Heads warn against 'grinding out hours' in summer catch up
09/02/2021 | news | education | 1,656
School leaders say catch up plans should not be "gimmicks" or create long hours for tired children.
1
JGC
09/02/2021 13:12:57 22 30
bbc
By "gimmick" does he mean anything that involves teachers working overtime?
7
09/02/2021 13:16:18 31 12
bbc
You’re not a teacher then. Go and do some teaching for a few years then pop back and share how it was.
9
09/02/2021 13:17:20 8 19
bbc
It sure does...... nothing has changed over the dcades. Any genuine and constructive proposal to increase educational standards is opposed by almost all the teacher/headteacher unions. Many schools are failing to offer education to their pupils who are "home schooling"..... time for a crackdown; teachers not teaching, either in school or at home = lose pay.
25
09/02/2021 13:21:10 19 3
bbc
Do you mean working more overtime (unpaid) than they already did before the pandemic struck, or more overtime (unpaid) than they already do preparing 3 lessons (homeschooled with broadband, homeschooled worksheets for those without broadband) and for those in school as children of essential workers or disadvantaged) for the same topics?
56
09/02/2021 13:28:21 10 3
bbc
First of all overtime has to be paid and is voluntary, teachers aren't lazy they work a lot harder and are under more pressure than you think. People on here have no idea how education is run and all schools and trusts are run differently. Some schools dont even have the old type of assemblys anymore and everything is run around grades so PE is often once a week lifetime skills are non existant.
2
al
09/02/2021 13:13:18 40 25
bbc
Kids need to be back at school and allowed to do kids organised sport. The damage of this nightmare is going to be life long for kids
16
09/02/2021 13:19:13 10 12
bbc
Very true, I am grateful my kids are both pre-school age and still able to attend their current settings. Friends and family with older kids are saying how damaging this has been for them.
134
09/02/2021 13:41:25 5 8
bbc
Organised sport ? Utterly irrelevant in a pandemic.

Education is 1,000,000% more important.
168
09/02/2021 13:47:28 1 1
bbc
But don't you know it's selfish for parents/children to worry about their welfare when instead all 68 million people in the country should be worrying about MY welfare and ruining their lives if I say so.
We should all be more caring and altruistic, which of course means ignoring the concerns of anyone below the age of 50
388
09/02/2021 14:14:45 4 2
bbc
Yes please - Sport ASAP!! - Having watched a kid go from 3 or 4 sessions a week (Rugby/Football training and matches) to zero for 3 months is pretty soul destroying, especially when winter sports are more his area/passion. I know 'how lucky' they really are before all the 'live in shoe when I was young' brigade start carping on..it has in my view done more damage than academic home schooling
452
09/02/2021 14:23:08 8 1
bbc
It is many decades since I was at school, but one thing I hated more than anything else was "organised sport." I do wish people would get it into their heads that sport is NOT important, vital or anything else and for millions of us it's boring and irrelevant. I wish the sporty types would stop trying to force their hobby onto the rest of us.
09/02/2021 17:00:21 0 0
bbc
Some kids hate school sport. Some prefer academic subjects and will have been working hard during this lockdown. Why should they be forced back to school In the summer to take part in something they hate because some kids can’t be bothered with online learning.
3
09/02/2021 13:14:45 138 116
bbc
The teaching unions have been a disgrace during the pandemic.
10
09/02/2021 13:17:34 87 82
bbc
100 % correct. complete disgrace.
13
09/02/2021 13:18:40 36 23
bbc
They sure have. The Unions don't care about children, or society at large. They care about one thing: subs.
92
09/02/2021 13:34:34 39 22
bbc
Yes. How dare they try and ensure a safe environment for staff and pupils? It's a disgrace I tell you. A total disgrace.
108
09/02/2021 13:28:11 15 17
bbc
Aren't they always?
131
09/02/2021 13:40:47 46 15
bbc
I have to agree. It was absolutely shocking before Christmas that the unions pointed out that it would not be safe to open schools in the New Year and wanted the government to plan for what was obvious to anyone with more than a few brain cells to rub together.
I bet you wouldn't have the balls to do a teaching job, you miserable old troll. Removed
326
09/02/2021 14:08:21 11 15
bbc
true... and you need not add "during the pandemic"... it has been true for decades.
421
09/02/2021 14:19:06 34 11
bbc
Those who can, teach.

Those who can't, are miserable bitter trolls on HYS.
826
pj
09/02/2021 15:28:05 8 1
bbc
That's your opinion Shupi but not the point. How many kids are going to want to be schooled in their summer holiday and who is going to do the teaching?
832
09/02/2021 15:28:56 6 2
bbc
No they haven't.

Just like any shallow-thinking righty, you hate the fact that working people can organise themselves into a group and stand up for their, and in this case, our children's interests.
911
Ben
09/02/2021 15:43:18 4 3
bbc
Unions exist primarily to protect the interests of their members which in this case is teachers. Given that 600 adults working in schools have died during this pandemic (until end of December - ONS statistics) compared to 880 in H&SC, it's just a shame they weren't listened to in September and December. Had they been, some of the 70,000 who've died in the second wave would be alive.
09/02/2021 16:11:42 3 1
bbc
What is disgraceful? Please answer using direct quotations from union delgates/policies and not tabloid soundbites. They have consistently been advocates for students/staff safety in the light of Govt blunder after blunder, the last- minute January closures being the latest case in point.
Deb
10/02/2021 10:57:41 0 0
bbc
Unions are wrong for wanting schools to be safe? You clearly don’t work in a school. You are quite welcome to come and work in one of our stuffy, overcrowded classrooms in my school. And no you can’t social distance or wear PPE. Then tell me that unions were wrong when they said schools aren’t safe.
4
09/02/2021 13:15:17 14 23
bbc
The main school holidays are too long anyway.
819
09/02/2021 15:27:23 4 1
bbc
to long? how long were your holidays when going to school.
kids and parents would like some proper time of doing things together, kids learn more that way about real life.
5
09/02/2021 13:15:21 91 12
bbc
someone needs to tell the 2.5 million who have rearranged last years holidays to this year that they may not be going again this year.
139
09/02/2021 13:42:07 56 7
bbc
Surely, most thinking people already knew that there was no guarantee.

I and my cousin's family were planning a trip to the US last summer, which we obviously cancelled. But we realised it was pointless booking again for 2021 as the chances of being allowed to go were slim anyway.
405
Kaa
09/02/2021 14:16:43 5 1
bbc
As teachers are not paid for their holidays, and some will finish their contract in July, I doubt there will be a rush to do more
653
09/02/2021 14:54:41 7 1
bbc
The way this virus is mutating I wouldn't get too giddy about holidays this year.

It aint over yet!
890
09/02/2021 15:39:43 5 1
bbc
You mean the selfish 2.5 million. You only had to look at what happened when the shops opened at Christmas to realise that was not going to happen . You do realise that to most people in this world a holiday is a luxury .
6
09/02/2021 13:15:58 24 13
bbc
Attempting to change the working hours and management of schools will not work. Staff have commitments and routine planned maintenance needs to be undertaken.
34
Bob
09/02/2021 13:23:19 9 9
bbc
Routine planned maintenance? I'm quite sure that the building won't fall down just because pupils had to stay an hour longer.

Schools are typically open late for clubs and activities anyway.
1
JGC
09/02/2021 13:12:57 22 30
bbc
By "gimmick" does he mean anything that involves teachers working overtime?
7
09/02/2021 13:16:18 31 12
bbc
You’re not a teacher then. Go and do some teaching for a few years then pop back and share how it was.
32
09/02/2021 13:22:57 4 20
bbc
Go out and get a job in the real world and than complain about how hard teaching is
185
09/02/2021 13:40:32 1 1
bbc
With all respect, it feels like I've been teaching my kids alone. Wife is a care worker. Each day I receive a lesson plan & am expected to teach it. 6hrs in total. Feedback/help is minimal-school says they're too busy. Teachers at our school are compiling work, but not actually teaching it or offering support. I'm also doing this while trying to run a business from home myself. It's hard.
398
09/02/2021 14:16:01 1 6
bbc
The implication that we don't 'understand' teaching is laughable.

