Covid-19: Sports equipment presents 'low risk'
10/02/2021 | news | health | 375
A study finds coronavirus particles decay rapidly on sports equipment, including cricket and tennis balls.
1
10/02/2021 10:51:34 74 17
bbc
And presumably swimming pools are even less risky, so open the gyms, the playing fields, the sports clubs and let people take exercise again.
11
Bob
10/02/2021 10:56:09 61 13
bbc
You can apply the same to everything. Drinking a beer is not going to give you the virus. But the environment in which you do so, could.

As the article states, and the study shows, whilst *some* sports gear and balls are less likely to be vectors for transmission it is the human interaction during the activity that poses the real danger.
272
10/02/2021 13:04:44 0 2
bbc
This is non-article that's potential to cause harm by people misreading it
This 'study' tells us nothing we didn't know 10 months ago: the transmittability/lifespan of Covid on objects.
Prob is those who'll use this as excuse to go puffing & panting the virus over others. Easy to find excuses that make one sport safer than another in particular cases but UK needs simple rules all can follow
281
10/02/2021 13:11:53 0 1
bbc
Open air sports (socially distanced) are statistically lower risk than indoor ones especially if people are puffing & panting. So maybe there could be some relaxations brought in for non team sports eg football/rugby: but places where folk are closely packed & exhaling/sweating strongly would be daft....so probably not Gyms (anyway great outdoors is much cheaper and nicer than a sweaty gym!)
2
10/02/2021 10:52:08 9 3
bbc
This is reassuring news, though doesn't change the fact that there is still an onus on people participating in sports to adhere to guidelines.

I do look forward to be able to play tennis again soon, particularly as the weather improves into March.
3
10/02/2021 10:53:09 11 15
bbc
And the chances of a person participating in any sporting activity and dying of Covid, is Zero
37
10/02/2021 11:08:43 2 4
bbc
How have you arrived at your definitive conclusion? Extensive research, across a wide ranging selection of sporting activities?
I think that properly controlled sporting activities should be allowed, but it’s simply my opinion.
126
10/02/2021 11:43:17 0 1
bbc
So nobody who plays sport has a spouse who works in a care home?
4
10/02/2021 10:53:10 67 14
bbc
If Covid could be so easily transmitted between people by touching objects and then someone else touching the same object, then every one in the world would have been infected by now, because it can't be avoided.

How are items put on shelves and then taken off again ? By 2 people touching the same object.

How are items delivered to peoples homes ? By 2 people touching the same object.
46
10/02/2021 11:13:37 32 93
bbc
I take it that you are one of the fools fingering all the produce in the supermarket.

You look with your eyes not your hands.

If people had just been considerate then many tens of thousands of people would still be alive today.

Selfish, self centered, arrogant fools.

It makes my blood boil when I see some granny going around slowly picking up and putting back everything off the shelves.
81
10/02/2021 11:28:25 9 10
bbc
That's assuming every person that touches the object first has COVID-19 particles present on their hands. Exponential increasing etc... so everyone wont have had it. That was the easiest debunking in my life.
110
10/02/2021 11:35:46 8 2
bbc
I thought that the idea of hand disinfection points was to kill covid germs. Even if other idiots don't use it, the liquid on your own hands will do the job.
I'm assuming that you aren’t one of the idiots.
314
10/02/2021 13:37:52 2 2
bbc
Which is why intelligent people use gell and then wash hands asap. Home deliveries are left for 3 days. Doorbells, etc. wiped regularly.

It's a pain but good practice to keep safe.
365
10/02/2021 15:44:29 0 1
bbc
And that's exactly why supermarkets are one of the worst places for spreading the virus.
5
10/02/2021 10:53:34 50 9
bbc
A large number of outdoor grass roots sport should never have been stopped. I believe the risk from running around playing football or doing a 10k fun run is far lower than buying a tin of beans of in Asda, and would have huge physical and mental health benefits.
10
10/02/2021 10:55:20 16 30
bbc
You "believe", but can you provide evidence?
34
10/02/2021 11:07:13 4 5
bbc
Not to mention playing golf, which was only stopped because the powers that be think of it as elitist- which it is not.
72
10/02/2021 11:23:55 5 4
bbc
The sport itself maybe low risk, but running around close to other heavily breathing people is surely very risky. Lone sports, yes. Team sports, no. And remember that whenever you say somethiing is open, the idiots will always ruin it for everyone by getting chnaged together etc
118
10/02/2021 11:40:06 4 2
bbc
A lot of grass root sports certainly don’t have the problem of large crowds.
218
10/02/2021 12:30:29 2 1
bbc
Getting shopping with a mask on is believed to reduce R, sharing a shower and changing room after grass roots sport is believed to increase it.

Other benefits are not even on the radar.
270
10/02/2021 13:04:17 3 1
bbc
Comparisons between essential (shopping) and non-essential (football) activities are totally invalid.

Also, feel free to go for a 10k "fun" run. On your own. Or with a friend.
319
10/02/2021 13:42:20 0 1
bbc
Like you said: "...I believe...". I think I'd rather accept professional guidance than the opinion of yet another social media jockey.
6
10/02/2021 10:53:43 7 2
bbc
Shame we can't go outside to practice this theory :-(

On me 'ed san!
7
Bob
10/02/2021 10:54:24 10 4
bbc
Not really sure why the article states balls are not a major issue when the study finds that some aren't and some are. Football notably performing the worst - essentially in line with the control object.

Many balls are still high at the one minute mark, too. Saying there's no virus after 10 minutes when balls will be handled and exchanged more frequently than that isn't much use either.
8
10/02/2021 10:54:33 13 13
bbc
So as usual the Government initially massively over-reacted and now it'd been found not to be true.

Again.

14
Bob
10/02/2021 10:57:46 12 4
bbc
I don't think you read the article properly. This study corrects previous studies. Worth noting that around a third of papers get proven wrong at some stage. That's a high amount. Science continually evolves, for that reason you can't bash prior decisions on based on then-correct information.
38
10/02/2021 11:09:02 2 1
bbc
Yes , it's going to be interesting next year when the retrospective reports and analysis are published. A bit of science and common sense wouldn't go amiss rather than media hysteria and pursuit of agenda.
51
CJR
10/02/2021 11:15:18 2 1
bbc
But what happens if they had been proven correct, I can imagine the outcry on here. They done what they thought was best at the time with the information they had.
If with the benefits of hindsight they may have done things differently.
What a lot of people don’t or will not understand this is/was a fast moving pandemic, with the situation changing daily.
9
10/02/2021 10:55:05 13 11
bbc
Ah I see what you did there. It was only Boris who said anything about sports equipment transmitting the virus - nobody else. No scientists, Doctors, WHO etc.

Implying only he was wrong.

It's just another dig at the Government by the BBC.
19
Bob
10/02/2021 10:59:08 7 1
bbc
Not only that but the following paragraphs then goes on to say that it is absorbent materials that are less likely to transmit the virus whilst harder materials are more likely.

Cricket balls are one such harder material. As the study data shows, especially for white balls, the risk *is* much higher.
32
10/02/2021 11:06:23 1 4
bbc
Oh dear the best you can offer is another boring BBC whinge

BTW bojo is wrong all the time but blinkered dopeys love his lies and bluster
5
10/02/2021 10:53:34 50 9
bbc
A large number of outdoor grass roots sport should never have been stopped. I believe the risk from running around playing football or doing a 10k fun run is far lower than buying a tin of beans of in Asda, and would have huge physical and mental health benefits.
10
10/02/2021 10:55:20 16 30
bbc
You "believe", but can you provide evidence?
240
10/02/2021 12:42:41 0 1
bbc
Yes. The stopping of grassroots sports did not stop Covid spreading.
You're welcome.
262
Pip
10/02/2021 12:56:38 0 2
bbc
And along comes a jobsworth.........?
297
10/02/2021 13:22:01 0 2
bbc
I was going to buy some sports equipment from Asda but on the basis of Woodys' comments, I think it would be unsafe.
1
10/02/2021 10:51:34 74 17
bbc
And presumably swimming pools are even less risky, so open the gyms, the playing fields, the sports clubs and let people take exercise again.
11
Bob
10/02/2021 10:56:09 61 13
bbc
You can apply the same to everything. Drinking a beer is not going to give you the virus. But the environment in which you do so, could.

