US airline set to buy flying electric taxis for airport runs
11/02/2021 | news | business | 108
United Airlines plans to buy 200 of the aircraft to fly passengers to airports within the next five years.
1
11/02/2021 10:35:55 13 1
bbc
I suppose we already have helicopters performing this function for the ultra rich.

But if it becomes cheaper and more ubiquitous? Would you want the skies full of these things?
52
11/02/2021 16:49:30 0 4
bbc
What's wrong with the train to the airport? If there isn't one then build it. The cost will be worth it. Imagine how many ordinary people could get to the airport relatively cheaply and not fill up the roads (or the skies right over you house).
2
11/02/2021 10:42:12 16 6
bbc
Hell to freeze over before I get into one of those.
6
11/02/2021 11:15:17 5 4
bbc
Why not far fewer than cars hurtling down the motorway ignoring anyone else and speed limits.
79
12/02/2021 08:32:10 1 0
bbc
It isn't that I'd worry about them stopping suddenly and falling our of the sky. But I would worry about them crashing into each other!
3
11/02/2021 11:02:40 5 2
bbc
Seems like a great advancement in travel using renewable energy. I can't wait.
4
11/02/2021 11:07:00 4 1
bbc
Isn't this just another form of helicopter? Not quite the flying-car that the term "flying electric taxi's" might imply. I assume that a pilot's license is still needed, and full air worthiness certification. But an interesting proposal and I'd have a go in one.
10
11/02/2021 11:47:10 1 2
bbc
Frankly it's not a flying car. Its a small ( non drone ) helicopter but requires piloting at least for now. If autonomous as a real remote controlled drone with no pilot thats another thing...All sounds extremely expensive and risky re safety etc.
Perhaps its easier than automonous cars in many respects as its not so crowded 200 Feet above us, but would you get into one with no physical pilot?
5
11/02/2021 11:09:17 7 6
bbc
This business will never take off.
25
11/02/2021 12:56:07 3 1
bbc
So predictable ??????
2
11/02/2021 10:42:12 16 6
bbc
Hell to freeze over before I get into one of those.
6
11/02/2021 11:15:17 5 4
bbc
Why not far fewer than cars hurtling down the motorway ignoring anyone else and speed limits.
7
11/02/2021 11:28:13 5 2
bbc
Fine, you go ahead Icarus and is there anyone you'd like me to contact ?
6
11/02/2021 11:15:17 5 4
bbc
Why not far fewer than cars hurtling down the motorway ignoring anyone else and speed limits.
7
11/02/2021 11:28:13 5 2
bbc
Fine, you go ahead Icarus and is there anyone you'd like me to contact ?
8
11/02/2021 11:31:35 3 3
bbc
Hmm going to need helicopter level pilots licensing, so that is going to be very very expensive. Bad enough cars on roads but when these things start dropping out of the sky on people, hitting power lines, birds, etc. Hopefully only a few for the rich like helicopters.
12
11/02/2021 11:55:32 2 0
bbc
Who sys there will be any pilots in the end?
9
11/02/2021 11:42:54 4 3
bbc
"... could nearly halve carbon dioxide emissions for passengers travelling to the airport"

Really? How can flying to the airport reduce carbon emissions unless they are comparing it to an inefficient old chopper. Keeping all that weight airborne as opposed to rolling along a road/track requires silly amounts of energy. It's physics! Electricity or fossil fuels, let's reduce consumption first.
19
11/02/2021 12:17:32 2 2
bbc
This is pushing forward development of electric aviation. Drones first, now these... large helicopters next, then planes.
20
11/02/2021 12:21:32 3 0
bbc
Read the article:
“could nearly halve carbon dioxide emissions for passengers travelling to the airport.
United Airlines has invested in flying taxi firm Archer as part of a $1.1bn deal.
With the right technology, we can curb the impact aircraft have on the planet, but we have to identify the next generation of companies who will make this a reality early”
51
11/02/2021 16:45:28 0 0
bbc
I wonder if this takes into account the truck that takes your luggage to the airport the night before. These taxis won't carry big suitcases, but the article doesn't mention that.
4
11/02/2021 11:07:00 4 1
bbc
Isn't this just another form of helicopter? Not quite the flying-car that the term "flying electric taxi's" might imply. I assume that a pilot's license is still needed, and full air worthiness certification. But an interesting proposal and I'd have a go in one.
10
11/02/2021 11:47:10 1 2
bbc
Frankly it's not a flying car. Its a small ( non drone ) helicopter but requires piloting at least for now. If autonomous as a real remote controlled drone with no pilot thats another thing...All sounds extremely expensive and risky re safety etc.
Perhaps its easier than automonous cars in many respects as its not so crowded 200 Feet above us, but would you get into one with no physical pilot?
11
11/02/2021 11:53:38 3 5
bbc
BBC adverstising in the last few days has been ridoculous.
24
11/02/2021 12:54:20 6 3
bbc
And your spelling is ridiculous!
8
11/02/2021 11:31:35 3 3
bbc
Hmm going to need helicopter level pilots licensing, so that is going to be very very expensive. Bad enough cars on roads but when these things start dropping out of the sky on people, hitting power lines, birds, etc. Hopefully only a few for the rich like helicopters.
12
11/02/2021 11:55:32 2 0
bbc
Who sys there will be any pilots in the end?
29
11/02/2021 13:24:35 1 0
bbc
Like commercial airliners, and Teslas, you need the pilot/driver there for when, not if, things go wrong.
13
11/02/2021 11:56:16 12 4
bbc
Seems a great concept : renewables are the way forward.