We have all been to school and witnessed first hand what a thin skinned, easily triggered bunch of layabouts so many of them are.

My wife's a teacher, I've been a teacher as well as I'm with JGC 100%.
8
09/02/2021 13:16:58 7 16
bbc
"Left behind white pupils"
Ethnic minority parents make their children work hard at school, they take an interest, they know their children need to work harder in life to achieve success.
26
09/02/2021 13:21:30 13 0
bbc
Are you suggesting white people don't....because that would be racist wouldn't it
37
09/02/2021 13:24:17 4 0
bbc
Some sweeping generalisations here.
60
09/02/2021 13:27:05 9 0
bbc
That's a sweeping statement and offensive in undertone. You cannot speak for all ethnic groups just as I cannot either. "Making" your child work hard is not always a recipe for success, it can create impossible standards for them to attain. There's a difference between demanding things and encouraging/ supporting them, especially during an already stressful time.
315
09/02/2021 14:07:33 1 0
bbc
Another myth.
1
JGC
09/02/2021 13:12:57 22 30
bbc
By "gimmick" does he mean anything that involves teachers working overtime?
9
09/02/2021 13:17:20 8 19
bbc
It sure does...... nothing has changed over the dcades. Any genuine and constructive proposal to increase educational standards is opposed by almost all the teacher/headteacher unions. Many schools are failing to offer education to their pupils who are "home schooling"..... time for a crackdown; teachers not teaching, either in school or at home = lose pay.
3
09/02/2021 13:14:45 138 116
bbc
The teaching unions have been a disgrace during the pandemic.
10
09/02/2021 13:17:34 87 82
bbc
100 % correct. complete disgrace.
09/02/2021 17:02:45 0 1
bbc
Teaching unions as you say are the problem as are Parents who know their children are not doing the work. My Grand Daughter is 8 years old & lives in the Phillippines she is like all the children there doing online learning no moaning they just get on with it its a lesson to Teachers here. The Teachers money there is a fraction for a year that UK teachers get for a year.
09/02/2021 23:16:32 0 0
bbc
Teachers also
11
09/02/2021 13:18:23 236 28
bbc
Most children have been learning and doing their work throughout this whole fiasco and those children will do well in life in spite of this.
The ones that have been absent and have done no work should have their parents reprimanded as they will be tomorrow’s drain on the economy.
27
09/02/2021 13:22:13 36 72
bbc
Yes Correction Centres for any one who does not achieve 5 GCSE
164
09/02/2021 13:47:02 12 8
bbc
If only it was that easy. Its not always the parents. You try getting 3 children different age groups working.
190
09/02/2021 13:51:01 19 24
bbc
Yes - we should be reprimanded for working full time jobs which need extra hours because of Covid and Brexit, hauled over the coals for not spending 6 hrs day sat with our 3 kids working through their worksheets because 20 minutes a day of live lessons is deemed sufficient. Teachers however, should be celebrated for providing those 20 minutes whilst their kids are at school with key worker status!
586
09/02/2021 14:41:19 3 1
bbc
But not all schools are doing proper on;ine work, som only offer an hour a day whilst others do a full day.
627
09/02/2021 14:49:28 2 2
bbc
You conveniently forget to mention the kids who have had 20 minutes a day and there are so so many, deny the facts all you like not all parents fault a pòr mix I would suggest
707
Lim
09/02/2021 15:05:50 1 3
bbc
That seems a bit harsh, what we need is compassion and understanding
09/02/2021 16:17:45 0 0
bbc
Fiasco? What would you have done differently and still managed to please a thousand different viewpoints and motives?
12
09/02/2021 13:18:27 9 10
bbc
Personally I felt the Summer holiday is too long and a relic of the summer harvest where children would help bring in the crop.

Having said that I have sympathy for teachers (my brother being one) who have already been saddled with more responsibilities without proper support and have no doubt these schemes would mostly be the same. Have to balance the profession and long term teaching as well.
118
09/02/2021 13:39:38 4 1
bbc
It's not a relic of summer harvest. The peak of UK harvest time is September, AFTER the school summer holidays (although silage may be gathered in August). Also, most countries have 6-10 weeks of summer holidays in the peak of summer, including countries where there'd be no harvest at all.

I agree about (some!) teachers not being given support.
3
09/02/2021 13:14:45 138 116
bbc
The teaching unions have been a disgrace during the pandemic.
13
09/02/2021 13:18:40 36 23
bbc
They sure have. The Unions don't care about children, or society at large. They care about one thing: subs.
14
09/02/2021 13:18:40 22 5
bbc
In short, we won’t be doing anything extra
15
09/02/2021 13:19:12 6 19
bbc
Schools open and stay open through summer, two week break in September for hols and then back to school until Christmas !
67
09/02/2021 13:30:18 14 4
bbc
Problem is who does the summer teaching? The teachers need a break too. My kids teachers are going above and beyond to provide content for online learning and looking after the kids mental health. They are also juggling the kids in schools and their own lives. When do they get to spend time with their families or unwind after juggling everything? We can't just double the number of teachers!
140
09/02/2021 13:42:12 0 0
bbc
So the 20/21 school year is already reduced by 2 weeks?
2
al
09/02/2021 13:13:18 40 25
bbc
Kids need to be back at school and allowed to do kids organised sport. The damage of this nightmare is going to be life long for kids
16
09/02/2021 13:19:13 10 12
bbc
Very true, I am grateful my kids are both pre-school age and still able to attend their current settings. Friends and family with older kids are saying how damaging this has been for them.
17
09/02/2021 13:15:42 146 37
bbc
Brace yourselves - the teacher bashers are coming
29
09/02/2021 13:22:34 159 48
bbc
Yep - the easy target as always. yet oddly throughout lockdown it's the teachers that are up there with NHS workers when it comes to putting in the work and the hours.
310
09/02/2021 14:06:56 8 14
bbc
Good job too; time that the myths about education be refuted once and for all.
10/02/2021 12:43:52 0 0
bbc
It's hilarious! It's like they're poised ready to pounce. I wonder who else they have a go at?
18
sw
09/02/2021 13:19:29 4 23
bbc
The school children need to catch up as much as possible. The schools need to be providing teaching on longer days, on Saturdays and 4 weeks in the summer. A 2 week holiday in the summer would be plenty. The virus is less prevalent when people are outside more. Teachers would be paid, Sunak could do something.
102
09/02/2021 13:36:41 10 4
bbc
You really think that Teachers would get paid more for this. You're dreaming.
Also, if your saying longer days AND a 6 day working week, when do you propose Teachers are marking work, preparing lessons etc
AND when are you proposing they have a life outside or work?
How many people do you really think are going to want to work 6 days a week 8-5
If people wont work these hours then no teachers
133
09/02/2021 13:41:22 6 2
bbc
And would you go to work on a Saturday for free?
Give up your contractural holiday for free?
or work into the evening for free?
150
09/02/2021 13:43:57 7 3
bbc
The holidays and weekends are the only time I get to spend time with my daughter as regularly work 60+ hours per week as a teacher. I refuse to put my relationship with my daughter on the back-burner for the children of others. Parents should have, and could have cared for their own during lockdown, but many elected not to...I will not be responsible for their laziness. End of story.
196
09/02/2021 13:43:05 6 2
bbc
Have you got children? So you are saying a 7 year old should have longer days at school, like 8am to 5pm and go in on a Saturday. Have Sunday as a rest day. Have a four week summer holiday. That child will have no life and probably have mental health problems a year later.

