Sainsbury’s takes on Aldi in supermarket price war
10/02/2021 | news | business | 922
The UK's second-largest supermarket joins Tesco in promising to price-match German discounter Aldi.
1
10/02/2021 14:08:29 316 9
bbc
Let's hope they don't just squeeze the suppliers even more....
3
10/02/2021 14:10:12 190 9
bbc
Absolutely. The chicken farmers still need to earn their livings, without pressure to reduce welfare standards to cut costs.
28
UBT
10/02/2021 14:18:20 21 1
bbc
Supermarkets have been squeezing suppliers for many years and they do it on the basis of volume...so suppliers have to pare back the quality of their products in order to compete...and losing a big contract with one supermarket can be a big problem as they cannot easily repalce that contract with another to another supermarket chain.
82
10/02/2021 14:27:14 30 6
bbc
A pound to a pinch of snuff that EVERY discount given to you by any supermarket is more than paid by the supplier.
If an item costs £1 with the supermarket having a 20p margin, the supplier gets 80p.
If the supermarket gives you it at half price you pay 50p but the supermarket demands its 20p margin so the supplier gets only 30p, way less than cost of production.
That's why many suppliers go bust
195
10/02/2021 14:47:03 6 1
bbc
Don't worry, they will >8-(
283
10/02/2021 15:00:43 3 0
bbc
It's the sad harsh reality of business. Suppliers will always compete for business, they are responsible for sucking up the extra overheads after making promises for who they supply to. It's the same with Boohoo when loads of journos were pointing the finger at them but it was the suppliers making promises on deals they could only cash by undercutting wages
342
AMc
10/02/2021 15:09:11 2 0
bbc
Haha, that's how it works, but of course everyone says it's disgraceful but we're all the first to buy good for less.
739
10/02/2021 19:31:10 1 0
bbc
I know a local meatball supplier to the supermarkets and he tells me they are being squeezed very hard.
766
10/02/2021 20:02:07 0 0
bbc
Inevitable!
781
10/02/2021 20:30:37 0 0
bbc
They will! Plus they are struggling to fill their shelves.
846
11/02/2021 05:56:34 0 0
bbc
Perhaps cut the bungs.
915
11/02/2021 16:04:49 0 0
bbc
Of course they will - till the “pips squeak “ , ruthlessly.
2
10/02/2021 14:10:05 8 1
bbc
I presume it will be mostly the own label discount brand that has a price reduction.
10
PTM
10/02/2021 14:14:00 7 2
bbc
Given "Own Brand Brands" is most of what Aldi sell, one would assume. Will be interesting to watch because many Aldi stores are build next to the local Sainsburys.
55
UBT
10/02/2021 14:22:25 1 0
bbc
You betcha....unless one brand has a "monopoly" on a specific foodstuff...and then it's down to whether to make that product a "loss leader" in order to entice shoppers in, who will then spend more on other products "whilst they are there".

Also: product placement in a supermarket is king - with cheaper (less profitable?) products on lower shelves and higher margin items placed at eye-level.
1
10/02/2021 14:08:29 316 9
bbc
Let's hope they don't just squeeze the suppliers even more....
3
10/02/2021 14:10:12 190 9
bbc
Absolutely. The chicken farmers still need to earn their livings, without pressure to reduce welfare standards to cut costs.
152
10/02/2021 14:40:42 16 9
bbc
or hope that Sainsburys don't add more water to their chicken to match Aldi's
339
10/02/2021 15:09:02 8 15
bbc
Actually, leave the chickens alone, just stop killing
787
10/02/2021 20:51:22 0 2
bbc
Or just not eat dead animals
808
10/02/2021 21:58:25 1 1
bbc
Chicken farmers can re coop a bird in the hand is worth killing two with one stone.
4
10/02/2021 14:10:24 189 10
bbc
Hopefully the farmers won't be treated even worse than they are currently to lower the prices
13
10/02/2021 14:15:05 59 101
bbc
Aldi and Lidl should be forced to sign up to GSCOP rules, as a requirement to trade in the UK.
207
10/02/2021 14:49:35 0 2
bbc
Two hopes I suspect
279
10/02/2021 14:59:46 9 6
bbc
The concern for farmers is, frankly, laughable. The Queen, James Dyson, Saudi royals, the Duke Of Westminster, Richard Drax MP and hundreds more of the ultra wealthy have large holdings

Poultry production in the UK is entirely dominated by the five major industrial farming conglomerates. They in turn are supported by mega farms holding up to 2 million birds.
5
ps
10/02/2021 14:10:42 180 5
bbc
Watch out for stealth price rises on other products. They will find a way to protect their margins somehow.
67
10/02/2021 14:23:50 83 3
bbc
Sainsbury's aren't doing this to reduce profits, it's good for consumers but suppliers will foot the bill as ever
189
10/02/2021 14:46:02 1 0
bbc
Butter has already gone through the roof. 50p more than this time last year.
190
10/02/2021 14:46:22 3 0
bbc
Already had a whole load of those over the last year. When price has stayed the same, quality and/or quantity has been reduced.
383
10/02/2021 15:17:04 0 0
bbc
Tesco already doing stealth pricing ploys. Last week they were advertising a well known tube of crisps at £2.50 or £1.25 with loyalty card. Wow.... half price, they want you to think. A Local discount store had them at £1 per tube. So rather than half price they were in fact a quarter more expensive.
389
10/02/2021 15:18:45 1 0
bbc
Just shop at Aldi or Lidl. I only go to a major supermarket for beer, they have better offers.
510
10/02/2021 15:58:25 0 0
bbc
The prep for this has been going on for months - Sainsbury's have been quietly reducing their product range and the sizes of the same product in favour of products that have a higher profit margin.

The 'price cuts' are paid for by the customer - swings and roundabouts.
6
10/02/2021 14:11:10 10 10
bbc
Surely this will drive the traditional Sainsbury customers into the arms of MandS or Waitrose. Lowering the tone of the supermarket!
21
10/02/2021 14:17:10 3 0
bbc
Presumably Sainsbury will still have their not-so budget and finer ranges alongside more basic priced matched produce
41
10/02/2021 14:20:27 0 0
bbc
Snob
7
10/02/2021 14:11:59 5 8
bbc
Not happy with Sainsburys. Booked a delivery and had an email an hour before saying they couldn't deliver due to adverse weather and I should call to re-schedule delivery. Called them today and they told me the next available slot is next week! Going to Morrisons instead now! Sainsburys = Epic Fail.
23
10/02/2021 14:17:25 10 1
bbc
We can't expect deliveries in adverse weather conditions. It happened to me with Tesco a couple of weeks ago. They called and rescheduled for the next day and sent me a £10 voucher for the inconvenience.
27
10/02/2021 14:18:03 5 0
bbc
How inconsiderate of God to send snow without consulting you and Sainsbury first. I'm sure He will have learned from the experience and check with you in advance next time.
#first world problems. It'd do Brits some good to live in the developing world or a war zone and see what real hardship is.
193
10/02/2021 14:46:44 0 1
bbc
Presumably you'd have been happy for their driver to attempt an impossible journey and have a crash on the way?
Only outcome, AT BEST, is you still don't get your delivery. Plus the driver gets hurt.
Attitude shortfall in spades.
206
10/02/2021 14:49:33 1 0
bbc
Yeah - immagine building a supermarket where it snows - numpties!
8
10/02/2021 14:13:17 21 18
bbc
Aldi don't cater for lazy people who demand their shopping is delivered, hence the lower growth.
Sainsbury's will never match Aldi for price no matter what. Stop dreaming.
39
10/02/2021 14:20:09 16 4
bbc
I object to being called 'lazy' when at the current time I am forced to use online shopping. Also Aldi do a click and collect service. What is your negative take on that?
48
10/02/2021 14:21:46 7 0
bbc
Way to go with the offensive categorisation. Lots of people who are using delivery services are NOT lazy - they are shielding, isolating or unable to make the journey to a supermarket.
72
10/02/2021 14:25:00 7 0
bbc
Perhaps "lazy" people are having groceries delivered or ordering click and collect because there is a pandemic on.
131
10/02/2021 14:37:00 2 0
bbc
What a charmer.
149
10/02/2021 14:40:09 0 0
bbc
Have you tried booking a grocery delivery???
9
10/02/2021 14:13:49 8 12
bbc
All this talk by the EU of level playing fields and ethical rights; Aldi and Lidl should be forced to sign up to GSCOP rules, as a requirement to trade in the UK.
73
10/02/2021 14:25:08 2 1
bbc
Really don't understand how anyone could disagree; clearly the people who are downvoting have no experience of the industry.
2
10/02/2021 14:10:05 8 1
bbc
I presume it will be mostly the own label discount brand that has a price reduction.
10
PTM
10/02/2021 14:14:00 7 2
bbc
Given "Own Brand Brands" is most of what Aldi sell, one would assume. Will be interesting to watch because many Aldi stores are build next to the local Sainsburys.
32
10/02/2021 14:19:06 0 1
bbc
Incorrect
Aldi simply use different brands
230
10/02/2021 14:51:43 1 0
bbc
But much of the Aldi 'own brand' stuff is really good, unlike Sainsbur's and others. Aldi 'Specially Selected' products are really good and often cheaper than own brand in the big supermarkets.
11
10/02/2021 14:14:17 18 9
bbc
Race to the bottom it would seem.
30
10/02/2021 14:18:32 12 5
bbc
We as consumers decide that, not them. If quality suffers, there's plenty other places to go.
426
10/02/2021 15:29:22 0 0
bbc
Already near the bottom, just their prices didn't match their position.
12
10/02/2021 14:14:48 9 6
bbc
Will you do giant Sicilian olives at the same price as Aldi? No? Ok then.
69
10/02/2021 14:24:26 1 1
bbc
I like Aldi but I have to tell you Tesco's Kalamati olives are very good.
4
10/02/2021 14:10:24 189 10
bbc
Hopefully the farmers won't be treated even worse than they are currently to lower the prices
13
10/02/2021 14:15:05 59 101
bbc
Aldi and Lidl should be forced to sign up to GSCOP rules, as a requirement to trade in the UK.
90
10/02/2021 14:29:44 17 1
bbc
Do you know that they haven't? In any event whilst I don't know about Sainsbury's the battle between growers and Tesco for fair pricing has been going on for years and is well documented.
97
10/02/2021 14:31:59 33 1
bbc
Both Aldi and Lidl are on the list of GSCOP designated retailers
280
10/02/2021 14:59:48 17 0
bbc
They are and I regularly see far more British sourced Veg, fish & meat produce in Lidl or Aldi than in Sainsbury's.

