Jaguar car brand to be all-electric by 2025
15/02/2021 | news | business | 1,958
JLR will launch electric models of its entire Jaguar and Land Rover line-up by 2030.
1
15/02/2021 16:09:18 303 119
bbc
Hydrogen is the future
2
15/02/2021 16:11:32 177 324
bbc
And the hydrogen comes from???????????

Oh yeah

Breaking down natural gas with lots of steam to get CO2 and Hydrogen
12
15/02/2021 16:15:58 30 49
bbc
I think the plan is to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. Not to increase it.
13
15/02/2021 16:16:08 23 13
bbc
If only you could polymerise hydrogen into a safer and less explosive state.
14
JGC
15/02/2021 16:16:29 66 52
bbc
I agree. Electric cars don't have the range for many journeys. Yes many people will quote the manufactures top range, forgetting that it's the absolute top, in perfect conditions. If it's cold (batteries less effective), you have heaters, lights going, stop start traffic, it can drop to be a lot less. Then you need to stop for 2 hours to fully recharge. (and find somewhere)
16
15/02/2021 16:17:14 40 104
bbc
Hydrogen has no future for domestic travel due to storage problems.
55
15/02/2021 16:24:25 4 24
bbc
No, petrol from air is. Solar power conversion removes co2 and stores it as petrol to be released later. Can be used for cars, power stations and many other uses. Doesn't require scalping billions of cars and building trillions of charging stations and battery recycling, or heavy metals, or inventions. The technology is already proven to work
58
15/02/2021 16:24:44 13 25
bbc
Hydrogen can play a part especially for big lorries and ships , not domestic cars though
159
15/02/2021 16:38:46 4 7
bbc
That'll cost even more !
165
15/02/2021 16:40:09 7 10
bbc
Hydrogen.....

I'm thinking, blimp, huge explosion, everyone running around on fire, panic and disbelief
171
15/02/2021 16:40:44 7 2
bbc
You appear to have inadvertently opened an Online University for budding
Chemists, Physicists and Engineers. Thank you, its an informative seminar.
198
15/02/2021 16:44:51 7 5
bbc
Hydrogen has been the future for 50 yrs, its isn't true and it won't ever be true.
The efficiency of using elemental Hydrogen to store electricity cannot be significantly improved. It is pretty much at is peak now, its not going to get any better than 40%, electricity-electricity when batteries are at 90%.
We'd have to build alot more power generation and it would delay a zero carbon grid.
203
15/02/2021 16:45:23 3 8
bbc
No it isn't. Even if it was possible to produce hydrogen without burning lots of carbon (as is currently the case) it still has to be distributed all over the world. It may have a place for trucks and the like, but for cars electric is clearly going to be completely dominant within a decade.
240
15/02/2021 16:53:12 10 3
bbc
Read the news today. UK already producing 60% of energy needs from wind so much so that occasionally they over produce. so are innovating to use the surplus electricity to generate hydrogen out at sea using salination. and the UK is leading the race. there's mountains of improvements to be made with renewable. we're only at the beginning of a new dawn. give it chance.
254
15/02/2021 16:54:53 2 3
bbc
The trouble with hydrogen is lousy energy density.
285
15/02/2021 16:59:22 2 2
bbc
Anyone interested in Hydrogen and its feasibility there is a video on YouTube by SkillBuilder. Provides a good practical discussion. Hydrogen can be made cleanly and where it can't they are looking into carbon capture.
301
15/02/2021 17:02:15 2 4
bbc
Except for the production, transportation and storage issues it's fine !
Battery development is still moving forward. We should however be looking at more efficiency rather than replacing a gas guzzler for an electron guzzler ...
309
15/02/2021 17:03:40 1 1
bbc
H-embrittlement ??
329
15/02/2021 17:06:01 2 1
bbc
You must be a Russian operative. :)

Natural gas is so yesterday.
361
15/02/2021 17:09:51 4 4
bbc
Not remotely. Hydrogen may have a few limited uses. But is being promoted by the oil industry so they can 'dig it up' in effect. Creating hydrogen from water takes a lot of energy!
458
Ken
15/02/2021 17:24:18 1 2
bbc
Solar panels to fuel the production is the way forward
1
15/02/2021 16:09:18 303 119
bbc
Hydrogen is the future
2
15/02/2021 16:11:32 177 324
bbc
And the hydrogen comes from???????????

Oh yeah

Breaking down natural gas with lots of steam to get CO2 and Hydrogen
7
15/02/2021 16:15:18 71 20
bbc
There is nothing wrong with using hydrogen to provide power, as long as it's in a fusion reactor 93 million miles away!
10
15/02/2021 16:15:37 27 23
bbc
The universe is full of the stuff. ????
15
15/02/2021 16:16:50 122 27
bbc
there are half a dozen routes, so far, to produce hydrogen without resorting to manipulation of hydrocarbons. hydrogen is most definitely the way forward.
25
15/02/2021 16:19:28 149 16
bbc
It comes from water via electrolysis - first "green" wind powered electrolysis systems are being designed now. Don't give up hope just yet!
42
15/02/2021 16:22:09 39 21
bbc
Every bit of energy that we use causes pollution in one way or another, electricity included. Also everything that we buy. Reducing our consumption is the best way to reduce pollution. Unfortunately that’s bad for the economy, and not appreciated by those who must keep up with the Joneses.
49
15/02/2021 16:20:25 83 10
bbc
Natural Gas Reforming/Gasification, Electrolysis, Renewable Liquid Reforming, or Fermentation are all currently used. When electrolysis is used and the electricity is produced by renewable sources, such as solar or wind, the resulting hydrogen will be considered renewable as well.
53
15/02/2021 16:24:12 16 14
bbc
And where does electricity come from?
China is building fossil fuelled power stations to meet the demand for batteries for “green” cars.....
56
15/02/2021 16:24:29 44 7
bbc
What???? I think you'll find electrolysis of water, which produces 2 parts Hydrogen to 1part of Oxygen is the process. Then when burnt or used in a fuel cell, they re-combine to produce - water. And nothing else. The only potential pollution would be from whatever is used to generate the electricity, which, in the case of nuclear, wind or solar, would be nil.
67
15/02/2021 16:25:33 18 2
bbc
You can get it from H2O by electrolysis. Of course whatever is cheaper is what will be used.
259
15/02/2021 16:55:40 1 1
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Not always!
279
15/02/2021 16:58:25 6 2
bbc
Hydrogen can be cleanly produced with wind power and sea water hence some older oil rigs are being converted for this process.

If car manufacturers get on board with https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-52328786 then existing fuel stations can swap some petrol and diesel pumps out for hydrogen.

Hydrogen cars only take slightly longer to fill then petrol & diesel.
321
15/02/2021 17:05:12 1 7
bbc
Another alternative is to use the very green solar electricity to break down water with lots off added Sulphuric acid !!
Another OUTSTANDING WOKE IDEOLOGY
337
15/02/2021 17:07:10 3 2
bbc
Or Green Hydrogen which can be produced by electrolysis - breaking down seawater - using wind power and subsea storage - still a few years away but prototypes are under development - I know as company I work for is developing such a system.
375
15/02/2021 17:11:26 3 3
bbc
That is the cheap way but it can be made by electrolysis of water
401
MrM
15/02/2021 17:08:47 3 3
bbc
That is one way - but hydrogen can also be made by electrolysing water using excess wind/solar. So hopefully a truly green solutiin
405
15/02/2021 17:15:47 3 3
bbc
Not quite true. The future mix will be some blue hydrogen through steam reforming, but policy is to grow this with carbon capture projects making it net zero CO2. With a growing proportion of green hydrogen from electrolysis powered by wind, so also net zero CO2
Better hydrogen than batteries, which have a hidden social and environmental cost and lack the range of hydrogen vehicles.
3
15/02/2021 16:13:28 4 19
bbc
Exceptional engineering if it’s achieved.
The U.K. owned and manufactured car industry probably hasn’t the skills base to achieve this so it’s socialism again to ensure it happens.
27
15/02/2021 16:19:46 6 9
bbc
Socialism means Ladas & Trabants.
38
15/02/2021 16:21:34 3 1
bbc
The UK does have the skills. It doesnt have Mgmt competency though. Worst is HMG encouraging this, buying non British ministerial cars is a kick in the teeth for car workers and designers here
44
15/02/2021 16:22:25 6 2
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Uk owned car industry?
Are you talking pre EEC? UK hasn’t had a mass market manufacturer for decades.
132
15/02/2021 16:34:45 0 1
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Where have you been the last twenty years. JLR is owned by the Indian conglomerate Tata. They were previously owned by Ford, another well known British company, which gave up on them.
199
15/02/2021 16:45:02 1 1
bbc
so apply Venezulian approaches? it's turned out to be disasterous for them so no thanks to socialism. Gov grants for training / partnership could be viable to support a key future industry.
4
15/02/2021 16:13:34 101 40
bbc
YES YES YES i know

You need a car that can recharge in under 5 minutes so you can rush to work/home and then let the car sit there not moving for 8 hours

Would you mobile phone be more convient if you had to take it into town once a week to be recharged instead of recharging it while you are fast asleep?
18
15/02/2021 16:18:09 117 76
bbc
The issue is not the popping to the shops, it's the commute to work, the visit to relatives and the holiday where the 150 miles at 30mph makes it unusable (check the e-mini specs) and the heavy metals and dead battery pack after 2 years make it expensive and environmentally harmful. Better to do petrol from air (proven) which allows us to keep our fleet without recycling
35
15/02/2021 16:20:29 10 11
bbc
Not everyone has access to chargers at home!
47
15/02/2021 16:23:02 12 9
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I can use my phone whilst charging it. I need a car that can recharge quickly for longer journeys. The quoted ranges may be 300+ miles, but when it's raining, dark and cold outside and I need heating / headlights and wipers then that range is going to drop off dramatically.
I'm not anti-electric cars by any means - bring em on but there's not enough charging points right now and not fast enough
280
z
15/02/2021 16:58:33 10 2
bbc
Are you aware how many people don't have off street parking let alone parking near enough to run a cable to their car? So it isn't comparable to charging a mobile phone but more like a 1930s radio before you had mains electricity. In practice people will have to share centralised charging stations like with petrol stations today so the recharge time is a critical issue.
547
15/02/2021 17:38:35 1 1
bbc
apples and pears
an electric car batters that fully recharges in less then 5 minutes have already been developed and is expected to become the norm in the next few years.