Ignore the doom mongering never positive types (that's 90% of HYSers).

Flying generally will come back later this year (not to all countries clearly) and more generally in 2022.
22
11/02/2021 12:40:21 1 2
bbc
Hmmm, shiny and new with a green badge slapped on it so there will be no consequences ? There's always a rub.
14
11/02/2021 12:07:30 5 9
bbc
Won’t work in the U.K.
Nobody’s allowed to go anywhere
23
11/02/2021 12:51:21 5 3
bbc
I've told you a million times not to exagerate.
15
11/02/2021 12:07:59 5 1
bbc
If fuel for air travel was taxed at the same rate as for terrestrial travel governments would have no problem balancing budgets and the benefits to the planet would be enormous because fewer planes would fly empty, fewer planes would fly live horses to Japan for sushi, and fewer people would casually go on flights......it s all about money!.
17
11/02/2021 12:14:12 12 0
bbc
They used to feed horses oats when my grandad was a lad. None of this flying them to Japan for sushi nonsense.

The world's gone mad!
44
11/02/2021 15:14:03 0 0
bbc
The thing is, duty on road fuel is required to pay for road construction/maintenance,.. ..even if it isn't specifically separate from the general tax pool, it still goes towards balancing the budget, ..whereas airlines typically pay directly for their use of airports etc, ..so there's no real justification for taxing aviation fuel beyond normal VAT rates.
16
11/02/2021 12:12:57 3 4
bbc
Slowly but inexorably our lives are being taken over by robots, drones, electric cars, driverless cars and online shopping. We won't be able to do anything for ourselves at this rate. I 'drove' a Tesla last year and it drove itself without any operator intervention including breaking and lane control.
34
Ken
11/02/2021 14:19:34 11 0
bbc
The most unreliable part of any vehicle is the driver and the standard of driving in the UK is pretty bad. I believe that US drivers are even worse. Computers can only be better.
41
11/02/2021 14:59:45 0 0
bbc
think of all that extra time you'd have to moan on HYS
75
12/02/2021 04:22:05 0 0
bbc
Riro, rubbish in rubbish out - a programmer's mantra from the early days of computers

'The blue screen of death - something else to consider when claiming that self driving cars are safe, and finally, unexpected glitches and bugs which might show up at critical moments. Look at Tesla's latest problems with its console
15
11/02/2021 12:07:59 5 1
bbc
If fuel for air travel was taxed at the same rate as for terrestrial travel governments would have no problem balancing budgets and the benefits to the planet would be enormous because fewer planes would fly empty, fewer planes would fly live horses to Japan for sushi, and fewer people would casually go on flights......it s all about money!.
17
11/02/2021 12:14:12 12 0
bbc
They used to feed horses oats when my grandad was a lad. None of this flying them to Japan for sushi nonsense.

The world's gone mad!
18
11/02/2021 12:16:03 4 11
bbc
Maybe they should rename United Airlines "Monty Pythons Flying Circus" as this venture is nothing short of a circus stunt. To cost alone of one of these devices is staggering and the passenger count by definition is very limited. I know air travel is the safest form of travel but this is a step too far.
9
11/02/2021 11:42:54 4 3
bbc
"... could nearly halve carbon dioxide emissions for passengers travelling to the airport"

Really? How can flying to the airport reduce carbon emissions unless they are comparing it to an inefficient old chopper. Keeping all that weight airborne as opposed to rolling along a road/track requires silly amounts of energy. It's physics! Electricity or fossil fuels, let's reduce consumption first.
19
11/02/2021 12:17:32 2 2
bbc
This is pushing forward development of electric aviation. Drones first, now these... large helicopters next, then planes.
9
11/02/2021 11:42:54 4 3
bbc
"... could nearly halve carbon dioxide emissions for passengers travelling to the airport"

Really? How can flying to the airport reduce carbon emissions unless they are comparing it to an inefficient old chopper. Keeping all that weight airborne as opposed to rolling along a road/track requires silly amounts of energy. It's physics! Electricity or fossil fuels, let's reduce consumption first.
20
11/02/2021 12:21:32 3 0
bbc
Read the article:
“could nearly halve carbon dioxide emissions for passengers travelling to the airport.
United Airlines has invested in flying taxi firm Archer as part of a $1.1bn deal.
With the right technology, we can curb the impact aircraft have on the planet, but we have to identify the next generation of companies who will make this a reality early”
21
11/02/2021 12:30:11 6 5
bbc
Would have thought USA had more to focus on ?
13
11/02/2021 11:56:16 12 4
bbc
Seems a great concept : renewables are the way forward.

Ignore the doom mongering never positive types (that's 90% of HYSers).