As the article states, and the study shows, whilst *some* sports gear and balls are less likely to be vectors for transmission it is the human interaction during the activity that poses the real danger.
48
10/02/2021 11:14:17 6 1
bbc
The cohort playing sport are probably the group at lowest risk of morbidity/mortality, even if they contract the virus. Even drinking a pint of beer carries risk for other aspects of health- a risk most of us are willing to take. It depends how far you want to go.
61
10/02/2021 11:19:54 7 1
bbc
Tennis has very little contact, swimming pools and gyms as well.
236
10/02/2021 12:39:59 2 1
bbc
Which to me says there shouldn't be restrictions on most outdoor sports, but perhaps on indoor activities in poorly ventilated areas.
288
rob
10/02/2021 13:15:00 0 1
bbc
uuhmm with people reading your comment also taking it in we might start to get somewhere
i dont think a lot of the public have worked out yet that its spread person to person and not the venue your at
12
10/02/2021 10:56:42 65 21
bbc
I remember all the rubbish spoken about AIDS transmission - people were claiming you could catch it from toilet seats and other such utter nonsense.

Well, the rubbish spoken about Covid transmission is equally hysterical utter nonsense as well.
25
10/02/2021 11:01:57 39 15
bbc
Not all of it is. The difference between Covid and AIDS is that AIDS is transferred physically between body fluids where Covid is more airborne. This means that Covid can transmit easier. I'm sure you could catch AIDS off a toilet seat if certain things happened it's just the likelihood is so remote.

Covid can attach to surfaces for different periods of time, so therefore still offers a threat.
43
10/02/2021 11:11:08 4 6
bbc
"rubbish spoken about Covid transmission..."

Yet, 107 million people have caught it.....
44
10/02/2021 11:12:31 4 1
bbc
But if you did catch HIV before the advent of HIV antiviral drugs it was pretty much a guaranteed death sentence. It still kills millions worldwide and a vaccine would be most welcome but it's a clever little so-and-so that has so far evaded all attempts at creating one.
154
10/02/2021 11:54:16 4 2
bbc
When something new and dangerous appears it is correct to err on the side of caution while doing research to determine the true risk.
What if we had poo pooed ebola? Zika was pretty nasty too.
350
10/02/2021 14:08:33 0 1
bbc
Very true. I remember reading that Hollywood stars were all taking their own cutlery to restaurants to avoid AIDS contamination. Strange times. Like now.
13
10/02/2021 10:57:18 134 9
bbc
Yes chlorine kills the virus stone dead. Outdoor pools especially are as safe as houses, you come with your costume on and change and dry outside on poolside. Safer than walking in the park. No reason you can't play tennis or golf with two people, and all children's outdoor sports should be opened immediately. The tiny risk of Covid is far outweighed by the health, physical and mental benefits.
42
10/02/2021 11:12:02 35 28
bbc
Yes, wondered that myself re swimming pools
Remember when I used to swim regularly, often go to the pool with sniffles, a cough maybe even a cold & every time came away from the pool feeling & breathing better
Can't help but think, Chlorine rich water/vapour gets into your tubes, sinus's, eyes & you breath it in
Figure that's got to help even with covid.

Maybe Trump was on to something? ;-)
49
10/02/2021 11:14:31 23 5
bbc
The ban on golf was ridiculous - and no I don't play!
95
10/02/2021 11:32:30 12 3
bbc
My 6 year old was so upset when he had to stop his weekly swimming lessons. He keeps asking when he can start them again, and it really sucks I can't give him an answer.
129
10/02/2021 11:44:30 4 10
bbc
Looking forward to an outdoor swim today. Catch hypothermia, go to hospital and maybe then catch you know what.
But in July completely agree.
238
10/02/2021 12:40:25 3 5
bbc
You have a point about outdoor swimming pools, if done with the conditions you stipulate.
However regarding all outdoor sports for children, if they come into close contact with other children, then virus transmission is possible between them and then onto other people(adults) who could then pass it on to other adults who could be adversely affected. The infection chain.
301
10/02/2021 13:27:34 2 1
bbc
Alcohol kills the virus stone dead. Lets open beer gardens and pubs.
310
10/02/2021 13:34:40 1 1
bbc
You could play golf with up to 4 people. certainly when we play we all hit our shots all over the fairway/rough and are so socially distanced we might as well go round on our own!!
347
10/02/2021 14:04:47 0 2
bbc
Safe as houses? Until the proportion of urine in the water becomes a Covid risk again. Not safe as houses
8
10/02/2021 10:54:33 13 13
bbc
So as usual the Government initially massively over-reacted and now it'd been found not to be true.

Again.

14
Bob
10/02/2021 10:57:46 12 4
bbc
I don't think you read the article properly. This study corrects previous studies. Worth noting that around a third of papers get proven wrong at some stage. That's a high amount. Science continually evolves, for that reason you can't bash prior decisions on based on then-correct information.
15
W 6
10/02/2021 10:57:55 162 6
bbc
So many of the anti-covid in sports is performative. Watching the players socially distance for the anthems in the Six Nations last weekend the piling into rucks two minutes later is frankly baffling. Same with scapegoating footballers (who get tested regularly, share dressing rooms, training facilities and coaches to games together) for celebrating after a goal. All rather silly.
28
10/02/2021 11:03:43 89 42
bbc
All soccer players are rather silly, I agree
120
10/02/2021 11:41:09 5 5
bbc
Almost as if we see coronavirus as a punishment for sin rather than an (admittedly nasty) virus. Lots of rules against things that people enjoy, but no plan to increase the proportion of confirmed cases who actually isolate for their infectious period for example.
I though we were no longer so superstitious
160
Rob
10/02/2021 11:51:16 8 7
bbc
It's different if you are in a bubble like the 6N squads or the England cricket team. Footballers are not in a bubble and go home to increase the chance of the spread. No idea why they can't stop groping each other after a goal especially as the atmosphere is lower with no crowd but I'm not here to judge. But it was odd to see the distancing during the anthems I must admit
163
10/02/2021 11:58:28 6 5
bbc
The argument around celebrating is also about the message it sends
175
10/02/2021 12:02:39 6 21
bbc
Social distancing, mask wearing, and the rest of it serves two purposes. 1) a mark of support for a terrible government policy and 2) virtue signalling -‘look how “safe” I am... I’ve got TWO masks on because I care way more than you......’.... pathetic.
227
You
10/02/2021 12:35:40 5 4
bbc
You are familiar with the definition of the word 'minimising'? They are not trying to eliminate all risk but accept there's things integral to some sports that are unavoidable like scrums in rugby but they can reduce risks elsewhere.
The only silly people around are the absolutists who think if it's not totally one way or the other, the world is broken. It's your logic that's broken mate.
16
10/02/2021 10:58:23 40 18
bbc
None of us are allowed to play sports anyway due to the draconian restrictions so it's a pointless article. The Government want us all to eat and get fat and drink alcohol instead of re-opening Covid secure swimming pools, gyms, tennis and golf clubs etc. Yeah, makes sense lol.
27
10/02/2021 11:03:13 30 13
bbc
I've been cycling uninterrupted since the first, and only proper lockdown.. it was great when it was a proper lockdown with less lethal cars on the roads
30
10/02/2021 11:05:10 8 17
bbc
Why are people so obsessed with opening everything up so quickly?