Do you do this as an adult? Well, if you do then you have to get a life
19
09/02/2021 13:19:35 206 64
bbc
Who to believe: teachers who have dedicated their lives to the profession, or politicians who pretend to cry on tv
31
09/02/2021 13:22:57 173 169
bbc
Not the teachers left wing unions, that's for sure
147
09/02/2021 13:43:27 5 33
bbc
politicians!
357
09/02/2021 14:11:37 8 35
bbc
The teaching union created the 2 tier education system. I despise any members of this; they take from the cohorts excluded from school to give to those pupils allowed in.
441
09/02/2021 14:18:53 6 26
bbc
Problem is that there are too many teachers in the job for the money and what they see as short working hours! Yes there are still teachers in the job because that's what they want to do! Unfortunately the unions seem to represent the former!
633
09/02/2021 14:51:58 2 8
bbc
Dedicated their life to the profession- sadly for most those days are a distant memory so many kids leave school today that can barely read and write according to published statistics
762
09/02/2021 15:15:03 9 1
bbc
The same politicians who caused more damage to children's development by closing down Sure Start centres than the virus could possibly manage.
895
09/02/2021 15:40:38 2 7
bbc
What about all the other teachers who aren't dedicated and are in it for the money? (Don't laugh. They're essentially unemployable, certainly for more than minimum wage, in any other field. For the rubbish ones it pays much, much better than any other job they could get.)
20
Bob
09/02/2021 13:19:49 8 9
bbc
If Geoff Barton wants to rule out making children sit through more hours or having shorter holidays, just how does he propose catch up takes place?

Make the teacher speak twice as fast? It simply cannot be done without one of those two.
23
09/02/2021 13:20:55 15 3
bbc
Well if kids have been doing home schooling how much catching up needs to be done? Not a lot I would hope.
46
09/02/2021 13:27:10 6 2
bbc
Because of course the children will be able to retain more while tired. They won't already be suffering the mental effects of disruption and the pandemic, so making them stay longer without breaks will mean they catch up perfectly.
59
09/02/2021 13:26:58 0 1
bbc
OK
65
09/02/2021 13:30:02 6 1
bbc
A simple solution could be for students to simply resit a year and for schools to permanently have their starting year pushed back
21
09/02/2021 13:20:04 13 28
bbc
More worried about their summer hols more like it!

Remember that teachers claim to work all through the holidays anyway so they shouldn't mind.

I always wondered why they didn't choose to strike during the holidays either (seeing as they claim to be so busy)!
38
09/02/2021 13:24:27 18 6
bbc
Not all teachers work all through the holidays - nor do they claim to! Preparing for a new school year, or catching up on record keeping is work that teachers do during school breaks (and at night) at times when they're not paid! They don't get paid holidays, unlike some workers.
44
09/02/2021 13:26:54 8 4
bbc
And why shouldn't teachers complain about loosing their Summer Holiday? They have been working through all of the lock downs to date. Why shouldn't they have the time off in their contracts?
103
09/02/2021 13:37:02 6 3
bbc
We are not paid for the summer holidays, any work undertaken then is unpaid...try getting your facts straight before spouting your teacher hating rubbish.
123
NNL
09/02/2021 13:39:59 7 2
bbc
What complete and utter garbage from someone who has probably never seen the inside of a school. My wife is a teacher, pre-pandemic at school for 07:15 each morning and home for around 18:15, she then sits at the dinner table and marks, prepares lessons etc. until 22:00. On a weekend she'll do at least 6 hrs a day. Presently, she works the same hours at home as well as the weekend
386
09/02/2021 14:14:26 4 1
bbc
Really? Wow. So teachers don’t deserve holidays. Got it. Thanks for sharing.
22
09/02/2021 13:20:42 6 12
bbc
Be pragmatic.
Covid is a Seasonal Illness.
When better to have children mixing than summertime.
Change School Holidays for good.
As Hancock said this disease is here for many years in many variants.
20
Bob
09/02/2021 13:19:49 8 9
bbc
If Geoff Barton wants to rule out making children sit through more hours or having shorter holidays, just how does he propose catch up takes place?

Make the teacher speak twice as fast? It simply cannot be done without one of those two.
23
09/02/2021 13:20:55 15 3
bbc
Well if kids have been doing home schooling how much catching up needs to be done? Not a lot I would hope.
24
09/02/2021 13:20:55 496 112
bbc
My son (12) has worked hard throughout lockdown, he's coped with all sorts of issues and kept smiling. His teachers have been brilliant.

But he's tired & stressed and will NOT be doing extra hours.

Children need a calm return to normality.
35
09/02/2021 13:24:10 181 511
bbc
His and your loss if he won't do extra hours
40
Bob
09/02/2021 13:24:42 43 33
bbc
And what about the 1 in 10 who had ZERO, yes ZERO interaction with their teaching during wave 1?
42
09/02/2021 13:24:45 115 33
bbc
I couldn't agree more. The kids and the teachers are already putting in the hours - they really don't need more.
216
09/02/2021 13:55:03 23 56
bbc
Stressed? Come back to school pre smartphone, go though tatty textbook lessons being forced to learn really old stuff and write shedloads on it. Then no smartphones or WhatsApp to look forward to or escape weeknights or weekends.
295
09/02/2021 14:00:00 38 14
bbc
I totally agree with you. Well said!
491
09/02/2021 14:28:50 11 15
bbc
Has he worked the usual 6 hours every weekday including home work that is worked in a normal year if so then he will need a break if not then the school holidays need to be shorter during covid
498
09/02/2021 14:29:36 24 7
bbc
Same for my son of 7 years. All credit to the children themselves.
507
09/02/2021 14:31:05 15 36
bbc
He is 12 years old and is tired and stressed? Get real!!!!!
581
09/02/2021 14:40:31 7 21
bbc
Then no doubt you'll be whining again when he can't get a job.
587
09/02/2021 14:40:34 19 5
bbc
Kathy, I think your son's aquired his dedication directly from your nuturing; his teachers will be proud of you both.
734
VoR
09/02/2021 15:11:39 7 1
bbc
Going to school doesn't have to be stressful. Especially if your friends are there and you haven't seen them (physically) in ages.

If anything, a return to school could be a return to structured normality for them.
760
09/02/2021 15:14:52 19 1
bbc
I think that is absolutely right. I think there are a lot of people who imagine what it’s like to have children and impose that poor vision on solutions. The kids who are trying very hard in most cases are knackered and don’t need a bunch of self serving knuckle heads deciding to act as irresponsible proxy parents for as long as it takes to fire off a short comment.
775
Gaz
09/02/2021 15:18:41 5 2
bbc
Kathy, my son is 9 and his current school (he changed in September) have been excellent providing online tuition and he has coped very well and received good feedback each day. I would prefer he did not attend additional classes in the summer, for the reasons you stated, but I would not be totally against it. Agree they need a break but maybe not the full 6 weeks, just a thought
883
HH
09/02/2021 15:38:43 5 9
bbc
Your child is possibly 4 years away from real life in the world of work where he will get the shock of his life if you don't prepare him for it now. Extra hours for his own benefit should be welcomed not refused.
952
09/02/2021 15:53:14 3 7
bbc
Great attitude for the world of work...
1
JGC
09/02/2021 13:12:57 22 30
bbc
By "gimmick" does he mean anything that involves teachers working overtime?
25
09/02/2021 13:21:10 19 3
bbc
Do you mean working more overtime (unpaid) than they already did before the pandemic struck, or more overtime (unpaid) than they already do preparing 3 lessons (homeschooled with broadband, homeschooled worksheets for those without broadband) and for those in school as children of essential workers or disadvantaged) for the same topics?
8
09/02/2021 13:16:58 7 16
bbc
"Left behind white pupils"
Ethnic minority parents make their children work hard at school, they take an interest, they know their children need to work harder in life to achieve success.
26
09/02/2021 13:21:30 13 0
bbc
Are you suggesting white people don't....because that would be racist wouldn't it
11
09/02/2021 13:18:23 236 28
bbc
Most children have been learning and doing their work throughout this whole fiasco and those children will do well in life in spite of this.
The ones that have been absent and have done no work should have their parents reprimanded as they will be tomorrow’s drain on the economy.
27
09/02/2021 13:22:13 36 72
bbc
Yes Correction Centres for any one who does not achieve 5 GCSE
130
09/02/2021 13:40:33 6 2
bbc
Spoof post ?
448
Ken
09/02/2021 14:20:36 3 3
bbc
I think the Correction Centres would be full of Union Leaders in that case.
28
09/02/2021 13:22:30 151 35
bbc
Sensible comment from headteacher asking for a proper policy over populist slogans and winged strategy.

