One in 10 teens in UK has tried hard drugs
10/02/2021 | news | education | 388
A study of 20,000 young people finds a third have used cannabis and half admit to binge-drinking.
Removed
2
10/02/2021 01:28:59 5 3
bbc
And yet, which are the ones to get locked up?
Hard to say since ukgov don't release figures.
Majority of faces in major drug dealing gangs are coloured. Majority murders on street.. Which you assume (cos media won't same) are coloured. So if this report correct.. Colored more concerned with dealing drugs than consumption?
Removed
10
10/02/2021 01:39:14 6 0
bbc
You get locked up for supplying, not possessing.
3
10/02/2021 01:30:00 6 4
bbc
Presumably these aren't held up by paper work at the border.
4
10/02/2021 01:29:38 21 5
bbc
Why is there a need to differentiate between the colours of the teens?
55
10/02/2021 02:39:32 20 15
bbc
Because it's important.
Like differentiating between the ethnicity of criminals is also important but it's never publicised, as the truth goes against the left's agenda.
243
10/02/2021 10:21:49 4 1
bbc
There could be more useful differentiations, such as socio-economic class, urban v rural, education level.
265
10/02/2021 10:37:58 2 0
bbc
Could say the same with BAME and Covid, or should we not try to eliminate the disparity. In order to eliminate the disparity we first need to identify it.
5
10/02/2021 01:32:36 27 19
bbc
Why not...The way things are now I'm not surprised. Get out of your head seems a good option given the situation so-called grown-ups have got the world into.

Now pass the LSD...
99
10/02/2021 06:54:28 4 7
bbc
Yep , with the current s%*tshow in this country many more will be turning to mind altering substances !
164
10/02/2021 09:36:08 1 2
bbc
No personal discipline or dignity, the human, the only species on the planet that can destroy itself and everything else and then there was covid!
6
10/02/2021 01:32:47 3 2
bbc
"This list of hard drugs included cocaine, acid, ecstasy, speed, ketamine and any other psychoactive substances."

Don't touch the grass, it could be super-strength skunk.
7
10/02/2021 01:33:49 5 6
bbc
A Study suggests. I no longer believe words like that.
2
10/02/2021 01:28:59 5 3
bbc
And yet, which are the ones to get locked up?
8
bbc
Hard to say since ukgov don't release figures.
Majority of faces in major drug dealing gangs are coloured. Majority murders on street.. Which you assume (cos media won't same) are coloured. So if this report correct.. Colored more concerned with dealing drugs than consumption?
Removed
35
10/02/2021 02:18:44 1 2
bbc
"COLOURED" Sums you up!!!
9
10/02/2021 01:36:32 7 5
bbc
What would you expect to happen if there was less guidance and control over youths?

It may be written in stone, but if there is no control (enforcement) the world is my oyster.

I'll do as I wontonly do and you can't touch me.

Result seems to be a sownward spiral where new parents me me me and their offspring gets IGNORED. {Too busy me sexting}
11
10/02/2021 01:40:07 5 8
bbc
Victim blaming, it's people from older generations who are grooming them and selling them these drugs.
2
10/02/2021 01:28:59 5 3
bbc
And yet, which are the ones to get locked up?
10
10/02/2021 01:39:14 6 0
bbc
You get locked up for supplying, not possessing.
9
10/02/2021 01:36:32 7 5
bbc
What would you expect to happen if there was less guidance and control over youths?

It may be written in stone, but if there is no control (enforcement) the world is my oyster.

I'll do as I wontonly do and you can't touch me.

Result seems to be a sownward spiral where new parents me me me and their offspring gets IGNORED. {Too busy me sexting}
11
10/02/2021 01:40:07 5 8
bbc
Victim blaming, it's people from older generations who are grooming them and selling them these drugs.
51
10/02/2021 02:37:28 2 0
bbc
There's nonsense, then there's this.
Most of them buy drugs from each other, or dealers of the same age.
12
10/02/2021 01:40:09 0 3
bbc
Shocking
13
10/02/2021 01:45:32 11 12
bbc
And zero out of ten have tried hard work.
15
10/02/2021 01:50:58 10 2
bbc
ye well sed mate!!!

back in are the only "ecstasy" we got wos gettin out of a 16 hour shift down the coal mines with your life in cheque. and we was glad to do it too

youngsters these days to obsesed with their facebook, and selfies and designer drug ecstasy. they wuldnt know a hard days graft if it hit them in the face

its pc gone mad mate!!
17
10/02/2021 01:51:58 4 3
bbc
Couldn’t be further from the truth.
28
10/02/2021 02:05:22 1 5
bbc
Moronic comment as all crass generalisations are. When was the last time you knew of young teens doing "hard work" in your living memory?
31
10/02/2021 02:07:30 2 2
bbc
Yes I'm sure no-one under 21 has ever done an hours work; not a single one.
14
10/02/2021 01:47:44 8 6
bbc
I'm really not surprised. The UK offers very little by way of vision or drive for future generations; selling drugs is a quick earner and for those who want it an easy fix.