1000+ people are dying every day in hospital. Hospitals are unable to provide a full array of services due to being overrun with Covid patients.

Are you happy for the NHS to not treat you or your family if you catch it?
17
10/02/2021 10:55:15 9 3
bbc
So, no probs with lifting the lockdown in time for Cheltenham then..
26
10/02/2021 11:02:01 3 4
bbc
I realise that's sarcasm, which is why I up thumbed..

I stay away from the filthy place (Cheltenham itself) at the best of times..
18
10/02/2021 10:59:02 65 1
bbc
Disinfect your balls just in case
23
10/02/2021 11:01:23 67 2
bbc
Stings a bit but totally worth it
246
10/02/2021 12:37:37 2 1
bbc
I got the wife to do mine.
279
10/02/2021 13:08:55 1 1
bbc
Is it that time of year again already?!
316
10/02/2021 13:39:37 1 1
bbc
And be careful not to pick up the Deep Heat by mistake!
363
10/02/2021 15:40:56 1 1
bbc
Just dunk 'em in bleach. That's what I do to my husband's (golf) balls.
9
10/02/2021 10:55:05 13 11
bbc
Ah I see what you did there. It was only Boris who said anything about sports equipment transmitting the virus - nobody else. No scientists, Doctors, WHO etc.

Implying only he was wrong.

It's just another dig at the Government by the BBC.
19
Bob
10/02/2021 10:59:08 7 1
bbc
Not only that but the following paragraphs then goes on to say that it is absorbent materials that are less likely to transmit the virus whilst harder materials are more likely.

Cricket balls are one such harder material. As the study data shows, especially for white balls, the risk *is* much higher.
147
10/02/2021 11:50:53 0 1
bbc
Is it ball tampering to sanitise your hands and the ball before bowling?
20
10/02/2021 10:59:15 3 4
bbc
Who would have thought sharing a dressing room with other players whilst singing and hugging would be a higher risk?

Some of these studies are dubious, for example there was a REACT study that came out mid November that stated infections were falling by 30%, 2 weeks later we were in another national lockdown.
21
10/02/2021 10:57:23 1 7
bbc
Bob
Not really sure why the article states balls are not a major issue..

Me neither, especially when Porky talks it constantly..............
29
10/02/2021 11:03:45 5 3
bbc
Some people can't help themselves even with a serious issue, and it would appear he was correct in referencing a cricket ball as it has a finish similar to a rugby ball and unless I missed it it also must apply to a football so why no mention.
108
10/02/2021 11:35:37 0 1
bbc
The value of the study has less to do with which sport is safer than what sort of surfaces does the virus remain transmissible on for longest. As suspected it is the least porous surfaces that the virus survives longest on. In football or rugby it's hardly the ball that will be transferring the virus.
22
10/02/2021 11:00:43 27 2
bbc
The BMJ had an article back in July, stating that viral transmission on fomites was highly unlikely.
I couldn't understand why that wasn't more widely publicised at the time.
52
10/02/2021 11:15:35 29 8
bbc
For the same reason they didn't widely publicise that article in the Lancet that did the worldwide analysis and couldn't find a significant impact on mortality rates by lockdown. It doesn't help the narrative they're spinning in the papers/media.
327
10/02/2021 13:49:19 0 2
bbc
Maybe no one knew what a fomite is, or just didn't read the BMJ?

Yes, I looked it up: by definition it's items which DO carry infection! Did you know that?
18
10/02/2021 10:59:02 65 1
bbc
Disinfect your balls just in case
23
10/02/2021 11:01:23 67 2
bbc
Stings a bit but totally worth it
133
10/02/2021 11:46:57 1 2
bbc
????????
24
10/02/2021 11:00:33 9 3
bbc
That's all fine if you're looking at painting balls with virus in the lab. The researchers may not have noticed that, for example, tennis balls are "spanked" every second or so. Could any virus actually survive that on tennis balls, golf balls, rugby balls or footballs?
67
10/02/2021 11:22:39 3 2
bbc
Easily. Try killing a virus with a hammer deliberately!
12
10/02/2021 10:56:42 65 21
bbc
I remember all the rubbish spoken about AIDS transmission - people were claiming you could catch it from toilet seats and other such utter nonsense.

Well, the rubbish spoken about Covid transmission is equally hysterical utter nonsense as well.
25
10/02/2021 11:01:57 39 15
bbc
Not all of it is. The difference between Covid and AIDS is that AIDS is transferred physically between body fluids where Covid is more airborne. This means that Covid can transmit easier. I'm sure you could catch AIDS off a toilet seat if certain things happened it's just the likelihood is so remote.

Covid can attach to surfaces for different periods of time, so therefore still offers a threat.
353
10/02/2021 14:11:08 0 2
bbc
Covid is also transmitted via bodily fluids. The most common of which is by sneezing or coughing whereby droplets of saliva are propelled into the atmosphere forming an aerosol. It's not airborne. Airborne would mean it could be transmitted by the wind over some distance.
17
10/02/2021 10:55:15 9 3
bbc
So, no probs with lifting the lockdown in time for Cheltenham then..
26
10/02/2021 11:02:01 3 4
bbc
I realise that's sarcasm, which is why I up thumbed..

I stay away from the filthy place (Cheltenham itself) at the best of times..
16
10/02/2021 10:58:23 40 18
bbc
None of us are allowed to play sports anyway due to the draconian restrictions so it's a pointless article. The Government want us all to eat and get fat and drink alcohol instead of re-opening Covid secure swimming pools, gyms, tennis and golf clubs etc. Yeah, makes sense lol.
27
10/02/2021 11:03:13 30 13
bbc
I've been cycling uninterrupted since the first, and only proper lockdown.. it was great when it was a proper lockdown with less lethal cars on the roads
15
W 6
10/02/2021 10:57:55 162 6
bbc
So many of the anti-covid in sports is performative. Watching the players socially distance for the anthems in the Six Nations last weekend the piling into rucks two minutes later is frankly baffling. Same with scapegoating footballers (who get tested regularly, share dressing rooms, training facilities and coaches to games together) for celebrating after a goal. All rather silly.
28
10/02/2021 11:03:43 89 42
bbc
All soccer players are rather silly, I agree
91
10/02/2021 11:31:31 37 4
bbc
Football not "soccer".
123
dan
10/02/2021 11:41:40 16 3
bbc
Says the man who just called FOOTBALL, soccer...
294
10/02/2021 13:19:10 1 2
bbc
Unlike your comment which is silly AND pointless.
21
10/02/2021 10:57:23 1 7
bbc
Bob
Not really sure why the article states balls are not a major issue..

Me neither, especially when Porky talks it constantly..............
29
10/02/2021 11:03:45 5 3
bbc
Some people can't help themselves even with a serious issue, and it would appear he was correct in referencing a cricket ball as it has a finish similar to a rugby ball and unless I missed it it also must apply to a football so why no mention.
33
Bob
10/02/2021 11:06:57 2 1
bbc
Yes intriguing the BBC left out any reference to football when it was the worst performing in the study. I mean if you're going to link to the study to allow people to see the facts for themselves you'd think they'd at least make the article reflective.
16
10/02/2021 10:58:23 40 18
bbc
None of us are allowed to play sports anyway due to the draconian restrictions so it's a pointless article. The Government want us all to eat and get fat and drink alcohol instead of re-opening Covid secure swimming pools, gyms, tennis and golf clubs etc. Yeah, makes sense lol.
30
10/02/2021 11:05:10 8 17
bbc
Why are people so obsessed with opening everything up so quickly?

1000+ people are dying every day in hospital. Hospitals are unable to provide a full array of services due to being overrun with Covid patients.

