/02/2021 11:02:24 3 53
bbc
Should have vaccinated tax paying wage earners first.

The OAPS haven’t anything to contribute, just a tax burden.

It’s the youngsters and the working age population whose tax is paying for the OAPS to do very little except foreign holidays.
96
16/02/2021 11:10:13 3 1
bbc
Plenty of healthy retired people in their early 60s have already been vaccinated yet are staying at home.

Meanwhile carers and other public-facing workers have to wait.
42
16/02/2021 11:02:24 3 53
bbc
Should have vaccinated tax paying wage earners first.

The OAPS haven’t anything to contribute, just a tax burden.

It’s the youngsters and the working age population whose tax is paying for the OAPS to do very little except foreign holidays.
These OAP’s as you call the paid through their taxes you schooling, your hospital costs, the roads you drive on and your life as many fought in the war. What an ungrateful idiot you are. Removed
31
Me
16/02/2021 11:00:57 59 25
bbc
"For 90% of these deaths, Covid was the main underlying cause"

What does "main underlying cause" mean? "Main" cause, or "underlying" cause?

Why is it so difficult to articulate this clearly -it would be good to know precisely.
98
16/02/2021 11:10:22 7 25
bbc
it means if you get hit by a bus can u have covid then covid killed you.
151
16/02/2021 11:15:21 14 4
bbc
No it doesn’t but you carry on
152
16/02/2021 11:15:44 13 4
bbc
No you were killed by stupidity for not looking where you re walking.
175
16/02/2021 11:18:27 8 0
bbc
People with a positive test will be self isolating at home or in a hospital ward.
How many of these people do you really think are involved in RTAs?
16/02/2021 14:29:20 1 0
bbc
Of course it can be the case. Getting hit by a bus doesn't necessarily kill you but if you're already infected with covid it could kill you while you are trying to recover from your injuries acquired when being hit by a bus.
99
16/02/2021 11:10:28 2 5
bbc
While the numbers of people being jabbed are truly brilliant, it's a bit worrying how many people in the top 4 cohorts have still not been jabbed.
While the target for the top 4 cohorts is X million, and X million have been jabbed (great??) that number of people jabbed includes people from cohorts 5 and 6 or lower in some areas (not so great??)
130
16/02/2021 11:12:50 7 1
bbc
You cant force people to have the vaccine so the 60-70% range is what was expected.

If some choose to continue to spread covid to their family and friends, its a bad thing for society but even worse for the people they live and interact with!
148
16/02/2021 11:14:46 0 1
bbc
Yes, Ive been missed. My doctors website clearly states they will ring me and, indeed I was there this morning and they confirmed they didnt know why I,d been missed. I cannot be the only one.
42
16/02/2021 11:02:24 3 53
bbc
Should have vaccinated tax paying wage earners first.

The OAPS haven’t anything to contribute, just a tax burden.

It’s the youngsters and the working age population whose tax is paying for the OAPS to do very little except foreign holidays.
100
16/02/2021 11:10:28 14 0
bbc
The OAPs mostly paid tax for all their working lives - tax that built the NHS hospitals, the roads and everything else that the younger generations take for granted. Or did you think that all this infrastructure magically appeared when you were born?
177
16/02/2021 11:18:43 1 1
bbc
That tupence halfpenny wouldn’t buy a single dose