Compound that with current curtailment on socialising and it's an epidemic waiting to happen.
27
10/02/2021 02:04:56 5 1
bbc
Interesting. If you are of limited ability and want to experience the high-life. Perhaps making money fast from drug dealing and accepting the consequences is a worthwhile gambit.
48
10/02/2021 02:35:25 1 1
bbc
Utter nonsense. The UK offers far more to the young than 95% of the rest of the world.
13
10/02/2021 01:45:32 11 12
bbc
And zero out of ten have tried hard work.
15
10/02/2021 01:50:58 10 2
bbc
ye well sed mate!!!

back in are the only "ecstasy" we got wos gettin out of a 16 hour shift down the coal mines with your life in cheque. and we was glad to do it too

youngsters these days to obsesed with their facebook, and selfies and designer drug ecstasy. they wuldnt know a hard days graft if it hit them in the face

its pc gone mad mate!!
Moron who clearly never went to school Removed
16
10/02/2021 01:51:06 74 27
bbc
>This list of hard drugs included cocaine, acid, ecstasy, speed, ketamine

None of those are what I would call 'hard drugs', these are all party drugs. Drug education in this country is a joke, almost everybody knows someone who uses or has used one of these. Hard drugs are Heroin, Crystal Meth, Crack Cocaine, two very different classes of substance for so many reasons.
18
10/02/2021 01:55:44 30 48
bbc
"None of those are what I would call 'hard drugs'"

Oooh, you're 'ard.
23
10/02/2021 02:01:33 12 0
bbc
It used to be that class A were the "hard drugs" and now it includes class B drugs. Cocaine was classed as a "hard drug" when I was a kid a long time ago when the education was "just say no". The problem is that people seem to think educating in this area will encourage more to try them, a bit like the attitude to sex ed. It is wrong and rather stupid but it is the way it is.
The name or hardness of a drug does not bother me anyone who takes drugs is IMO is an idiot. Removed
123
DG
10/02/2021 08:28:22 11 6
bbc
cocaine is a HARD drug. Only a moron or user would class this a lower drug
231
10/02/2021 10:11:44 7 1
bbc
I don't think you know much about drugs do you? Taken occasionally and in a sensible manner, there isn't much wrong with any of the drugs you mention. But people, particularly the young, are not sensible, and do overdo things, and they do become ill, and occasionally even dead!
326
10/02/2021 12:12:18 3 1
bbc
I must have led a very sheltered life . I don’t know anyone who’s taken drugs,haven’t myself and wouldn’t know the smell
13
10/02/2021 01:45:32 11 12
bbc
And zero out of ten have tried hard work.
17
10/02/2021 01:51:58 4 3
bbc
Couldn’t be further from the truth.
16
10/02/2021 01:51:06 74 27
bbc
>This list of hard drugs included cocaine, acid, ecstasy, speed, ketamine

None of those are what I would call 'hard drugs', these are all party drugs. Drug education in this country is a joke, almost everybody knows someone who uses or has used one of these. Hard drugs are Heroin, Crystal Meth, Crack Cocaine, two very different classes of substance for so many reasons.
18
10/02/2021 01:55:44 30 48
bbc
"None of those are what I would call 'hard drugs'"

Oooh, you're 'ard.
24
10/02/2021 02:03:22 14 4
bbc
Weird reaction Julius
42
10/02/2021 02:30:35 14 3
bbc
child
349
10/02/2021 13:14:29 1 0
bbc
That's just for breakfast ??
19
10/02/2021 01:58:01 6 4
bbc
Young people have been experimenting with drugs for at least the past 60 years, it's hardly a revelation.

It's probably healthy in the long run to gets things out of your system at a young age.
34
10/02/2021 02:12:26 7 2
bbc
It has been going on a lot longer than 60 years.
20
10/02/2021 01:58:25 12 6
bbc
Shocking, but not surprising. So much for the mantra started in the 1990s “let kids be kids and give them the freedom to do what they want”. Now those kids of the 90s are now parents and allowing their kids even more freedoms than they had themselves ...and this the result

Too many kids today aspire to be rich and famous celebs, wanting the WAG/champagne lifestyle of success which includes drugs.
22
10/02/2021 02:01:31 13 3
bbc
The origin of the permissive society is those born post-war who spent the late 60's off their face on drugs; the origin is earlier than kids of the 90's.
21
10/02/2021 02:00:43 62 9
bbc
As a teenager most of my friends took a variety drugs beyond alcohol and cannabis. I instinctively realised that if I even took 1 step down that road I would never be able to return. One of the few smart decisions I have made. Just as true now as it ever was.
217
10/02/2021 10:08:50 6 14
bbc
Are you the same 'Bonehead' who used to sell weed down 'dog do alley' out the back of my old secondary school in the 80s by any chance?
290
10/02/2021 10:51:51 7 0
bbc
It's great that you were sensible as a teenager, but let's face it, for most teenagers being sensible isn't a priority. We need to re-evaluate the policies that are currently in place as it's clear that they aren't working. Legalise cannabis for people aged 21+ and set the taxes on it fairly low to begin with to crush the blackmarket. This would cut off the main revenue stream for drugs gangs.
20
10/02/2021 01:58:25 12 6
bbc
Shocking, but not surprising. So much for the mantra started in the 1990s “let kids be kids and give them the freedom to do what they want”. Now those kids of the 90s are now parents and allowing their kids even more freedoms than they had themselves ...and this the result

Too many kids today aspire to be rich and famous celebs, wanting the WAG/champagne lifestyle of success which includes drugs.
22
10/02/2021 02:01:31 13 3
bbc
The origin of the permissive society is those born post-war who spent the late 60's off their face on drugs; the origin is earlier than kids of the 90's.
16
10/02/2021 01:51:06 74 27
bbc
>This list of hard drugs included cocaine, acid, ecstasy, speed, ketamine

None of those are what I would call 'hard drugs', these are all party drugs. Drug education in this country is a joke, almost everybody knows someone who uses or has used one of these. Hard drugs are Heroin, Crystal Meth, Crack Cocaine, two very different classes of substance for so many reasons.
23
10/02/2021 02:01:33 12 0
bbc
It used to be that class A were the "hard drugs" and now it includes class B drugs. Cocaine was classed as a "hard drug" when I was a kid a long time ago when the education was "just say no". The problem is that people seem to think educating in this area will encourage more to try them, a bit like the attitude to sex ed. It is wrong and rather stupid but it is the way it is.
18
10/02/2021 01:55:44 30 48
bbc
"None of those are what I would call 'hard drugs'"

Oooh, you're 'ard.
24
10/02/2021 02:03:22 14 4
bbc
Weird reaction Julius
25
10/02/2021 02:03:36 29 11
bbc
And in the over 50s it comes down to 1 in 3
107
10/02/2021 07:43:38 8 11
bbc
Your evidence is?
166
10/02/2021 09:37:40 1 2
bbc
When you get old you get them on the NHS but usually because you have a poor prognosis anyway.
26
10/02/2021 02:04:23 5 5
bbc
They say poverty and living in poor areas ,leads to Drugs , so Is the BBC admitting their is a disproportionate number of White kids living in poverty and poor areas , Drugs are racist
29
10/02/2021 02:05:49 2 3
bbc
Drugs cost money
14
10/02/2021 01:47:44 8 6
bbc
I'm really not surprised. The UK offers very little by way of vision or drive for future generations; selling drugs is a quick earner and for those who want it an easy fix.