Do try to keep up True Scott, and if you are unable to keep up then quickly google before you type out of date rubbish
672
15/02/2021 18:03:35 0 1
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A good point.
5
15/02/2021 16:14:02 20 18
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The benefit to the Climate and Environment by doing this and other Car makers is so huge,

Well done Jaguar and hope others follow
59
15/02/2021 16:24:55 21 23
bbc
No it's not, there is no evidence it will change or slow anything. There is however visual evidence around the world where huge climatic changes have occurred long before we were around, or before we started burning fossil fuels. Something may well be happening, but vital we keep an open mind and realise there are billions being made off the back of climate change.
398
15/02/2021 17:15:14 2 1
bbc
It must be a slow news day because pretty much every manufacturer that wants to sell to Europe and China is going down the same route.
However, internal combustion engines will still be manufactured long after 2030 because the world is a big place and both diesel and petrol engines will remain essential in many remoter places.
6
15/02/2021 16:14:18 9 8
bbc
This might work for other countries where Jags are sold but i fear their UK sales will drop without sustained public investment in the supporting infrastructure. Even if the Gov invested now (or private investors) i just dont see sufficient charging points etc by 2030.
22
15/02/2021 16:18:59 5 2
bbc
Even less infrastructure to support hydrogen fuel.
50
15/02/2021 16:21:17 3 2
bbc
According to Zap Map there is something in excess of 20,000 charge points in the UK at the moment. Given that this number will be ramped up at the same time that the production of electric cars is being ramped up, not being able to "see sufficient charging points by 2030" is not a provable statement.
137
15/02/2021 16:34:56 2 2
bbc
Not only do we have insufficient charging points we do not have the generating capacity
2
15/02/2021 16:11:32 177 324
bbc
And the hydrogen comes from???????????

Oh yeah

Breaking down natural gas with lots of steam to get CO2 and Hydrogen
7
15/02/2021 16:15:18 71 20
bbc
There is nothing wrong with using hydrogen to provide power, as long as it's in a fusion reactor 93 million miles away!
223
15/02/2021 16:49:00 2 3
bbc
You are a tad confused I think
8
15/02/2021 16:15:18 102 28
bbc
This is good for everyone in terms of the environment, but unaffordable for most people.
26
15/02/2021 16:19:34 146 19
bbc
Petrol cars were unaffordable for most people 100 years ago; the price will come down. Besides, there's no immediate rush; let the early-adopters bear the cost of development.
28
15/02/2021 16:19:47 11 2
bbc
For now... electric cars will eventually be cheaper due to far simpler engineering. When a thing first comes out, that thing is always expensive. Just look at the fact you can now buy a 65" TV for less than £500... crazy to think they cost 50 times that not so long ago.
68
15/02/2021 16:25:34 2 1
bbc
If an OEM moves to new tech then a supplier base is established. This enables other OEMs who rely on established tech and an established supplier base to design, build, and sell affordable cars to go down this route. Tech has always trickled down from the expensive to eventually become mainstream affordable. To have cheap hydrogen cars, we need OEMs that sell at the high end to adopt this tech
118
15/02/2021 16:33:01 11 5
bbc
It is not good for the environment when you consider the damage done by mining the resources needed to manufacture batteries
180
15/02/2021 16:41:42 3 2
bbc
Most people don't buy brand new cars now...

Suckers like me buy the new ones, and the older ones get sold on, with a shedload of depreciation :-)

Why would that change, given that EV batteries seem to be lasting much better than was originally expected?
230
15/02/2021 16:50:32 11 9
bbc
Electric cars are nowhere near as environmentally friendly as people with an agenda would like you to think they are:
https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/industry-news/inside-industry-evs-are-greener-ices-only-just
They might produce less CO2 (depending on how the electricity is made), but in almost every other measurable way they are worse for the environment than "normal" cars.
252
15/02/2021 16:54:43 6 2
bbc
We cannot presently make enough electricity from solar and wind power. From where is the power to come for electric vehicles? Nuclear?
537
15/02/2021 17:36:53 2 1
bbc
Any new car is unaffordable for most people - used is the sourc.
15/02/2021 23:56:57 0 2
bbc
Apart from the lids mining cobalt in the Republic of Congo.
9
15/02/2021 16:15:30 6 15
bbc
Why? Electric means destroying the planet. Better to invest in petrol from air, proven technology with net co2 negative.
24
15/02/2021 16:19:15 4 2
bbc
How do you get petrol from air? I plead total ignorance on achieving the possibility.
45
15/02/2021 16:22:37 0 3
bbc
Electric means saving the planet - petrol from air is a proven technology only on a micro scale
2
15/02/2021 16:11:32 177 324
bbc
And the hydrogen comes from???????????

Oh yeah

Breaking down natural gas with lots of steam to get CO2 and Hydrogen
10
15/02/2021 16:15:37 27 23
bbc
The universe is full of the stuff. ????
11
15/02/2021 16:15:56 76 30
bbc
Well done Jaguar - an ambitious target. Here's hoping we can get charging time down within the coming years, which will no doubt happen.
87
15/02/2021 16:28:29 64 18
bbc
The government needs to get on top of home charging, fast. Every home needs a charger, and for many that means on-street charging. I needs to be cheap, ideally billed to your home electricity bill at the same price as domestic electricity.

Otherwise it will just create yet another social divide, and make houses without charging work far less than those with.
850
15/02/2021 18:53:54 2 5
bbc
The quicker you recharge a battery, the quicker you reduce its life, new battery's after 2 years. Exempt from Warranty ??
16/02/2021 19:04:42 0 0
bbc
You won't achieve fast charge with current batteries, so these bags will become worthless dinasours in about 5 years time
1
15/02/2021 16:09:18 303 119
bbc
Hydrogen is the future
12
15/02/2021 16:15:58 30 49
bbc
I think the plan is to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. Not to increase it.
328
15/02/2021 17:05:57 3 1
bbc
Fossil fuels are only part of global warming. Population explosion and greater use of these fuels is an integral part of the problem. A concrete planet.
1
15/02/2021 16:09:18 303 119
bbc
Hydrogen is the future
13
15/02/2021 16:16:08 23 13
bbc
If only you could polymerise hydrogen into a safer and less explosive state.
130
15/02/2021 16:34:22 17 10
bbc
Hydrogen is no more explosive than natural gas and most people don't worry about that.
1
15/02/2021 16:09:18 303 119
bbc
Hydrogen is the future
14
JGC
15/02/2021 16:16:29 66 52
bbc
I agree. Electric cars don't have the range for many journeys. Yes many people will quote the manufactures top range, forgetting that it's the absolute top, in perfect conditions. If it's cold (batteries less effective), you have heaters, lights going, stop start traffic, it can drop to be a lot less. Then you need to stop for 2 hours to fully recharge. (and find somewhere)
73
15/02/2021 16:26:44 19 5
bbc
You'd never stop for two hours in a modern EV. As for start/stop traffic, EVs excel there. Motorways in the cold is what kills the range more than anything else.
139
15/02/2021 16:35:18 8 6
bbc
I would hazard a guess that you don't have an EV? And haven't considered it because you'd heard someone else say that they don't have the range?
459
15/02/2021 17:24:21 4 2
bbc
Seems the residents of that well know tropical country of Norway disagree with you. 54% of sales on 2020 there were full battery electric vehicles.

EVs with 2010s tech didnt have enough range. EVs with 2020s tech do.
2
15/02/2021 16:11:32 177 324
bbc
And the hydrogen comes from???????????

Oh yeah

Breaking down natural gas with lots of steam to get CO2 and Hydrogen
15
15/02/2021 16:16:50 122 27
bbc
there are half a dozen routes, so far, to produce hydrogen without resorting to manipulation of hydrocarbons. hydrogen is most definitely the way forward.
1
15/02/2021 16:09:18 303 119
bbc
Hydrogen is the future
16
15/02/2021 16:17:14 40 104
bbc
Hydrogen has no future for domestic travel due to storage problems.
445
15/02/2021 17:21:25 6 2
bbc
Hydrogen is already available at 8 filling stations in London and there are a range of cars with >300 mile range available to buy. We have a fleet of busses running on it in Aberdeen. There are numerous cities globally rolling out hydrogen fuels and hydrogen fuel cell technology.
It is already being g blended up to 17% in some domestic gas networks.
What storage problems? Same as lpg.
447
15/02/2021 17:21:34 1 1
bbc
We to be doing a damn good job of storing it bonded to oxygen
(fun fact: approximately 40% of your body is made up of hydrogen stored this way)
17
15/02/2021 16:16:40 9 19
bbc
“ The company will launch electric models of its entire Jaguar and Land Rover line-up by 2030, it added.”

Well they’ve lost my business then.
34
15/02/2021 16:20:15 3 6
bbc
So will you walk then because ICEd cars won’t be made??????
57
15/02/2021 16:24:33 2 5
bbc
In five years you'll look back at your comment and not believe that you thought this way.
308
15/02/2021 17:03:17 0 1
bbc
Which jag do you drive now?
4
15/02/2021 16:13:34 101 40
bbc
YES YES YES i know

You need a car that can recharge in under 5 minutes so you can rush to work/home and then let the car sit there not moving for 8 hours

Would you mobile phone be more convient if you had to take it into town once a week to be recharged instead of recharging it while you are fast asleep?
18
15/02/2021 16:18:09 117 76
bbc
The issue is not the popping to the shops, it's the commute to work, the visit to relatives and the holiday where the 150 miles at 30mph makes it unusable (check the e-mini specs) and the heavy metals and dead battery pack after 2 years make it expensive and environmentally harmful. Better to do petrol from air (proven) which allows us to keep our fleet without recycling
61
15/02/2021 16:25:09 26 8
bbc
Which battery packs only last two years?! I drove to Italy and did Land's End to John O'Groats in my Kia e-Niro (with its battery warranty of seven years) so although the electric Mini may not be suitable, other EVs certainly are.