So no doubt the shills are out in force moaning about lazy teachers?
55
09/02/2021 13:28:20 54 123
bbc
Ah so people you don't agree with are shills, whether they have evidence or not? Typical lefty comment!
445
09/02/2021 14:22:22 6 13
bbc
Most head teachers are failed businessmen and wannabe politicians.
They often cause the animosity aimed at teachers and offer little support to their staff as they're busy in meetings. Google how various TKAT heads have been caught out fiddling the books whilst their staff turnover is massive.
568
Bob
09/02/2021 14:39:15 4 3
bbc
A sensible comment that makes no sense, you mean.

He agrees that catch up needs to happen but all he has to offer is a list of things that can't happen. You can't do longer hours and you can't recall pupils during holiday periods.

What does he propose then?
Removed
17
09/02/2021 13:15:42 146 37
bbc
Brace yourselves - the teacher bashers are coming
29
09/02/2021 13:22:34 159 48
bbc
Yep - the easy target as always. yet oddly throughout lockdown it's the teachers that are up there with NHS workers when it comes to putting in the work and the hours.
226
09/02/2021 13:56:23 17 27
bbc
Really? All I heard and have seen with my own eyes including a relative who is a teacher they most certainly are not anywhere near in the same bracket as the NHS workers!! Not even close!! All I’ve seen and heard is nothing but moaning, and moaning.
255
09/02/2021 14:00:23 13 8
bbc
And other key workers they just dont keep banging on about it!
272
09/02/2021 14:01:58 15 39
bbc
Ha Ha. I love it. Putting teachers in the same category as NHS workers when it comes to hard work and hours. Priceless. I just thank god the nursing unions haven't carried on the same way as the teaching unions throughout all of this. Time to roll your sleeves up teachers and do what it takes to get the kids back on track. Parents have been doing the teaching for the past 12 months. Your turn.
518
09/02/2021 14:31:55 9 13
bbc
Delusional for I know a number who have done little, to say they are up there with NHS is in my opinion offensive
897
09/02/2021 15:40:54 16 2
bbc
I have a number of front line workers where I live in London , both teachers and NHS staff, and they are all working their socks off
967
09/02/2021 15:57:30 4 8
bbc
With the greatest will in the world, you cannot possibly compare Teachers to NHS workers. Yes they’ve worked hard and adapted to change to try and keep children educated. But there really is absolutely no comparison to Frontline NHS workers. Please, get a grip !
09/02/2021 17:39:03 0 4
bbc
Rubbish. Teachers don’t work the hours that NHS frontline staff do. I know - with 2 close relatives on the NHS frontline and another a primary school teacher.
09/02/2021 17:43:48 0 0
bbc
really????
30
09/02/2021 13:22:46 80 33
bbc
Simply drop something from the curriculum and go over the stuff we are doing now. My child is seven; does he really need to be learning French? Does he really need to be learning how to express his feelings and to be nice to people (!)? Stopping those for two months is not going to damage his career prospects.
58
09/02/2021 13:28:33 76 3
bbc
Best time to learn French, or any foreign language. Before the language connections in the brain become "hard wired".

Wish I'd been able to start that young.
107
09/02/2021 13:27:35 2 11
bbc
It would, if he wanted to be a French speaking social worker, is that a career choice that has been offered ?
137
09/02/2021 13:42:04 1 0
bbc
your lucky my wifes school is mathes english and science all day every day with a bit of history and geography. PE once a week
141
09/02/2021 13:42:25 35 1
bbc
"Does he really need to be learning how to express his feelings and to be nice to people"

You mean you haven't taught your child basic social interaction skills ?????
172
09/02/2021 13:35:19 2 0
bbc
Oui.
187
09/02/2021 13:50:44 19 2
bbc
Bit sad that you don't think your child needs to be able to learn how to express his feelings. As someone who works in mental health, I think most people need to learn how to do this. Evidence suggests the younger we start, the better.

And as someone else has pointed out, learning a language at a young age is a lot easier.
189
09/02/2021 13:50:58 13 2
bbc
As a bilingual parent of bilingual kids I would say, yes, because it opens a whole world up to them. The younger you learn another language, the easier it is, and you never know how they might want to use it. They could work anywhere in the world! As for emotional expression and social etiquette, we're never too young to learn these and they integrate very well with all subjects.
285
09/02/2021 14:04:11 25 9
bbc
Easily drop R.E. If they are behind. Why do they need to learn about magical sky wizards in the 21st Century. Religion has no place in schools
345
09/02/2021 14:10:17 9 1
bbc
Gets worse at secondary - Loose a PE lesson a week to 'Dance' - which as you can imagine has 'fart in space suit' popularity with near 100% of the kids, running 'textiles' a close second. Luckily my year 9 son gets to finally make his choices this year so can focus on valuable/required subjects for the modern world!!
356
JA
09/02/2021 14:11:23 11 1
bbc
For many (primary) children it is the 'soft' subjects like art, or PE, or History, that make school enjoyable. If the breadth of the curriculum were stripped away leaving just wall-to-wall English, phonics and Maths their love of learning would be damaged.
473
09/02/2021 14:26:23 11 1
bbc
French yes, it improves grammar.
RE and science at primary, no.
Primary should be the 3 Rs, if you can read, write and do arithmetic you can access chemistry, physics, history, biology, geography etc. with ease at secondary school.
Worst thing as a science teacher was spending 3 years undoing p*ss poor primary science - 'heat rises' and 'light things float' bang goes radiation and displacement!
09/02/2021 16:55:07 2 0
bbc
They start teaching English from the age of 6 in Germany. That’s why most Germans can speak English fluently. Speaking a foreign language is a valuable skill. The younger they start the better. Surely you should be teaching your son to be nice to people, not school.
09/02/2021 17:50:32 2 0
bbc
Someone needs to teach them how to be nice because parents certainly aren't. School isn't just about career prospects. Schools now do the job parents should be doing too.
09/02/2021 20:29:10 1 1
bbc
Does he really need to be learning how to express his feelings and to be nice to people (!)?

Well let’s hope he learns it at school because he won’t be learning it at home.

You are just a being. There is no human in you at all.

A school’s curriculum is actually EVERYTHING that happens the minute they enter the building.

Your are an animal with no humanity whatsoever.
19
09/02/2021 13:19:35 206 64
bbc
Who to believe: teachers who have dedicated their lives to the profession, or politicians who pretend to cry on tv
31
09/02/2021 13:22:57 173 169
bbc
Not the teachers left wing unions, that's for sure
75
09/02/2021 13:31:35 42 7
bbc
Flook no one asked about Unions. We asked teachers or politicians. Who should we trust to have the best knowledge of what is and isn't a good idea for children?

Should we trust the people who have spent their lives training and working with kids
Or the people who have spent their lives in different sectors entirely?
299
09/02/2021 14:06:20 39 5
bbc
I think we all know you. You were the kid who had to be sat at the front of the class in front of teacher because you wouldn't behave. You were the kid who wanted to shout out naughty words. You were the kid who thought anything you didn't understand was stupid. You are the kid who is now working for the people you used to antagonise. You are the one would wouldn't survive 2 mins as a teacher.
"Not the teachers left wing unions, that's for sure"

Hmmm. Missing an apostrophe, a hyphen and an exclamation mark. It's hard to sound authoritative when the participation in learning was clearly so absent.
Removed
416
09/02/2021 14:18:53 11 3
bbc
Despite your anti-everything agenda, once again, you're completely wrong.

"Mr Barton, leader of the ASCL head teachers' union, also cast doubt on whether penalty fines would really be imposed on parents for not sending their children to classes in the summer holidays, should they be made compulsory."