Flying generally will come back later this year (not to all countries clearly) and more generally in 2022.
22
11/02/2021 12:40:21 1 2
bbc
Hmmm, shiny and new with a green badge slapped on it so there will be no consequences ? There's always a rub.
14
11/02/2021 12:07:30 5 9
bbc
Won’t work in the U.K.
Nobody’s allowed to go anywhere
23
11/02/2021 12:51:21 5 3
bbc
I've told you a million times not to exagerate.
26
11/02/2021 13:00:23 2 0
bbc
Or even exaggerate ??
59
11/02/2021 18:16:36 1 0
bbc
I told them a billion times. I like your post.
11
11/02/2021 11:53:38 3 5
bbc
BBC adverstising in the last few days has been ridoculous.
24
11/02/2021 12:54:20 6 3
bbc
And your spelling is ridiculous!
5
11/02/2021 11:09:17 7 6
bbc
This business will never take off.
25
11/02/2021 12:56:07 3 1
bbc
So predictable ??????
23
11/02/2021 12:51:21 5 3
bbc
I've told you a million times not to exagerate.
26
11/02/2021 13:00:23 2 0
bbc
Or even exaggerate ??
67
11/02/2021 19:40:53 0 0
bbc
egg-saturate
27
11/02/2021 13:10:03 4 1
bbc
Will it take a full load of Aldi Shopping is the first consideration to accepting any lift.
28
11/02/2021 13:17:07 5 3
bbc
As you sit in the garden with earmuffs to drown out the sound of the flying taxi's.....
12
11/02/2021 11:55:32 2 0
bbc
Who sys there will be any pilots in the end?
29
11/02/2021 13:24:35 1 0
bbc
Like commercial airliners, and Teslas, you need the pilot/driver there for when, not if, things go wrong.
42
11/02/2021 15:05:44 2 0
bbc
One day the cockpit will contain a person and a dog. It will be the person's job to feed the dog and the dog's job to bite the person if they touch anything. :D
30
11/02/2021 13:26:33 4 3
bbc
How often would these things need servicing, maintenance and inspection?

Once every 50 hours?
48
11/02/2021 16:04:32 7 0
bbc
Probably not. Electric motors are far more reliable than internal combustion (or gas turbine) engines and are relatively easy to diagnose faults long before they become a problem.
31
11/02/2021 13:30:31 4 1
bbc
I want my own harrier then I can fly my way. Just don't push that little red button
37
11/02/2021 14:40:47 5 0
bbc
Push the red button, Do it
32
11/02/2021 14:04:46 6 1
bbc
My first thoughts on looking at these pictures are what happens if for some reason the engine fails. These vehicles don't look as if they have brilliant glide properties.
33
Ken
11/02/2021 14:15:18 7 1
bbc
Just like any other helicopter. However, these do at least have several engines and I suspect that, like many 'drones' they may fly with one failed motor?
53
11/02/2021 17:04:39 0 1
bbc
Normal helicopters glide perfectly well - look up autorotation landings. It's pretty much the most important thing you are taught when learning to fly, same goes for the computer controlling these :)
32
11/02/2021 14:04:46 6 1
bbc
My first thoughts on looking at these pictures are what happens if for some reason the engine fails. These vehicles don't look as if they have brilliant glide properties.
33
Ken
11/02/2021 14:15:18 7 1
bbc
Just like any other helicopter. However, these do at least have several engines and I suspect that, like many 'drones' they may fly with one failed motor?
47
11/02/2021 16:02:31 1 1
bbc
but any conventional helicopter can autorotate the blades
89
12/02/2021 11:03:58 1 0
bbc
No, not like any other helicopter, because it's not a helicopter. Helicopters can autorotate because of the large angular momentum stored in the rotor system, plus the ability to alter the pitch of the blades in order to 'windmill'. UAVs have neither of these abilities, so have to rely on multiply-redundant power, control, motor and propulsion systems to avoid free-fall when anything fails.
16
11/02/2021 12:12:57 3 4
bbc
Slowly but inexorably our lives are being taken over by robots, drones, electric cars, driverless cars and online shopping. We won't be able to do anything for ourselves at this rate. I 'drove' a Tesla last year and it drove itself without any operator intervention including breaking and lane control.
34
Ken
11/02/2021 14:19:34 11 0
bbc
The most unreliable part of any vehicle is the driver and the standard of driving in the UK is pretty bad. I believe that US drivers are even worse. Computers can only be better.
38
11/02/2021 14:42:30 1 0
bbc
But computers are only as good as the programmer. even a computer can say 1+1=2 is not correct.
64
11/02/2021 18:43:03 0 1
bbc
The standard of driving in the US is better than the UK overall, that's mainly due to penalties for speeding etc and the fact that outside of the major cities the roads are fairly empty, the one time I would disagree is during bad weather, this tends to me much worse in the US than the UK and it makes no difference to a lot of people
35
ant
11/02/2021 14:39:06 6 2
bbc
Drop me off anywhere here please mate.....aaaaarrrrggghhhh!
50
11/02/2021 16:39:50 2 0
bbc
Have you been busy? What time do you finish? God bless Peter Kay.
36
11/02/2021 14:40:41 2 3
bbc
I reckon, for personal air vehicles to ever become the flying cars of the masses, we'll need to push beyond the flying brick concepts currently being touted. Technology permitting, I'd guess some kind of morphing airframe design, that can take on a shape optimal to it's speed and altitude, and some passive safety whereby it relaxes back into a slow gliding form in the event of a power outage.
39
11/02/2021 14:46:14 7 0
bbc
Some criteria for PAV's to ever make it big:
1) Economical/efficient to buy and operate,
2) Easy to handle by average couch potato, ...or, more likely, fully autonomous
3) Passive safety,. ..relaxes to glide form in power outage.
4) VTOL
5) Relatively silent.
6) Decent range
31
11/02/2021 13:30:31 4 1
bbc
I want my own harrier then I can fly my way. Just don't push that little red button
37
11/02/2021 14:40:47 5 0
bbc
Push the red button, Do it
34
Ken
11/02/2021 14:19:34 11 0
bbc
The most unreliable part of any vehicle is the driver and the standard of driving in the UK is pretty bad. I believe that US drivers are even worse. Computers can only be better.
38
11/02/2021 14:42:30 1 0
bbc
But computers are only as good as the programmer. even a computer can say 1+1=2 is not correct.
46
11/02/2021 15:24:59 1 0
bbc
Still, if you can get your self driven cars comparable to the most competent and conscientious 10% (or better) of drivers, ..then you can apply this uniformly across the whole fleet of cars,.. you effectively eliminate the clowns and complacents responsible for a huge fraction of the accidents.
36
11/02/2021 14:40:41 2 3
bbc
I reckon, for personal air vehicles to ever become the flying cars of the masses, we'll need to push beyond the flying brick concepts currently being touted. Technology permitting, I'd guess some kind of morphing airframe design, that can take on a shape optimal to it's speed and altitude, and some passive safety whereby it relaxes back into a slow gliding form in the event of a power outage.
39
11/02/2021 14:46:14 7 0
bbc
Some criteria for PAV's to ever make it big:
1) Economical/efficient to buy and operate,
2) Easy to handle by average couch potato, ...or, more likely, fully autonomous
3) Passive safety,. ..relaxes to glide form in power outage.
4) VTOL
5) Relatively silent.
6) Decent range
100
12/02/2021 13:56:38 1 0
bbc
1) efficiency of scale
2) fully automatic aka no human interference
3) redundant motors, 1 fails carry on, 2 fail land asap
4) ?
5) depends on the Hz & materials. Ever heard a proper drone? virtually quiet
6) wont be for all journeys although may be able to go to France, which I cant drive to in a car? Ferries & EuroTunnel is cheating??