"Petrol from air" would be good for existing combustion engines but it still creates emissions around town. Electric makes so much more sense.
64
15/02/2021 16:25:20 34 5
bbc
"dead battery pack after 2 years"

There's nothing quite like hyperbole.

" Better to do petrol from air (proven)"

Mmm, I think you better tell someone about this proven magical process.
76
15/02/2021 16:26:56 15 12
bbc
I really don't think this will be a big problem at all. Most ppl with electric cars will almost always be able to recharge at home, with enough mileage for the commute or weekend driving. The oncce/twice a year driving hol of a 100/200 miles + will require 10mins extra planning to look at somewhere to stop and recharge or find somewhere to stay that has charging points (getting more common)
204
15/02/2021 16:45:47 7 3
bbc
I think you'll find that most battery packs are lasting longer than two years.

Oh, and Lithium is only a heavy metal if you are an astronomer :-)

Other than that, I agree - it is the 250-300 mile round trip with no chance to charge at the far end that stopped me this time.

And no, addng an extra half-hour at a service station is not an option - maximising time at the far end is!
294
15/02/2021 17:00:48 4 7
bbc
You've been reading ALOT of oil industry propaganda about batteries, havn't you? That propaganda is simply not true. BEVs work well and last well, far superior to combustion cars.
333
15/02/2021 17:06:34 4 3
bbc
>dead battery pack after 2 years

Why is your battery pack dead after 2 years? Mine has lasted 6 so far, with almost no decrease in range.

Why do you feel the need to tell lies to make your point?
414
15/02/2021 17:16:59 5 7
bbc
The days of long distance traveling must be curtailed. Millions eager not to commute at all thanks to covid. Attitudes are changing. Relatives separate by distance then it is 'Zoom' or forget each other.
479
15/02/2021 17:27:38 1 2
bbc
where to start unpicking this, its all false.
558
15/02/2021 17:39:41 2 2
bbc
MINI is a poor example. Batteries are generally guaranteed for 7 years and work well beyond that.
962
15/02/2021 19:35:08 4 2
bbc
my leaf is 10 years old so really old battery technology but it still has 70% of its original range. I drive it at normal car speeds. Main dealer servicing has averaged just over £100 a year and the only other visits to mechanics have been to replace a door window motor and to change the tyres - electrics don't rattle themselves to bits like petrol engined cars do.
15/02/2021 20:30:44 1 2
bbc
Petrol from air??? Link to a reputable website please.
15/02/2021 20:35:55 3 2
bbc
"and dead battery pack after 2 years make it expensive and environmentally harmful" Why are the manufacturers so cagey about battery life and replacement cost?
15/02/2021 20:41:07 0 2
bbc
I've owned electric since 2016 and I can't see a difference in the battery performance and don't expect to for at least another 5. Where'd you get 2 years from? Electric's proven enough by now. Petrol's a dead duck.
15/02/2021 21:44:11 0 2
bbc
Nonsense!

My battery is six years old and still operating at 100% capacity.

I drive a fully electric four door hatchback which does 0-60 in 4 seconds and top speed of 100mph.

At 6 years old it's as good as new. Minimal servicing required. Fewer moving parts. No gears. No pistons. No engine oil etc.
19
15/02/2021 16:17:26 4 2
bbc
Why embed an 18 month old video in the news report.
20
15/02/2021 16:18:33 189 33
bbc
The problem with going electric is where are the recharge points ? Not much use if you live in a rural area or cannot install a home charging point.
40
15/02/2021 16:21:47 160 39
bbc
Recharge speeds too are still too slow and impractical for mass recharging.
92
15/02/2021 16:29:21 16 23
bbc
There is already a network of street lighting in almost every village and hamlet in the UK. Just need to add a charging point to every lamp post.
100
15/02/2021 16:29:58 28 12
bbc
Exactly said. I live in a village...my home is 200m from a road .... My village does not have Gas/ 4G or even a Terrestrial TV signal, Broadband is OK but not superfast.
Tell me HMG are going to give me a charging point on my lane...where all cars have to park over the curb...so that others can pass! Bollocks comes to mind!
104
15/02/2021 16:30:35 15 13
bbc
We'll have 400 mile range as normal by 2025.
349
15/02/2021 17:08:18 5 6
bbc
Oh I can't think of any way to resolve that, I can only complain.. No wait I'm an Engineer there are many ways to resolve it. The gov't already provided councils a budget for this, but they spent it on town centre charging instead. Once the gov't give them a slap, the residental chargers will start appearing, but you may have to ask for it. Suppliers want to install these.
366
15/02/2021 17:10:33 2 3
bbc
They are being rolled out at petroleum stations
462
15/02/2021 17:25:09 8 4
bbc
The bigger issue is the supply of electricity if we all convert to electric cars and domestic heating. In the UK we use 4700 kwh per person of electricity and the grid struggles to meet that demand. In Norway, where they have moved to a much greater % of EV and electric domestic heating, the figure is 22,000 kwh per person. Hence the grid would need to supply 5x the amount of electricity!
512
15/02/2021 17:32:37 3 2
bbc
The problem for me is that I can't afford one. Those who can get a Government subsidy. Something wronge here.
792
15/02/2021 18:43:11 5 4
bbc
My pal with an iPace has run out of juice twice in 6 months & had to be towed home (on a truck). Nightmare logistics to run/charge & use in daily life unless you potter about doing 50 miles a week.
910
15/02/2021 19:17:55 6 4
bbc
"where are the recharge points?" I have about 50 in my house alone. You can charge at about 10 miles an hour from an ordinary 13 amp socket if you really want to. It is about the same as a kettle or power shower. So overnight you can get about 120 miles. The average car does about 22 miles per day so most people are covered by charging at home, that includes rural areas.
15/02/2021 20:33:27 1 2
bbc
Don't think you need a home charging point specifically, just normal plug socket. If you don't have that then perhaps you have bigger issues and should sort them out first. Just saying. Friendly advice. No, you're welcome. Mind you, I suppose it would take you a while to find me if you've no electicity.
15/02/2021 20:35:39 2 2
bbc
Run a standard 3-pin connector through your letterbox. Well I did!
15/02/2021 21:17:17 0 2
bbc
Why would you not be able to install home charging?
Don't you have electricity?
15/02/2021 23:29:14 0 1
bbc
Why can you not install a charging point at home?
16/02/2021 08:17:36 0 0
bbc
Many have them at work
16/02/2021 13:22:47 0 0
bbc
A little over a century ago... These 'ere motor-cars 'll never catch on. There's nowhere to get the fuel from! Loads of 'ay for 'orses about though...

Never say never
21
15/02/2021 16:18:46 158 48
bbc
Good to see someone is looking at Hydrogen Fuel Technology. Quick refill at a garage. Batteries may not be the future.
52
15/02/2021 16:24:06 111 39
bbc
That would work for me. Drive, refill, drive etc. Easy conversion to HFT. Electric? Drive. Charge. Wait. Wait some more. Wait some more. Drive. Repeat. Hardly any infrastructure in place. Makes one sound way more appealing doesn't it?
93
15/02/2021 16:29:31 14 8
bbc
Hydrogen is an absolute pain to store and fuel a car with.
260
15/02/2021 16:55:55 8 7
bbc
Hydrogen has been "looked at" for the last 50 yrs. Its still not viable as an energy storage medium due to gross inefficiency.
Batteries don't need to be refilled quickly at a station. In a few year fast chargers will not be needed except by a few.
357
15/02/2021 17:09:21 5 6
bbc
Hydrogen becomes a liquid at -252.87C, how do you keep it that cold at the service station, let alone in your car.
If it explodes you won't need a cremation, there will be nothing left apart from a dirty big crater.
469
LG
15/02/2021 17:26:05 4 3
bbc
Hydrogen Fuel cell cars still use batteries to store electricity produced
15/02/2021 19:56:39 1 3
bbc
I believe there will be a blend, maybe hydrogen for commercials, BEV for personal transport. I'm one of the lucky ones with a BEV, range isn't as important as you may think. Fast charging makes long journeys possible, you just have to adjust the way you go about things, it's actually quite liberating.
15/02/2021 21:31:35 0 2
bbc
Indeed - may have more of a future than people think as could be easier to adapt existing infrastructure and car floor plans. BMW have already had production models in the early 2000s and in 1970s if my hazy memory of Tomorrow’s World is real.
OwO
15/02/2021 21:52:23 0 2
bbc
Slightly explosive though, that's the issue.

Hydrogen power plants to charge your batteries is the real future.
AAJ
16/02/2021 14:52:58 0 0
bbc
Hydrogen fuel cell EVs have a battery. Why don't people realise that. It's just an EV complete with battery, but with a hydrogen fuel cell range extender in the place of a large battery.
6
15/02/2021 16:14:18 9 8
bbc
This might work for other countries where Jags are sold but i fear their UK sales will drop without sustained public investment in the supporting infrastructure. Even if the Gov invested now (or private investors) i just dont see sufficient charging points etc by 2030.
22
15/02/2021 16:18:59 5 2
bbc
Even less infrastructure to support hydrogen fuel.
63
15/02/2021 16:25:14 2 2
bbc
I'm guessing possibly easier to retrofit existing stations to hydrogen than it is to put in electric charging points?
65
15/02/2021 16:25:21 2 2
bbc
Easy enough to convert existing filling stations to stock hydrogen. A LOT easier and cheaper than having to build a charging infrastructure on almost every street where people don't have a private driveway.
23
15/02/2021 16:19:14 3 8
bbc
I guess they are losing money right now, and need any hype they can get. I expect their sales will go down further with this news, as there's nowhere to conveniently re-fuel a car away from home. So it will be back to big oil soon enough for them. Too much lip service to improving the environment, in future years, of course, but nothing substantive being done right now.
9
15/02/2021 16:15:30 6 15
bbc
Why? Electric means destroying the planet. Better to invest in petrol from air, proven technology with net co2 negative.
24
15/02/2021 16:19:15 4 2
bbc
How do you get petrol from air? I plead total ignorance on achieving the possibility.
46
15/02/2021 16:22:47 1 2
bbc
They mean Hydrogen, as in H2o
2
15/02/2021 16:11:32 177 324
bbc
And the hydrogen comes from???????????