Compound that with current curtailment on socialising and it's an epidemic waiting to happen.
27
10/02/2021 02:04:56 5 1
bbc
Interesting. If you are of limited ability and want to experience the high-life. Perhaps making money fast from drug dealing and accepting the consequences is a worthwhile gambit.
13
10/02/2021 01:45:32 11 12
bbc
And zero out of ten have tried hard work.
28
10/02/2021 02:05:22 1 5
bbc
Moronic comment as all crass generalisations are. When was the last time you knew of young teens doing "hard work" in your living memory?
26
10/02/2021 02:04:23 5 5
bbc
They say poverty and living in poor areas ,leads to Drugs , so Is the BBC admitting their is a disproportionate number of White kids living in poverty and poor areas , Drugs are racist
29
10/02/2021 02:05:49 2 3
bbc
Drugs cost money
30
10/02/2021 02:07:08 8 9
bbc
Drug, knife & gang crime through the roof. Purely down to half naked women, gangster wannabe music. Egged on by social media "influencers". Not helped by idiotic mayor's like Khan. Who scrapped knife searches. MET police too scared to be labelled "racist". But quick enough bending the knee for Marxist organisations that want to defund the police. Then there's Starmer who's quick enough on the knee
32
10/02/2021 02:09:56 5 3
bbc
Ofcourse that is the sole cause. Funny thing is most of the people I know who use drugs are my age or older and I am not a spring lamb anymore, getting closer to mutton.
283
10/02/2021 10:50:24 2 0
bbc
True. But why the reference to half-naked women?
13
10/02/2021 01:45:32 11 12
bbc
And zero out of ten have tried hard work.
31
10/02/2021 02:07:30 2 2
bbc
Yes I'm sure no-one under 21 has ever done an hours work; not a single one.
30
10/02/2021 02:07:08 8 9
bbc
Drug, knife & gang crime through the roof. Purely down to half naked women, gangster wannabe music. Egged on by social media "influencers". Not helped by idiotic mayor's like Khan. Who scrapped knife searches. MET police too scared to be labelled "racist". But quick enough bending the knee for Marxist organisations that want to defund the police. Then there's Starmer who's quick enough on the knee
32
10/02/2021 02:09:56 5 3
bbc
Ofcourse that is the sole cause. Funny thing is most of the people I know who use drugs are my age or older and I am not a spring lamb anymore, getting closer to mutton.
33
10/02/2021 02:11:51 6 0
bbc
Heroin users are increasingly knocking on. Trainspotting was made 25 years ago.
32
10/02/2021 02:09:56 5 3
bbc
Ofcourse that is the sole cause. Funny thing is most of the people I know who use drugs are my age or older and I am not a spring lamb anymore, getting closer to mutton.
33
10/02/2021 02:11:51 6 0
bbc
Heroin users are increasingly knocking on. Trainspotting was made 25 years ago.
19
10/02/2021 01:58:01 6 4
bbc
Young people have been experimenting with drugs for at least the past 60 years, it's hardly a revelation.

It's probably healthy in the long run to gets things out of your system at a young age.
34
10/02/2021 02:12:26 7 2
bbc
It has been going on a lot longer than 60 years.
40
10/02/2021 02:27:30 3 0
bbc
True, I said at least 60 years.

Hundreds of years of professional sales of drugs, e.g. the opium wards

Plenty of use of laudanum in the classical world.

At some point someone living in a cave found that some plants gave them good sensations. Who knows when that was!
Hard to say since ukgov don't release figures.
Majority of faces in major drug dealing gangs are coloured. Majority murders on street.. Which you assume (cos media won't same) are coloured. So if this report correct.. Colored more concerned with dealing drugs than consumption?
Removed
35
10/02/2021 02:18:44 1 2
bbc
"COLOURED" Sums you up!!!
36
10/02/2021 02:22:18 2 0
bbc
yes British spelling please
35
10/02/2021 02:18:44 1 2
bbc
"COLOURED" Sums you up!!!
36
10/02/2021 02:22:18 2 0
bbc
yes British spelling please
37
10/02/2021 02:25:10 6 4
bbc
Guess that is the sort of thing the go to schools to pick up. Bad habits meeting bad types in an artificial forced gang. Like many other things decent families would not come into contact with otherwise. School spread diseases. Of the mind too, and pretend teen culture.
39
10/02/2021 02:27:28 4 12
bbc
Correct. Not forgetting the Marxist lefty teachers etc
38
10/02/2021 02:27:01 3 0
bbc
UB40 did a song about it back in the 80's
41
10/02/2021 02:28:51 5 1
bbc
Red wine isn't quite a hard drug
37
10/02/2021 02:25:10 6 4
bbc
Guess that is the sort of thing the go to schools to pick up. Bad habits meeting bad types in an artificial forced gang. Like many other things decent families would not come into contact with otherwise. School spread diseases. Of the mind too, and pretend teen culture.
39
10/02/2021 02:27:28 4 12
bbc
Correct. Not forgetting the Marxist lefty teachers etc
34
10/02/2021 02:12:26 7 2
bbc
It has been going on a lot longer than 60 years.
40
10/02/2021 02:27:30 3 0
bbc
True, I said at least 60 years.