Last time I checked about 4 years ago they and Morrisons paid the most to Dairy producers as well

They operate on lower overheads, smaller stores & product ranges and margins so this isn't a surprise
317
10/02/2021 15:05:51 5 0
bbc
They already are...
416
10/02/2021 15:25:47 13 0
bbc
Aldi buy from local farmers and pay good money quickly
580
10/02/2021 16:45:00 0 0
bbc
Checked it. They are signed up. By law.
657
10/02/2021 17:47:40 0 0
bbc
Why forced? How do you think whether they haven't done so already?
14
10/02/2021 14:15:15 4 1
bbc
General question: why is it that foreign shops (= Aldi/ Lidl) are able to sell at lower prices? What's lower: their quality of goods or quality of service or other overheads?
22
10/02/2021 14:17:20 14 5
bbc
None, amount of profit to shareholders.
35
10/02/2021 14:19:56 8 0
bbc
Aldi & Lidl and many other large German companies are still family owned. No shareholders to appease. They don't have the "city" demanding ever higher profits
43
10/02/2021 14:16:19 5 1
bbc
try working for them and you will soon find out...
53
10/02/2021 14:18:21 7 7
bbc
Poorer quality in many areas.

Fruit and veg in both mentioned are of shocking quality...
54
10/02/2021 14:22:23 7 1
bbc
They're designed to be low-cost stores. Fewer lines, fewer staff, multi-tasking, fast checkouts, no manned bakery/fish/meat/deli, smaller buildings, less "presentation". Far less stuff discounted to flog it off. Both incorporated in the UK for over 30 years and around 70% UK-sourced.
60
tv
10/02/2021 14:20:26 10 0
bbc
You never see anyone just sat on checkouts at Aldi/Lidl waiting for a customer, they jump on and off tills to stack shelves, use of pallets for stock means less time stacking shelves, smaller stores so less utility costs- overall less overheads
92
10/02/2021 14:30:28 2 3
bbc
It comes to less staff thus less product inspection, no used by dates, not shelving products leaving them in transport packaging. No fresh counters - no fish mongers, butches etc. Also they have a limited stock in smaller shop.

Mainly it is the less staff and not signing up to Groceries Supply Code of Practice
203
10/02/2021 14:48:12 3 2
bbc
Efficiency! Much of the produce is as good or better at Aldi. Started shopping there over 10 years ago and only go to the others for those rare items they don't stock. Fortunately snobbery keeps some people out of Aldi (they don't know what they're missing, please don't tell them). Sainsbury's the worst of the lot - can't believe the prices.
349
10/02/2021 15:10:10 5 1
bbc
As a supplier to these businesses I can honestly say they put a gun to your head on price. The suppliers and manufacturers lose out just to retain volumes while making next to zero profit. And people in this country think they’re wonderful shops... they’re a disgrace.
15
10/02/2021 14:15:33 7 8
bbc
It’ll be a tough battle but quality will shine through

Could be the end of Sainsburys
57
10/02/2021 14:22:35 7 5
bbc
I keep hearing about this famous Aldi/Lidl quality, certainly not the case in my experience.
182
10/02/2021 14:44:43 0 0
bbc
They certainly have the high price, low quality model all wrapped up at the moment.
16
10/02/2021 14:15:49 18 4
bbc
Forget the popular items - they all fleece us on the other products, no matter who they are. Bit like eating in a pub - fleece you on the drinks.
17
10/02/2021 14:16:13 78 14
bbc
The difficulty the big supermarkets have is they try to compete on price but their price match products are poor quality and taste cheap, I have been an Aldi shopper for years and even if they brought all the products down to Aldi level I still wouldn’t shop there as they have been ripping off the consumer for too long.
885
11/02/2021 08:39:52 7 1
bbc
I gave up on Sainsbury's years ago when they were charging almost £2 for a packet of chocolate digestives. Three times the price in the discount stores. They took the Mickey out of their loyal customer base, like all the near monopolies try to do.
18
10/02/2021 14:16:30 80 7
bbc
Enormous credit to Aldi stores, they are ensuring the big companies are having to think about their customers, at last and not just treating them as cash cows. We all realise these big conglomerates don’t give a monkeys about about us so might start shopping at aldis
83
10/02/2021 14:27:13 42 72
bbc
You mean the private business that isn't transparent and doesn't have a wide range of shareholders to be accountable to. One where the profit is held by a family trust in Germany? I don't want my world dominated by businesses like that
176
10/02/2021 14:43:48 1 2
bbc
No, no, no - it's very crowded in there! Not sure why.
198
10/02/2021 14:47:53 11 7
bbc
I tried a new Lidl when they opened near me. Not a good shopping experience, hardly any choice, prices not massively cheaper (watch the packet sizes), and loads of junk like power tools and beach toys piled up in the centre aisles. I haven't been back, there's more to food shopping than saving a pound a week.
290
10/02/2021 15:02:07 1 3
bbc
Until very recently it was not possible to get baskets at A or L...guess why?
519
Bob
10/02/2021 16:01:58 7 0
bbc
Aldi and Lidl are not cheaper because the others are overcharging you. Food is one of the lowest profit margin businesses going.