Oh yeah

Breaking down natural gas with lots of steam to get CO2 and Hydrogen
25
15/02/2021 16:19:28 149 16
bbc
It comes from water via electrolysis - first "green" wind powered electrolysis systems are being designed now. Don't give up hope just yet!
169
15/02/2021 16:40:31 9 12
bbc
There can never be "green" electrolysis as you are taking perfectly usable energy in the form of electricity and creating a fuel with it that has less energy in it then the electricity you started with.

Because of that fundamental fact hydrogen can only ever be a niche product.
212
15/02/2021 16:47:21 7 4
bbc
It doesn't come from electrolysis, it can but it doesn't. It comes from fossil fuels because electrolysis is expensive. Using wind power to make Hydrogen is just wasting wind power, Hydrogen just chucks away 2/3s of the energy.
8
15/02/2021 16:15:18 102 28
bbc
This is good for everyone in terms of the environment, but unaffordable for most people.
26
15/02/2021 16:19:34 146 19
bbc
Petrol cars were unaffordable for most people 100 years ago; the price will come down. Besides, there's no immediate rush; let the early-adopters bear the cost of development.
197
15/02/2021 16:44:49 14 3
bbc
To be fair though no one 100 years ago told anyone there was a time limit on how long they could keep there horse and cart before they banned hay, it's not natural market progression, it's government mandated, but I do think EV's will be the norm eventually, I just don't think it's going to be affordable for many in the timescales quoted
737
15/02/2021 18:08:43 1 2
bbc
great so im 67 ,so when im 167 i can afford a electric car
15/02/2021 22:47:27 0 1
bbc
Electric car technology is nothing new at all.
15/02/2021 23:16:59 0 2
bbc
problem is, 30 % of what you pay for an electric car is the battery cost, these will not reduce because of the incredibly expensive components.
15/02/2021 23:32:52 0 2
bbc
To be fair, 100 years ago, the government didn’t ban the sale of horse and cart when petrol cars were too expensive for most people. It’s less comparable than you suggest
16/02/2021 19:02:23 0 0
bbc
Yes but 100 years ago, when people could not afford cars , the horse was not suddenly banned!
3
15/02/2021 16:13:28 4 19
bbc
Exceptional engineering if it’s achieved.
The U.K. owned and manufactured car industry probably hasn’t the skills base to achieve this so it’s socialism again to ensure it happens.
27
15/02/2021 16:19:46 6 9
bbc
Socialism means Ladas & Trabants.
84
15/02/2021 16:28:08 3 3
bbc
Tory Britain means no car industry
8
15/02/2021 16:15:18 102 28
bbc
This is good for everyone in terms of the environment, but unaffordable for most people.
28
15/02/2021 16:19:47 11 2
bbc
For now... electric cars will eventually be cheaper due to far simpler engineering. When a thing first comes out, that thing is always expensive. Just look at the fact you can now buy a 65" TV for less than £500... crazy to think they cost 50 times that not so long ago.
81
15/02/2021 16:27:40 0 1
bbc
Good point
245
15/02/2021 16:53:33 5 2
bbc
Agreed to an extent. But not sure that analogy is perfect. The initially high cost of TVs was likely due to recovering high R&D cost and juicy profits for the few providers, both of which inevitably get eroded over time by competition. But my understanding with EVs is that the major marginal cost is raw materials in the battery, which likely won't decrease in cost much, and will possibly increase.
So castle Bromwich to become a car showroom while India moves production to Austria. Well HMG that's what you get allowing foreign ownership. Jag is no longer a British brand so should be made to put a swastika on the wing not a union flag Removed
48
15/02/2021 16:23:17 1 1
bbc
You could have made a sensible comment without resorting to that remark at the end.
85
15/02/2021 16:28:17 1 1
bbc
Doesn't matter who owns the brand - all big corporations have been outsourcing production to Asia for decades. Need a bit of "blue sky thinking" to entice manufacturers back here.
30
15/02/2021 16:19:54 267 31
bbc
It's good news, But not too surprising Jaguar can commit to this target earlier than most; given that your very unlikely to pay less than £30k for a jaguar.

The real test will be in the £10-15k bracket.
284
15/02/2021 16:59:21 135 612
bbc
Take the bus and give up this private car obsession.
298
15/02/2021 17:01:20 29 8
bbc
Is there currently much of a 10-15k sector in the new UK car market?
324
15/02/2021 17:05:23 39 8
bbc
Most private buyers are in the second hand market. A quick check of Autotrader shows you have your choice of 2016 or 2017 plate Jaguar XF for under £15K.

Most purchases of new cars are as company cars, fleets and for leases - a minor contingent are private buyers with more money than sense.

If you dont want to lease then next generation of EVs will trickle down to the rest of us 3 years hence.
352
15/02/2021 17:08:52 30 4
bbc
Sadly that will be the cost of the battery, if you want a 250 mile range that is and Jaguars by nature are not small cars.

That is, unless we start making the batteries here in the UK.

Surely there has never been a better time to start a company manufacturing batteries for cars?
539
15/02/2021 17:36:57 3 1
bbc
where do you get £30k from!!!!!! you are joking
721
15/02/2021 18:16:37 10 1
bbc
You can add £20,000 to the cost!!....Theres very few electric cars from even the cheapest make that you can get for £30k!!!.....Ridiculously overpriced and until they reduce the cost to around that of petrol versions, they will remain outside the realms of affordability for the vast majority of the population.
31
15/02/2021 16:19:58 48 26
bbc
Good news and more evidence if Scotland needs if that basing independence on North Sea oil revenues is too late , the world is transitioning away from dinosaur juice.
142
15/02/2021 16:35:43 22 9
bbc
What about plastic? What's the replacement?
195
15/02/2021 16:44:30 7 3
bbc
Yes, if only we had access to another energy source we could use to generate income, especially one that could be harvested at sea and only required an up-front investment….
269
15/02/2021 16:57:29 2 5
bbc
Read the latest on Hydrogen usage and Scotland. Rigs being re-invented!
32
15/02/2021 16:20:01 11 13
bbc
Thank Elon for getting this ball rolling. Or should we say EV rolling.
416
15/02/2021 17:17:24 2 2
bbc
There were electric cars before that con artist
33
15/02/2021 16:20:08 11 19
bbc
That is what it's all about, forcing people to take out loans of tens of thousands on cars. Or hire them with this obsession with subscriptions. Electric charging will follow with price rises and more subscriptions. They want us in a circle of debt continuously, not a chance will I ever sign up to it. Too many corporations behind this climate change push, they are also funding documentaries.
39
15/02/2021 16:21:41 2 5
bbc
wut
89
15/02/2021 16:28:42 1 1
bbc
No it isn't. You'll still be able to buy petrol powered cars until 2030, and you can reasonably assume that such cars will last to 2040. Anyone who thinks that electrically powered vehicles, and charged via a green power grid isn't the future is simply wrong.
94
15/02/2021 16:29:38 0 2
bbc
Rubbish
17
15/02/2021 16:16:40 9 19
bbc
“ The company will launch electric models of its entire Jaguar and Land Rover line-up by 2030, it added.”

Well they’ve lost my business then.
34
15/02/2021 16:20:15 3 6
bbc
So will you walk then because ICEd cars won’t be made??????
88
15/02/2021 16:24:22 3 2
bbc
No, I’ll just buy used cars.
4
15/02/2021 16:13:34 101 40
bbc
YES YES YES i know

You need a car that can recharge in under 5 minutes so you can rush to work/home and then let the car sit there not moving for 8 hours

Would you mobile phone be more convient if you had to take it into town once a week to be recharged instead of recharging it while you are fast asleep?
35
15/02/2021 16:20:29 10 11
bbc
Not everyone has access to chargers at home!
36
15/02/2021 16:21:07 6 8
bbc
About time! Should've been done decades ago!!
37
15/02/2021 16:21:25 50 17
bbc
Need to get the national grid in better condition then.
436
15/02/2021 17:19:26 24 17
bbc
Why? do you get alot of outages?
830
15/02/2021 18:54:30 5 4
bbc
The National Grid itself calls claims that it's not up to the demand of all electric cars as "a myth": https://www.nationalgrid.com/stories/journey-to-net-zero/5-myths-about-electric-vehicles-busted

I'm going to believe them over a random doom monger on the web any day.
3
15/02/2021 16:13:28 4 19
bbc
Exceptional engineering if it’s achieved.
The U.K. owned and manufactured car industry probably hasn’t the skills base to achieve this so it’s socialism again to ensure it happens.
38
15/02/2021 16:21:34 3 1
bbc
The UK does have the skills. It doesnt have Mgmt competency though. Worst is HMG encouraging this, buying non British ministerial cars is a kick in the teeth for car workers and designers here
33
15/02/2021 16:20:08 11 19
bbc
That is what it's all about, forcing people to take out loans of tens of thousands on cars. Or hire them with this obsession with subscriptions. Electric charging will follow with price rises and more subscriptions. They want us in a circle of debt continuously, not a chance will I ever sign up to it. Too many corporations behind this climate change push, they are also funding documentaries.
39
15/02/2021 16:21:41 2 5
bbc
wut
113
15/02/2021 16:32:32 0 2
bbc
You can have a go at me all you like. Why do you think huge areas of land are being purchased and cultivated? Food companies trying to change our diet with synthetic foods and replacement milk that is water and blended oats, profit. What damage is being done by mass farming of soy and many other thirsty crops? What worries me the most is no one questions anything or researches anymore.
20
15/02/2021 16:18:33 189 33
bbc
The problem with going electric is where are the recharge points ? Not much use if you live in a rural area or cannot install a home charging point.
40
15/02/2021 16:21:47 160 39
bbc
Recharge speeds too are still too slow and impractical for mass recharging.
Newly developed electric car batteries take less then 5 minutes to fully charge up

These are expected to become the norm in the very near future

You keep posting the same uneducated comment about recharging speeds but you were wrong about it for 1st time and still wrong now
15/02/2021 20:37:34 2 3
bbc
You just change habits slightly to accommodate. Need to remember to recharge overnight. Then, it's only exceptionally long journeys when you have to recharge while waiting for it - and you need a 'comfort' break by then anyway.
15/02/2021 21:16:41 3 3
bbc
No they are not!
15/02/2021 21:44:34 1 3
bbc
20 minutes is not too slow. Complete straw man argument
16/02/2021 09:33:49 0 0
bbc
its 5mins now
41
15/02/2021 16:22:01 10 11
bbc
I see a lot of people moaning about inconvenience of charging. But how often do many of you do over 200miles a day?