Certainly has potential
40
11/02/2021 14:58:37 6 2
bbc
A quick read of all the 'incidents' occurring to UAVs in the AAIB's monthly bulletin will give a clue as to why taxis with that type of design (multi-propeller, VTOL) are a long way from ever getting approval. Most are not capable of autorotation, the last resort of the conventional helicopter in the event of engine/gearbox failure.
54
11/02/2021 17:08:31 5 0
bbc
Electric vehicles don't have a gear box and mechanical failures are very rarer due to a lot less moving parts. Different technology different solutions. The answer is not the same specification as existing regulation - but smarter regulation focusing on number of hours without incident etc
99
12/02/2021 13:50:57 0 0
bbc
Well hopefully there be more room for others as you being a luddite.

These dont need all motors to run to fly, its called redundancy. 1 fail no issue, 2 fail, of course possible but very unlikely then it does an emergency decent to land safely. "autorotation" is totally irrelevant!
16
11/02/2021 12:12:57 3 4
bbc
Slowly but inexorably our lives are being taken over by robots, drones, electric cars, driverless cars and online shopping. We won't be able to do anything for ourselves at this rate. I 'drove' a Tesla last year and it drove itself without any operator intervention including breaking and lane control.
41
11/02/2021 14:59:45 0 0
bbc
think of all that extra time you'd have to moan on HYS
29
11/02/2021 13:24:35 1 0
bbc
Like commercial airliners, and Teslas, you need the pilot/driver there for when, not if, things go wrong.
42
11/02/2021 15:05:44 2 0
bbc
One day the cockpit will contain a person and a dog. It will be the person's job to feed the dog and the dog's job to bite the person if they touch anything. :D
43
11/02/2021 15:08:42 2 5
bbc
When will we see these in UK
Removed
15
11/02/2021 12:07:59 5 1
bbc
If fuel for air travel was taxed at the same rate as for terrestrial travel governments would have no problem balancing budgets and the benefits to the planet would be enormous because fewer planes would fly empty, fewer planes would fly live horses to Japan for sushi, and fewer people would casually go on flights......it s all about money!.
44
11/02/2021 15:14:03 0 0
bbc
The thing is, duty on road fuel is required to pay for road construction/maintenance,.. ..even if it isn't specifically separate from the general tax pool, it still goes towards balancing the budget, ..whereas airlines typically pay directly for their use of airports etc, ..so there's no real justification for taxing aviation fuel beyond normal VAT rates.
63
11/02/2021 18:38:04 0 0
bbc
It would also be illegal, there is an international agreement that covers the non-taxing of aviation fuel
45
11/02/2021 15:18:37 11 2
bbc
If they take over the role of helicopters to ferry the rich to & from airports then they could potentially be more environmentally friendly; if the power to charge them is guaranteed to be from renewables & the batteries they contain aren't full of rare earth minerals dug from the ground by the bare hands of malnourished 7-year-olds. It would be better for the clients simply not to fly though.
80
12/02/2021 08:33:12 3 0
bbc
The latest generation of batteries don't use cobalt, so forget the child labour nonsense.
84
12/02/2021 09:22:21 0 0
bbc
Renewables are energy dense enough to be a viable source of energy. Do some reading. You do know solar panels are made from coal and quartz and wind turbines made from steel!!
38
11/02/2021 14:42:30 1 0
bbc
But computers are only as good as the programmer. even a computer can say 1+1=2 is not correct.
46
11/02/2021 15:24:59 1 0
bbc
Still, if you can get your self driven cars comparable to the most competent and conscientious 10% (or better) of drivers, ..then you can apply this uniformly across the whole fleet of cars,.. you effectively eliminate the clowns and complacents responsible for a huge fraction of the accidents.
33
Ken
11/02/2021 14:15:18 7 1
bbc
Just like any other helicopter. However, these do at least have several engines and I suspect that, like many 'drones' they may fly with one failed motor?
47
11/02/2021 16:02:31 1 1
bbc
but any conventional helicopter can autorotate the blades
30
11/02/2021 13:26:33 4 3
bbc
How often would these things need servicing, maintenance and inspection?