Do you think fining the parents will help their kids be able to study, and learn, effectively?
435
09/02/2021 14:20:44 26 3
bbc
This is the Head Teachers union - hardly left-wing. But don't let the truth cloud your judgement.
554
RPH
09/02/2021 14:37:13 9 1
bbc
Although busy filling in my Communist Pary application form, I've still got time to point out that should be " teachers' ". My class of 7-year olds would have known that.
09/02/2021 16:16:00 7 1
bbc
Whoever told you Teacher's Unions were left wing is ill informed. Teacher's Unions work for the wellbeing of pupils and teachers and not affiliated political parties. They are run by people who have been part of the profession know what it is like to work with young people, unlike most politicians and many of the DfE and Ofsted who make the rules about what goes on in school.
Idiot Removed
09/02/2021 16:56:09 1 1
bbc
agree
09/02/2021 17:23:26 1 1
bbc
Offs. The left wing who fight for free education and equality of your kids?
7
09/02/2021 13:16:18 31 12
bbc
You’re not a teacher then. Go and do some teaching for a few years then pop back and share how it was.
32
09/02/2021 13:22:57 4 20
bbc
Go out and get a job in the real world and than complain about how hard teaching is
95
09/02/2021 13:35:17 12 0
bbc
Done. Don’t assume every teacher has been in teaching all their life. Oh, and I don’t believe I was complaining. The point of the article is gimmicks are essentially a waste of time and money. Putting proper plans that are properly funded and based on real evidence in place is far more effective.
179
09/02/2021 13:48:54 8 1
bbc
I have. Teaching is still the hardest job I have ever done.
574
09/02/2021 14:39:51 5 1
bbc
Go out and get a job in the teaching and then complain about how the real world is.

Having worked in both sectors, teaching will whip anyone who thinks "the real world" is harder into shape.
881
09/02/2021 15:38:31 2 1
bbc
I worked in industry and taught in a secondary school. Teaching is not an easy option. If you think is, try it!
33
09/02/2021 13:23:04 16 14
bbc
Whilst the schools have been closed every single teacher should have been going into schools as normal, holding as many online classes as they can, sharing best practice with each other on home to do this and plenty of teacher training. I know some parents that have had some good online classes and support from their schools and some that have had zero, absolutely nothing.
51
09/02/2021 13:27:24 34 2
bbc
I don't know a school that hasn't been open - and some with 50% of the kids attending. And the teachers are ALSO providing online lessons. The schools around me could not have done more.
61
09/02/2021 13:29:21 5 0
bbc
Many of us have been.
80
09/02/2021 13:32:51 3 5
bbc
Schools in my area have stopped online learning due to the weather. How on earth does the weather stop a teacher from teaching online...….go figure!
81
09/02/2021 13:33:26 9 2
bbc
What time did you start work this morning? What time will you finish tonight?
I'd wager that the hours you work are far shorter than any teacher.
110
09/02/2021 13:38:13 2 3
bbc
what people forget is that some teachers have had to isolate some schools were already having financial issues so no spare cash for extra facilities or extra paperwork - a lot of temp teachers were teaching & probably weren't working. academies finance & organisation can differ radically & are independent. We need to know which schools failed, why, & give extra support in classroom, more finance!
128
09/02/2021 13:40:14 2 1
bbc
the large majority are in school
161
09/02/2021 13:34:09 2 0
bbc
They did/do...
169
09/02/2021 13:47:33 2 0
bbc
Many teachers that I know and know of have been working very hard, and conducting online classes with true diligence. It's not always been possible, as here in a very rural and remote community, suitable internet access has only been possible for about 60% of all pupils - either because no internet at all, but also some families have simply not been able to afford the necessary hardware.
330
09/02/2021 14:09:02 2 1
bbc
blueskies, school's have NEVER been closed. Teachers have been working harder than ever to ensure that they can teach people remotely.
Of cause there will be a disparity in online teaching quality, every single teacher is just now learning how to do this, added to that not all school will have had the IT in place to allow it at 1st.
427
09/02/2021 14:19:52 2 0
bbc
Teaching online is exactly what many teachers have been doing! 5 hours a day Monday to Friday plus tutor time. Plus around 3 hours prep and marking a day. I’m fed up of looking at a computer screen! I want to go back to the classroom but it also needs to be safe. No one wants to be spreading COVID.
6
09/02/2021 13:15:58 24 13
bbc
Attempting to change the working hours and management of schools will not work. Staff have commitments and routine planned maintenance needs to be undertaken.
34
Bob
09/02/2021 13:23:19 9 9
bbc
Routine planned maintenance? I'm quite sure that the building won't fall down just because pupils had to stay an hour longer.

Schools are typically open late for clubs and activities anyway.
191
09/02/2021 13:51:06 6 3
bbc
Some schools are in absolutely dire need of repairs so I think you might be wrong on that.

Also, if clubs and activities are happening doesn't that mean they will need to stop so children will be missing out on even more?
510
09/02/2021 14:31:11 6 2
bbc
When schools close for the summer and everyone is off on their six weeks paid holidays (like hell they are!) support staff and others are busy repairing, repainting and adapting the place. It's the only time the buildings are available for maintenance and repairs.
24
09/02/2021 13:20:55 496 112
bbc
My son (12) has worked hard throughout lockdown, he's coped with all sorts of issues and kept smiling. His teachers have been brilliant.

But he's tired & stressed and will NOT be doing extra hours.

Children need a calm return to normality.
35
09/02/2021 13:24:10 181 511
bbc
His and your loss if he won't do extra hours
238
09/02/2021 13:58:00 20 24
bbc
Beatings shall continue until moral improves!
That's the spirit, quantity over quality, did you get one of Blair's Micky Mouse degrees, business, psychology, maybe media studies?
Don't forget that most of the work on DNA and satellites was done in various pubs around London.
358
09/02/2021 14:12:03 13 32
bbc
Won't isn't a word. Go back to school.
378
09/02/2021 14:13:55 41 7
bbc
Did you have extra hours? Because if you did, they clearly didn't help.
379
09/02/2021 14:14:00 13 5
bbc
What a kind and thoughtful statement. Well done you.
428
09/02/2021 14:20:15 34 10
bbc
"But he's tired & stressed and will NOT be doing extra hours."

Kathy probably knows her kids and their needs & abilities better than your spiteful nonsense. Do you work a 14 hour day?
Removed
530
RPH
09/02/2021 14:34:26 24 2
bbc
Perhaps Kathy does not consider quality time with her child to be 'her loss'. Maybe she is a good enough parent that time spent with her child is good for him/her?
654
09/02/2021 14:54:42 15 2
bbc
I've no doubt that those on this thread you are advocating extending the school year have not had to look after, home educate children or grand children over the last 10 months.
693
09/02/2021 15:03:01 14 2
bbc
"His and your loss if he won't do extra hours" - - - - why? IYou cannot stuff knowledge into pupils at a fast rate. Pupils NEED down time to PROCESS the knowledge they have.

Read a book on knowledge acquisition and understand how children learn. They DON'T learn faster but working longer hours.
Cretin Removed
739
09/02/2021 15:12:04 15 1
bbc
My 9 year old has worked really hard, so have his teachers. In maths he's way ahead of where they normally would be, in science they are ahead but haven't done the same practicals, in french they are a bit behind.
My 12 year old is roughly on target.
My 13 year old has been a train wreak.

Different children respond differently
779
09/02/2021 15:19:24 14 2
bbc
And what do you know? No doubt you're one of those who can take their annual leave at any time during the year. Those who work with children cannot - most of us went without any kind of normality last year. We're not prepared to accept that again this year. Your attitude is selfish, patronising and arrogant
866
Rab
09/02/2021 15:35:59 1 5
bbc
I agree, the whole worlds had to do things a little different for the past year, going forward. Don't complain and moan when he doesn't make the grade ??
36
09/02/2021 13:24:16 28 25
bbc
The headline should be 'education unions will go against everything suggested by the government'...…………...
48
09/02/2021 13:27:14 41 22
bbc
No it should be "teachers should not listen to an incompetent government desperately trying any gimmick in the book to look half-competent in the face of the total disaster they have made of COVID handling".
53
09/02/2021 13:27:53 9 4
bbc
Who do you think knows more about children's education and how best to deliver it? Teachers or politicians/government officials?
74
09/02/2021 13:31:31 2 2
bbc
If, as they are currently suggesting, solutions that are bereft of pragmatism.... yes
8
09/02/2021 13:16:58 7 16
bbc
"Left behind white pupils"
Ethnic minority parents make their children work hard at school, they take an interest, they know their children need to work harder in life to achieve success.
37
09/02/2021 13:24:17 4 0
bbc
Some sweeping generalisations here.
21
09/02/2021 13:20:04 13 28
bbc
More worried about their summer hols more like it!