I find going to the petrol station pretty inconvenient, charging on my drive would be a blessing.
62
15/02/2021 16:25:11 4 1
bbc
About 30% of my trips
75
JGC
15/02/2021 16:26:53 3 1
bbc
I regularly do an 80 mile return journey in a day, so 160 miles in total. Yes 160 is less than 200. But the 200 you are quoting is probably the maximum range in perfect conditions, which will be almost never. So in practice, if you get less than 80% of the total range in more typical conditions it won't be enough. Then if you get roadworks and have to take a diversion....
105
15/02/2021 16:30:43 3 1
bbc
I think this is a good point, though I do make long journeys of >200 miles a few times a year. My issue is I don't have a drive or off road parking, so charging at home is not possible.
193
15/02/2021 16:44:24 0 2
bbc
For that matter, I could fill up a 20l jerry can next time I go to the filling station, then I can add 200 miles of range to my car whilst it's stood on my drive. I've calculated I spend an average 24 seconds/day fuelling my car. How long does it take to get a charge lead out and plug it in, then disconnect and put it away the next day?
365
15/02/2021 17:10:32 0 1
bbc
Under normal circumstances - every weekend, and twice that at least once a month.

Most of the time, charging on the drive would be great - it is the 300+ mile round trips in winter that are the problem, currently!
2
15/02/2021 16:11:32 177 324
bbc
And the hydrogen comes from???????????

Oh yeah

Breaking down natural gas with lots of steam to get CO2 and Hydrogen
42
15/02/2021 16:22:09 39 21
bbc
Every bit of energy that we use causes pollution in one way or another, electricity included. Also everything that we buy. Reducing our consumption is the best way to reduce pollution. Unfortunately that’s bad for the economy, and not appreciated by those who must keep up with the Joneses.
43
15/02/2021 16:22:11 11 7
bbc
Paul Pantone invented the Geet Engine and built a working model in 1983. The Geet Engine will run on anything tea coffee water beer pee. Have a google if you are into engines and green solutions you will not be wasting your time. Find out all that you can about Pantone he was a really interesting inventor with ideas in bucket-loads. I hope i am near enough on subject to pass the edit button.
60
15/02/2021 16:25:00 3 4
bbc
That's pretty cool!
91
15/02/2021 16:29:18 4 2
bbc
any chance it could run on BS as our government have seemingly a never ending supply of that. #gamechanger
109
15/02/2021 16:31:22 2 3
bbc
Did he design one that ran on Bu....it? If so our current govt could power the entire country.
115
15/02/2021 16:32:56 1 2
bbc
The GEET device allows an engine to run on pre-heated petrol vapour, which can give up to 3 times the fuel efficiency in the right conditions.
121
15/02/2021 16:33:12 3 1
bbc
The hoax is the idea that it can run on any liquid, as it can all be turned into plasma fuel by the GEET device. Unfortunately not true, the bubbling of the fuel/non-combustible liquid mix just allows the release of the fuel vapour, hence the demonstration of the fuel and sugar mix (not neat Coke, as claimed).
122
15/02/2021 16:33:29 1 2
bbc
Tests have been performed with a number of different non-combustable liquids, water seems to help with the engine running, but there is no water consumed in the process, so it is not converted to fuel.
125
15/02/2021 16:33:50 1 3
bbc
It can increase fuel efficiency by 3 times & it appears the emissions are considerably cleaner than a standard combustion engine.
141
15/02/2021 16:35:29 6 1
bbc
You fell for the hoax. Good job.
3
15/02/2021 16:13:28 4 19
bbc
Exceptional engineering if it’s achieved.
The U.K. owned and manufactured car industry probably hasn’t the skills base to achieve this so it’s socialism again to ensure it happens.
44
15/02/2021 16:22:25 6 2
bbc
Uk owned car industry?
Are you talking pre EEC? UK hasn’t had a mass market manufacturer for decades.
82
15/02/2021 16:27:51 2 3
bbc
At last someone has actually read what I posted.??
Also the number of downs is because of using socialism which is obviously a word NOT understood. The Trabant reply proved that so succinctly.??
9
15/02/2021 16:15:30 6 15
bbc
Why? Electric means destroying the planet. Better to invest in petrol from air, proven technology with net co2 negative.
45
15/02/2021 16:22:37 0 3
bbc
Electric means saving the planet - petrol from air is a proven technology only on a micro scale
24
15/02/2021 16:19:15 4 2
bbc
How do you get petrol from air? I plead total ignorance on achieving the possibility.
46
15/02/2021 16:22:47 1 2
bbc
They mean Hydrogen, as in H2o
4
15/02/2021 16:13:34 101 40
bbc
YES YES YES i know

You need a car that can recharge in under 5 minutes so you can rush to work/home and then let the car sit there not moving for 8 hours

Would you mobile phone be more convient if you had to take it into town once a week to be recharged instead of recharging it while you are fast asleep?
47
15/02/2021 16:23:02 12 9
bbc
I can use my phone whilst charging it. I need a car that can recharge quickly for longer journeys. The quoted ranges may be 300+ miles, but when it's raining, dark and cold outside and I need heating / headlights and wipers then that range is going to drop off dramatically.
I'm not anti-electric cars by any means - bring em on but there's not enough charging points right now and not fast enough
So castle Bromwich to become a car showroom while India moves production to Austria. Well HMG that's what you get allowing foreign ownership. Jag is no longer a British brand so should be made to put a swastika on the wing not a union flag Removed
48
15/02/2021 16:23:17 1 1
bbc
You could have made a sensible comment without resorting to that remark at the end.
2
15/02/2021 16:11:32 177 324
bbc
And the hydrogen comes from???????????

Oh yeah

Breaking down natural gas with lots of steam to get CO2 and Hydrogen
49
15/02/2021 16:20:25 83 10
bbc
Natural Gas Reforming/Gasification, Electrolysis, Renewable Liquid Reforming, or Fermentation are all currently used. When electrolysis is used and the electricity is produced by renewable sources, such as solar or wind, the resulting hydrogen will be considered renewable as well.
6
15/02/2021 16:14:18 9 8
bbc
This might work for other countries where Jags are sold but i fear their UK sales will drop without sustained public investment in the supporting infrastructure. Even if the Gov invested now (or private investors) i just dont see sufficient charging points etc by 2030.
50
15/02/2021 16:21:17 3 2
bbc
According to Zap Map there is something in excess of 20,000 charge points in the UK at the moment. Given that this number will be ramped up at the same time that the production of electric cars is being ramped up, not being able to "see sufficient charging points by 2030" is not a provable statement.
51
15/02/2021 16:23:41 5 4
bbc
Hydrogen combustion in air depending on temperature and pressure produces nitrous oxides as well as water
106
15/02/2021 16:30:45 0 2
bbc
what does that mean? do leccy cars produce nitrous oxides?
133
15/02/2021 16:34:52 1 1
bbc
It also needs stupid amounts of electricity to make the Hydrogen. FCEVs are bad enough, combustion Hydrogen is just brainless.
302
15/02/2021 17:02:23 1 1
bbc
No where near the effect of Diesel Particulate Pollution.
21
15/02/2021 16:18:46 158 48
bbc
Good to see someone is looking at Hydrogen Fuel Technology. Quick refill at a garage. Batteries may not be the future.
52
15/02/2021 16:24:06 111 39
bbc
That would work for me. Drive, refill, drive etc. Easy conversion to HFT. Electric? Drive. Charge. Wait. Wait some more. Wait some more. Drive. Repeat. Hardly any infrastructure in place. Makes one sound way more appealing doesn't it?
78
15/02/2021 16:27:09 18 15
bbc
Hydrogen is so inconvenient. You have to go to a special place just to fill up, can't do it at home or at work. I start every day with a full charge.
555
15/02/2021 17:39:33 2 6
bbc
what infrastructure was around when petrol cars first appeared?
Guess if you were around at the turn of last century you would still be using a horse... oh and they only do about 15-20 miles a day.
Newly developed electric car batteries that are expected to become the norm in the very near future take less then 5 minutes to fully charge up.

When you are educated on the facts then it all sounds much more appealing

Wouldn't you agree Bald Crusader?
15/02/2021 21:37:15 1 2
bbc
Nonsense!

Plenty of places to charge. Even lampposts near my work are now charging points.

Fast chargers give upwards of 100mile range in 30 min. Just time for a coffee and to use the loo.
2
15/02/2021 16:11:32 177 324
bbc
And the hydrogen comes from???????????

Oh yeah

Breaking down natural gas with lots of steam to get CO2 and Hydrogen
53
15/02/2021 16:24:12 16 14
bbc
And where does electricity come from?
China is building fossil fuelled power stations to meet the demand for batteries for “green” cars.....
54
15/02/2021 16:24:13 44 4
bbc
Sorry if I am missing something but having a fully electric range is not quite the same as have an only electric range!
119
15/02/2021 16:33:07 33 9
bbc
Electric will be an option.

It would be a bit rash to commit yet to abandoning manufacture of petrol and diesel versions.
126
15/02/2021 16:33:52 0 1
bbc
it says "All electric"
470
sja
15/02/2021 17:26:14 0 1
bbc
Well spotted that man! Sorry if I assumed your gender
15/02/2021 19:56:02 1 2
bbc
Electric cars are not emission free when over half of the grid that charges them is fossil.