The reason they are cheaper is because their cost base is cheaper. Few staff. Restricted lines. Cheap Chinese made toot in the middle to draw you in.
543
10/02/2021 16:14:34 0 0
bbc
Aldi are a big company and just like the British ones search for the best strategy to maximise their profits, so now they've introduced upmarket products (specially selected) popular UK brands, vegan items and even Sushi. All supermarkets are trying to emulate but at the same time outfox their competitors.
921
11/02/2021 20:47:00 1 0
bbc
They also don’t care about their staff.
19
Ian
10/02/2021 14:16:51 43 10
bbc
And just like Aldi, they've now got no fresh meat, fish or deli counters, so more unnecessary plastic everywhere and all in the name of shareholder profits and to hell with the environment.
62
PTM
10/02/2021 14:22:58 86 5
bbc
Slightly off topic I know, but they could re-introduce fish counters to help Fishermen sell their shellfish and the vast range of fish no longer getting to Europe since Brexit.
188
10/02/2021 14:45:55 4 3
bbc
Just because it's prepacked doesn't mean it's not fresh.
322
10/02/2021 15:06:46 3 1
bbc
These add-on counters were and are a ploy to convince shoppers they're having a traditional shopping experience. It's purely window-dressing. What you're not seeing is the amount of packaging discarded behind the scenes as they pretend to put 'fresher' meat on display. And, come on, your deli portions of samosas and pate have to go in something don't they? Or do you juggle them to the till?
338
10/02/2021 15:08:59 1 1
bbc
!. Did you not notice the pandemic?
2. You are wrong, my local Sainsburys and Tescos have meat, fish and deli counters.
498
Sue
10/02/2021 15:52:14 0 2
bbc
No, they just sell prepacked meat and fish in lots of plastic.... hardly better for the environment
20
10/02/2021 14:16:54 35 8
bbc
Chasing cheap food has worked so well for the British public and the environment over the last 70 years, what can possibly go wrong?
47
10/02/2021 14:21:45 16 3
bbc
Ha, how true. In general, we have a fairly poor attitude to food, it's quality and it's source. My veggie mrs still laughs when she remember the headline "100% horse" during the horsemeat scandal.
179
10/02/2021 14:44:30 5 0
bbc
Yep. People would rather save 2p on a can of watered down baked beans than save real money on their mobile phone or Sky tv packages.
537
10/02/2021 16:09:13 0 0
bbc
Not heard of botulism for quite some time. Was fairly common 70 years ago. So not only cheaper but safer than it was. As for the environment destruction is mainly due to the massive demand the enlarged population is putting on the planet coupled with political drives to make fuels out of crops.
6
10/02/2021 14:11:10 10 10
bbc
Surely this will drive the traditional Sainsbury customers into the arms of MandS or Waitrose. Lowering the tone of the supermarket!
21
10/02/2021 14:17:10 3 0
bbc
Presumably Sainsbury will still have their not-so budget and finer ranges alongside more basic priced matched produce
14
10/02/2021 14:15:15 4 1
bbc
General question: why is it that foreign shops (= Aldi/ Lidl) are able to sell at lower prices? What's lower: their quality of goods or quality of service or other overheads?
22
10/02/2021 14:17:20 14 5
bbc
None, amount of profit to shareholders.
7
10/02/2021 14:11:59 5 8
bbc
Not happy with Sainsburys. Booked a delivery and had an email an hour before saying they couldn't deliver due to adverse weather and I should call to re-schedule delivery. Called them today and they told me the next available slot is next week! Going to Morrisons instead now! Sainsburys = Epic Fail.
23
10/02/2021 14:17:25 10 1
bbc
We can't expect deliveries in adverse weather conditions. It happened to me with Tesco a couple of weeks ago. They called and rescheduled for the next day and sent me a £10 voucher for the inconvenience.
61
10/02/2021 14:22:50 1 2
bbc
Our roads are clear and we're not far from the dispatch depot. Nothing adverse about the weather last night, it's just a bit cold. If Sainsburys can't operate when there's anything other than normal then they are useless.
87
10/02/2021 14:28:56 2 0
bbc
Happened to me too 24th Jan but Tesco couldn't redeliver until 5 days later, like you said can't help the weather although the slightest bit of snow & we all come to a stand still.
24
10/02/2021 14:17:31 4 6
bbc
... most of the customers in my local Aldington and Lidl are low income families and Tesco and Sainsbury tend not to be located in low income areas
44
10/02/2021 14:21:01 5 1
bbc
Tesco not in low income areas ?

Er, really ?
162
10/02/2021 14:42:33 0 0
bbc
Great - keeps the snobs out - gets too crowded in Aldi as it is!

If they're local I guess you don't live in a decent area then?
25
10/02/2021 14:17:38 9 8
bbc
I'll still be shopping at Aldi and Lidl limiting my visit to Tesco for a handful of items.
26
10/02/2021 14:17:51 302 17
bbc
Funny how the big supermarkets are always 'lowering prices' - for as long as I can remember

The only real driver to lower prices is new entrants like Aldi and Lidl, which do a fantastic job. Without them the bigger markets wouldn't be feeling so charitable towards the consumer
.
46
10/02/2021 14:21:30 171 14
bbc
absolutely correct. its the aldi/lidls which stop the sainsbury/waitrose ( and asda/tesco as well) stuffing us all.
160
10/02/2021 14:42:23 8 15
bbc
Asda and Tesco are pretty much as cheap as Aldi / Lidl and there is a lot more choice. And didn't Aldi get told off by the advertising standards agency for not comparing like with like? ie. their cheap own branded junk against named brands at Tesco?
411
10/02/2021 15:25:16 1 2
bbc
Price matching isn't always beneficial. When Aldi opened up near my local Tesco a product I buy regularly in Tesco acquired a price match sign & went up by 50p or 10% overnight as the product was 50p dearer in Aldi.
Great - where the value for money on that.
548
10/02/2021 16:17:09 0 4
bbc
If all of the UK supermarkets follow the Aldi/Lidl model I simply won't enter another store. Disorganised layouts, narrow aisles in which it's impossible to socially distance and cardboard boxes strewn all over the place does not make for a pleasant shopping experience.
607
10/02/2021 17:05:57 2 0
bbc
It’s not only price rises. The size of all tinned goods has decreased several times in the last two years whilst the price has increased.
It is time the Government issued a price index for supermarket goods the RPI does not reflect people’s experience.
The entire way goods are sold needs changing in the consumers favour. With standardised pricing, and previous prices for a whole year shown.
7
10/02/2021 14:11:59 5 8
bbc
Not happy with Sainsburys. Booked a delivery and had an email an hour before saying they couldn't deliver due to adverse weather and I should call to re-schedule delivery. Called them today and they told me the next available slot is next week! Going to Morrisons instead now! Sainsburys = Epic Fail.
27
10/02/2021 14:18:03 5 0
bbc
How inconsiderate of God to send snow without consulting you and Sainsbury first. I'm sure He will have learned from the experience and check with you in advance next time.
85
10/02/2021 14:28:10 0 0
bbc
It's hardly enough to cancel services where we live. Roads are clear. I could venture out to the stores and risk catching covid and bringing it home but I'd rather not. They offer the service...they should have known the issues in advance. Like I say, just poor service from Sainsburys
1
10/02/2021 14:08:29 316 9
bbc
Let's hope they don't just squeeze the suppliers even more....
28
UBT
10/02/2021 14:18:20 21 1
bbc
Supermarkets have been squeezing suppliers for many years and they do it on the basis of volume...so suppliers have to pare back the quality of their products in order to compete...and losing a big contract with one supermarket can be a big problem as they cannot easily repalce that contract with another to another supermarket chain.
29
10/02/2021 14:18:24 46 11
bbc
A con to get you into the store. Aldi/Lidl will keep providing most of my shopping
50
10/02/2021 14:22:10 19 3
bbc
I'd like to see how Sainsburys can do a true price match - they don't stock the brands that Aldi and Lidl do!
11
10/02/2021 14:14:17 18 9
bbc
Race to the bottom it would seem.
30
10/02/2021 14:18:32 12 5
bbc
We as consumers decide that, not them. If quality suffers, there's plenty other places to go.
143
10/02/2021 14:39:15 1 0
bbc
Regrettably nowhere near as many other places as there used to be and probably still less after this current situation is over. 30 years ago my local high road had 3 butchers and 2 fishmongers. Now there is one butcher left. We need to totally rethink and evaluate our attitude and strategy to food in this country I believe.
874
11/02/2021 08:32:07 0 0
bbc
Define QUALITY
31
10/02/2021 14:18:44 5 8
bbc
The human race to the bottom continues. So to cut costs quality decreases and staff get even more exploited. The quicker we are extinct the better for the planet.
42
10/02/2021 14:20:44 2 2
bbc
Cheer up sweetie. It might never happen.
10
PTM
10/02/2021 14:14:00 7 2
bbc
Given "Own Brand Brands" is most of what Aldi sell, one would assume. Will be interesting to watch because many Aldi stores are build next to the local Sainsburys.
32
10/02/2021 14:19:06 0 1
bbc
Incorrect
Aldi simply use different brands
33
10/02/2021 14:19:18 6 7
bbc
I thought Brexit was going to make food more expensive?
91
10/02/2021 14:30:24 0 1
bbc
Until it effects take out coffee, avacados or Waitrose it doesn't count...
108
UBT
10/02/2021 14:33:52 0 0
bbc
We're only 1 month into Brexit...and already fish exporters (from UK) are having difficulties selling their products into the EU. Just wait until 1st June when UK Customs duties start coming into full effect for food IMPORTS....just in time for the normal summer imports of fresh fruits and veg from the Continent...
161
10/02/2021 14:42:28 0 0
bbc
no deal brexit and tarrifs would have why do you think boris was so desperate for a deal
34
10/02/2021 14:19:24 148 21
bbc
According to a 'Which ?' study, 30 years ago 33% of peoples income went on food, today it is just over 10%. Especially now, after Brexit, we should expect to pay more for our food for better quality and sustainability and to give our UK producers an opportunity to make a decent living and invest for a future where we can import less.

This is a race to the bottom and to no ones ultimate benefit.
51
10/02/2021 14:22:13 55 53
bbc
To pay more for food most people will need to pay less in taxes, including council tax, and housing costs.

Many people are not left with much for food. Some no-where near enough which is why we have food banks.
129
10/02/2021 14:36:54 2 7
bbc
Why are you assuming that the food we buy is made in Britain or that being British makes it better quality?
150
10/02/2021 14:40:15 9 8
bbc
Yep, I was looking for some good old British tomatoes in Sainsbury's just last night but they've been out of stock for months and all the pineapples were foreign. Expected better after Brexit! Picked up some cheap plonk in the wine aisle though and that was OK 'cos it was australian (my grandad fought in the desert with the Ozzies and said they were good chaps).