Are you happy for the NHS to not treat you or your family if you catch it?
53
10/02/2021 11:15:46 15 4
bbc
Because pools, tennis courts, golf courses and other amenities used by common people to keep healthy, have virtually no risk of transmission, especially how they were organised before the last lockdown, with one way systems, bookings etc.
68
10/02/2021 11:22:46 12 2
bbc
They aren't... the whole point is that a lot of activities that carry next to no risk and have profound physical and mental benefits are banned. For no fathomable reason other than 'because lockdown' golf is a perfect example. Outdoors, easy to distance, no shared equipment.. but its banned. Why?
31
10/02/2021 11:06:23 77 10
bbc
As we all knew. Golf, tennis should be happening now, absolutely no reason why not.
76
10/02/2021 11:26:23 18 49
bbc
Sadly those involved can still pass it on and who wants outdoor tennis at present this article is just more click bait from lousy BBC to set people going again not worthy of a HYS and they know it.
83
37p
10/02/2021 11:28:41 11 2
bbc
I see there were two petitions, one for golf and one for tennis.
The government responded to the both petitions with no points made other than it's still banned and sport is very important.
The golf petition reached 132,000 signatures and will need to be considered for debate in parliament.
The tennis petition reached 27,000 signatures.

Yet indoor church services are allowed!
162
Jim
10/02/2021 11:57:05 3 4
bbc
Re golf, normal transmission route aside, the issue is how long the virus would live on the flag pole as that is likely to be touched by differing people.

An impermeable surface so virus lasts long time. Is the answer to wipe pole after each touch? The rest of the kit is likely single user only.
265
10/02/2021 12:59:57 1 4
bbc
Aside from being non-essential, what more reason do you need?
348
10/02/2021 14:05:20 1 3
bbc
No, we don't.
9
10/02/2021 10:55:05 13 11
bbc
Ah I see what you did there. It was only Boris who said anything about sports equipment transmitting the virus - nobody else. No scientists, Doctors, WHO etc.

Implying only he was wrong.

It's just another dig at the Government by the BBC.
32
10/02/2021 11:06:23 1 4
bbc
Oh dear the best you can offer is another boring BBC whinge

BTW bojo is wrong all the time but blinkered dopeys love his lies and bluster
78
10/02/2021 11:27:29 1 2
bbc
It's astonishing how many leftie FBPE types (you can tell who they are as their comments always contain an insult or put down), jump to the defence of the BBC given it is supposed to be 'right wing'.
29
10/02/2021 11:03:45 5 3
bbc
Some people can't help themselves even with a serious issue, and it would appear he was correct in referencing a cricket ball as it has a finish similar to a rugby ball and unless I missed it it also must apply to a football so why no mention.
33
Bob
10/02/2021 11:06:57 2 1
bbc
Yes intriguing the BBC left out any reference to football when it was the worst performing in the study. I mean if you're going to link to the study to allow people to see the facts for themselves you'd think they'd at least make the article reflective.
5
10/02/2021 10:53:34 50 9
bbc
A large number of outdoor grass roots sport should never have been stopped. I believe the risk from running around playing football or doing a 10k fun run is far lower than buying a tin of beans of in Asda, and would have huge physical and mental health benefits.
34
10/02/2021 11:07:13 4 5
bbc
Not to mention playing golf, which was only stopped because the powers that be think of it as elitist- which it is not.
57
10/02/2021 11:18:11 3 3
bbc
But fox hunting was allowed during the first lockdown.
320
10/02/2021 13:42:41 1 1
bbc
The same "powers that be" that are constantly accused of acting only in the interests of their elitist buddies you mean? Funny how peoples opinions change when they are part of any specific elite or perceived favorable group?
322
10/02/2021 13:43:33 1 2
bbc
If they thought it was 'elitist' it would still be OK. Maybe they just don't like the dress sense of golfers?
370
10/02/2021 16:31:52 0 1
bbc
You mean the current "powers that be" aren't elitist?

You might want to look up what the word means....
35
10/02/2021 11:07:29 9 4
bbc
The equipment may not do much to spread covid, but I notice the footballers are all still hugging each other
80
10/02/2021 11:28:20 5 3
bbc
They are outdoors and tested three times a week. The risk in professional football is absolutely minimal.
As has always been the case, nearly all transmission is by breathing in droplets and most of that is in the home or confined workplaces.
36
10/02/2021 11:08:11 17 4
bbc
Footballers are a great example to the ignorant amongst us who see them hugging one another after a goal is scored, laughable that England & Scotland stood for anthems socially distanced yet two minutes later they were as close as one can get once game started crazy and according to Gregor Townsend some Scot's must have poor vision!!
65
10/02/2021 11:21:45 16 6
bbc
Remind me. How many footballers are in hospital with Covid-19?
3
10/02/2021 10:53:09 11 15
bbc
And the chances of a person participating in any sporting activity and dying of Covid, is Zero
37
10/02/2021 11:08:43 2 4
bbc
How have you arrived at your definitive conclusion? Extensive research, across a wide ranging selection of sporting activities?
I think that properly controlled sporting activities should be allowed, but it’s simply my opinion.
8
10/02/2021 10:54:33 13 13
bbc
So as usual the Government initially massively over-reacted and now it'd been found not to be true.

Again.

38
10/02/2021 11:09:02 2 1
bbc
Yes , it's going to be interesting next year when the retrospective reports and analysis are published. A bit of science and common sense wouldn't go amiss rather than media hysteria and pursuit of agenda.
39
10/02/2021 11:10:30 2 2
bbc
Think how many products are handled at the supermarket. It's a bit of a moot point - clearly it's not the equipment but close contact environments.
40
10/02/2021 11:11:15 15 8
bbc
It is astonishingly difficult to be conclusive about this

However if we were to focus on known problems like walking around a unventilated supermarket for an hour with 100's of other people breathing in and out simultaneously (and 1,000's across a day) then perhaps we'd do better

We have continued to do the most dangerous thing whilst banning marginal activities

Madness
317
10/02/2021 13:41:02 0 1
bbc
Because marginal activities keep you fed?
338
10/02/2021 13:54:15 0 1
bbc
Footie doesn't fill your stomach - you'll just die of starvation. Why would you spend AN HOUR in the supermarket?
41
10/02/2021 11:11:45 6 4
bbc
Sports equipment is often shared. I never share my pint glass.
13
10/02/2021 10:57:18 134 9
bbc
Yes chlorine kills the virus stone dead. Outdoor pools especially are as safe as houses, you come with your costume on and change and dry outside on poolside. Safer than walking in the park. No reason you can't play tennis or golf with two people, and all children's outdoor sports should be opened immediately. The tiny risk of Covid is far outweighed by the health, physical and mental benefits.
42
10/02/2021 11:12:02 35 28
bbc
Yes, wondered that myself re swimming pools
Remember when I used to swim regularly, often go to the pool with sniffles, a cough maybe even a cold & every time came away from the pool feeling & breathing better
Can't help but think, Chlorine rich water/vapour gets into your tubes, sinus's, eyes & you breath it in
Figure that's got to help even with covid.

Maybe Trump was on to something? ;-)
135
10/02/2021 11:47:18 9 1
bbc
Chlorine is never really very good on the inside. At best it is fairly harmless in low concentration. At worst we call it chemical warfare.
183
10/02/2021 12:07:14 10 9
bbc
Was beggining to agree with you until you mentioned ~Trump the chump nothing he says makes sense
195
10/02/2021 12:13:14 12 10
bbc
You probably infected others in the changing room, shower, sauna, jacuzzi with your cough/cold/flu. Rather disgusting behaviour.
202
10/02/2021 12:16:09 7 3
bbc
You know, i was agreeing with your comment, and then you said "Maybe Trump was on to something?" You ruined it....
249
Pip
10/02/2021 12:46:17 2 1
bbc
I'd agree he was certainly on something..........?
12
10/02/2021 10:56:42 65 21
bbc
I remember all the rubbish spoken about AIDS transmission - people were claiming you could catch it from toilet seats and other such utter nonsense.