Once every 50 hours?
48
11/02/2021 16:04:32 7 0
bbc
Probably not. Electric motors are far more reliable than internal combustion (or gas turbine) engines and are relatively easy to diagnose faults long before they become a problem.
49
11/02/2021 16:39:45 10 4
bbc
Electric taxis with four wheels would be a lot better. These are playthings for the rich!
68
11/02/2021 20:13:10 2 0
bbc
Funny thing is that they are cheaper than your four wheeled taxi - oh and quicker too.
35
ant
11/02/2021 14:39:06 6 2
bbc
Drop me off anywhere here please mate.....aaaaarrrrggghhhh!
50
11/02/2021 16:39:50 2 0
bbc
Have you been busy? What time do you finish? God bless Peter Kay.
9
11/02/2021 11:42:54 4 3
bbc
"... could nearly halve carbon dioxide emissions for passengers travelling to the airport"

Really? How can flying to the airport reduce carbon emissions unless they are comparing it to an inefficient old chopper. Keeping all that weight airborne as opposed to rolling along a road/track requires silly amounts of energy. It's physics! Electricity or fossil fuels, let's reduce consumption first.
51
11/02/2021 16:45:28 0 0
bbc
I wonder if this takes into account the truck that takes your luggage to the airport the night before. These taxis won't carry big suitcases, but the article doesn't mention that.
62
11/02/2021 18:35:13 0 0
bbc
Where does it say that they won't carry big suitcases, it doesn't, you just made it up
1
11/02/2021 10:35:55 13 1
bbc
I suppose we already have helicopters performing this function for the ultra rich.

But if it becomes cheaper and more ubiquitous? Would you want the skies full of these things?
52
11/02/2021 16:49:30 0 4
bbc
What's wrong with the train to the airport? If there isn't one then build it. The cost will be worth it. Imagine how many ordinary people could get to the airport relatively cheaply and not fill up the roads (or the skies right over you house).
60
11/02/2021 18:32:00 3 0
bbc
Have you ever been to Heathrow? It is serviced by the Underground, the Heathrow Express and regular train services and the roads are still clogged - when you're travelling with luggage public transport is a nightmare at the best of times
32
11/02/2021 14:04:46 6 1
bbc
My first thoughts on looking at these pictures are what happens if for some reason the engine fails. These vehicles don't look as if they have brilliant glide properties.
53
11/02/2021 17:04:39 0 1
bbc
Normal helicopters glide perfectly well - look up autorotation landings. It's pretty much the most important thing you are taught when learning to fly, same goes for the computer controlling these :)
70
11/02/2021 21:13:21 1 0
bbc
Looking at the size of the rotors 'can it autorotate?' was my first thought. I doubt there would be enough rotor area to overcome the torque to turn the motors.