Won't go in those Jerry shops!
233
10/02/2021 14:52:21 6 10
bbc
Please do us a similar comparison for, say, Council Tax, Fuel Taxes, VAT, etc.

Then try transport costs, clothing, phone bills, energy costs, etc.

Unfair to select just one aspect of spending for a somewhat irrelevant "comparison."
298
10/02/2021 15:03:21 6 0
bbc
A lot of the reduction in food costs has been driven through automation and consolidation, vast quantities can now be produced with little or no manpower effort. Inside the factory with Gregg Wallace is very enlightening if you mute him....
381
10/02/2021 15:16:41 4 0
bbc
yep agree. Sell quality produce with quality service, support local producers etc. It devalues everything otherwise. How does a local butcher compete with this endless reduction in price.

"it's good for the consumer", no it's not. It will drive down quality and squeeze the market.
397
10/02/2021 15:21:04 1 6
bbc
Race to the bottom is capitalism. It’s how the big cheeses earn their bonuses and how shareholders earn their dividends.
675
10/02/2021 18:15:03 1 1
bbc
"According to a 'Which ?' study, 30 years ago 33% of peoples income went on food"
What proportion of our income went on housing then? And what proportion now goes towards propping up today's dysfunctional housing 'market'?
877
11/02/2021 08:36:51 0 0
bbc
Whilst it is true that much less of our disposable income is spend on food now, more and more of our food is imported. The EU supplies the bulk of our imports, like cheese, wine, salad, fruits, vegetables, etc. There are very limited UK substitutes for these.
880
11/02/2021 08:37:52 0 0
bbc
And 80% on rent! Swings and roundabouts eh
14
10/02/2021 14:15:15 4 1
bbc
General question: why is it that foreign shops (= Aldi/ Lidl) are able to sell at lower prices? What's lower: their quality of goods or quality of service or other overheads?
35
10/02/2021 14:19:56 8 0
bbc
Aldi & Lidl and many other large German companies are still family owned. No shareholders to appease. They don't have the "city" demanding ever higher profits
36
10/02/2021 14:14:27 50 6
bbc
Yet people still go to Aldi as it is still far cheaper than the rip off Sainsbury and Tesco giants. Bothe the giants are very selctive on where they offer this prcie match and it certainly isn't helping the everyday shop.
256
10/02/2021 14:56:17 31 33
bbc
Have you been in a tescos? Pretty much the same price as aldi. Tesco also have people on the till rather than waiting in huge queues for the 1 ALDI checkout staff to hurl shopping at you at 100mph. All the 'comparisons' they did on tv was comparing branded with their non-branded items. They have stopped comparing with Tescos now as they know they aren't cheaper.
532
Bob
10/02/2021 16:07:47 5 1
bbc
The price match is on every day items. And actually most of what Tesco threw a 'price match' label against didn't even change in price - it already was that price and in some cases they actually increased the price!

Aldi and Lidl really are not as cheap as some people believe. Some things are cheaper, but some things are cheapest in Tesco, some in ASDA etc. Shop in them all if you want best price
37
10/02/2021 14:14:40 28 9
bbc
what makes me so angry is that if they can "afford" to do price matches now, why didn't they do it before?

Its an insult

Its a bit like when someone magically can offer a discount out of thin air, and you're left with that appalling feeling you've been "had" all along.

I will be speaking with the store manager of Sainsbury's to ask for a refund from all the years of ovrecharging.
63
10/02/2021 14:23:19 25 0
bbc
Good luck with that.
66
10/02/2021 14:23:46 3 2
bbc
More fool you for shopping there. Sainsburys is inefficient and makes little money today. They need to grab back market share. Taking Aldi on with price when they have a worldwide business is fool hardy. Its all about trying to appear more competitive. We know that they can't be. At least Tesco has the scale and profitability to sustain their price push
115
10/02/2021 14:34:56 2 1
bbc
I'm sure he'll agree - as long as you have your receipts! If you keep shopping there who's the fool?
286
10/02/2021 15:01:02 2 0
bbc
"Its a bit like when someone magically can offer a discount out of thin air, and you're left with that appalling feeling you've been "had" all along."

Radio Times does exactly that! My half-yearly subscription renewal, they tell me, will be £91. If I were a new subscriber, it would strangely be £65. I have e-mailed them to ask why they believe they have the right to rip off existing customers.
793
10/02/2021 21:36:04 1 0
bbc
It not magic - you shift some prices down and other up, you reformulate to make some things cheaper, you restructure your staffing and you squeeze your suppliers.

It's a game they all play
38
10/02/2021 14:20:00 3 3
bbc
Bring back Safeways and Caters.
110
10/02/2021 14:34:01 2 1
bbc
You like mouldy food?
118
10/02/2021 14:35:17 0 0
bbc
I was a Presto, Gateway and Somerfield man myself !
8
10/02/2021 14:13:17 21 18
bbc
Aldi don't cater for lazy people who demand their shopping is delivered, hence the lower growth.
Sainsbury's will never match Aldi for price no matter what. Stop dreaming.
39
10/02/2021 14:20:09 16 4
bbc
I object to being called 'lazy' when at the current time I am forced to use online shopping. Also Aldi do a click and collect service. What is your negative take on that?
440
10/02/2021 15:32:39 0 0
bbc
Only in England.
40
10/02/2021 14:20:24 12 8
bbc
Gosh a supermarket price war; who'd a thought. Super-exciting stuff especially for BBC hacks.

Anything else going on i.e. newsworthy? No; thought not.
420
10/02/2021 15:26:51 2 0
bbc
But you have read it though haven't you. If it is that boring remember you don't have to click and connect - read something else instead.
6
10/02/2021 14:11:10 10 10
bbc
Surely this will drive the traditional Sainsbury customers into the arms of MandS or Waitrose. Lowering the tone of the supermarket!
41
10/02/2021 14:20:27 0 0
bbc
Snob
The human race to the bottom continues. So to cut costs quality decreases and staff get even more exploited. The quicker we are extinct the better for the planet.
42
10/02/2021 14:20:44 2 2
bbc
Cheer up sweetie. It might never happen.
14
10/02/2021 14:15:15 4 1
bbc
General question: why is it that foreign shops (= Aldi/ Lidl) are able to sell at lower prices? What's lower: their quality of goods or quality of service or other overheads?
43
10/02/2021 14:16:19 5 1
bbc
try working for them and you will soon find out...
24
10/02/2021 14:17:31 4 6
bbc
... most of the customers in my local Aldington and Lidl are low income families and Tesco and Sainsbury tend not to be located in low income areas
44
10/02/2021 14:21:01 5 1
bbc
Tesco not in low income areas ?

Er, really ?
7
10/02/2021 14:11:59 5 8
bbc
Not happy with Sainsburys. Booked a delivery and had an email an hour before saying they couldn't deliver due to adverse weather and I should call to re-schedule delivery. Called them today and they told me the next available slot is next week! Going to Morrisons instead now! Sainsburys = Epic Fail.
45
10/02/2021 14:21:14 1 2
bbc
#first world problems. It'd do Brits some good to live in the developing world or a war zone and see what real hardship is.
75
10/02/2021 14:25:59 0 1
bbc
Err there's a pandemic on at the moment and we are not going out unnecessarily as we have elderly relatives in the same household so we are completely reliant on the delivery service. You may have noticed the report that shows covid spread is highest around supermarkets.
26
10/02/2021 14:17:51 302 17
bbc
Funny how the big supermarkets are always 'lowering prices' - for as long as I can remember