Well, the rubbish spoken about Covid transmission is equally hysterical utter nonsense as well.
43
10/02/2021 11:11:08 4 6
bbc
"rubbish spoken about Covid transmission..."

Yet, 107 million people have caught it.....
12
10/02/2021 10:56:42 65 21
bbc
I remember all the rubbish spoken about AIDS transmission - people were claiming you could catch it from toilet seats and other such utter nonsense.

Well, the rubbish spoken about Covid transmission is equally hysterical utter nonsense as well.
44
10/02/2021 11:12:31 4 1
bbc
But if you did catch HIV before the advent of HIV antiviral drugs it was pretty much a guaranteed death sentence. It still kills millions worldwide and a vaccine would be most welcome but it's a clever little so-and-so that has so far evaded all attempts at creating one.
45
10/02/2021 11:12:53 5 4
bbc
Stay Safe.

Keep your ball in your trousers and then there is no chance of getting infected.
4
10/02/2021 10:53:10 67 14
bbc
If Covid could be so easily transmitted between people by touching objects and then someone else touching the same object, then every one in the world would have been infected by now, because it can't be avoided.

How are items put on shelves and then taken off again ? By 2 people touching the same object.

How are items delivered to peoples homes ? By 2 people touching the same object.
46
10/02/2021 11:13:37 32 93
bbc
I take it that you are one of the fools fingering all the produce in the supermarket.

You look with your eyes not your hands.

If people had just been considerate then many tens of thousands of people would still be alive today.

Selfish, self centered, arrogant fools.

It makes my blood boil when I see some granny going around slowly picking up and putting back everything off the shelves.
63
10/02/2021 11:20:20 16 9
bbc
You don't suffer from any food intolerances, do you Ahmed?
66
10/02/2021 11:22:07 22 9
bbc
You take it very wrong.

How do you think the items were put on the supermarket shelf in the first place so people can take then off again when they want to buy them ?

How do you you think the items were loaded onto a lorry ? Then off again ?

An item on a supermarket shelf has been touched by endless people before it finally arrives on the shelf.
114
37p
10/02/2021 11:38:37 10 7
bbc
What an unfounded rant!
146
10/02/2021 11:50:24 4 4
bbc
What do you think the hand sanitisers are there for?
If you are that paranoid about germs, sanitise on the way in, & the way out, just to be sure.
Not wishing to heighten your fears, but just think about all the hands that have been on that produce to get them to where they are, Covid or not.
You could order online, but think of all the germs that have.....etc etc.
184
10/02/2021 12:07:14 0 2
bbc
Having turned over the bruised fruit it can be put back. It is the people who throw it back that cause the problems of handling loose fruit in supermarkets.
193
10/02/2021 12:12:02 3 3
bbc
It's made my blood boil to listen to your rant, you are discriminating against peoples grannies, you put antibacterial on your hands before you go in, you obviously don't - my rant over
211
10/02/2021 12:24:03 0 1
bbc
And if your glasses steam up you have to pick things up in order to be able to read the small print, especially if you have to be careful to avoid certain ingredients.

And I object to your ageist comment regarding 'some granny'. It isn't only the elderly who pick things up and put them back.
I fingered a chicken the other day, but that's another story, and I was very lonely....honest. Removed
253
10/02/2021 12:50:01 2 1
bbc
You can't get covid through your hands - simply don't touch your face until you have washed your hands and you'll be fine. Also, as demonstrated by this study, the amount of virus present on an object reduces rapidly with time, so by the time you get home it will be safe, or you can wash it if you're feeling paranoid. There, no need for the rant, let's all focus on the real transmission routes.
340
10/02/2021 13:55:10 0 1
bbc
I have to read stuff to make sure its Gluten free. And ingredients are always written so tiny it takes ages
349
10/02/2021 14:07:03 0 1
bbc
then was it when you get home. A 60 degree cottons was should do it. And cook it.
47
10/02/2021 11:13:42 25 5
bbc
Given the low transmission of the virus, it is surely more beneficial to allow participation in sport, and permitting gyms to re-open - if the inter-human contact can be controlled. In the gym I attended before lockdown, numbers were limited, machines well spaced out, and equipment cleaned constantly by both users and staff - far safer than any supermarket.
11
Bob
10/02/2021 10:56:09 61 13
bbc
You can apply the same to everything. Drinking a beer is not going to give you the virus. But the environment in which you do so, could.

As the article states, and the study shows, whilst *some* sports gear and balls are less likely to be vectors for transmission it is the human interaction during the activity that poses the real danger.
48
10/02/2021 11:14:17 6 1
bbc
The cohort playing sport are probably the group at lowest risk of morbidity/mortality, even if they contract the virus. Even drinking a pint of beer carries risk for other aspects of health- a risk most of us are willing to take. It depends how far you want to go.
13
10/02/2021 10:57:18 134 9
bbc
Yes chlorine kills the virus stone dead. Outdoor pools especially are as safe as houses, you come with your costume on and change and dry outside on poolside. Safer than walking in the park. No reason you can't play tennis or golf with two people, and all children's outdoor sports should be opened immediately. The tiny risk of Covid is far outweighed by the health, physical and mental benefits.
49
10/02/2021 11:14:31 23 5
bbc
The ban on golf was ridiculous - and no I don't play!
50
10/02/2021 11:15:11 29 6
bbc
If you like supermarkets you will defend those. If you like going to the gym you will defend that. If you like a pint you will want pubs to open... and so on.
77
10/02/2021 11:27:00 3 2
bbc
I like all those things in that order.
315
10/02/2021 13:37:58 0 1
bbc
I don't like badgers but I'll defend their right to state the obvious.
351
10/02/2021 14:08:57 0 1
bbc
totally not true! just because i go to the gym regularly and really miss it doesnt mean I am biased towards opening them..........ahem....at all....... honest,....... (you buying this at all?)
8
10/02/2021 10:54:33 13 13
bbc
So as usual the Government initially massively over-reacted and now it'd been found not to be true.

Again.

51
CJR
10/02/2021 11:15:18 2 1
bbc
But what happens if they had been proven correct, I can imagine the outcry on here. They done what they thought was best at the time with the information they had.
If with the benefits of hindsight they may have done things differently.
What a lot of people don’t or will not understand this is/was a fast moving pandemic, with the situation changing daily.
22
10/02/2021 11:00:43 27 2
bbc
The BMJ had an article back in July, stating that viral transmission on fomites was highly unlikely.
I couldn't understand why that wasn't more widely publicised at the time.
52
10/02/2021 11:15:35 29 8
bbc
For the same reason they didn't widely publicise that article in the Lancet that did the worldwide analysis and couldn't find a significant impact on mortality rates by lockdown. It doesn't help the narrative they're spinning in the papers/media.
291
10/02/2021 13:18:16 0 3
bbc
The study on the impact of lockdown was deeply, deeply flawed when it inferred that an absence of evidence was evidence of absence.
352
10/02/2021 14:10:06 0 2
bbc
They didn't publicise it because, to use this topic's focus, it was a load of balls.
30
10/02/2021 11:05:10 8 17
bbc
Why are people so obsessed with opening everything up so quickly?

1000+ people are dying every day in hospital. Hospitals are unable to provide a full array of services due to being overrun with Covid patients.