However a number of years ago I remember reading of a parachute for light aircraft, a RAPS or other steerable canopy might be the way to do it?
40
11/02/2021 14:58:37 6 2
bbc
A quick read of all the 'incidents' occurring to UAVs in the AAIB's monthly bulletin will give a clue as to why taxis with that type of design (multi-propeller, VTOL) are a long way from ever getting approval. Most are not capable of autorotation, the last resort of the conventional helicopter in the event of engine/gearbox failure.
54
11/02/2021 17:08:31 5 0
bbc
Electric vehicles don't have a gear box and mechanical failures are very rarer due to a lot less moving parts. Different technology different solutions. The answer is not the same specification as existing regulation - but smarter regulation focusing on number of hours without incident etc
55
11/02/2021 17:57:00 4 1
bbc
The noise!.......
56
11/02/2021 18:09:01 4 0
bbc
Not a fundamentally insoluble problem for PAV's!, ...though probably a significant issue for most, or all, of the quad/hexa/etc-copter concepts being bandied around in the last few years.
My guess, if we ever see a PAV for the masses it'll be nothing like these noisy flying bricks.
57
11/02/2021 18:11:36 0 1
bbc
When the vehicle turns off, there is no noise.
55
11/02/2021 17:57:00 4 1
bbc
The noise!.......
56
11/02/2021 18:09:01 4 0
bbc
Not a fundamentally insoluble problem for PAV's!, ...though probably a significant issue for most, or all, of the quad/hexa/etc-copter concepts being bandied around in the last few years.
My guess, if we ever see a PAV for the masses it'll be nothing like these noisy flying bricks.
55
11/02/2021 17:57:00 4 1
bbc
The noise!.......
57
11/02/2021 18:11:36 0 1
bbc
When the vehicle turns off, there is no noise.
43
11/02/2021 15:08:42 2 5
bbc
When will we see these in UK
Removed
23
11/02/2021 12:51:21 5 3
bbc
I've told you a million times not to exagerate.
59
11/02/2021 18:16:36 1 0
bbc
I told them a billion times. I like your post.
52
11/02/2021 16:49:30 0 4
bbc
What's wrong with the train to the airport? If there isn't one then build it. The cost will be worth it. Imagine how many ordinary people could get to the airport relatively cheaply and not fill up the roads (or the skies right over you house).
60
11/02/2021 18:32:00 3 0
bbc
Have you ever been to Heathrow? It is serviced by the Underground, the Heathrow Express and regular train services and the roads are still clogged - when you're travelling with luggage public transport is a nightmare at the best of times
78
12/02/2021 08:31:17 0 0
bbc
Most people take far too much luggage with them anyway. If you are going somewhere hot you need very little. And unless you are going to be in the middle of a desert, rain forest or remote mountain range, if yo forget anything you can buy it when you get there anyway!
61
11/02/2021 18:32:11 1 11
bbc
Biden climate envoy John Kerry warns world has nine years to prevent catastrophe. Al Gore said we had 10 years to fix, that was 14 years ago! Lol!!
82
12/02/2021 09:19:20 1 2
bbc
Agree and the clowns downing your comment clearly deny climate history...10
to 15C hotter, 2000% more CO2 oh and life thrived...
51
11/02/2021 16:45:28 0 0
bbc
I wonder if this takes into account the truck that takes your luggage to the airport the night before. These taxis won't carry big suitcases, but the article doesn't mention that.
62
11/02/2021 18:35:13 0 0
bbc
Where does it say that they won't carry big suitcases, it doesn't, you just made it up
44
11/02/2021 15:14:03 0 0
bbc
The thing is, duty on road fuel is required to pay for road construction/maintenance,.. ..even if it isn't specifically separate from the general tax pool, it still goes towards balancing the budget, ..whereas airlines typically pay directly for their use of airports etc, ..so there's no real justification for taxing aviation fuel beyond normal VAT rates.
63
11/02/2021 18:38:04 0 0
bbc
It would also be illegal, there is an international agreement that covers the non-taxing of aviation fuel
34
Ken
11/02/2021 14:19:34 11 0
bbc
The most unreliable part of any vehicle is the driver and the standard of driving in the UK is pretty bad. I believe that US drivers are even worse. Computers can only be better.
64
11/02/2021 18:43:03 0 1
bbc
The standard of driving in the US is better than the UK overall, that's mainly due to penalties for speeding etc and the fact that outside of the major cities the roads are fairly empty, the one time I would disagree is during bad weather, this tends to me much worse in the US than the UK and it makes no difference to a lot of people
65
11/02/2021 19:25:03 0 0
bbc
That may also be the case. My point was that there's no real justification to tax aviation or shipping fuel at anything like the same rate as road fuel, as use of infrastructure by the former two will be paid directly via all the relevant fees.
66
11/02/2021 19:26:42 0 0
bbc
Oops,.. that reply was intended for your response in the previous thread!
64
11/02/2021 18:43:03 0 1
bbc
The standard of driving in the US is better than the UK overall, that's mainly due to penalties for speeding etc and the fact that outside of the major cities the roads are fairly empty, the one time I would disagree is during bad weather, this tends to me much worse in the US than the UK and it makes no difference to a lot of people
65
11/02/2021 19:25:03 0 0
bbc
That may also be the case. My point was that there's no real justification to tax aviation or shipping fuel at anything like the same rate as road fuel, as use of infrastructure by the former two will be paid directly via all the relevant fees.
64
11/02/2021 18:43:03 0 1
bbc
The standard of driving in the US is better than the UK overall, that's mainly due to penalties for speeding etc and the fact that outside of the major cities the roads are fairly empty, the one time I would disagree is during bad weather, this tends to me much worse in the US than the UK and it makes no difference to a lot of people
66
11/02/2021 19:26:42 0 0
bbc
Oops,.. that reply was intended for your response in the previous thread!
26
11/02/2021 13:00:23 2 0
bbc
Or even exaggerate ??
67
11/02/2021 19:40:53 0 0
bbc
egg-saturate
49
11/02/2021 16:39:45 10 4
bbc
Electric taxis with four wheels would be a lot better. These are playthings for the rich!
68
11/02/2021 20:13:10 2 0
bbc
Funny thing is that they are cheaper than your four wheeled taxi - oh and quicker too.
83
12/02/2021 09:20:38 0 3
bbc
especially falling from the air to the ground...127mph terminal velocity enjoy!
69
11/02/2021 20:53:17 2 0
bbc
Not a lot of room for your luggage in one of things
53
11/02/2021 17:04:39 0 1
bbc
Normal helicopters glide perfectly well - look up autorotation landings. It's pretty much the most important thing you are taught when learning to fly, same goes for the computer controlling these :)
70
11/02/2021 21:13:21 1 0
bbc
Looking at the size of the rotors 'can it autorotate?' was my first thought. I doubt there would be enough rotor area to overcome the torque to turn the motors.