Hundreds of years of professional sales of drugs, e.g. the opium wards

Plenty of use of laudanum in the classical world.

At some point someone living in a cave found that some plants gave them good sensations. Who knows when that was!
38
10/02/2021 02:27:01 3 0
bbc
UB40 did a song about it back in the 80's
41
10/02/2021 02:28:51 5 1
bbc
Red wine isn't quite a hard drug
131
10/02/2021 08:39:51 0 0
bbc
That comment has just made my day.
18
10/02/2021 01:55:44 30 48
bbc
"None of those are what I would call 'hard drugs'"

Oooh, you're 'ard.
42
10/02/2021 02:30:35 14 3
bbc
child
43
10/02/2021 02:31:36 28 3
bbc
At least three in ten teens who admit to having tried hard drugs are lying because it boosts their ego - remember; "edginess" is a major factor in teen thinking.

How do I know?

Because almost 50 years ago, I & several classmates took part in an anonymous survey regarding drugs & three admitted to using them when they hadn't. One of them was me.

It's all about peer pressure, even anonymously...
90
10/02/2021 03:34:10 9 11
bbc
I'm guessing you're white? As young black men are often stereotyped as drug users, they might feel under pressure to do the opposite?
44
10/02/2021 02:31:54 2 2
bbc
Can you blame them?
208
10/02/2021 10:01:22 1 1
bbc
Yes, as it was THEIR choice!
45
10/02/2021 02:32:41 22 7
bbc
Inflammatory headline. 'Hard drugs' means what exactly? This isn't a term used by the UK Home Office or indeed the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. A number of the substances listed as 'hard' here in fact might be considered 'recreational' drugs.
54
10/02/2021 02:39:02 4 20
bbc
Modern painkillers a primarily opiate based. I assumed they meant them, same companies that are "saving us" with their vaccines/RNA manipulators
46
10/02/2021 02:33:07 3 4
bbc
alcohol and cigarettes are ok though. they're all perfectly acceptable. and taxable.
47
10/02/2021 02:34:29 8 3
bbc
Only those people aren't going around stabbing folks for them are they?
46
10/02/2021 02:33:07 3 4
bbc
alcohol and cigarettes are ok though. they're all perfectly acceptable. and taxable.
47
10/02/2021 02:34:29 8 3
bbc
Only those people aren't going around stabbing folks for them are they?
50
10/02/2021 02:37:03 3 1
bbc
They wouldn't be for other substances if you could buy them in Tesco's (other major supermarket chains are available)
88
10/02/2021 03:31:43 1 2
bbc
Given that a pack of fags is about £10, and benefits are about £80 a week, it might seem reasonable that a smoker would need a side hustle of some sort just to feed the habit. In non-crime families with smokers the high price of cigs in UK must contribute to child poverty.
158
10/02/2021 09:32:48 1 1
bbc
People would and do stab for cigarettes. Raid them from bins, pick them off the floor etc. Cigarettes are up there with heroin. They also subtly warp the minds of addicts such that they think they have the entitled to smoke anywhere and everywhere when the withdrawal starts.
14
10/02/2021 01:47:44 8 6
bbc
I'm really not surprised. The UK offers very little by way of vision or drive for future generations; selling drugs is a quick earner and for those who want it an easy fix.

Compound that with current curtailment on socialising and it's an epidemic waiting to happen.
48
10/02/2021 02:35:25 1 1
bbc
Utter nonsense. The UK offers far more to the young than 95% of the rest of the world.
49
10/02/2021 02:36:51 14 6
bbc
Many of the great bands of the 60's and 70's wouldn't be around if it wasn't for acid. I say let them be free!
60
10/02/2021 02:42:50 6 6
bbc
Psycheledics are not hard drugs, they are medicine.

Hard drugs: cocaine, heroine, crack, methamphetamine.
89
10/02/2021 03:31:47 1 1
bbc
Many of the great bands of the 60s and 70s AREN'T around because of acid. Admittedly though, Syd Barrett using the stuff turned Pink Floyd into what they were because they had to get rid of him.
47
10/02/2021 02:34:29 8 3
bbc
Only those people aren't going around stabbing folks for them are they?
50
10/02/2021 02:37:03 3 1
bbc
They wouldn't be for other substances if you could buy them in Tesco's (other major supermarket chains are available)
11
10/02/2021 01:40:07 5 8
bbc
Victim blaming, it's people from older generations who are grooming them and selling them these drugs.
51
10/02/2021 02:37:28 2 0
bbc
There's nonsense, then there's this.
Most of them buy drugs from each other, or dealers of the same age.
52
10/02/2021 02:38:08 4 5
bbc
If the Rolling Stones have taught us anything its that drugs make you live forever.
53
Jim
10/02/2021 02:34:50 1 3
bbc
What utter rubbish. Where on earth do you get these figures from ? Are you trying to telling me that you do surveys that show this ? I don't think so. How about giving the youth of today some credit for a change, instead of all this fake news and over dramatisation of the facts. How about some good news for a change, instead of this rubbish, especially in the present climate.
59
10/02/2021 02:42:24 3 5
bbc
On the whole young people have sacrificed one of the best quality years of their lives to help vulnerable people. I suspect nobody will be grateful.
45
10/02/2021 02:32:41 22 7
bbc
Inflammatory headline. 'Hard drugs' means what exactly? This isn't a term used by the UK Home Office or indeed the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. A number of the substances listed as 'hard' here in fact might be considered 'recreational' drugs.
54
10/02/2021 02:39:02 4 20
bbc
Modern painkillers a primarily opiate based. I assumed they meant them, same companies that are "saving us" with their vaccines/RNA manipulators
4
10/02/2021 01:29:38 21 5
bbc
Why is there a need to differentiate between the colours of the teens?
55
10/02/2021 02:39:32 20 15
bbc
Because it's important.
Like differentiating between the ethnicity of criminals is also important but it's never publicised, as the truth goes against the left's agenda.
138
10/02/2021 08:55:46 2 1
bbc
Why is it important
285
10/02/2021 10:52:22 4 2
bbc
Criminality has more to do with poverty and opportunity than the largely white Altie-righties will admit. But that doesn't suit their narrative, of course
56
10/02/2021 02:40:08 43 11
bbc
Drugs are illicit, and sexy, and expensive because they are illegal. Start giving coke out free at the GP surgery and see how cool it looks then, with queues of users waiting outside for their fix. Legalise and you take the money and power out of gangs, as well as being able to legislate for purity, strength, and license who can sell. Would also save money on policing & make tax revenue instead.
156
10/02/2021 09:29:12 10 11
bbc
There's a good reason class A drugs are class A irrespective if they are pharmaceutical grade, they are damaging to your health in a severe and addictive way. Your body but remember you're playing Russian roulette with your physical and mental health, your choice. Don't say you weren't warned.
207
stu
10/02/2021 09:59:22 4 0
bbc
I stopped doing coke when I saw a mate drop a tiny crumb of it and get on his hands and knees trying to pry it out of a crack in the pavement.. eurgh. that was enough for me. before that though I did coke a fair bit, but could take it or leave it