Remember that teachers claim to work all through the holidays anyway so they shouldn't mind.

I always wondered why they didn't choose to strike during the holidays either (seeing as they claim to be so busy)!
38
09/02/2021 13:24:27 18 6
bbc
Not all teachers work all through the holidays - nor do they claim to! Preparing for a new school year, or catching up on record keeping is work that teachers do during school breaks (and at night) at times when they're not paid! They don't get paid holidays, unlike some workers.
79
09/02/2021 13:32:46 4 2
bbc
Teachers are paid for the full 52 weeks of the year. Only teaching assistants are paid pro rata, and therefore not for the holidays, so stop preaching. "Some workers"? That'll be me then, who hasn't had a sick day, "working from home (answering emails in pyjamas)" day or a furlough day at all, since before this even started. I EARN my paid holiday thanks, while I help grease the economic wheels.
166
09/02/2021 13:47:12 2 1
bbc
Agree they get the same paid amount of holidays as everyone else its just there pay is calculeted over 12 months and they dont get paid for all the extra work they do at weekends planning for the week ahead.
39
09/02/2021 13:24:41 10 15
bbc
It's quite simple scrap all the totally unnecessary holidays. It's the primary reason parents can't get full time work. And what better way to get children out of poverty than to have their parent (s) working full time.
84
09/02/2021 13:33:43 13 5
bbc
And teachers can work every weekday for the rest of their lives. What a great way to attract talent to an underpaid and undervalued profession already facing shortages.
109
09/02/2021 13:37:57 6 1
bbc
From this comment, you clearly perceive education as a handy babysitting service for working parents.

Additionally, you clearly have never worked in a school setting to come out with the ‘unnecessary holidays’ comment, anyone that has would be able to relate to you how ‘grey” both children and staff get with exhaustion after a term. Those holidays are essential. These are children not adults.
111
09/02/2021 13:38:43 3 0
bbc
yeah and then parents will be moaning they cant get time off work to take their kids on holiday as their employer wont allow more than a certain number to take leave. So they take their kids out of school in term time and disrupts their education and when the school staff have to be given extra pay plus extra leave days because it does bet your the first to complain about extra taxes.
24
09/02/2021 13:20:55 496 112
bbc
My son (12) has worked hard throughout lockdown, he's coped with all sorts of issues and kept smiling. His teachers have been brilliant.

But he's tired & stressed and will NOT be doing extra hours.

Children need a calm return to normality.
40
Bob
09/02/2021 13:24:42 43 33
bbc
And what about the 1 in 10 who had ZERO, yes ZERO interaction with their teaching during wave 1?
09/02/2021 16:08:05 1 1
bbc
It's more than that. More like 30%. My wife has been setting lessons for remote learning throughout (as well as teaching those who are in school) and it's a red letter day if more than 70% of pupils respond to the work she's set them to do remotely.

Oh. Wait. You were having a pop at the teachers, not the parents and pupils. I'm not sure how many of them haven't interacted. Doubt it's 10% though.
41
09/02/2021 13:24:43 20 16
bbc
A far simpler solution would be for each child to repeat the school year they have missed. Longer school days would be pointless for younger children, they have a much shorter concentration span.
57
09/02/2021 13:28:28 20 3
bbc
How exactly is that possible when each year there is a new set of kids coming in? double class sizes in reception?
97
09/02/2021 13:35:29 3 0
bbc
Schools are not large enough to accomodate an extra year group and there aren't 10% spare teachers to teach them!
176
09/02/2021 13:48:40 4 0
bbc
Simpler for who?

You increase a secondary school population by 20%: where are you going to put them? Who is going to teach them?

You increase 6th form populations by 50%. Same question.

Primary schools don't have the luxury of empty classrooms like some secondary schools.
270
09/02/2021 13:53:47 3 1
bbc
How about those children that have done all the work and kept up? There are many if not far more of these?

Why should they be punished by repeating a year they have already completed? An excellent way to demotivate and turn them against education.

Make it optional for parents and teachers and pupils to decide what’s best for each individual not try and force blanket solutions.
24
09/02/2021 13:20:55 496 112
bbc
My son (12) has worked hard throughout lockdown, he's coped with all sorts of issues and kept smiling. His teachers have been brilliant.

But he's tired & stressed and will NOT be doing extra hours.

Children need a calm return to normality.
42
09/02/2021 13:24:45 115 33
bbc
I couldn't agree more. The kids and the teachers are already putting in the hours - they really don't need more.
200
09/02/2021 13:52:39 109 8
bbc
Actually there are a lot of kids who are not doing the hours because their parents dont care about their education and its the same group that believe schools should teach kids basic hygiene.
556
09/02/2021 14:37:46 5 13
bbc
School Holidays are 13 weeks a year but teachers only get 6 weeks holiday so shorter school holidays during covid is a perfectly reasonable option
749
09/02/2021 15:13:34 1 1
bbc
Some are, some aren’t
43
09/02/2021 13:26:49 17 14
bbc
What do they suggest then? I am not hearing any suggestion coming out of the teaching profession.

There is an issue with the public sector in that it has thousands of managers paid more than the Prime Minister yet it still expects to be spoon fed about how to run their service. It's high time that those paid a lot of money to run these services start being accountable for them.
87
09/02/2021 13:33:59 11 2
bbc
Well said. Take the many "Chief Executives" of multi-academy trusts drawing huge salaries for work which local authorities performed more efficiently and at lower cost.
94
09/02/2021 13:35:10 0 4
bbc
Think you'll find Boris is paid alot more than most people in this country most politicians are their own businesses and still earn £££outside of their actual job
404
09/02/2021 14:16:34 0 1
bbc
The government fork out for volunteer teachers and tutors to run extra classes outside of school hours and/or during the holidays. Teachers should not be asked to give up their free time and work overtime for free
21
09/02/2021 13:20:04 13 28
bbc
More worried about their summer hols more like it!

Remember that teachers claim to work all through the holidays anyway so they shouldn't mind.

I always wondered why they didn't choose to strike during the holidays either (seeing as they claim to be so busy)!
44
09/02/2021 13:26:54 8 4
bbc
And why shouldn't teachers complain about loosing their Summer Holiday? They have been working through all of the lock downs to date. Why shouldn't they have the time off in their contracts?
86
09/02/2021 13:33:51 3 4
bbc
Working through all of the lockdowns? Are you sure about that?? Not any that I know. Evidence please.
45
09/02/2021 13:27:03 5 8
bbc
Let Mr Blobby Bojo sort it all out. His privileged education should allow him to produce a world beating system.
20
Bob
09/02/2021 13:19:49 8 9
bbc
If Geoff Barton wants to rule out making children sit through more hours or having shorter holidays, just how does he propose catch up takes place?