Add in transmission losses, battery efficiency, degradation, and disposal costs, and the green credentials are really not that clear cut.

If you think that's nonsense; bear in mind the same industry experts pushing electric as a saviour now, are the same industry experts who were pushing Diesel v recently
1
15/02/2021 16:09:18 303 119
bbc
Hydrogen is the future
55
15/02/2021 16:24:25 4 24
bbc
No, petrol from air is. Solar power conversion removes co2 and stores it as petrol to be released later. Can be used for cars, power stations and many other uses. Doesn't require scalping billions of cars and building trillions of charging stations and battery recycling, or heavy metals, or inventions. The technology is already proven to work
2
15/02/2021 16:11:32 177 324
bbc
And the hydrogen comes from???????????

Oh yeah

Breaking down natural gas with lots of steam to get CO2 and Hydrogen
56
15/02/2021 16:24:29 44 7
bbc
What???? I think you'll find electrolysis of water, which produces 2 parts Hydrogen to 1part of Oxygen is the process. Then when burnt or used in a fuel cell, they re-combine to produce - water. And nothing else. The only potential pollution would be from whatever is used to generate the electricity, which, in the case of nuclear, wind or solar, would be nil.
144
15/02/2021 16:35:59 15 24
bbc
So you think we are going to save the world by taking the electricity that could drive an EV let's say 100 miles and using that to to electrolyse water and create hydrogen that then needs to be compressed, pumped, transported and vended to a hydrogen car that will do, at best, 40 miles on the hydrogen created. Brilliant.
233
15/02/2021 16:50:59 6 6
bbc
Its suggested in article that Jaguar would be use combustion Hydrogen engines.
Hydrogen needs 3x the electricity that batteries do per mile, you would need to build alot more generation than we have now, and that would mean delaying a zero carbon grid. So Hydrogen means MORE CO2. Saying 'it will produced with renewables' is just wishful thinking not reality. Batteries don't need more capacity.
17
15/02/2021 16:16:40 9 19
bbc
“ The company will launch electric models of its entire Jaguar and Land Rover line-up by 2030, it added.”

Well they’ve lost my business then.
57
15/02/2021 16:24:33 2 5
bbc
In five years you'll look back at your comment and not believe that you thought this way.
136
15/02/2021 16:32:31 2 1
bbc
How so?
1
15/02/2021 16:09:18 303 119
bbc
Hydrogen is the future
58
15/02/2021 16:24:44 13 25
bbc
Hydrogen can play a part especially for big lorries and ships , not domestic cars though
5
15/02/2021 16:14:02 20 18
bbc
The benefit to the Climate and Environment by doing this and other Car makers is so huge,

Well done Jaguar and hope others follow
59
15/02/2021 16:24:55 21 23
bbc
No it's not, there is no evidence it will change or slow anything. There is however visual evidence around the world where huge climatic changes have occurred long before we were around, or before we started burning fossil fuels. Something may well be happening, but vital we keep an open mind and realise there are billions being made off the back of climate change.
276
15/02/2021 16:58:05 2 4
bbc
Ah, the climate change deniers crawl out of the woodwork...

Why am I not surprised?
383
15/02/2021 17:12:48 2 1
bbc
How much has been made off the back of fossil fuels?
438
15/02/2021 17:19:45 1 4
bbc
We are in an interglacial period and in the long term we may need to increase CO2 emissions to survive by keeping warm. The world's population is mostly doomed if permafrost once again extended to southern England.
43
15/02/2021 16:22:11 11 7
bbc
Paul Pantone invented the Geet Engine and built a working model in 1983. The Geet Engine will run on anything tea coffee water beer pee. Have a google if you are into engines and green solutions you will not be wasting your time. Find out all that you can about Pantone he was a really interesting inventor with ideas in bucket-loads. I hope i am near enough on subject to pass the edit button.
60
15/02/2021 16:25:00 3 4
bbc
That's pretty cool!
18
15/02/2021 16:18:09 117 76
bbc
The issue is not the popping to the shops, it's the commute to work, the visit to relatives and the holiday where the 150 miles at 30mph makes it unusable (check the e-mini specs) and the heavy metals and dead battery pack after 2 years make it expensive and environmentally harmful. Better to do petrol from air (proven) which allows us to keep our fleet without recycling
61
15/02/2021 16:25:09 26 8
bbc
Which battery packs only last two years?! I drove to Italy and did Land's End to John O'Groats in my Kia e-Niro (with its battery warranty of seven years) so although the electric Mini may not be suitable, other EVs certainly are.

"Petrol from air" would be good for existing combustion engines but it still creates emissions around town. Electric makes so much more sense.
41
15/02/2021 16:22:01 10 11
bbc
I see a lot of people moaning about inconvenience of charging. But how often do many of you do over 200miles a day?

I find going to the petrol station pretty inconvenient, charging on my drive would be a blessing.
62
15/02/2021 16:25:11 4 1
bbc
About 30% of my trips
289
15/02/2021 16:59:57 0 1
bbc
Then Hydrogen might be for you?!
22
15/02/2021 16:18:59 5 2
bbc
Even less infrastructure to support hydrogen fuel.
63
15/02/2021 16:25:14 2 2
bbc
I'm guessing possibly easier to retrofit existing stations to hydrogen than it is to put in electric charging points?
18
15/02/2021 16:18:09 117 76
bbc
The issue is not the popping to the shops, it's the commute to work, the visit to relatives and the holiday where the 150 miles at 30mph makes it unusable (check the e-mini specs) and the heavy metals and dead battery pack after 2 years make it expensive and environmentally harmful. Better to do petrol from air (proven) which allows us to keep our fleet without recycling
64
15/02/2021 16:25:20 34 5
bbc
"dead battery pack after 2 years"

There's nothing quite like hyperbole.

" Better to do petrol from air (proven)"

Mmm, I think you better tell someone about this proven magical process.
22
15/02/2021 16:18:59 5 2
bbc
Even less infrastructure to support hydrogen fuel.
65
15/02/2021 16:25:21 2 2
bbc
Easy enough to convert existing filling stations to stock hydrogen. A LOT easier and cheaper than having to build a charging infrastructure on almost every street where people don't have a private driveway.
66
15/02/2021 16:25:33 186 57
bbc
No point making a "grand tourer" model then as you would have to stop so many times to recharge the bloody thing.
322
15/02/2021 17:05:17 115 136
bbc
Not really. Many new electric cars have ranges of at least 200 miles, premium ones up to 400. So pop it on a quick charger at 20% when you stop for a toilet and food break and 30 mins later you're back at 100% again. A Youtuber did a road trip across America in his Tesla successfully
718
15/02/2021 18:15:06 31 1
bbc
I remember Amstrad work computers in 1995. Hard drive was 40MB. I get several files that are 40Gb now. Tech is getting there, but you are right, we need to be at the point of charging for 500 miles in 15mins for people to be really interested. Then when we all think we are on a winner, they will tax us to death
15/02/2021 21:17:33 0 1
bbc
Not true
2
15/02/2021 16:11:32 177 324
bbc
And the hydrogen comes from???????????