cannabis was an out and out addiction, very difficult to stop
57
10/02/2021 02:41:24 0 10
bbc
Britain has failed, no future.
They learbn from the lying leaders called tory party

That's why your kids are addicts
62
10/02/2021 02:44:31 4 2
bbc
If Britain was really that bad kids would be emigrating to Uganda for a better life.
65
10/02/2021 02:44:57 1 2
bbc
??????????????
Says an idiot who can’t even spell the word learn... must be a Labour supporting scum Removed
58
10/02/2021 02:42:08 27 12
bbc
Now that we’re admitting cannabis is safer than alcohol, can we finally talk legalisation?
61
10/02/2021 02:44:07 16 29
bbc
It’s a lot more addictive.
63
10/02/2021 02:44:32 5 12
bbc
Go to Amsterdam.
93
10/02/2021 04:39:54 16 4
bbc
Ah the good old I drink a bottle of wine a day but if you smoke a spliff a few times a week you're an addict gang are out I see.
53
Jim
10/02/2021 02:34:50 1 3
bbc
What utter rubbish. Where on earth do you get these figures from ? Are you trying to telling me that you do surveys that show this ? I don't think so. How about giving the youth of today some credit for a change, instead of all this fake news and over dramatisation of the facts. How about some good news for a change, instead of this rubbish, especially in the present climate.
59
10/02/2021 02:42:24 3 5
bbc
On the whole young people have sacrificed one of the best quality years of their lives to help vulnerable people. I suspect nobody will be grateful.
67
10/02/2021 02:46:09 2 3
bbc
Really? Constant illegal raves of 200 scally students? I think not.
49
10/02/2021 02:36:51 14 6
bbc
Many of the great bands of the 60's and 70's wouldn't be around if it wasn't for acid. I say let them be free!
60
10/02/2021 02:42:50 6 6
bbc
Psycheledics are not hard drugs, they are medicine.

Hard drugs: cocaine, heroine, crack, methamphetamine.
78
10/02/2021 03:06:48 1 5
bbc
Heroine = a female hero... you must be ESN... educationally sub normal, but you can clearly spell methamphetamine... perhaps you’ve used it so often from reading it on the label...
58
10/02/2021 02:42:08 27 12
bbc
Now that we’re admitting cannabis is safer than alcohol, can we finally talk legalisation?
61
10/02/2021 02:44:07 16 29
bbc
It’s a lot more addictive.
79
10/02/2021 03:15:58 12 0
bbc
We really don't have the data to say for sure which is more addictive as of yet. Addicts per capita probably skews more towards alcohol if anything, though obviously legality and availability impact this.
86
10/02/2021 03:30:24 12 11
bbc
Cannabis *isn't* addictive. It simply does not create a physical dependency.

Alcohol, on the other hand, is the second most addictive substance known behind only heroin.
162
10/02/2021 09:35:03 2 1
bbc
Wrong :) I have friends with liver-cirhosis.
173
10/02/2021 09:42:30 3 1
bbc
Utter rubbish
292
10/02/2021 10:55:16 1 0
bbc
Depends on the person, like all addictions.
57
10/02/2021 02:41:24 0 10
bbc
Britain has failed, no future.
They learbn from the lying leaders called tory party

That's why your kids are addicts
62
10/02/2021 02:44:31 4 2
bbc
If Britain was really that bad kids would be emigrating to Uganda for a better life.
58
10/02/2021 02:42:08 27 12
bbc
Now that we’re admitting cannabis is safer than alcohol, can we finally talk legalisation?
63
10/02/2021 02:44:32 5 12
bbc
Go to Amsterdam.
64
10/02/2021 02:44:45 0 7
bbc
Lol given Brexit this figure won’t be improving any time soon!
Always a remoaner spouting rubbish. Removed
69
10/02/2021 02:48:18 2 0
bbc
Brexit might reduce supply if imports become more difficult
57
10/02/2021 02:41:24 0 10
bbc
Britain has failed, no future.
They learbn from the lying leaders called tory party

That's why your kids are addicts
65
10/02/2021 02:44:57 1 2
bbc
??????????????
66
10/02/2021 02:46:04 96 22
bbc
The war on drugs has raged for decades with billions spent on policing, with this as the effect. Prohibition didn't work with alcohol, and it clearly isn't working with drugs.
Kids will always climb trees and break arms, so we build play parks with soft landings to reduce the harms instead of banning climbing.
Legalised, taxed, & licensed drugs with strength & purity controls is the answer.
81
You
10/02/2021 03:17:27 34 6
bbc
It keeps the market free for the shadowy people making billions.
160
10/02/2021 09:34:02 9 25
bbc
Legalised drugs is not the answer and never will be.
Common sense? The Government would never allow that.