Make the teacher speak twice as fast? It simply cannot be done without one of those two.
46
09/02/2021 13:27:10 6 2
bbc
Because of course the children will be able to retain more while tired. They won't already be suffering the mental effects of disruption and the pandemic, so making them stay longer without breaks will mean they catch up perfectly.
624
Bob
09/02/2021 14:49:15 2 0
bbc
Yes - we understand his thought process - but where is his solution? You cannot catch up if you don't put extra work in. It isn't physically possible to do.
47
09/02/2021 13:27:12 4 7
bbc
Course they do. Means more work for them.
66
09/02/2021 13:30:12 15 5
bbc
Yes it would and for no good reason. The teachers could not have worked harder over the last 12 months and they don't need this rubbish from the likes of the lazy, incompetent Johnson.
165
09/02/2021 13:47:09 2 0
bbc
Of cause they don't want to do more work for the same money. Who in their right mind would want to have a permanent increase to their hours and an increase in days, while having their holiday time reduced.
Who WOULDN'T complain about that?
36
09/02/2021 13:24:16 28 25
bbc
The headline should be 'education unions will go against everything suggested by the government'...…………...
48
09/02/2021 13:27:14 41 22
bbc
No it should be "teachers should not listen to an incompetent government desperately trying any gimmick in the book to look half-competent in the face of the total disaster they have made of COVID handling".
73
09/02/2021 13:31:27 6 11
bbc
Teachers don't listen to anyone except unions who are as incompetent as the govt!
49
09/02/2021 13:27:14 331 36
bbc
When I read these comments, I really do wonder why anyone would want to get into teaching.
69
09/02/2021 13:30:58 371 33
bbc
Well they don’t. Applications are plummeting. Those who decide to train have a huge drop out rate. Those who make it through and teach, are leaving early. Only in Britain is there this contempt for teachers. Education is really important so why don’t we value teachers?
77
09/02/2021 13:32:27 48 200
bbc
Good pay, long holidays, short working days, unins that will, on their behalf, oppose any changes to raise standards, generous sick pay, (including payments when the teacher is not ill) etc.
100
09/02/2021 13:36:07 31 206
bbc
Judging by the fact that teachers have done little in the last 12 months and it seems doing little in the future do not think they will have a shortage, their are always members of society happy to do little and get paid for it.
162
09/02/2021 13:34:31 4 47
bbc
If you can't do it teach it.
280
09/02/2021 14:02:51 2 38
bbc
Because they are paid well and have long holidays
319
09/02/2021 14:07:42 5 21
bbc
Simple in last 10 years only a handful have been sacked, a retired lifelong teacher said once the NUT merged with other teaching unions standards and moral fell through the floor and the extreem left took over all but public schools no wonder Dianne Abbott and many others followed suit.

There are good teachers out there but too many happy with bare minimum and I know a few of them also.
582
09/02/2021 14:40:47 8 2
bbc
A vast majority of teachers haven't the time to read and reply to odious comments for the uneducated
585
09/02/2021 14:41:16 2 16
bbc
Basically it's the old mantra - those who can, do, and those who can't, teach.
50
09/02/2021 13:21:02 354 36
bbc
Let’s imagine the teachers are doing what they can remotely and stop beating up on them with talk of falling behind. The whole nation is in the same boat. Work on child poverty which is a govt issue not school’s responsibility - and dare I say it parental?
175
09/02/2021 13:48:27 152 164
bbc
I heard that when Nelson Mandela was released from prison he came upon a group of child activists and gave them a simple instruction.

"Go to school"

He realised that their education was crucial to the future of the country and more important than activism, however justified that activism was in apartheid SA.

I hope the teachers and their unions make the same realisation and put the kids first.
222
09/02/2021 13:55:49 49 22
bbc
Child poverty is a parent"s responsibility. Get a job, get help from family, don't have the children you can't afford. The govt doesn't force anyone to have children.
261
09/02/2021 13:50:11 28 4
bbc
Child poverty is not the subject but in response I agree that Parents have the main responsibility for the children’s welfare. The Government are not.
338
09/02/2021 14:10:03 9 55
bbc
The teaching unions created this 2 tier education system. They win from it, their kids don't lose out.
673
09/02/2021 14:58:51 0 0
bbc
I've sat in on my son's home schooling. Some of it is good and some of it is bad. So no, not all of the teachers are doing what they can. Or maybe I saw the only three teachers in the UK who just issued files of teachers-notes to 11 year olds and left them to do it themselves without checking up on how it turned out.
09/02/2021 16:25:03 0 1
bbc
"Let’s imagine the teachers are doing what they can remotely"

Why imagine? It should be a given. I have friends who work in primary and secondary schools, and a lot of teachers are working very hard and going beyond what is asked of them in terms of pupils education and welfare, whereas a lot sadly are doing nothing.
Faz
09/02/2021 18:14:19 0 0
bbc
We may be in the same storm, but we most definitely are not in the same boat.
I get your point though.
33
09/02/2021 13:23:04 16 14
bbc
Whilst the schools have been closed every single teacher should have been going into schools as normal, holding as many online classes as they can, sharing best practice with each other on home to do this and plenty of teacher training. I know some parents that have had some good online classes and support from their schools and some that have had zero, absolutely nothing.
51
09/02/2021 13:27:24 34 2
bbc
I don't know a school that hasn't been open - and some with 50% of the kids attending. And the teachers are ALSO providing online lessons. The schools around me could not have done more.
83
09/02/2021 13:33:38 4 1
bbc
Not all schools are providing online lessons. My son has only just started getting in the last 2 weeks a single daily 15 minute video call with his classmates. His teacher isn't at the school either, instead she is working from home, so it's not like she's having to teach an in-school class and remote class at the same time.
52
09/02/2021 13:27:27 155 17
bbc
A lot of children and their parents have worked hard to access remote learning and follow all lessons / complete as much set work as possible. Should these be forced to spend the summer in school with the children whose parents have not got them out of bed or off the playstation to do the schooling freely available to them? (Setting aside any households with genuine IT issues.)
211
09/02/2021 13:54:25 118 21
bbc
But when there has been little or no remote learning to access what then? My 3 have had about 20-40 minutes live lessons per day this time round and none at all in the previous lockdown. Your assumption that I've been in bed or on the playstation is frankly offensive - I have a full time job and have worked all hours to try to help the kids but they've still not had the education they should.
931
09/02/2021 15:47:33 1 2
bbc
What a ridiculous comment. Great if you don't work full time and can teach your kids at home in a distraction-filled environment, however for those from not-great backgrounds and for those with full-time working parents, why not have extra hours as an option?

I agree it shouldn't be mandatory but your elitist comment is generalising abhorrent codswallop.
09/02/2021 16:49:21 3 1
bbc
The parents who have ignored remote learning won’t send their kids to summer school either. It’s a waste of time and money.
09/02/2021 17:16:59 1 0
bbc
Spot on! Children, and adults come to that, need to meet and interact. More hours sitting in front of screens in overcrowded school buildings will solve nothing.
36
09/02/2021 13:24:16 28 25
bbc
The headline should be 'education unions will go against everything suggested by the government'...…………...
53
09/02/2021 13:27:53 9 4
bbc
Who do you think knows more about children's education and how best to deliver it? Teachers or politicians/government officials?
54
09/02/2021 13:28:06 185 56
bbc
My children are stuck indoors doing their online lessons each weekday. They need a break! I will not be sending my children to school during holidays.
117
09/02/2021 13:30:25 55 40
bbc
Bless them sounds like it's time to book a couple of weeks away.
217
09/02/2021 13:55:10 8 4
bbc
You're lucky they're getting online lessons at all !!
That's because you will have to get up and get them there - smaks of really good parenting to me, take a hard look at what hours and work public school educated children get through then moan "my kids didn't get those chances" Removed
467
09/02/2021 14:25:31 8 6
bbc
It's been stressful and occasionally chaotic with multiple websites to log into that sometimes just don't work. The teachers, though, are brilliant and deserve high praise! Frankly, to have a break,I want my children to physically attend school. Even they are asking for it.

This home schooling is tokenism at best and no substitute for professional teaching. Burden failing esp. hard on women.
661
09/02/2021 14:56:33 2 6
bbc
You fail to say how much teaching they are getting are you sure it is not you who dont wish to bother rather than take the opportunity to further enhance your children's education
690
09/02/2021 15:02:04 10 1
bbc
Absolutely agree. As a parent and governor extending the already long summer term will achieve nothing. Kids are tired by then, teachers are tired by then and not to mention all the school maintenance and prep for the next year that starts.