The only real driver to lower prices is new entrants like Aldi and Lidl, which do a fantastic job. Without them the bigger markets wouldn't be feeling so charitable towards the consumer
.
46
10/02/2021 14:21:30 171 14
bbc
absolutely correct. its the aldi/lidls which stop the sainsbury/waitrose ( and asda/tesco as well) stuffing us all.
210
10/02/2021 14:49:55 10 2
bbc
Interesting assumption you've made that there was no competition between Tesco/Sainsbury's/ASDA before the Germans entered the market
247
10/02/2021 14:55:00 8 9
bbc
Waitrose has far superior products, wider range of products..AND don't go there if you object. There food regulation is second to none..as for A&L...they are the ones ripping off farmers!
If you don't go there currently how do you KNOW?
499
10/02/2021 15:52:30 6 1
bbc
You're so niave......the only thing that 99% of consumers bother about, particularly those on a budget, is price, price, price...oh and price again.
20
10/02/2021 14:16:54 35 8
bbc
Chasing cheap food has worked so well for the British public and the environment over the last 70 years, what can possibly go wrong?
47
10/02/2021 14:21:45 16 3
bbc
Ha, how true. In general, we have a fairly poor attitude to food, it's quality and it's source. My veggie mrs still laughs when she remember the headline "100% horse" during the horsemeat scandal.
513
10/02/2021 16:00:16 0 0
bbc
you forgot the 'no added Shergar' bit... :)
516
10/02/2021 16:01:27 2 0
bbc
IKEA meatballs tasted better with horsemeat.
As did crispy pancakes.
Nothing wrong with a big of horse meat, provided everyone knows!
8
10/02/2021 14:13:17 21 18
bbc
Aldi don't cater for lazy people who demand their shopping is delivered, hence the lower growth.
Sainsbury's will never match Aldi for price no matter what. Stop dreaming.
48
10/02/2021 14:21:46 7 0
bbc
Way to go with the offensive categorisation. Lots of people who are using delivery services are NOT lazy - they are shielding, isolating or unable to make the journey to a supermarket.
49
nic
10/02/2021 14:21:46 1 1
bbc
Reduced profit margins or go out of business ? as it were . I stopped going to Sainsbury when the shelf labelling started saying 1.00 pound dead and knowing that things like a tin of mackeral were a whole lot cheaper elsewhere, maybe 30% ....but I now am watching as to see the brexit factor and am regarding the Sainsbury VS Aldi as a price war and wonder if that's what its all about . Thanks
106
10/02/2021 14:33:43 2 1
bbc
Sorry but I read it twice and still don't understand your point.
29
10/02/2021 14:18:24 46 11
bbc
A con to get you into the store. Aldi/Lidl will keep providing most of my shopping
50
10/02/2021 14:22:10 19 3
bbc
I'd like to see how Sainsburys can do a true price match - they don't stock the brands that Aldi and Lidl do!
899
Rob
11/02/2021 11:48:05 0 0
bbc
True. And many of Sainsbury's own brands are vastly inferior to Aldi brands. Compare for example dishwasher tablets. You'll need to wash twice with Sainsbury's they are sooo poor.
34
10/02/2021 14:19:24 148 21
bbc
According to a 'Which ?' study, 30 years ago 33% of peoples income went on food, today it is just over 10%. Especially now, after Brexit, we should expect to pay more for our food for better quality and sustainability and to give our UK producers an opportunity to make a decent living and invest for a future where we can import less.

This is a race to the bottom and to no ones ultimate benefit.
51
10/02/2021 14:22:13 55 53
bbc
To pay more for food most people will need to pay less in taxes, including council tax, and housing costs.

Many people are not left with much for food. Some no-where near enough which is why we have food banks.
221
10/02/2021 14:51:00 27 5
bbc
Or some of the people unable to afford food could do away with alcohol and/or cigarettes and the phone contracts and the TV's etc on hire and the take-aways. Not tarring everyone who is poor but you can't say people can't afford food when you can buy a bag of rice for <50p that will last a week. If you buy the 'basics' range food costs very little.
284
10/02/2021 15:00:44 18 5
bbc
Yet most have very expensive mobile paraphernalia, smoke, some do drugs and some drink. Lots do all of those.
People need to learn how to prepare and cook food!
Microwave millennials...sad fact!!
400
10/02/2021 15:22:53 17 3
bbc
£30+ a month Apple/Samsung mobile phone contract, £50 a month Sky TV, Uber Eats, Amazon Prime - these are all LUXURIES. Don't pay for these things and then plead poverty.

Cook from scratch, don't eat ready meals. SIMPLE.
431
10/02/2021 15:30:40 10 3
bbc
No, it's because they fail to budget properly, buy "value added" foods & too many snacks, cakes, biscuits...
With a tiny amount of foresight, I can feed myself well on £3 a day, using almost exclusively fresh produce (frozen fish, peas & chips though).
No meal takes more than 30 minutes to prepare & batch cooking cuts that.
"Home economics" classes should be 100% compulsory for any food bank user.
509
10/02/2021 15:57:44 10 2
bbc
We have food banks because of namby pamby Libs! Get real if you offer someyhing for FREE people will grab it!!
792
10/02/2021 21:28:58 1 0
bbc
Or buy fewer luxury items...
52
10/02/2021 14:22:18 6 3
bbc
And when Amazon decides to ditch morrisons and go alone they will be all working together to stop them. Will be too late and Amazon will wipe the floor with them
14
10/02/2021 14:15:15 4 1
bbc
General question: why is it that foreign shops (= Aldi/ Lidl) are able to sell at lower prices? What's lower: their quality of goods or quality of service or other overheads?
53
10/02/2021 14:18:21 7 7
bbc
Poorer quality in many areas.

Fruit and veg in both mentioned are of shocking quality...
14
10/02/2021 14:15:15 4 1
bbc
General question: why is it that foreign shops (= Aldi/ Lidl) are able to sell at lower prices? What's lower: their quality of goods or quality of service or other overheads?
54
10/02/2021 14:22:23 7 1
bbc
They're designed to be low-cost stores. Fewer lines, fewer staff, multi-tasking, fast checkouts, no manned bakery/fish/meat/deli, smaller buildings, less "presentation". Far less stuff discounted to flog it off. Both incorporated in the UK for over 30 years and around 70% UK-sourced.
2
10/02/2021 14:10:05 8 1
bbc
I presume it will be mostly the own label discount brand that has a price reduction.
55
UBT
10/02/2021 14:22:25 1 0
bbc
You betcha....unless one brand has a "monopoly" on a specific foodstuff...and then it's down to whether to make that product a "loss leader" in order to entice shoppers in, who will then spend more on other products "whilst they are there".

Also: product placement in a supermarket is king - with cheaper (less profitable?) products on lower shelves and higher margin items placed at eye-level.
56
10/02/2021 14:22:29 9 5
bbc
Aldi and Lidl, run there stores with fewer staff - less supervisors hanging around. Floor staff seem to be expected to run the place. The mid tier supermarket will find it hard to compete. On the down side there is no best before dates on fresh fruit / veg which makes the week shop impossible.
70
10/02/2021 14:24:38 24 4
bbc
Can you not just have a look at the veg/fruit and make up your own mind?
88
UBT
10/02/2021 14:29:18 2 1
bbc
There's no "best before" dates on ANY loose veg or fruit products in ANY supermarket that I know of. Most pre-packed veg and fruit in Aldi DOES have best before dates printed on the packing, if you care to look.
99
10/02/2021 14:32:28 0 1
bbc
Never seen a best before date on a cabbage.
102
10/02/2021 14:32:58 0 1
bbc
Aldi certainly has dates on fresh produce (maybe not Lidl), but didn't Tesco announce they were doing the same recently? Hint: if it's brown and mouldy leave it behind. Farmer's market likewise!
109
10/02/2021 14:33:55 0 1
bbc
Are you blind?? The best before dates are clearly on the fruit and veg!
132
PTM
10/02/2021 14:37:27 1 0
bbc
No point shopping for "Soft Fruit and Veg" in Aldi, is mainly squashed. Staff don't get the time to stack the shelves... Just slam another case out before "Assistant to Till......"
251
MDK
10/02/2021 14:55:47 0 1
bbc
Why on earth would you need a best before date on fruit and veg?

??
15
10/02/2021 14:15:33 7 8
bbc
It’ll be a tough battle but quality will shine through

Could be the end of Sainsburys
57
10/02/2021 14:22:35 7 5
bbc
I keep hearing about this famous Aldi/Lidl quality, certainly not the case in my experience.
58
10/02/2021 14:22:39 92 6
bbc
Why didn’t they and Tesco lower their prices before Aldi and Lidl started to bite into their massive profits? Nothing like a bit of competition to focus the mind.
526
10/02/2021 16:04:45 21 1
bbc
Quite. And shop around is the name of the game.
556
10/02/2021 16:22:26 0 0
bbc
Would that be the Aldi that is several times larger company than Tesco or Sainsburys? Now could you tell us all what is the profit margin for Tesco or Sainsburys? No thought not! The last time i looded at Tesco they aimed at a 3% margin, which to many large companies is a very small margin. Aldi never broadcast their margins, Tesco must by law
59
10/02/2021 14:22:45 108 11
bbc
Great, can they start with Pringles which are £1.50 in Asda and Iceland but £3 in Sainsbury’s...

Double the price, someone is making a profit
128
10/02/2021 14:36:39 55 1
bbc
Your wish has been granted, I was in a Sainsbury's this morning and noticed Pringles reduced to £1.50. Fill yer boots!!
139
10/02/2021 14:38:40 14 9
bbc
They should double the price to £6, completely unhealthy????
343
10/02/2021 15:09:13 3 5
bbc
Pringles-Reconstituted dried potato, starch and various other additives & preservatives that have never seen a veg patch.

Don't know why anyone should even pay £1.50.

You can easily get hand cut crisps at £1 a sharing bag. Theres always a deal on.