Besides which, a lot of the Tory base are the "My kids would never do drugs" kinda people (despite all evidence to the contrary) and they don't tend to think outside the tiny box.

If the government legalised, taxed and regulated drugs, they would face a lot of backlash from their supporters (although everyone else would be pleased).
Removed
168
10/02/2021 09:38:57 8 17
bbc
I used to think exactly the same as you. My younger sister died of heroine abuse at 35. But I travel to Vancouver quite a bit where it's legalised. And the place stinks.!!! You can't go anywhere without breathing in the strong smell of weed, it's everywhere. So much so, that I wouldn't legalise it.
210
10/02/2021 09:54:52 5 2
bbc
A trillion upticks!
215
Dax
10/02/2021 10:06:54 10 1
bbc
I do agree, and there is a good example of how a sensible drug decriminalization programme can work in Portugal. Worldwide, we need to be clever against the mafias, we owe this to our young people - https://transformdrugs.org/blog/drug-decriminalisation-in-portugal-setting-the-record-straight
226
10/02/2021 10:07:05 5 6
bbc
Cannabis should have been legalised decades ago. But other drugs not so. Even cocaine, delivered like pizza now, is nasty. becomes habit forming and money draining and is a really bad thing to be taking regularly.
247
10/02/2021 10:24:01 8 7
bbc
Anyone that takes recreational drugs is. Plonker.
305
10/02/2021 11:20:00 4 1
bbc
I've thought this for years, as it seems the only way to control the market and cut off the suppliers/ dealers millions.
342
Bob
10/02/2021 12:48:03 0 1
bbc
Did you read the headline or read the article? Per the article - and not the headline - usage has fallen.
361
10/02/2021 15:34:29 0 1
bbc
There is a reason junkies are called that, because they consume junk.

We need to tackle the root reasons that people take junk rather than encouraging them.

I mean everybody seems to complain about Amazon and the little tax they pay, what if they started trading drugs? The money won't suddenly end up in your community..have you seen the boarded up high street shops that was even before covid..
362
10/02/2021 16:33:40 0 0
bbc
Legalisation, regulation, taxation is obviously the answer, prohibition has never worked. Most kids are basically nice, but they have to interact with criminals to score their gear. I knew some very dodgy types in my youth, people who were genuinely scary & dangerous, that I never would have come into contact with if I'd been able to buy dope as easily as booze.
59
10/02/2021 02:42:24 3 5
bbc
On the whole young people have sacrificed one of the best quality years of their lives to help vulnerable people. I suspect nobody will be grateful.
67
10/02/2021 02:46:09 2 3
bbc
Really? Constant illegal raves of 200 scally students? I think not.
70
10/02/2021 02:49:59 1 1
bbc
If most young people were at raves then the incidence of new infections wouldn't fall.
64
10/02/2021 02:44:45 0 7
bbc
Lol given Brexit this figure won’t be improving any time soon!
Always a remoaner spouting rubbish. Removed
64
10/02/2021 02:44:45 0 7
bbc
Lol given Brexit this figure won’t be improving any time soon!
69
10/02/2021 02:48:18 2 0
bbc
Brexit might reduce supply if imports become more difficult
71
10/02/2021 02:50:55 2 3
bbc
Fantastic. PROBLEM SOLVED then ??
67
10/02/2021 02:46:09 2 3
bbc
Really? Constant illegal raves of 200 scally students? I think not.
70
10/02/2021 02:49:59 1 1
bbc
If most young people were at raves then the incidence of new infections wouldn't fall.
69
10/02/2021 02:48:18 2 0
bbc
Brexit might reduce supply if imports become more difficult
71
10/02/2021 02:50:55 2 3
bbc
Fantastic. PROBLEM SOLVED then ??
72
10/02/2021 02:53:44 2 0
bbc
The home-grown stuff will still circulate but a fall in drug importation could be a benefit of brexit.
71
10/02/2021 02:50:55 2 3
bbc
Fantastic. PROBLEM SOLVED then ??
72
10/02/2021 02:53:44 2 0
bbc
The home-grown stuff will still circulate but a fall in drug importation could be a benefit of brexit.
73
Pez
10/02/2021 02:56:10 22 7
bbc
LOL @ this report - Everyone I knew in the late 80's were doing them - and then some. It's the forbidden fruit they all approach. Legalise and remove the "novelty" :)
76
10/02/2021 03:02:08 17 7
bbc
If God had told Adam and Eve just help yourselves to the apples they might not have bothered
201
10/02/2021 09:41:57 3 3
bbc
Don't drag everyone into your sordid world,
74
Pez
10/02/2021 02:59:36 7 1
bbc
The types of drugs references at not "hard Drugs" although do fall in to the "Class A" category. Honestly, having live through the 80's and 90's the drugs from my understanding were softer, yet purer. These days, they've been cut with everything and something else - making per kilo returns a lot higher - but causing far more medical issues than there original forms. Just my 2 cents from the 80s
83
10/02/2021 03:28:07 5 0
bbc
Class A is the definition of had drugs. Not a good definition, but legally it is so.
87
10/02/2021 03:31:13 1 0
bbc
Perhaps, though from what I've heard, certain modern-day avenues are actually probably more consistent, what with the accessibility of the deepweb, cryptocurrencies, and reagent tests etc.
57
10/02/2021 02:41:24 0 10
bbc
Britain has failed, no future.
They learbn from the lying leaders called tory party

That's why your kids are addicts
75
bbc
Says an idiot who can’t even spell the word learn... must be a Labour supporting scum Removed
73
Pez
10/02/2021 02:56:10 22 7
bbc
LOL @ this report - Everyone I knew in the late 80's were doing them - and then some. It's the forbidden fruit they all approach. Legalise and remove the "novelty" :)
76
10/02/2021 03:02:08 17 7
bbc
If God had told Adam and Eve just help yourselves to the apples they might not have bothered
15
10/02/2021 01:50:58 10 2
bbc
ye well sed mate!!!

back in are the only "ecstasy" we got wos gettin out of a 16 hour shift down the coal mines with your life in cheque. and we was glad to do it too

youngsters these days to obsesed with their facebook, and selfies and designer drug ecstasy. they wuldnt know a hard days graft if it hit them in the face

its pc gone mad mate!!
77
bbc
Moron who clearly never went to school Removed
60
10/02/2021 02:42:50 6 6
bbc
Psycheledics are not hard drugs, they are medicine.