However a number of years ago I remember reading of a parachute for light aircraft, a RAPS or other steerable canopy might be the way to do it?
90
12/02/2021 11:04:37 0 0
bbc
can it autorotate? No.
71
SD
11/02/2021 22:10:20 2 3
bbc
The way forward
72
11/02/2021 22:36:32 4 3
bbc
Gimmick

So it can carry a couple of people plus if you're lucky the luggage

Transport for the rich but hardly mass transport
98
12/02/2021 13:27:04 1 0
bbc
That's what they said about the first airplanes.
73
12/02/2021 02:06:19 2 1
bbc
I can imagine the well-heeled taking one look at those plastic coffins and doing a full180.
74
12/02/2021 04:14:43 4 0
bbc
Remebering what the Wright brothers' first effort looked like, and the rapidity of development of materials and propulsion thereafter, it could well be that these 'flying bricks' really are the shape of things to come, at least until transporter technology develops exponentially
97
12/02/2021 13:26:06 1 0
bbc
Finally a sensible post that understands how progress happens.
16
11/02/2021 12:12:57 3 4
bbc
Slowly but inexorably our lives are being taken over by robots, drones, electric cars, driverless cars and online shopping. We won't be able to do anything for ourselves at this rate. I 'drove' a Tesla last year and it drove itself without any operator intervention including breaking and lane control.
75
12/02/2021 04:22:05 0 0
bbc
Riro, rubbish in rubbish out - a programmer's mantra from the early days of computers

'The blue screen of death - something else to consider when claiming that self driving cars are safe, and finally, unexpected glitches and bugs which might show up at critical moments. Look at Tesla's latest problems with its console
76
12/02/2021 08:00:00 2 0
bbc
Brilliant
77
12/02/2021 08:28:57 2 0
bbc
Bye bye ICE engines.
60
11/02/2021 18:32:00 3 0
bbc
Have you ever been to Heathrow? It is serviced by the Underground, the Heathrow Express and regular train services and the roads are still clogged - when you're travelling with luggage public transport is a nightmare at the best of times
78
12/02/2021 08:31:17 0 0
bbc
Most people take far too much luggage with them anyway. If you are going somewhere hot you need very little. And unless you are going to be in the middle of a desert, rain forest or remote mountain range, if yo forget anything you can buy it when you get there anyway!
2
11/02/2021 10:42:12 16 6
bbc
Hell to freeze over before I get into one of those.
79
12/02/2021 08:32:10 1 0
bbc
It isn't that I'd worry about them stopping suddenly and falling our of the sky. But I would worry about them crashing into each other!
45
11/02/2021 15:18:37 11 2
bbc
If they take over the role of helicopters to ferry the rich to & from airports then they could potentially be more environmentally friendly; if the power to charge them is guaranteed to be from renewables & the batteries they contain aren't full of rare earth minerals dug from the ground by the bare hands of malnourished 7-year-olds. It would be better for the clients simply not to fly though.
80
12/02/2021 08:33:12 3 0
bbc
The latest generation of batteries don't use cobalt, so forget the child labour nonsense.
85
12/02/2021 09:23:21 1 1
bbc
If they are made in China then they use slave labour......
81
12/02/2021 09:17:00 1 0
bbc
what could possibly go wrong? I do hope they come with parachutes or will you enter at your risk. Bit of a difference between a car crash and an air crash in terms of inertia!
96
12/02/2021 13:25:17 2 0
bbc
I'm sure the same was said when the Wright brothers were testing their crazy contraptions.
61
11/02/2021 18:32:11 1 11
bbc
Biden climate envoy John Kerry warns world has nine years to prevent catastrophe. Al Gore said we had 10 years to fix, that was 14 years ago! Lol!!
82
12/02/2021 09:19:20 1 2
bbc
Agree and the clowns downing your comment clearly deny climate history...10
to 15C hotter, 2000% more CO2 oh and life thrived...
68
11/02/2021 20:13:10 2 0
bbc
Funny thing is that they are cheaper than your four wheeled taxi - oh and quicker too.
83
12/02/2021 09:20:38 0 3
bbc
especially falling from the air to the ground...127mph terminal velocity enjoy!
45
11/02/2021 15:18:37 11 2
bbc
If they take over the role of helicopters to ferry the rich to & from airports then they could potentially be more environmentally friendly; if the power to charge them is guaranteed to be from renewables & the batteries they contain aren't full of rare earth minerals dug from the ground by the bare hands of malnourished 7-year-olds. It would be better for the clients simply not to fly though.
84
12/02/2021 09:22:21 0 0
bbc
Renewables are energy dense enough to be a viable source of energy. Do some reading. You do know solar panels are made from coal and quartz and wind turbines made from steel!!
80
12/02/2021 08:33:12 3 0
bbc
The latest generation of batteries don't use cobalt, so forget the child labour nonsense.
85
12/02/2021 09:23:21 1 1
bbc
If they are made in China then they use slave labour......
86
12/02/2021 10:12:06 1 0
bbc
Hardly a door to airport service, you'd need a taxi just to get to the take off pad - and there is no way it could lift my wife's holiday suitcase (s) !
87
12/02/2021 10:40:43 2 0
bbc
What goes up - must come down! - but getting it to happen in the "right" place can be problematic. If its onto my roof or Mrs Braines before she's finished the gardening - then I'm likely to get riled. Something that goes up and not down? - House Insurance.
88
12/02/2021 10:52:32 4 0
bbc
A 15 minute flight vs an hour or more in congested traffic + rip off parking charges - what's not to like.
33
Ken
11/02/2021 14:15:18 7 1
bbc
Just like any other helicopter. However, these do at least have several engines and I suspect that, like many 'drones' they may fly with one failed motor?
89
12/02/2021 11:03:58 1 0
bbc
No, not like any other helicopter, because it's not a helicopter. Helicopters can autorotate because of the large angular momentum stored in the rotor system, plus the ability to alter the pitch of the blades in order to 'windmill'. UAVs have neither of these abilities, so have to rely on multiply-redundant power, control, motor and propulsion systems to avoid free-fall when anything fails.
70
11/02/2021 21:13:21 1 0
bbc
Looking at the size of the rotors 'can it autorotate?' was my first thought. I doubt there would be enough rotor area to overcome the torque to turn the motors.