Are you happy for the NHS to not treat you or your family if you catch it?
53
10/02/2021 11:15:46 15 4
bbc
Because pools, tennis courts, golf courses and other amenities used by common people to keep healthy, have virtually no risk of transmission, especially how they were organised before the last lockdown, with one way systems, bookings etc.
79
10/02/2021 11:27:29 1 6
bbc
Vanishingly few. Most common people walk, jog, cycle. Rich to comfortably off people use those expensive facilities largely. They are inconvenient usually needing a car or public transport to get anywhere near.
98
10/02/2021 11:33:03 5 1
bbc
Is the right answer. Also what is better for mental and physical health? Spending all day drinking beer and eating indoors or going swimming and then for a game of golf all Covid secure? No brainer. This Government are so dumb it's criminal.
54
10/02/2021 11:16:51 41 2
bbc
Outdoor activity is less risky
Golf and tennis are sports where you are always “socially distanced(as long as you don’t hug each other...
Tennis is easy to open up .. just use different balls for serving ..
And golf even easier ..
Everyone is closer to many objects and people when they go to the supermarket .. than playing golf or tennis...
311
10/02/2021 13:35:52 2 5
bbc
Yes, why are they going to the supermarket, when they could stay at home and eat a golf ball or tennis ball?
55
jay
10/02/2021 11:17:36 8 5
bbc
Yet kids can’t play it .....

Covid , Covid , Covid..........yawn
56
DSA
10/02/2021 11:18:00 17 4
bbc
I would agree to non contact sports restarting where there is no sweating and physical contact involved but cannot understand how football and rugby are not shut down.

Obviously big money comes before health.

One sport that should be allowed is golf where the only physical contact is tapping the putters when coming off the last green.
109
10/02/2021 11:35:39 4 3
bbc
Golf in singles is the ideal way to exercise and social distance
34
10/02/2021 11:07:13 4 5
bbc
Not to mention playing golf, which was only stopped because the powers that be think of it as elitist- which it is not.
57
10/02/2021 11:18:11 3 3
bbc
But fox hunting was allowed during the first lockdown.
58
10/02/2021 11:18:52 14 7
bbc
Everybody seems to have a reason to be the exception to the rule.
71
10/02/2021 11:23:15 22 9
bbc
When the rules are rubbish, it’s easy to find exceptions!
159
10/02/2021 11:55:34 2 1
bbc
I'm driving to a beauty spot for an eye test later.
356
10/02/2021 14:22:53 1 1
bbc
The last thing you should ever do is think for yourself, that's fatal.
59
10/02/2021 11:19:38 10 10
bbc
Really the whole thing's not that bad is it? One of history's great overreactions.
309
10/02/2021 13:33:13 1 1
bbc
Just what would qualify as 'bad' in your analysis? Nuclear War? Uber not turned up?
60
10/02/2021 11:19:40 36 10
bbc
What a surprise, I can also confirm that after receiving approximately 400 Amazon packages since March without catching covid that packaging is low risk too.
Why do people believe the bull?
88
10/02/2021 11:31:06 9 4
bbc
Unless you were specifically and systematically licking all the parcels then there should be more or less zero risk. Who says there was any risk?
11
Bob
10/02/2021 10:56:09 61 13
bbc
You can apply the same to everything. Drinking a beer is not going to give you the virus. But the environment in which you do so, could.

As the article states, and the study shows, whilst *some* sports gear and balls are less likely to be vectors for transmission it is the human interaction during the activity that poses the real danger.
61
10/02/2021 11:19:54 7 1
bbc
Tennis has very little contact, swimming pools and gyms as well.
208
10/02/2021 12:20:00 1 5
bbc
Have you been to swimming pools and gyms?

They're a hotbed of flirting, posing and preening, and often viewed as a place to get dates rather than actually exercise.
62
10/02/2021 11:19:54 0 1
bbc
Lol. Let’s make masks out of cricket balls then!
75
10/02/2021 11:25:45 0 1
bbc
You would if you were facing my bowling.
305
10/02/2021 13:30:26 0 1
bbc
I am the 'Masked Cricketer'.
46
10/02/2021 11:13:37 32 93
bbc
I take it that you are one of the fools fingering all the produce in the supermarket.

You look with your eyes not your hands.

If people had just been considerate then many tens of thousands of people would still be alive today.

Selfish, self centered, arrogant fools.

It makes my blood boil when I see some granny going around slowly picking up and putting back everything off the shelves.
63
10/02/2021 11:20:20 16 9
bbc
You don't suffer from any food intolerances, do you Ahmed?
131
10/02/2021 11:45:25 1 5
bbc
Surely folk eat the same products they did before covid. Why risk peoples safety by shopping any slower than is necessary to get the things you need.
137
10/02/2021 11:47:34 6 4
bbc
I think you may need to spell it out a bit clearer than that to someone who doesn't understand that you need to know exactly what's in the packet, both for allergy reasons and to know whether the yoghurt is gelatine free, for example.
312
10/02/2021 13:36:25 1 1
bbc
Clearly not. Other intolerance's abound in him however.
64
10/02/2021 11:20:28 4 11
bbc
Oh great very useful.

So long as the ball is not picked up by a different person to the last one to let it go for, what? Fifteen minutes? Then the virus should have decayed if it was on it.

Might make for a slow game even for cricket!

Stop looking for excuses to behave recklessly in a disease situation!
Your fun of fat cat pro sports incomes are not worth it.
102
10/02/2021 11:34:17 3 2
bbc
A truly stupid comment
139
37p
10/02/2021 11:49:07 1 1
bbc
You're obviously not a sports person or you'd realise the value of sport rather than sitting on the sofa watching TV
36
10/02/2021 11:08:11 17 4
bbc
Footballers are a great example to the ignorant amongst us who see them hugging one another after a goal is scored, laughable that England & Scotland stood for anthems socially distanced yet two minutes later they were as close as one can get once game started crazy and according to Gregor Townsend some Scot's must have poor vision!!
65
10/02/2021 11:21:45 16 6
bbc
Remind me. How many footballers are in hospital with Covid-19?
127
10/02/2021 11:43:35 6 4
bbc
Footballers may not be in hospital with covid but they could be part of the chain of infection. People could be in hospital because of them.
323
10/02/2021 13:46:08 1 2
bbc
I'll remind you, huckleberry.
For the same reasons that they are not at the top of the list to receive the vaccine. Time to get your head out of the Daily Sport.
46
10/02/2021 11:13:37 32 93
bbc
I take it that you are one of the fools fingering all the produce in the supermarket.

You look with your eyes not your hands.

If people had just been considerate then many tens of thousands of people would still be alive today.

Selfish, self centered, arrogant fools.

It makes my blood boil when I see some granny going around slowly picking up and putting back everything off the shelves.
66
10/02/2021 11:22:07 22 9
bbc
You take it very wrong.

How do you think the items were put on the supermarket shelf in the first place so people can take then off again when they want to buy them ?

How do you you think the items were loaded onto a lorry ? Then off again ?

An item on a supermarket shelf has been touched by endless people before it finally arrives on the shelf.
24
10/02/2021 11:00:33 9 3
bbc
That's all fine if you're looking at painting balls with virus in the lab. The researchers may not have noticed that, for example, tennis balls are "spanked" every second or so. Could any virus actually survive that on tennis balls, golf balls, rugby balls or footballs?
67
10/02/2021 11:22:39 3 2
bbc
Easily. Try killing a virus with a hammer deliberately!
271
Pip
10/02/2021 13:04:40 0 1
bbc
You'd be sectioned in no time........?
30
10/02/2021 11:05:10 8 17
bbc
Why are people so obsessed with opening everything up so quickly?

1000+ people are dying every day in hospital. Hospitals are unable to provide a full array of services due to being overrun with Covid patients.