Hard drugs: cocaine, heroine, crack, methamphetamine.
78
10/02/2021 03:06:48 1 5
bbc
Heroine = a female hero... you must be ESN... educationally sub normal, but you can clearly spell methamphetamine... perhaps you’ve used it so often from reading it on the label...
85
10/02/2021 03:29:59 2 1
bbc
Come on davadan we are all up at this hour. We could call be on amphetamines.
61
10/02/2021 02:44:07 16 29
bbc
It’s a lot more addictive.
79
10/02/2021 03:15:58 12 0
bbc
We really don't have the data to say for sure which is more addictive as of yet. Addicts per capita probably skews more towards alcohol if anything, though obviously legality and availability impact this.
80
You
10/02/2021 03:16:44 11 8
bbc
Probably more than 1 in 10 of the cabinet have tried hard drugs. Ask Michael Gove. How has he got the brass neck to preside over young people being criminalised when he wasn't after he admitted using them? Jail him.
66
10/02/2021 02:46:04 96 22
bbc
The war on drugs has raged for decades with billions spent on policing, with this as the effect. Prohibition didn't work with alcohol, and it clearly isn't working with drugs.
Kids will always climb trees and break arms, so we build play parks with soft landings to reduce the harms instead of banning climbing.
Legalised, taxed, & licensed drugs with strength & purity controls is the answer.
81
You
10/02/2021 03:17:27 34 6
bbc
It keeps the market free for the shadowy people making billions.
I'd take heroin if I could get hold of it. Modern life is psychological torture. What a finely tuned hell we have created. Removed
100
10/02/2021 07:05:32 0 2
bbc
Life is tough yes, but no one should suffer alone like this - please seek the mental help you so obviously need from your post
74
Pez
10/02/2021 02:59:36 7 1
bbc
The types of drugs references at not "hard Drugs" although do fall in to the "Class A" category. Honestly, having live through the 80's and 90's the drugs from my understanding were softer, yet purer. These days, they've been cut with everything and something else - making per kilo returns a lot higher - but causing far more medical issues than there original forms. Just my 2 cents from the 80s
83
10/02/2021 03:28:07 5 0
bbc
Class A is the definition of had drugs. Not a good definition, but legally it is so.
84
10/02/2021 03:29:09 11 2
bbc
I'm curious as to what measures were in place to discount the false positives and false negatives. Have they included everyone who said they've taken drugs because they think it makes them sound cool? Have they excluded everyone who denied it because they think admitting it in a survey gets them in trouble? Or have they corrected for both?
78
10/02/2021 03:06:48 1 5
bbc
Heroine = a female hero... you must be ESN... educationally sub normal, but you can clearly spell methamphetamine... perhaps you’ve used it so often from reading it on the label...
85
10/02/2021 03:29:59 2 1
bbc
Come on davadan we are all up at this hour. We could call be on amphetamines.
61
10/02/2021 02:44:07 16 29
bbc
It’s a lot more addictive.
86
10/02/2021 03:30:24 12 11
bbc
Cannabis *isn't* addictive. It simply does not create a physical dependency.

Alcohol, on the other hand, is the second most addictive substance known behind only heroin.
149
OwO
10/02/2021 09:18:56 8 0
bbc
Psychological dependency on cannabis is a very real thing - addiction can be of the mind too.

I agree it's less dangerous, but pretending there's no danger doesn't help.
198
stu
10/02/2021 09:54:25 4 2
bbc
cannabis IS addictive. trust me. you're probably young and just spouting the old retterick you use to convince yourself. like I did

20 years later it took me a lot of effort to stop

you know what else.. if I didnt do it I would own a house by now. literally hundreds of thousands.

mugs game
293
10/02/2021 10:56:33 4 0
bbc
No. Tobacco is up there with skag. A lot of people struggle to give up cannabis because it is the tobacco they smoke with it that is the addiction.
74
Pez
10/02/2021 02:59:36 7 1
bbc
The types of drugs references at not "hard Drugs" although do fall in to the "Class A" category. Honestly, having live through the 80's and 90's the drugs from my understanding were softer, yet purer. These days, they've been cut with everything and something else - making per kilo returns a lot higher - but causing far more medical issues than there original forms. Just my 2 cents from the 80s
87
10/02/2021 03:31:13 1 0
bbc
Perhaps, though from what I've heard, certain modern-day avenues are actually probably more consistent, what with the accessibility of the deepweb, cryptocurrencies, and reagent tests etc.
47
10/02/2021 02:34:29 8 3
bbc
Only those people aren't going around stabbing folks for them are they?
88
10/02/2021 03:31:43 1 2
bbc
Given that a pack of fags is about £10, and benefits are about £80 a week, it might seem reasonable that a smoker would need a side hustle of some sort just to feed the habit. In non-crime families with smokers the high price of cigs in UK must contribute to child poverty.
49
10/02/2021 02:36:51 14 6
bbc
Many of the great bands of the 60's and 70's wouldn't be around if it wasn't for acid. I say let them be free!
89
10/02/2021 03:31:47 1 1
bbc
Many of the great bands of the 60s and 70s AREN'T around because of acid. Admittedly though, Syd Barrett using the stuff turned Pink Floyd into what they were because they had to get rid of him.
197
10/02/2021 09:54:14 0 0
bbc
Clapton, Richards, Jagger etc...still getting by.....lol....but yeah, greats like Kossoff gone. Some of the footage of Clapton playing sublimely while high as a kite are astounding.
43
10/02/2021 02:31:36 28 3
bbc
At least three in ten teens who admit to having tried hard drugs are lying because it boosts their ego - remember; "edginess" is a major factor in teen thinking.