Oh yeah

Breaking down natural gas with lots of steam to get CO2 and Hydrogen
67
15/02/2021 16:25:33 18 2
bbc
You can get it from H2O by electrolysis. Of course whatever is cheaper is what will be used.
8
15/02/2021 16:15:18 102 28
bbc
This is good for everyone in terms of the environment, but unaffordable for most people.
68
15/02/2021 16:25:34 2 1
bbc
If an OEM moves to new tech then a supplier base is established. This enables other OEMs who rely on established tech and an established supplier base to design, build, and sell affordable cars to go down this route. Tech has always trickled down from the expensive to eventually become mainstream affordable. To have cheap hydrogen cars, we need OEMs that sell at the high end to adopt this tech
69
15/02/2021 16:25:39 156 34
bbc
Good news but the starting price of these new jags will probably be at least £60k and over. How can you convince people to abandon traditional fuel vehicles when the alternative costs 3x as much?
117
15/02/2021 16:33:00 112 37
bbc
the equivalent combustion jag isn't 20k. Yes, there's a premium for the electric but it's around 20%, not 300%
353
Rob
15/02/2021 17:08:52 8 4
bbc
There are EVs on the market for under £20K.
Govt will probably start increasing the fuel duty enough to make the total cost of ownership of EVs lower than traditional fuels.
Finance deals will help spread any initial outlay. It will soon make economic sense to buy EVs (possibly not Jag ones).
488
15/02/2021 17:29:28 12 5
bbc
But going electric is currently the preserve of the wealthy. And the same people who get Government subsidies to buy a greener car. Money follows money as usual. This has to change if we are serious about emissions targets.
525
15/02/2021 17:34:44 12 4
bbc
Battery life about 10 years, second Hand car market will be interesting. Yes sir, the car costs 13000, but only two years left on the battery
527
15/02/2021 17:35:08 5 5
bbc
Total cost of ownership is less. The Jaguar iPace is a luxury car, and not much more than the Jaguar F-type at £54K. Cheaper alternatives include the Renault Zoe, Kia eNiro, Peugot e208, Fiat 500 around £25-35K, or Tesla Model 3 at about £47K (top choice of What Car?)
574
15/02/2021 17:41:57 1 4
bbc
With very low residual value too so you’ll be keeping it forever!
780
15/02/2021 18:39:01 1 1
bbc
Suspect the majority will be run via leasing schemes so very few will shell out the full price.
Only certain people will buy them now. But ramping of taxation and eventually limited fuel availability will force everyone down this route.
851
Dcf
15/02/2021 18:54:24 2 2
bbc
How much convincing will it take when the choice is either drive electric or walk?
877
15/02/2021 19:06:36 0 1
bbc
Plus charging times..
15/02/2021 19:57:14 0 1
bbc
The cheapest Jag is over £30,000, and it's not one you'd want to drive...diesel, cloth seats, etc!
15/02/2021 20:23:28 1 2
bbc
Ipace is fully electric and about 40K. Much less than the rubbish electric Mercedes, which only do about half the miles per charge.
15/02/2021 20:51:46 0 1
bbc
Guess what? These aren't and won't be the only EVs available. Nissan Leaf is £30k new. That price will begin to fall rapidly as more and cheaper models are added. Plus you don't have to buy a new one.
15/02/2021 21:34:16 0 1
bbc
Got mine 2nd hand for a third of the price.
16/02/2021 10:36:41 0 0
bbc
Tax breaks are already in place for all electric cars. I guess these will be increased
70
15/02/2021 16:25:42 25 10
bbc
So there are challenges in moving significantly to electric cars covering the amount of raw materials required to make batteries, lack of charging points and the insufficient electricity infrastructure in the UK. Would require importing more electricity and will cause the cost of electricity to rise. Cost of batteries may also raise depending on scarcity of required raw materials.
413
15/02/2021 17:16:50 14 12
bbc
There are challenges in material volume but no real obstacles. Charge points can and are being built according to demand. Electricty infrastruction is 100% fine, just look it up on the national grid under "Myths about Electric vehicles".
Electricity Prices will actually reduce due to better capacity factors, night time demand using the same capacity as day time.
429
15/02/2021 17:18:55 3 3
bbc
Oh and materials price increases are expected but they won't negatively affect battery prices. This will be more than outweight by technology and production iimprovements. Materials are not the major cost in battery production, currently its energy, this is realitively easy to improve.
71
Alf
15/02/2021 16:26:02 7 2
bbc
I will sorely miss the AJ-8 and all the bonkers cars that they've put it in.
72
15/02/2021 16:26:29 7 10
bbc
That'll give the Greens a false sense of security whilst Jags charge up on fossil fuelled power station electricity.
90
DM
15/02/2021 16:29:02 6 2
bbc
You should do some research and check how much of the electricity in the UK is generated by renewables.
101
15/02/2021 16:30:22 1 1
bbc
44% comes from fossil fuels now and that number will continue to drop
102
15/02/2021 16:30:24 1 1
bbc
Have you checked lately what proportion of electricity is produced from fossil fuels? And that proportion is diminishing all the time.
112
15/02/2021 16:32:25 1 1
bbc
Most of the UK's power comes from nuke, wind and solar also you could have panels and a battery at home ...
14
JGC
15/02/2021 16:16:29 66 52
bbc
I agree. Electric cars don't have the range for many journeys. Yes many people will quote the manufactures top range, forgetting that it's the absolute top, in perfect conditions. If it's cold (batteries less effective), you have heaters, lights going, stop start traffic, it can drop to be a lot less. Then you need to stop for 2 hours to fully recharge. (and find somewhere)
73
15/02/2021 16:26:44 19 5
bbc
You'd never stop for two hours in a modern EV. As for start/stop traffic, EVs excel there. Motorways in the cold is what kills the range more than anything else.
103
JGC
15/02/2021 16:30:26 15 4
bbc
"Motorways in the cold is what kills the range more than anything else".

You mean the sort of roads your going to be using if travelling a long distance?
74
15/02/2021 16:26:53 22 7
bbc
Good job, now we just need a charging infrastructure that is properly implemented, especially at motorway services. The current offering from Ecotricity is sadly lacking, woefully so in my opinion.
989
Stu
15/02/2021 19:41:57 9 6
bbc
As we buy more e-cars, more fuelling services will appear -- It's !supply and demand.
41
15/02/2021 16:22:01 10 11
bbc
I see a lot of people moaning about inconvenience of charging. But how often do many of you do over 200miles a day?

I find going to the petrol station pretty inconvenient, charging on my drive would be a blessing.
75
JGC
15/02/2021 16:26:53 3 1
bbc
I regularly do an 80 mile return journey in a day, so 160 miles in total. Yes 160 is less than 200. But the 200 you are quoting is probably the maximum range in perfect conditions, which will be almost never. So in practice, if you get less than 80% of the total range in more typical conditions it won't be enough. Then if you get roadworks and have to take a diversion....
18
15/02/2021 16:18:09 117 76
bbc
The issue is not the popping to the shops, it's the commute to work, the visit to relatives and the holiday where the 150 miles at 30mph makes it unusable (check the e-mini specs) and the heavy metals and dead battery pack after 2 years make it expensive and environmentally harmful. Better to do petrol from air (proven) which allows us to keep our fleet without recycling
76
15/02/2021 16:26:56 15 12
bbc
I really don't think this will be a big problem at all. Most ppl with electric cars will almost always be able to recharge at home, with enough mileage for the commute or weekend driving. The oncce/twice a year driving hol of a 100/200 miles + will require 10mins extra planning to look at somewhere to stop and recharge or find somewhere to stay that has charging points (getting more common)
229
15/02/2021 16:50:02 5 8
bbc
Doesn't currently work for me - 250-300 mile round trip to visit the sister-in-law, no charging option at the far end (park 400m away), and suggesting leaving half an hour earlier so that we can do a quick top up on the way back will get me talking in a high, squeaky voice!

The object is maximum time with family for those trips, about once a month under normal circumstances...
235
15/02/2021 16:52:15 9 2
bbc
try once a week 200 mile journeys (400 mile round trip), with no guarantee of a charging point while parked at the far end. I may not be like the majority, but I'm hardly the only one either.
291
Jim
15/02/2021 17:00:20 10 5
bbc
Once a year driving journey of 100-200miles????? When I was slightly younger and going to the outdoors most weekends, then a day trip would cover that distance. Whilst conducting the activity there is not likely to e a charging point, and maximising the daylight hours means avoiding a long stop to charge.

Many outdoor enthusiasts are the same
77
15/02/2021 16:26:59 7 7
bbc
J have had an all electric car for over a year and there is no way I would have a combustion engine car ever again. Electric is great even if you do a lot of miles per day the charging systems available mean that you can re charge your vehicle in as little as half an hour, and i can beat a porsche away from the lights!
52
15/02/2021 16:24:06 111 39
bbc
That would work for me. Drive, refill, drive etc. Easy conversion to HFT. Electric? Drive. Charge. Wait. Wait some more. Wait some more. Drive. Repeat. Hardly any infrastructure in place. Makes one sound way more appealing doesn't it?
78
15/02/2021 16:27:09 18 15
bbc
Hydrogen is so inconvenient. You have to go to a special place just to fill up, can't do it at home or at work. I start every day with a full charge.
179
15/02/2021 16:41:42 14 3
bbc
Lucky you to have somewhere at home and/or work to charge yours. not everyone is so lucky.
15/02/2021 19:57:18 2 1
bbc
And presumably don't drive very far.
79
15/02/2021 16:27:16 174 19
bbc
Great news, but I'll still never be able to afford one.
323
15/02/2021 17:05:17 95 11
bbc
you'll be able to buy a nice used f-type for £5k
612
15/02/2021 17:50:07 3 1
bbc
Become a photographer. Their adverts illustrate one who can afford one.
15/02/2021 19:55:10 9 6
bbc
Electric cars are not emission free when over half of the grid that charges them is fossil.

Add in transmission losses, battery efficiency, degradation, and disposal costs, and the green credentials are really not that clear cut.

If you think that's nonsense; bear in mind the same industry experts pushing electric as a saviour now, are the same industry experts who were pushing Diesel v recently
15/02/2021 21:33:18 0 2
bbc
You can get 2nd hand ones for under £10,000
Yes, Indian engineering company
80
15/02/2021 16:22:00 4 3
bbc
Oh no
But what about Brexit. I thought this (and Nissan) wasn't supposed to happen.
152
15/02/2021 16:37:26 0 1
bbc
by 2027 55% percent of any car exported to EU from the UK has to be manufactured in the UK or face tarrifs. For electric cars the largest cost is the battery so if UK can't get battery cost down by 2027 likely our car industry will take a big hit.
28
15/02/2021 16:19:47 11 2
bbc
For now... electric cars will eventually be cheaper due to far simpler engineering. When a thing first comes out, that thing is always expensive. Just look at the fact you can now buy a 65" TV for less than £500... crazy to think they cost 50 times that not so long ago.
81
15/02/2021 16:27:40 0 1
bbc
Good point
44
15/02/2021 16:22:25 6 2
bbc
Uk owned car industry?
Are you talking pre EEC? UK hasn’t had a mass market manufacturer for decades.
82
15/02/2021 16:27:51 2 3
bbc
At last someone has actually read what I posted.??
Also the number of downs is because of using socialism which is obviously a word NOT understood. The Trabant reply proved that so succinctly.??
83
15/02/2021 16:28:03 4 2
bbc
There's no value in the brand anymore. Back in the 90's they went after the lower end managers / sales people market and now you see them being used as taxi's or towing caravans.

Time will tell is going full electic is the right thing to do since it will limit the range that those taxi drivers can do in a day.
120
15/02/2021 16:33:08 1 1
bbc
Taxis are perfect for electrification, they really don't do large miles in a day and mostly at low speed.
27
15/02/2021 16:19:46 6 9
bbc
Socialism means Ladas & Trabants.
84
15/02/2021 16:28:08 3 3
bbc
Tory Britain means no car industry
So castle Bromwich to become a car showroom while India moves production to Austria. Well HMG that's what you get allowing foreign ownership. Jag is no longer a British brand so should be made to put a swastika on the wing not a union flag Removed
85
15/02/2021 16:28:17 1 1
bbc
Doesn't matter who owns the brand - all big corporations have been outsourcing production to Asia for decades. Need a bit of "blue sky thinking" to entice manufacturers back here.
86
15/02/2021 16:28:18 43 13
bbc
It's a positive move but we really need affordable electric cars that the average person can afford, rather than luxury brands.
346
15/02/2021 17:08:04 12 8
bbc
There's already MG and Hyundai and Kia plus you need to remember that there is up to a 20 year period to get it all together.
563
15/02/2021 17:40:12 1 1
bbc
MG already do it.
915
Stu
15/02/2021 19:19:01 0 1
bbc
There are plenty of cars that average people can afford (and they'll get cheaper as the volume goes up and battery technology continues to improve) -- but those who can afford a petrol Jag now won't want to upgrade to a mini.
975
15/02/2021 19:38:51 1 2
bbc
check out leasing costs of electric v petrol you might be surprised
16/02/2021 02:51:05 0 0
bbc
In what way is it positive? It doesn't save the environment (ultimately likely to cause more damage), is less convenient and costs more. Where is the positive?
AAJ
16/02/2021 14:59:58 0 0
bbc
Price is an issue. I'm tired of being gaslighted by people saying different. We were told that they would become parity with ICE, but this is not happening.
11
15/02/2021 16:15:56 76 30
bbc
Well done Jaguar - an ambitious target. Here's hoping we can get charging time down within the coming years, which will no doubt happen.
87
15/02/2021 16:28:29 64 18
bbc
The government needs to get on top of home charging, fast. Every home needs a charger, and for many that means on-street charging. I needs to be cheap, ideally billed to your home electricity bill at the same price as domestic electricity.