Are you happy for the NHS to not treat you or your family if you catch it?
68
10/02/2021 11:22:46 12 2
bbc
They aren't... the whole point is that a lot of activities that carry next to no risk and have profound physical and mental benefits are banned. For no fathomable reason other than 'because lockdown' golf is a perfect example. Outdoors, easy to distance, no shared equipment.. but its banned. Why?
69
10/02/2021 11:22:46 34 3
bbc
During the brief respites from the lock downs I swam, steamed, worked out and played (singles) tennis at my local David Lloyd ( other gyms available ). At 67 I had no problems with Covid, equipment was wiped down constantly by staff and punters. Now I have put on a stone, have hair like Charlie Chuck (google him) and am drinking too much - I'll be a burden on the NHS without covid at this rate
239
10/02/2021 12:42:29 6 1
bbc
At least you have hair !
Bonus
324
10/02/2021 13:46:53 0 2
bbc
Sample of 1 - proves it of course.
Are you going to tell us your grandad smoked 100 a day all his life and didn't get lung cancer - so smoking is 'safe'?
70
10/02/2021 11:23:10 3 1
bbc
The rational behind a peer review is it separates the horse droppings from the Dog droppings. Please wait until the Methodology and results are reviewed before becoming a headline story.
58
10/02/2021 11:18:52 14 7
bbc
Everybody seems to have a reason to be the exception to the rule.
71
10/02/2021 11:23:15 22 9
bbc
When the rules are rubbish, it’s easy to find exceptions!
5
10/02/2021 10:53:34 50 9
bbc
A large number of outdoor grass roots sport should never have been stopped. I believe the risk from running around playing football or doing a 10k fun run is far lower than buying a tin of beans of in Asda, and would have huge physical and mental health benefits.
72
10/02/2021 11:23:55 5 4
bbc
The sport itself maybe low risk, but running around close to other heavily breathing people is surely very risky. Lone sports, yes. Team sports, no. And remember that whenever you say somethiing is open, the idiots will always ruin it for everyone by getting chnaged together etc
101
10/02/2021 11:34:07 0 5
bbc
Is it really that much more risky to be around heavily breathing sportspeople? Given that the average brit is so unfit they are panting heavily when pushing a trolley in Sainsburys (indoors), I would like to see an actual comparison of the risk
73
10/02/2021 11:25:19 4 4
bbc
Can not understand why my gym is closed. Social distancing between equipment, personal sanitising spray and small towel for wiping down before and after use, track and trace on entry. Felt much safer and protected in the gym than working round a busy supermarket!
97
10/02/2021 11:33:03 1 1
bbc
sweating in the locker rooms
104
10/02/2021 11:35:19 3 1
bbc
Are you mad?

Intense exercise causes heavy breathing and the expelling of airborne particles - never mind the buckets of sweat harbouring particles.

Put people in a confined space, socially distanced or not, and you have the perfect breeding ground.

It's astonishing that people still don't get how this works it really is....
74
10/02/2021 11:25:31 23 8
bbc
Long walks touching gates. Trips to the supermarket touching trollies and goods. Going to work in an office every day and touching things. Receiving online goods and touching them. I don't use anti bacterial hand sanitiser (why would you for a virus... you need anti viral) I haven't had so much as a snivel. I'm not a denier, just very confused about what is going on. Happy to wear a mask, but why?
84
10/02/2021 11:28:45 8 23
bbc
If after all this time your comments are genuine then I feel sorry for your views and sincerely hope they don't catch up with you and yours stay safe
86
10/02/2021 11:29:28 11 4
bbc
My partner does her mums shopping. Her mum is nearly 80. She gets the shopping and just drops it off. None of it is ever disinfected. No problems at all so far a year in nearly. The nation is obsessed with sanitizing.
90
10/02/2021 11:31:26 9 5
bbc
I know I'm replying to my own message... but WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON! Why can't I go on furlough! Why can't I go to the pub! Why can't I be free to do what I want to do. Why am I a picture of health after spending so much time around people and touching all kinds of objects and touching my face because my nose runs after wearing a mask! Why are we doing this! Rant over...
99
10/02/2021 11:33:20 6 9
bbc
So far you have been fortunate. It's quite simple really.
Removed
334
10/02/2021 13:52:45 0 2
bbc
So, you won't believe it until it gets you then? 60%+ alcohol hand sanitizer kills viruses - then wash your hands properly asap. You're really not very bright - just lucky (so far).
62
10/02/2021 11:19:54 0 1
bbc
Lol. Let’s make masks out of cricket balls then!
75
10/02/2021 11:25:45 0 1
bbc
You would if you were facing my bowling.
31
10/02/2021 11:06:23 77 10
bbc
As we all knew. Golf, tennis should be happening now, absolutely no reason why not.
76
10/02/2021 11:26:23 18 49
bbc
Sadly those involved can still pass it on and who wants outdoor tennis at present this article is just more click bait from lousy BBC to set people going again not worthy of a HYS and they know it.
89
10/02/2021 11:31:20 3 5
bbc
but they can pass it on whether they are playing sport or not.
The question is not whether you can pass the virus on playing sport, the question is whether it is so much more likely when playing sport than whatever you would be doing instead that it is worth not having the benefit of playing sport
50
10/02/2021 11:15:11 29 6
bbc
If you like supermarkets you will defend those. If you like going to the gym you will defend that. If you like a pint you will want pubs to open... and so on.
77
10/02/2021 11:27:00 3 2
bbc
I like all those things in that order.
371
10/02/2021 16:41:43 0 1
bbc
I like them in reverse order.
32
10/02/2021 11:06:23 1 4
bbc
Oh dear the best you can offer is another boring BBC whinge

BTW bojo is wrong all the time but blinkered dopeys love his lies and bluster
78
10/02/2021 11:27:29 1 2
bbc
It's astonishing how many leftie FBPE types (you can tell who they are as their comments always contain an insult or put down), jump to the defence of the BBC given it is supposed to be 'right wing'.
53
10/02/2021 11:15:46 15 4
bbc
Because pools, tennis courts, golf courses and other amenities used by common people to keep healthy, have virtually no risk of transmission, especially how they were organised before the last lockdown, with one way systems, bookings etc.
79
10/02/2021 11:27:29 1 6
bbc
Vanishingly few. Most common people walk, jog, cycle. Rich to comfortably off people use those expensive facilities largely. They are inconvenient usually needing a car or public transport to get anywhere near.
106
10/02/2021 11:35:27 5 2
bbc
Rich? My council season ticket is £24.99 a month, which includes a dozen pools and gyms and all the classes and communal activities at all the leisure centres and for all the hours that they are open.
111
37p
10/02/2021 11:36:16 6 2
bbc
What is expensive about tennis? Equipment and facilities are little cost (racket £60, club member ship about £2.00 a week). There are tennis courts and clubs which are usually nearby.
Yes, if you want to spend a lot more you can but I don't class this as expensive for anyone.
35
10/02/2021 11:07:29 9 4
bbc
The equipment may not do much to spread covid, but I notice the footballers are all still hugging each other
80
10/02/2021 11:28:20 5 3
bbc
They are outdoors and tested three times a week. The risk in professional football is absolutely minimal.
As has always been the case, nearly all transmission is by breathing in droplets and most of that is in the home or confined workplaces.
342
10/02/2021 13:59:17 0 1
bbc
What about all the footballers (and other sports professionals) who have tested positive then? Most of them young and fit but that does not ensure it doesn't 'get you'.
346
10/02/2021 14:04:46 0 1
bbc
And we all thought we could go a whole year without having to remind the numpties of the simple mechanism of this virus.
4
10/02/2021 10:53:10 67 14
bbc
If Covid could be so easily transmitted between people by touching objects and then someone else touching the same object, then every one in the world would have been infected by now, because it can't be avoided.

How are items put on shelves and then taken off again ? By 2 people touching the same object.

How are items delivered to peoples homes ? By 2 people touching the same object.
81
10/02/2021 11:28:25 9 10
bbc
That's assuming every person that touches the object first has COVID-19 particles present on their hands. Exponential increasing etc... so everyone wont have had it. That was the easiest debunking in my life.
82
10/02/2021 11:28:36 0 1
bbc
Cue Mike Ashley at Sport Direct...
31
10/02/2021 11:06:23 77 10
bbc
As we all knew. Golf, tennis should be happening now, absolutely no reason why not.
83
37p
10/02/2021 11:28:41 11 2
bbc
I see there were two petitions, one for golf and one for tennis.
The government responded to the both petitions with no points made other than it's still banned and sport is very important.
The golf petition reached 132,000 signatures and will need to be considered for debate in parliament.
The tennis petition reached 27,000 signatures.