How do I know?

Because almost 50 years ago, I & several classmates took part in an anonymous survey regarding drugs & three admitted to using them when they hadn't. One of them was me.

It's all about peer pressure, even anonymously...
90
10/02/2021 03:34:10 9 11
bbc
I'm guessing you're white? As young black men are often stereotyped as drug users, they might feel under pressure to do the opposite?
151
10/02/2021 09:19:31 13 0
bbc
Applying racial thinking in a totally unwarranted manner... nice.
281
10/02/2021 10:48:35 2 3
bbc
I've never even heard black people being stereotyped as drug users
I thought 'casual drug use' was a white, often 'upper/middle-class' problem in this country. People with money. People like Gove
309
10/02/2021 11:25:45 5 1
bbc
Ahhh.... The ol' 'race card'?

Trumps all things doesn't it?

Vaccine uptake (for many odd reasons), stopping kids taking knives into school (because stop & search infringes their 'rights'), and so on...

Still, easy to blame after the events (and find fault) than find a reason to be pro-active and deal with the problems head on?
91
10/02/2021 03:42:20 10 5
bbc
This world is changed and not for the better when I grew up my parents taught me that things like drugs ruin your life and that you walk away and live a better life today everything is acceptable no matter what it is mainly because kids and parents don’t talk anymore I know which childhood I prefer and had certainly not this one
121
10/02/2021 08:25:54 1 2
bbc
"kids and parents don't talk anymore" - that's a sweeping generalisation if every I saw one. And all generalisations are false.
206
10/02/2021 09:58:26 1 0
bbc
don't take drugs it will impede your ability to slave at ASDA for 50 years for minimum wage
92
10/02/2021 03:52:15 41 6
bbc
I have two points: The headline, no doubt for effect, is that 1 in 10 teenagers have taken hard drugs but that means 9 in 10 have not. Secondly, there seems to be a great emphasis on making BAME teenagers look 'less destructive' to themselves & society than white teenagers. If we are to build an equal society then we need to stop the differentiation, they are all just teenagers.
194
10/02/2021 09:51:34 13 7
bbc
1 in 10 teens gave admitted to taking drugs. From my experience at school at least I bet the real figure is far higher
343
Bob
10/02/2021 12:48:39 2 0
bbc
And also tucked away from the headline is that usage has fallen.
58
10/02/2021 02:42:08 27 12
bbc
Now that we’re admitting cannabis is safer than alcohol, can we finally talk legalisation?
93
10/02/2021 04:39:54 16 4
bbc
Ah the good old I drink a bottle of wine a day but if you smoke a spliff a few times a week you're an addict gang are out I see.
94
10/02/2021 04:47:06 7 2
bbc
BAME figures are skewed by demographics that have little freedom. Fortunately many other teens do. I always made it clear that drugs including legal ones will feel good else why would anyone use them. However all pose a risk to mental and physical health and can be addictive including alcohol.
95
10/02/2021 05:06:03 4 8
bbc
Too much debate and not enough action. The law must be harder. Higher penalties for any drug use and dealing.
Education is needed also.
96
10/02/2021 05:40:58 8 3
bbc
The threat of stiff penalties never achieves anything. The War On Drugs has failed. This should be treated as a public health issue, not an issue of criminality.
105
10/02/2021 07:36:54 0 2
bbc
Such a poor comment.
95
10/02/2021 05:06:03 4 8
bbc
Too much debate and not enough action. The law must be harder. Higher penalties for any drug use and dealing.
Education is needed also.
96
10/02/2021 05:40:58 8 3
bbc
The threat of stiff penalties never achieves anything. The War On Drugs has failed. This should be treated as a public health issue, not an issue of criminality.
112
10/02/2021 08:00:47 1 1
bbc
Really - Take a look at China mate. Works over there. Obedience is built in to 99.99% of the population.
97
10/02/2021 05:55:37 7 4
bbc
Tax them and then the UK will be back on its feet in no time.
187
10/02/2021 09:50:17 2 2
bbc
And have a workforce stoned, driving under influence, killing others, as if the NHS is not stressed out enough...
98
10/02/2021 06:57:52 23 3
bbc
You will never stop drug use.

Legalise, produce in regulated dosages the same as any over the counter pharmacy drugs, sell with the appropriate warnings as alcohol and aspirin and TAX it.

The billions would be better spent on health and schooling rather than guns and BMWs.
274
10/02/2021 10:42:42 4 1
bbc
You are right about not stopping it. Same with prostitution and gambling. If thre is a demand, and someone willing to profit from supply, then it will always be there. Prohibition demonstrates that. But it is managing problems so as to reduce harm that matters.
5
10/02/2021 01:32:36 27 19
bbc
Why not...The way things are now I'm not surprised. Get out of your head seems a good option given the situation so-called grown-ups have got the world into.

Now pass the LSD...
99
10/02/2021 06:54:28 4 7
bbc
Yep , with the current s%*tshow in this country many more will be turning to mind altering substances !
I'd take heroin if I could get hold of it. Modern life is psychological torture. What a finely tuned hell we have created. Removed
100
10/02/2021 07:05:32 0 2
bbc
Life is tough yes, but no one should suffer alone like this - please seek the mental help you so obviously need from your post