Not happy with Walkers though as they have stopped doing Wasabi & Ginger. Grrrr
351
10/02/2021 15:10:26 2 1
bbc
Sorry but Pringles never £3, not even in expensive corner shops!
418
10/02/2021 15:26:43 3 1
bbc
Pringles aren't food...
419
10/02/2021 15:26:46 2 0
bbc
The reason pringles are £1.50 in Asda and £3.00 in Sainsburys is the fact that Asda has them on promotion. If you go to Sainsburys today you will find Sainsbury has got the aforementioned item on promotion as of today.
616
10/02/2021 17:14:36 0 0
bbc
Pringles - the healthy food stuff we should be consuming !!
636
10/02/2021 17:25:38 0 0
bbc
... or a loss
14
10/02/2021 14:15:15 4 1
bbc
General question: why is it that foreign shops (= Aldi/ Lidl) are able to sell at lower prices? What's lower: their quality of goods or quality of service or other overheads?
60
tv
10/02/2021 14:20:26 10 0
bbc
You never see anyone just sat on checkouts at Aldi/Lidl waiting for a customer, they jump on and off tills to stack shelves, use of pallets for stock means less time stacking shelves, smaller stores so less utility costs- overall less overheads
23
10/02/2021 14:17:25 10 1
bbc
We can't expect deliveries in adverse weather conditions. It happened to me with Tesco a couple of weeks ago. They called and rescheduled for the next day and sent me a £10 voucher for the inconvenience.
61
10/02/2021 14:22:50 1 2
bbc
Our roads are clear and we're not far from the dispatch depot. Nothing adverse about the weather last night, it's just a bit cold. If Sainsburys can't operate when there's anything other than normal then they are useless.
447
10/02/2021 15:37:02 1 0
bbc
But delivery to you is the end of a number of long supply chains...
19
Ian
10/02/2021 14:16:51 43 10
bbc
And just like Aldi, they've now got no fresh meat, fish or deli counters, so more unnecessary plastic everywhere and all in the name of shareholder profits and to hell with the environment.
62
PTM
10/02/2021 14:22:58 86 5
bbc
Slightly off topic I know, but they could re-introduce fish counters to help Fishermen sell their shellfish and the vast range of fish no longer getting to Europe since Brexit.
141
10/02/2021 14:39:10 17 1
bbc
What our fishermen failed to take in to account when voting for Brexit is that much of the fish they catch is not what the British public want to buy - which is why they were exporting it in the first place!
238
10/02/2021 14:53:29 2 3
bbc
Good idea, maybe also intruduce indoor cooking giving the customer a taster of the seefood on offer.
670
10/02/2021 18:08:13 0 0
bbc
I hope they wash their fish before getting it into british shops. Not washing the shellfish before delivery was the reason for the EU rejecting british catches.
37
10/02/2021 14:14:40 28 9
bbc
what makes me so angry is that if they can "afford" to do price matches now, why didn't they do it before?

Its an insult

Its a bit like when someone magically can offer a discount out of thin air, and you're left with that appalling feeling you've been "had" all along.

I will be speaking with the store manager of Sainsbury's to ask for a refund from all the years of ovrecharging.
63
10/02/2021 14:23:19 25 0
bbc
Good luck with that.
113
10/02/2021 14:27:52 3 3
bbc
Thank you.

I've kept every single receipt in date order, and the oldest one was at 13:14 on Tuesday 3rd October 1989, when i was served by "Sarah".

So i will take them all in as proof in case they challenge me.
64
10/02/2021 14:23:22 42 2
bbc
Who is financing the lower prices? The suppliers or are the retailers taking a much smaller margin? I know who my money is on.
93
10/02/2021 14:31:00 30 9
bbc
Or maybe Sainsbury's plan to just stop wasting shoppers money on non-core projects. ASDA purchase failed, they're screwing up Argos and has anyone ever bought anything from their overpriced Habitat shop-in-shops?

Worst of the big chains, I hate it!

One exception: TU clothing is pretty good and well priced in their regular sales.
65
10/02/2021 14:23:32 3 8
bbc
It's a tough business to be in, with tight margins. Sales have increased, but costs have risen. How the chancellor can be considering a corporate tax raid on this sector seems odd when other companies make far greater profits. Can only be politically motivated.
37
10/02/2021 14:14:40 28 9
bbc
what makes me so angry is that if they can "afford" to do price matches now, why didn't they do it before?

Its an insult

Its a bit like when someone magically can offer a discount out of thin air, and you're left with that appalling feeling you've been "had" all along.

I will be speaking with the store manager of Sainsbury's to ask for a refund from all the years of ovrecharging.
66
10/02/2021 14:23:46 3 2
bbc
More fool you for shopping there. Sainsburys is inefficient and makes little money today. They need to grab back market share. Taking Aldi on with price when they have a worldwide business is fool hardy. Its all about trying to appear more competitive. We know that they can't be. At least Tesco has the scale and profitability to sustain their price push
119
10/02/2021 14:30:48 2 1
bbc
Yes I think you're right, and the challenge / hang up Sainbury's have is they are not sure which "camp" they fall in.

Tesco, Asda and Morrisons have always been about "value".

Sainsbury's have never pushed the value message, they were more "middle England" too embarrassed to be seen with an Asda shopping bag.

So now they have to admit defeat on their snobbery.
5
ps
10/02/2021 14:10:42 180 5
bbc
Watch out for stealth price rises on other products. They will find a way to protect their margins somehow.
67
10/02/2021 14:23:50 83 3
bbc
Sainsbury's aren't doing this to reduce profits, it's good for consumers but suppliers will foot the bill as ever
68
10/02/2021 14:23:52 132 21
bbc
When Sainsbury's starts matching the proportion of UK goods on sale ( approx 80-85% of all items at Aldi/Lidl), maybe I may be tempted back to them; until then I'll be sticking with Aldi and Lidl
84
10/02/2021 14:27:18 49 8
bbc
Good point!
116
10/02/2021 14:35:04 13 0
bbc
I was just about to say the same. The British grown fruit and veg is far more prevalent in Lidl than the traditional big supermarkets. Meats, cheese, dairy, all primarily British. I was shocked when I went to Asda at how little domestically produced products they sell. Makes sense though, the Lidl/Aldi supply chain is about maximising every penny; sourcing domestically means lower transport costs
12
10/02/2021 14:14:48 9 6
bbc
Will you do giant Sicilian olives at the same price as Aldi? No? Ok then.
69
10/02/2021 14:24:26 1 1
bbc
I like Aldi but I have to tell you Tesco's Kalamati olives are very good.
56
10/02/2021 14:22:29 9 5
bbc
Aldi and Lidl, run there stores with fewer staff - less supervisors hanging around. Floor staff seem to be expected to run the place. The mid tier supermarket will find it hard to compete. On the down side there is no best before dates on fresh fruit / veg which makes the week shop impossible.
70
10/02/2021 14:24:38 24 4
bbc
Can you not just have a look at the veg/fruit and make up your own mind?
105
10/02/2021 14:33:28 1 0
bbc
Yes if it is for tomorrow at most a couple of days - not if you are buying it for 5 days time, you just don't know how long it has been there.
127
10/02/2021 14:36:39 1 0
bbc
The trouble is Aldi/Lidl buy cheap, which means the fruit and veg they buy is what the producers can't shift to the main supermarkets and is old stock. The amount of veg I see in Aldi that is just on the cusp of going off is worrying. I live in S. Lincolnshire and know fresh veg when I see it.....
71
10/02/2021 14:24:56 241 7
bbc
Aldi and Lidl have a very simple store system, they have a reduced choice range and they seem to accept stock lines running out which means less wastage. For the consumer you accept that there isn't 12 different types of hummus dip, you can't get 30 types of sausages or washing liquid. Maybe we have been spoilt with choice that supports a circular economy with advertisements to promote products.
126
10/02/2021 14:36:32 147 20
bbc
Fact is, the customer doesn't need that much choice. Which magazine Best washing up liquid? Cheap sausages to best quality sausages is enough for most people and if people want more choice it's called the local butchers. Right now, people just want acceptable standards of produce at an acceptable price and Aldi has nailed it.
409
10/02/2021 15:24:55 5 4
bbc
Aldi/Lidl only do value ranges with fake branding. Which is fine apart from those conned into thinking they are anything better. I have lived on Tesco value range for ages, it was UK supermarket policy to package them as very down market to encourage you to pay more for the mid range, merely marked up more equivalents. They are changing the packaging to be the same look as the interlopers now.
479
10/02/2021 15:45:44 4 2
bbc
Add in the no frills approach to presenting the product for sale. Many items just brought in on the pallet and stood down. Reduced costs on stacking shelves. Not sure if they still do but at one point the haulier had to unload their own deliveries saving the need to pay for a forklift driver. All designed to run stores with minimal staffing levels.
508
Bob
10/02/2021 15:56:55 5 0
bbc
And they employ far fewer staff. That's their real advantage. When I visit Aldi or Lidl there's hardly any staff about. When I visit a Tesco they're everywhere.