However a number of years ago I remember reading of a parachute for light aircraft, a RAPS or other steerable canopy might be the way to do it?
90
12/02/2021 11:04:37 0 0
bbc
can it autorotate? No.
101
12/02/2021 13:58:27 0 0
bbc
Doesnt need to autorotate.

Redundant motor will be safer than a helicopter
91
12/02/2021 11:17:07 0 0
bbc
You can add to the spice by making sure your flight is on. 737 max
92
12/02/2021 11:47:12 0 0
bbc
"we have to identify the next generation of companies who will make this a reality early and find ways to help them get off the ground," United Airlines chief executive Scott Kirby said in a statement."

Couldn't help smiling at this statement.
93
12/02/2021 11:53:55 1 1
bbc
Further improvements in the technology are in the pipeline. This mode of transport looks like it has a bright future. Also, it could reduce road conjestion and even road maintenance.
94
12/02/2021 12:59:19 0 0
bbc
Come back in 3 hours Sir, the battocopter is currently on a charge cycle.
95
12/02/2021 13:23:07 1 1
bbc
The batteries can be changed in these. But thanks for playing.
94
12/02/2021 12:59:19 0 0
bbc
Come back in 3 hours Sir, the battocopter is currently on a charge cycle.
95
12/02/2021 13:23:07 1 1
bbc
The batteries can be changed in these. But thanks for playing.
81
12/02/2021 09:17:00 1 0
bbc
what could possibly go wrong? I do hope they come with parachutes or will you enter at your risk. Bit of a difference between a car crash and an air crash in terms of inertia!
96
12/02/2021 13:25:17 2 0
bbc
I'm sure the same was said when the Wright brothers were testing their crazy contraptions.
74
12/02/2021 04:14:43 4 0
bbc
Remebering what the Wright brothers' first effort looked like, and the rapidity of development of materials and propulsion thereafter, it could well be that these 'flying bricks' really are the shape of things to come, at least until transporter technology develops exponentially
97
12/02/2021 13:26:06 1 0
bbc
Finally a sensible post that understands how progress happens.
72
11/02/2021 22:36:32 4 3
bbc
Gimmick

So it can carry a couple of people plus if you're lucky the luggage

Transport for the rich but hardly mass transport
98
12/02/2021 13:27:04 1 0
bbc
That's what they said about the first airplanes.
40
11/02/2021 14:58:37 6 2
bbc
A quick read of all the 'incidents' occurring to UAVs in the AAIB's monthly bulletin will give a clue as to why taxis with that type of design (multi-propeller, VTOL) are a long way from ever getting approval. Most are not capable of autorotation, the last resort of the conventional helicopter in the event of engine/gearbox failure.
99
12/02/2021 13:50:57 0 0
bbc
Well hopefully there be more room for others as you being a luddite.

These dont need all motors to run to fly, its called redundancy. 1 fail no issue, 2 fail, of course possible but very unlikely then it does an emergency decent to land safely. "autorotation" is totally irrelevant!
39
11/02/2021 14:46:14 7 0
bbc
Some criteria for PAV's to ever make it big:
1) Economical/efficient to buy and operate,
2) Easy to handle by average couch potato, ...or, more likely, fully autonomous
3) Passive safety,. ..relaxes to glide form in power outage.
4) VTOL
5) Relatively silent.
6) Decent range
100
12/02/2021 13:56:38 1 0
bbc
1) efficiency of scale
2) fully automatic aka no human interference
3) redundant motors, 1 fails carry on, 2 fail land asap
4) ?
5) depends on the Hz & materials. Ever heard a proper drone? virtually quiet
6) wont be for all journeys although may be able to go to France, which I cant drive to in a car? Ferries & EuroTunnel is cheating??

Certainly has potential
105
12/02/2021 15:59:13 0 0
bbc
Regarding point 3),. active redundancy is obviously great, and presumably you'd have it it any case, ..but you still want passive safety features,.. i.e, total power outage, you glide gently back to earth as opposed to falling out of the sky like a brick.
Which is why I'm convinced the eventual evolution of PAV's will look considerably different from the concepts currently being promoted.