Yet indoor church services are allowed!
74
10/02/2021 11:25:31 23 8
bbc
Long walks touching gates. Trips to the supermarket touching trollies and goods. Going to work in an office every day and touching things. Receiving online goods and touching them. I don't use anti bacterial hand sanitiser (why would you for a virus... you need anti viral) I haven't had so much as a snivel. I'm not a denier, just very confused about what is going on. Happy to wear a mask, but why?
84
10/02/2021 11:28:45 8 23
bbc
If after all this time your comments are genuine then I feel sorry for your views and sincerely hope they don't catch up with you and yours stay safe
85
10/02/2021 11:29:15 1 1
bbc
Who funded this work?
74
10/02/2021 11:25:31 23 8
bbc
Long walks touching gates. Trips to the supermarket touching trollies and goods. Going to work in an office every day and touching things. Receiving online goods and touching them. I don't use anti bacterial hand sanitiser (why would you for a virus... you need anti viral) I haven't had so much as a snivel. I'm not a denier, just very confused about what is going on. Happy to wear a mask, but why?
86
10/02/2021 11:29:28 11 4
bbc
My partner does her mums shopping. Her mum is nearly 80. She gets the shopping and just drops it off. None of it is ever disinfected. No problems at all so far a year in nearly. The nation is obsessed with sanitizing.
87
10/02/2021 11:23:16 1 10
bbc
Mr angry-Why do people believe the bull?

Cos they voted Berxit ..
60
10/02/2021 11:19:40 36 10
bbc
What a surprise, I can also confirm that after receiving approximately 400 Amazon packages since March without catching covid that packaging is low risk too.
Why do people believe the bull?
88
10/02/2021 11:31:06 9 4
bbc
Unless you were specifically and systematically licking all the parcels then there should be more or less zero risk. Who says there was any risk?
76
10/02/2021 11:26:23 18 49
bbc
Sadly those involved can still pass it on and who wants outdoor tennis at present this article is just more click bait from lousy BBC to set people going again not worthy of a HYS and they know it.
89
10/02/2021 11:31:20 3 5
bbc
but they can pass it on whether they are playing sport or not.
The question is not whether you can pass the virus on playing sport, the question is whether it is so much more likely when playing sport than whatever you would be doing instead that it is worth not having the benefit of playing sport
74
10/02/2021 11:25:31 23 8
bbc
Long walks touching gates. Trips to the supermarket touching trollies and goods. Going to work in an office every day and touching things. Receiving online goods and touching them. I don't use anti bacterial hand sanitiser (why would you for a virus... you need anti viral) I haven't had so much as a snivel. I'm not a denier, just very confused about what is going on. Happy to wear a mask, but why?
90
10/02/2021 11:31:26 9 5
bbc
I know I'm replying to my own message... but WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON! Why can't I go on furlough! Why can't I go to the pub! Why can't I be free to do what I want to do. Why am I a picture of health after spending so much time around people and touching all kinds of objects and touching my face because my nose runs after wearing a mask! Why are we doing this! Rant over...
119
10/02/2021 11:40:25 0 1
bbc
You may throw some hate at me for this... I don't mind. But I vape heavily, really heavily, all day long. Now I'm not promoting vaping, it's not ideal. Vaping leaves a fine coating on the inside of my house windows, that I have to clean each week. Is it doing that to my lungs? Yes, probably. Is that stopping me from getting sick (not even a cold for six years) Who the hell knows?
328
10/02/2021 13:49:21 0 2
bbc
You really havent been paying attention have you? Not surprising though as you post is about the "me" thing.
28
10/02/2021 11:03:43 89 42
bbc
All soccer players are rather silly, I agree
91
10/02/2021 11:31:31 37 4
bbc
Football not "soccer".
251
10/02/2021 12:48:38 4 5
bbc
Kissball or Oikball - not "Football"
92
10/02/2021 11:31:32 1 1
bbc
No but the sweat that is produced is as it is a body fluid but saying that if the equipment is wiped down with sanitizer after every use it is perhaps a bit safer but not everybody will do that
93
10/02/2021 11:31:34 1 2
bbc
Why has no one done any research into whether masks work? Anecdotally they don't seem to make the slightest bit of difference as UK second wave just as bad or worse than first.

In the US the states with the worst deaths and infections (NY, California) have the most draconian mask laws.
141
10/02/2021 11:43:12 1 2
bbc
In answer to your point about whether masks work. Probably do but how well depends.....I saw a chap in Selfridges the other day. He had full mask, a hoodie, a scarf, and sun glasses. 12 months ago a friend was sued to remove his crash helmet when paying for petrol. It struck me that the chap in Selfridges may well not have been allowed in 12 months ago.
94
10/02/2021 11:32:28 13 2
bbc
A soon as the schools go back it's important that children's sport resumes as well.
122
10/02/2021 11:38:19 1 15
bbc
Only if the teachers feel safe!
13
10/02/2021 10:57:18 134 9
bbc
Yes chlorine kills the virus stone dead. Outdoor pools especially are as safe as houses, you come with your costume on and change and dry outside on poolside. Safer than walking in the park. No reason you can't play tennis or golf with two people, and all children's outdoor sports should be opened immediately. The tiny risk of Covid is far outweighed by the health, physical and mental benefits.
95
10/02/2021 11:32:30 12 3
bbc
My 6 year old was so upset when he had to stop his weekly swimming lessons. He keeps asking when he can start them again, and it really sucks I can't give him an answer.
96
10/02/2021 11:32:50 4 2
bbc
There was a lot of scaremongering early on in the pandemic about people being able to catch Covid-19 off surfaces which have since been proved to be wrong.

Maybe the media should make sure reports have been peer reviewed before publishing them as being the truth.
73
10/02/2021 11:25:19 4 4
bbc
Can not understand why my gym is closed. Social distancing between equipment, personal sanitising spray and small towel for wiping down before and after use, track and trace on entry. Felt much safer and protected in the gym than working round a busy supermarket!
97
10/02/2021 11:33:03 1 1
bbc
sweating in the locker rooms
113
10/02/2021 11:38:02 1 1
bbc
Changing rooms are closed
53
10/02/2021 11:15:46 15 4
bbc
Because pools, tennis courts, golf courses and other amenities used by common people to keep healthy, have virtually no risk of transmission, especially how they were organised before the last lockdown, with one way systems, bookings etc.
98
10/02/2021 11:33:03 5 1
bbc
Is the right answer. Also what is better for mental and physical health? Spending all day drinking beer and eating indoors or going swimming and then for a game of golf all Covid secure? No brainer. This Government are so dumb it's criminal.
74
10/02/2021 11:25:31 23 8
bbc
Long walks touching gates. Trips to the supermarket touching trollies and goods. Going to work in an office every day and touching things. Receiving online goods and touching them. I don't use anti bacterial hand sanitiser (why would you for a virus... you need anti viral) I haven't had so much as a snivel. I'm not a denier, just very confused about what is going on. Happy to wear a mask, but why?
99
10/02/2021 11:33:20 6 9
bbc
So far you have been fortunate. It's quite simple really.
105
10/02/2021 11:35:25 3 1
bbc
Well I havent won the lottery... but yes, I guess your right.
100
10/02/2021 11:33:22 9 3
bbc
It's a disgrace that outdoor sports were banned at all. Many can be done safely.

The UK, one of the fattest nations on Earth.
121
10/02/2021 11:37:41 5 2
bbc
Your point about fat people may be true. However I suspect it is not “fat people” as you put it, that are missing sport.
199
10/02/2021 12:14:55 0 1
bbc
It's not really the sport itself it's the socialising before and afterwards