That's why Tesco and others began closing the deli counters. That's another cost base that the Germans do without.
599
10/02/2021 16:58:10 0 0
bbc
I went into Tesco once and noticed they had about 30 different types of package of Philadelphia Cheese. No one needs that many choices of exactly the same product by the same manufacturer. The reasons for all this variety of non-variety is the same reason some utility supplier have over 100 tariffs.
To confuse and rip of the customer.
703
10/02/2021 18:46:35 0 0
bbc
But in my very limited experience of trying Aldi I find that I can't get everything I want there, and these days (at age 78) I prefer to do all my shopping under one roof. Also, the journey to Aldi happens to be very much further than that to my very good local Tesco Superstore (which happens to be within walking distance). So I have little incentive to use Aldi.
750
10/02/2021 19:38:59 0 0
bbc
Try getting a laundry product that is suitable for wool and silk at Tesco. You can purchase loads of other products to launder with, but, none are suitable for wool. You can at Sainsbury's, n3 prods. Don't know about others, since they're not easily accessible in my area. But, there is also the accessibility of UK fish. Sainsbury's just pulled out of fresh counters. No fish shops now. Tesco? Hmm.
892
11/02/2021 09:35:19 0 0
bbc
Need the loo in JS? get there via loo roll aisle - not busy as stocks packs of 4, 6, 12, 24 etc etc of every brand and type. Sell 6 rolls per pack and give discounts on multibuys, using the space created to sell something else? Lidl sell 3 different loo rolls, take it or leave it. JS overwhelming, I don't need unlimited confusing choice all priced differently, I prefer simplicity of Lidl.
8
10/02/2021 14:13:17 21 18
bbc
Aldi don't cater for lazy people who demand their shopping is delivered, hence the lower growth.
Sainsbury's will never match Aldi for price no matter what. Stop dreaming.
72
10/02/2021 14:25:00 7 0
bbc
Perhaps "lazy" people are having groceries delivered or ordering click and collect because there is a pandemic on.
9
10/02/2021 14:13:49 8 12
bbc
All this talk by the EU of level playing fields and ethical rights; Aldi and Lidl should be forced to sign up to GSCOP rules, as a requirement to trade in the UK.
73
10/02/2021 14:25:08 2 1
bbc
Really don't understand how anyone could disagree; clearly the people who are downvoting have no experience of the industry.
178
10/02/2021 14:44:06 1 0
bbc
They are GSCOP listed supermarkets?
74
10/02/2021 14:25:46 7 4
bbc
Aldi and Lidl don't provide a full range of products. They are ok for basics.
244
10/02/2021 14:54:31 4 0
bbc
Their selection of lobster, caviar and Champagne is has to be admitted is a bit sparse. :-)
#first world problems. It'd do Brits some good to live in the developing world or a war zone and see what real hardship is.
75
10/02/2021 14:25:59 0 1
bbc
Err there's a pandemic on at the moment and we are not going out unnecessarily as we have elderly relatives in the same household so we are completely reliant on the delivery service. You may have noticed the report that shows covid spread is highest around supermarkets.
76
10/02/2021 14:26:24 53 7
bbc
For years Sainsbury overpriced its own label whilst it was market leader, then Tesco took over the mantel. Lately they have been ditching their own label in an effort to increase profit per sq. foot(mtr). The reality is the German discounters are prepared to take lower %margins and that is why they are succeeding and good luck I say, greedy shareholders at British stores are the real problem here
194
UBT
10/02/2021 14:46:57 28 3
bbc
Years ago Tesco was the "no frills" store, where products were stacked on pallets and most of the items were still in their cardboard cartons.

The upmarket stores were Safeways/Sainsburys.

Aldi and Lidl are just doing what Tesco did years ago - Sainsburys are now overpriced, Safeways are gone, but Morrisons/ASDA are now market leaders for
food and Tesco lost it's way in clothing/electricals.
547
10/02/2021 16:13:45 0 0
bbc
The range/availability of goods/service at Sainsbury has fallen. EPOS systems are a train wreck. Deli's, bakeries, fresh meat/fish counters closed. Costs cut, prices increased. I now shop weekly at Lidl, saving me £20 on excellent basic produce. I buy my hard to source produce/treats at Waitrose. We'll soon see Sainsbury in the John Lewis 'dying on its feet, ' camp.

77
10/02/2021 14:26:27 6 1
bbc
There is sometimes a cost to being cheap. Try buying chicken which is not fed on soya from S America (where rainforest used to grow). I bet you will be hard pressed to.
156
10/02/2021 14:41:14 9 1
bbc
Well Aldi chicken is British farmed and cheap. Try it sometime, you might be surprised
78
10/02/2021 14:26:33 5 3
bbc
Sainsbury's really are the worst of the lot: ASDA quality at Waitrose prices. I just don't believe them on this. It's all hype and PR.

I do most of our shopping in Aldi. Limited range but the stuff is good at substantially lower prices and some of their own brand stuff has become our favourites and we miss it if we shop elsewhere. Unfortunately their C&C has major problems though!
79
10/02/2021 14:26:34 14 4
bbc
Aldi price match? Aldi is way too expensive! I'll be sticking with Home Bargains.
112
10/02/2021 14:34:11 15 1
bbc
A tube of toothpaste in B&M or it might have been Home Bargains, £1. The identical item containing the same quantity from Boots £3.50.
80
10/02/2021 14:27:02 136 17
bbc
Years too late for this from Sainsbury's and Tesco.

This boat sailed a long time ago while they took us for granted and faffed about with Clubcard/Nectar points, Mobile phones, Home Insurance, Giraffe restaurants when all we wanted was cheaper home essential shopping.
130
10/02/2021 14:36:59 187 76
bbc
And don't forget Sainsbury's incessant wokery... S
pecial weeks for
Gay Pride week.
BLM.
Black History.
Veganism.
Forget it, I want a supermarket that sells goods, and doesn't preach.
405
10/02/2021 15:22:48 7 3
bbc
Absolutely correct. I'm having my shopping delivered because of shielding but as soon as I can I'm off to my Aldi. It'll be like meeting an old friend.
81
10/02/2021 14:27:14 9 13
bbc
I've tried both Aldi and Lidl, just to see what all the hype was about and on more than one occasion, just to make sure I wasn't getting a false impression. I really wish I hadn't bothered, absolute tat. Much prefer Waitrose, but to be fair their reputation for higher prices is justified, but the quality difference is obvious. It's a classic case of yer pays yer money and yer makes your choice.
96
10/02/2021 14:31:49 5 3
bbc
This posts of yours casts doubt on you ever having shopped at Aldi or Lidl. Find a better fillet steak than Aldi's and get back to us.
104
10/02/2021 14:33:25 4 0
bbc
majority of produce for all supermarkets come from the same place just placed into a different box at the end of a conveyor belt,i know this having worked at factories that do this.
the quality difference you talk about,in most cases is little more than a placebo effect.
107
10/02/2021 14:33:44 1 0
bbc
You have probably got more money than sense.
151
10/02/2021 14:40:22 1 0
bbc
To be fair, branches of Aldi and Lidl differ considerably in layout, and vibes. Our local Lidl is pretty pleasant, but there is a dismal Aldi some miles away! I agree that a good shopping experience is significant for all, and, yes, Waitrose manage that better than anyone. But, if cost-cutting is important, then Lidl and Aldi are worth the visit!
1
10/02/2021 14:08:29 316 9
bbc
Let's hope they don't just squeeze the suppliers even more....
82
10/02/2021 14:27:14 30 6
bbc
A pound to a pinch of snuff that EVERY discount given to you by any supermarket is more than paid by the supplier.
If an item costs £1 with the supermarket having a 20p margin, the supplier gets 80p.
If the supermarket gives you it at half price you pay 50p but the supermarket demands its 20p margin so the supplier gets only 30p, way less than cost of production.
That's why many suppliers go bust
232
10/02/2021 14:52:16 12 2
bbc
That's not how it works, those type of deals are called loss leaders, supermarket lose money on them to get you in the door, where you will hopefully buy other things. That's why the industry has only a 2% profit margin.
18
10/02/2021 14:16:30 80 7
bbc
Enormous credit to Aldi stores, they are ensuring the big companies are having to think about their customers, at last and not just treating them as cash cows. We all realise these big conglomerates don’t give a monkeys about about us so might start shopping at aldis
83
10/02/2021 14:27:13 42 72
bbc
You mean the private business that isn't transparent and doesn't have a wide range of shareholders to be accountable to. One where the profit is held by a family trust in Germany? I don't want my world dominated by businesses like that
218
10/02/2021 14:50:21 12 3
bbc
So you prefer to be paying higher prices to fund the dividends for shareholders? I'm sure there's plenty of choice for you out there. As for 'transparency', you find much of that from the big supermarkets, especially if you ask what they pay their suppliers.
301
10/02/2021 15:03:41 2 0
bbc
Your post isn't very transparent.
403
10/02/2021 15:23:44 6 0
bbc
Shareholders accountable Ok.

Must be nice on your planet.