Otherwise it will just create yet another social divide, and make houses without charging work far less than those with.
220
15/02/2021 16:48:30 15 4
bbc
I'd love to hear your idea of how on street charging will work, particularly on terraced streets, and who funds it?

Personally I disagree with the Govt funding it, if you can't afford to have it installed yourself why should the tax payer pay more on top of the massive discounts they are funding towards the installation of home chargers and price of a new ecar.
314
15/02/2021 17:04:16 4 3
bbc
Hydrogen is the way forward. It can be cleanly generated from wind power. Existing fuel stations could convert some of their pumps to hydrogen; hydrogen fuel tanks only take slightly longer to fill than petrol & diesel.

If car manufacturers get on board with this breakthrough hydrogen would make much more sense than battery powered vehicles https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-52328786
603
4wd
15/02/2021 17:48:25 6 1
bbc
It's lucky the power just magically comes down the line.
In reality when dozens of fast chargers are being plugged in at the same time every line in the country will need major upgrades.
Sam
15/02/2021 19:49:06 3 5
bbc
Charger fitted at my home?? No thanks, I would rather have the plague
15/02/2021 20:35:40 4 2
bbc
YYYEEEEEEEEEEESSSS!! First one!!! 'It's the government's responsibility!!!!' Yeeees! Blame Boris!!!!!!!!!
15/02/2021 21:24:47 5 1
bbc
What about owners who live in apartment blocks? How do you set up individual off street charging for them?
15/02/2021 21:49:37 0 4
bbc
To charge my car at home costs about £4 for 100 miles. (At my usual home energy price).

To charge it in my work car park costs about £4 for 100 miles.

To plug it into a lamppost charger costs about £4 for 100 miles.

To charge it on the motorway costs about £4 for 100 miles.
15/02/2021 21:56:10 1 1
bbc
This will involve respecifying the entire grid, at vast expense. Most local transformers don't have the capacity to support everyone charging their car at night. And that goes for all the supply infrastructure. Maybe we'll have to do it, but if we're serious we should already have begun.
16/02/2021 00:04:49 0 1
bbc
THe petrol companies have spent billions setting up their distribution networks now you want to spend billions replacing it.
16/02/2021 19:07:03 0 0
bbc
But for s fast charge you will most likely need completely different infrastructure , so doing what you say now would be a complete waste if time and money. The tech is not yet stable but is being forced on everyone before it is ready.
34
15/02/2021 16:20:15 3 6
bbc
So will you walk then because ICEd cars won’t be made??????
88
15/02/2021 16:24:22 3 2
bbc
No, I’ll just buy used cars.
33
15/02/2021 16:20:08 11 19
bbc
That is what it's all about, forcing people to take out loans of tens of thousands on cars. Or hire them with this obsession with subscriptions. Electric charging will follow with price rises and more subscriptions. They want us in a circle of debt continuously, not a chance will I ever sign up to it. Too many corporations behind this climate change push, they are also funding documentaries.
89
15/02/2021 16:28:42 1 1
bbc
No it isn't. You'll still be able to buy petrol powered cars until 2030, and you can reasonably assume that such cars will last to 2040. Anyone who thinks that electrically powered vehicles, and charged via a green power grid isn't the future is simply wrong.
72
15/02/2021 16:26:29 7 10
bbc
That'll give the Greens a false sense of security whilst Jags charge up on fossil fuelled power station electricity.
90
DM
15/02/2021 16:29:02 6 2
bbc
You should do some research and check how much of the electricity in the UK is generated by renewables.
43
15/02/2021 16:22:11 11 7
bbc
Paul Pantone invented the Geet Engine and built a working model in 1983. The Geet Engine will run on anything tea coffee water beer pee. Have a google if you are into engines and green solutions you will not be wasting your time. Find out all that you can about Pantone he was a really interesting inventor with ideas in bucket-loads. I hope i am near enough on subject to pass the edit button.
91
15/02/2021 16:29:18 4 2
bbc
any chance it could run on BS as our government have seemingly a never ending supply of that. #gamechanger
20
15/02/2021 16:18:33 189 33
bbc
The problem with going electric is where are the recharge points ? Not much use if you live in a rural area or cannot install a home charging point.
92
15/02/2021 16:29:21 16 23
bbc
There is already a network of street lighting in almost every village and hamlet in the UK. Just need to add a charging point to every lamp post.
238
15/02/2021 16:53:00 25 5
bbc
You do realise streetlights are usually much less than a kilowatt, and your council -won't- have over specced the feed cables by enough to charge any EV overnight.
264
15/02/2021 16:56:40 24 2
bbc
There are not many street lights as houses though. Just counted - in my street there are 6 street lamps but 24 houses and 2 small blocks of flats. Many houses have 2 (or more cars). All the houses have drives but the flats do not have specified parking.

There will wires from the houses crossing the pavement to where the cars are.

I'm not convinced this is a whole solution.
790
15/02/2021 18:41:24 3 3
bbc
And cables dragging over every pavement -that’s assuming the numpties haven’t actually parked their car on the pavement of course.
853
15/02/2021 19:00:12 1 2
bbc
And who will foot the bill?
15/02/2021 23:43:56 0 1
bbc
Wouldn’t work for everyone I’m afraid. The street I live on has 2 lampposts and about 20 houses, none of which have drives. Even at 1 car per house (and many in this street have 2) that’s 10 cars per lamppost and cables trailing everywhere, (some of which would need to be 100 metres long) which is a health and safety nightmare.
21
15/02/2021 16:18:46 158 48
bbc
Good to see someone is looking at Hydrogen Fuel Technology. Quick refill at a garage. Batteries may not be the future.
93
15/02/2021 16:29:31 14 8
bbc
Hydrogen is an absolute pain to store and fuel a car with.
878
15/02/2021 19:07:21 3 1
bbc
They said that about Petrol & Diesel when when they were both in thier infancy.
33
15/02/2021 16:20:08 11 19
bbc
That is what it's all about, forcing people to take out loans of tens of thousands on cars. Or hire them with this obsession with subscriptions. Electric charging will follow with price rises and more subscriptions. They want us in a circle of debt continuously, not a chance will I ever sign up to it. Too many corporations behind this climate change push, they are also funding documentaries.
94
15/02/2021 16:29:38 0 2
bbc
Rubbish
95
15/02/2021 16:29:49 2 1
bbc
Jaguar buyers very likely have their own garage, expect most luxury brands to go this way.

If you have that kind of money you'll probably take a plane before you do a 4+ hour drive yourself!
339
15/02/2021 17:07:18 0 2
bbc
It may come as a shock, but most Jag owners buy them because they actually enjoy driving - other than in traffic jams...
96
15/02/2021 16:29:50 1 3
bbc
manufacturers are charging too much for the electric cars and government is allowing them to get away with it. The same happened with Photovoltaic panels when they were being rolled out. get the cost of EV similar to the P/D equivalent models and it will take off with increased sales.
161
15/02/2021 16:39:08 0 1
bbc
what do you mean "allowing them to get away with it?" It's called the free market economy. We're not the Soviet Union. Or are you going to complain that the government is allowing Rolex to charge too much for their watches? If they're too expensive they won't sell and the price will adjust accordingly
97
15/02/2021 16:29:52 1 1
bbc
I am glad that BBC has corrected the report to zero TAILPIPE emissions.
98
15/02/2021 16:29:52 10 3
bbc
Try boiling a kettle, putting an extra bar on the fire or charging up your storage heaters on economy 7 when every ones charging up their electric motors overnight!!
16/02/2021 00:21:59 0 0
bbc
That *will* work ... the grid will just steal the electricity back from the cars!
99
15/02/2021 16:29:55 10 4
bbc
Wouldn't it be cool if they can build a decent looking EV that everyone can afford?
242
15/02/2021 16:53:22 3 3
bbc
That would be great, but then they would cease to be a luxury brand, so it will never happen.
446
15/02/2021 17:21:27 2 1
bbc
Why should 'everyone' be able to afford one? Can 'everyone' afford a new petrol or diesel vehicle?
20
15/02/2021 16:18:33 189 33
bbc
The problem with going electric is where are the recharge points ? Not much use if you live in a rural area or cannot install a home charging point.
100
15/02/2021 16:29:58 28 12
bbc
Exactly said. I live in a village...my home is 200m from a road .... My village does not have Gas/ 4G or even a Terrestrial TV signal, Broadband is OK but not superfast.
Tell me HMG are going to give me a charging point on my lane...where all cars have to park over the curb...so that others can pass! Bollocks comes to mind!
372
15/02/2021 17:11:15 8 7
bbc
Is your patrol station at the end of your house?
927
15/02/2021 19:23:16 3 2
bbc
Don't worry when you do the weekly shop you will be able to charge your car for the week. Try Lidl as they currently have a mass rollout of EV charging points at the moment and the rest will follow.
949
15/02/2021 19:31:35 4 2
bbc
Crucially, you have electricity, you can get a charger at your house ??
Removed
15/02/2021 22:55:34 0 2
bbc
If you don't like it you can leave
15/02/2021 23:01:22 0 1
bbc
What bollocks