Still waiting for them to do something about Executive Bonuses and failed payoffs for the past couple of decades.

Still be waiting for another couple of decades.
603
10/02/2021 17:03:09 0 0
bbc
Me neither. but I'm not going to pass up the opportunity to get better quality products at more competitive prices. Plus things I simply cannot get at any price in a UK supermarket. They need to up their game, and stop mucking about wasting money on activities unrelated to their frontline business.
666
10/02/2021 18:00:09 0 0
bbc
It is transparent. Learn German.
830
10/02/2021 23:39:35 0 0
bbc
Britain has many tax havens, where much of previously-onshore wealth is now hidden away from the taxman, in private equity, hedge funds, family trusts, and all creaming profits from companies you use.!
863
11/02/2021 08:19:32 0 0
bbc
Oh dear, you obviously struggled with the education system.
68
10/02/2021 14:23:52 132 21
bbc
When Sainsbury's starts matching the proportion of UK goods on sale ( approx 80-85% of all items at Aldi/Lidl), maybe I may be tempted back to them; until then I'll be sticking with Aldi and Lidl
84
10/02/2021 14:27:18 49 8
bbc
Good point!
337
10/02/2021 15:08:53 1 5
bbc
But not true.
27
10/02/2021 14:18:03 5 0
bbc
How inconsiderate of God to send snow without consulting you and Sainsbury first. I'm sure He will have learned from the experience and check with you in advance next time.
85
10/02/2021 14:28:10 0 0
bbc
It's hardly enough to cancel services where we live. Roads are clear. I could venture out to the stores and risk catching covid and bringing it home but I'd rather not. They offer the service...they should have known the issues in advance. Like I say, just poor service from Sainsburys
86
10/02/2021 14:28:54 25 6
bbc
Too late. Sainsburys lockdown performance has been atrocious compared to others. Ranges cut, prices increased, stock shortages (when others had plenty) and the closure of their deli sections. Been a regular customer for 30+ years but their performance over the last eighteen months has led me to take the majority of my trade elsewhere.
23
10/02/2021 14:17:25 10 1
bbc
We can't expect deliveries in adverse weather conditions. It happened to me with Tesco a couple of weeks ago. They called and rescheduled for the next day and sent me a £10 voucher for the inconvenience.
87
10/02/2021 14:28:56 2 0
bbc
Happened to me too 24th Jan but Tesco couldn't redeliver until 5 days later, like you said can't help the weather although the slightest bit of snow & we all come to a stand still.
56
10/02/2021 14:22:29 9 5
bbc
Aldi and Lidl, run there stores with fewer staff - less supervisors hanging around. Floor staff seem to be expected to run the place. The mid tier supermarket will find it hard to compete. On the down side there is no best before dates on fresh fruit / veg which makes the week shop impossible.
88
UBT
10/02/2021 14:29:18 2 1
bbc
There's no "best before" dates on ANY loose veg or fruit products in ANY supermarket that I know of. Most pre-packed veg and fruit in Aldi DOES have best before dates printed on the packing, if you care to look.
220
10/02/2021 14:50:36 1 0
bbc
No they use ciphered "use-by" codes - these batch codes allow the staff to look up, but there isn't enough staff to do this.

On individual medium to larger fruits in Sainsburys there is generally a sticker with the date. On other fruit they guarantee the longevity. Taking things back to Lidl / Aldi is near impossible, there is no customer services.

I disagree with this race to the bottom
89
10/02/2021 14:29:26 52 3
bbc
Usually when a supermarket has a "special price reduction" on an item it's the supplier who has reduced the price to the supermarket to allow the item to be sold at a lower price than previously. The supermarkets seldom "pay" for the price reduction resulting in a lower profit margin it's the supplier who does. I doubt that anyone will be able to compete with Aldi and Lidl on value for money.
13
10/02/2021 14:15:05 59 101
bbc
Aldi and Lidl should be forced to sign up to GSCOP rules, as a requirement to trade in the UK.
90
10/02/2021 14:29:44 17 1
bbc
Do you know that they haven't? In any event whilst I don't know about Sainsbury's the battle between growers and Tesco for fair pricing has been going on for years and is well documented.
33
10/02/2021 14:19:18 6 7
bbc
I thought Brexit was going to make food more expensive?
91
10/02/2021 14:30:24 0 1
bbc
Until it effects take out coffee, avacados or Waitrose it doesn't count...
14
10/02/2021 14:15:15 4 1
bbc
General question: why is it that foreign shops (= Aldi/ Lidl) are able to sell at lower prices? What's lower: their quality of goods or quality of service or other overheads?
92
10/02/2021 14:30:28 2 3
bbc
It comes to less staff thus less product inspection, no used by dates, not shelving products leaving them in transport packaging. No fresh counters - no fish mongers, butches etc. Also they have a limited stock in smaller shop.

Mainly it is the less staff and not signing up to Groceries Supply Code of Practice
299
10/02/2021 15:03:22 3 1
bbc
Except that they ARE signed up to the Groceries Supply Code of Practice, actually. See comment above for link to evidence!
64
10/02/2021 14:23:22 42 2
bbc
Who is financing the lower prices? The suppliers or are the retailers taking a much smaller margin? I know who my money is on.
93
10/02/2021 14:31:00 30 9
bbc
Or maybe Sainsbury's plan to just stop wasting shoppers money on non-core projects. ASDA purchase failed, they're screwing up Argos and has anyone ever bought anything from their overpriced Habitat shop-in-shops?

Worst of the big chains, I hate it!

One exception: TU clothing is pretty good and well priced in their regular sales.
900
Rob
11/02/2021 11:49:42 0 0
bbc
Very true. The Habitat in York had eye-watering prices. Very few people visited and it has now closed.
94
10/02/2021 14:31:23 1 0
bbc
Bit miffed when Tesco's price-matched Aldi on McEwans Champion, they were selling it cheaper!
13
10/02/2021 14:15:05 59 101
bbc
Aldi and Lidl should be forced to sign up to GSCOP rules, as a requirement to trade in the UK.
172
10/02/2021 14:43:26 6 0
bbc
Thanks for the link. With news being so sparse of facts and analysis your link helps clarify at least one non issue.
81
10/02/2021 14:27:14 9 13
bbc
I've tried both Aldi and Lidl, just to see what all the hype was about and on more than one occasion, just to make sure I wasn't getting a false impression. I really wish I hadn't bothered, absolute tat. Much prefer Waitrose, but to be fair their reputation for higher prices is justified, but the quality difference is obvious. It's a classic case of yer pays yer money and yer makes your choice.
96
10/02/2021 14:31:49 5 3
bbc
This posts of yours casts doubt on you ever having shopped at Aldi or Lidl. Find a better fillet steak than Aldi's and get back to us.
13
10/02/2021 14:15:05 59 101
bbc
Aldi and Lidl should be forced to sign up to GSCOP rules, as a requirement to trade in the UK.
97
10/02/2021 14:31:59 33 1
bbc
Both Aldi and Lidl are on the list of GSCOP designated retailers
344
10/02/2021 15:09:14 16 1
bbc
Not only are they on it, but ALDI have been the mostly highly rated according to the adjudicators for the last 7 years !!!!
98
10/02/2021 14:32:05 2 1
bbc
Very often the large british supermarkets turn over products before they have to pay for them, using suppliers money to create exhorbitant profit margins on foods that poor people in society cannot afford to buy. This is capitalism at its worst, whilst claiming they are supporting food etc. This is a prime example of retailing gone bad and should be outlawed as was loss leaders a few years ago
124
10/02/2021 14:34:13 0 0
bbc
Yep, sadly the suppliers taking the hit
146
UBT
10/02/2021 14:39:47 1 0
bbc
Many large UK businesses negotiate contracts with suppliers based on 90-180 day payment terms...so the product is shipped in and sold to end users long before the business has to pay for it.

At work, I refused to supply one big UK business where THEY stipulated what their terms of payment were (it was 90 days) , whereas in most cases, SELLERS stipulate the payment terms.
56
10/02/2021 14:22:29 9 5
bbc
Aldi and Lidl, run there stores with fewer staff - less supervisors hanging around. Floor staff seem to be expected to run the place. The mid tier supermarket will find it hard to compete. On the down side there is no best before dates on fresh fruit / veg which makes the week shop impossible.
99
10/02/2021 14:32:28 0 1
bbc
Never seen a best before date on a cabbage.
100
10/02/2021 14:32:30 3 5
bbc
I tend to find Aldi has the highest rate of non compliance in mask wearing.
Sainsbury's actually take covid serious
122
UBT
10/02/2021 14:35:49 4 1
bbc
Are you talking about customers or staff? I shop at 3 different Aldi's and 99% of the time customers AND staff are all wearing masks (excepting those on the till who are behind screens).
138
10/02/2021 14:38:36 0 0
bbc
Largely agree but I occasionaly used to pick up stuff in Poundland and they're don't bother with enforcement at all.