The DFE have been more pants at handling schools than spongebob squarepants wearing two sets of pants while panting after his socially distanced jog.
966
09/02/2021 15:57:22 5 1
bbc
Even prisoners are allowed outside once a day...why are they "stuck" indoors?
09/02/2021 17:20:30 1 0
bbc
Spot on!
28
09/02/2021 13:22:30 151 35
bbc
Sensible comment from headteacher asking for a proper policy over populist slogans and winged strategy.

So no doubt the shills are out in force moaning about lazy teachers?
55
09/02/2021 13:28:20 54 123
bbc
Ah so people you don't agree with are shills, whether they have evidence or not? Typical lefty comment!
156
09/02/2021 13:44:59 9 3
bbc
What is a shill? A lover of shillings? Someone on £sd? A misspelling of a shrill-voiced Trumpster type?
213
09/02/2021 13:54:51 21 5
bbc
Typical right-wing comment
468
09/02/2021 14:25:39 9 1
bbc
No, the people that are shills, and cannot possbily have any evidence for their lies, are rightly called out as shills. Your false logic doesn't work, and you are demonstrating , yet again, all that the shills demonstrate. Are you one?
971
09/02/2021 15:58:25 2 0
bbc
Typical shill response.
1
JGC
09/02/2021 13:12:57 22 30
bbc
By "gimmick" does he mean anything that involves teachers working overtime?
56
09/02/2021 13:28:21 10 3
bbc
First of all overtime has to be paid and is voluntary, teachers aren't lazy they work a lot harder and are under more pressure than you think. People on here have no idea how education is run and all schools and trusts are run differently. Some schools dont even have the old type of assemblys anymore and everything is run around grades so PE is often once a week lifetime skills are non existant.
41
09/02/2021 13:24:43 20 16
bbc
A far simpler solution would be for each child to repeat the school year they have missed. Longer school days would be pointless for younger children, they have a much shorter concentration span.
57
09/02/2021 13:28:28 20 3
bbc
How exactly is that possible when each year there is a new set of kids coming in? double class sizes in reception?
177
09/02/2021 13:48:50 9 2
bbc
Easily.

Put the starting age back to 5. Allow the children to learn to play (and a few life/social skills) before trying to bombard them with formal teaching.

Lowering the starting age has not improved the attainment level of children.

Other countries have school starting ages of 6 or 7 and yet their children end up ahead of ours by senior school.
178
09/02/2021 13:48:53 7 1
bbc
Simple, have all students start education 1 year later. This is already done in other countries and they have a higher education quality than us
30
09/02/2021 13:22:46 80 33
bbc
Simply drop something from the curriculum and go over the stuff we are doing now. My child is seven; does he really need to be learning French? Does he really need to be learning how to express his feelings and to be nice to people (!)? Stopping those for two months is not going to damage his career prospects.
58
09/02/2021 13:28:33 76 3
bbc
Best time to learn French, or any foreign language. Before the language connections in the brain become "hard wired".

Wish I'd been able to start that young.
20
Bob
09/02/2021 13:19:49 8 9
bbc
If Geoff Barton wants to rule out making children sit through more hours or having shorter holidays, just how does he propose catch up takes place?

Make the teacher speak twice as fast? It simply cannot be done without one of those two.
59
09/02/2021 13:26:58 0 1
bbc
OK
8
09/02/2021 13:16:58 7 16
bbc
"Left behind white pupils"
Ethnic minority parents make their children work hard at school, they take an interest, they know their children need to work harder in life to achieve success.
60
09/02/2021 13:27:05 9 0
bbc
That's a sweeping statement and offensive in undertone. You cannot speak for all ethnic groups just as I cannot either. "Making" your child work hard is not always a recipe for success, it can create impossible standards for them to attain. There's a difference between demanding things and encouraging/ supporting them, especially during an already stressful time.
33
09/02/2021 13:23:04 16 14
bbc
Whilst the schools have been closed every single teacher should have been going into schools as normal, holding as many online classes as they can, sharing best practice with each other on home to do this and plenty of teacher training. I know some parents that have had some good online classes and support from their schools and some that have had zero, absolutely nothing.
61
09/02/2021 13:29:21 5 0
bbc
Many of us have been.
62
moi
09/02/2021 13:29:34 13 5
bbc
Where is Gavin Williams these days? In hiding or been told to keep quiet, due his unpopularity.
76
09/02/2021 13:32:19 6 8
bbc
Ahhh, our Daily Star reader!
63
09/02/2021 13:29:35 29 26
bbc
The school day should be permanently extended by 1 hour irregardless, with that hour consisting of a daily PE lesson. Not only would this help students health, but it could open up an additional daily free hour for teachers to either mark work or plan lessons at school, where they are paid, compared to doing the work in their own time at home
167
09/02/2021 13:47:22 13 2
bbc
If it's an hour extension, how does it free up anyone? It means the same amount of time doing non-PE subjects, an hour more doing PE and an hour less marking/planning/recouping from all the stress at home.
183
09/02/2021 13:50:11 4 1
bbc
Who is going to run these PE classes, if not the teachers?

My school of 600 students has 3 PE teachers. That's one teacher per 200 pupils.

Also, if you take an hour of "own time" away from teachers, you're not freeing up own time, are you?
516
Kaa
09/02/2021 14:31:37 1 0
bbc
PE stopped being provided in house when academy's started taking over the running of school. As it is now a paid for service, how are schools going to pay for this when the money in schools is not enough as it is ?
64
09/02/2021 13:29:55 7 16
bbc
Should not be grinding out more hours from tired children...?
Really?
Are they the same ones too tired to fire up their games consoles?
96
09/02/2021 13:35:20 5 2
bbc
Children are locked down at home. The last thing they need is being locked up in a classroom all summer.
20
Bob
09/02/2021 13:19:49 8 9
bbc
If Geoff Barton wants to rule out making children sit through more hours or having shorter holidays, just how does he propose catch up takes place?

Make the teacher speak twice as fast? It simply cannot be done without one of those two.
65
09/02/2021 13:30:02 6 1
bbc
A simple solution could be for students to simply resit a year and for schools to permanently have their starting year pushed back
626
Bob
09/02/2021 14:49:28 3 1
bbc
That isn't catching up. That's staying permanently behind.
47
09/02/2021 13:27:12 4 7
bbc
Course they do. Means more work for them.
66
09/02/2021 13:30:12 15 5
bbc
Yes it would and for no good reason. The teachers could not have worked harder over the last 12 months and they don't need this rubbish from the likes of the lazy, incompetent Johnson.
15
09/02/2021 13:19:12 6 19
bbc
Schools open and stay open through summer, two week break in September for hols and then back to school until Christmas !
67
09/02/2021 13:30:18 14 4
bbc
Problem is who does the summer teaching? The teachers need a break too. My kids teachers are going above and beyond to provide content for online learning and looking after the kids mental health. They are also juggling the kids in schools and their own lives. When do they get to spend time with their families or unwind after juggling everything? We can't just double the number of teachers!
132
Bob
09/02/2021 13:41:09 5 2
bbc
The teachers of your children may well be providing them with content for learning, but what do you think happened in 2019?

Do you think children go to school, sit at a desk and do nothing?

Of course not - they're provided with content to learn from none other than, you guess it, teachers.

The delivery method has changed. The need to plan lessons and provide materials has not.
68
09/02/2021 13:30:21 6 4
bbc
I doubt that extra school over the summer break will be an option: if it were, the government would have announced the scheme before people starting booking their holidays.
49
09/02/2021 13:27:14 331 36
bbc
When I read these comments, I really do wonder why anyone would want to get into teaching.
69
09/02/2021 13:30:58 371 33
bbc
Well they don’t. Applications are plummeting. Those who decide to train have a huge drop out rate. Those who make it through and teach, are leaving early. Only in Britain is there this contempt for teachers. Education is really important so why don’t we value teachers?
91
09/02/2021 13:34:31 71 8
bbc
Because the Shazzas and Daves of this world always think they know better.
144
09/02/2021 13:42:40 16 34
bbc
It's not teachers that Britain holds in contempt, it's their unions.
146
GPL
09/02/2021 13:43:05 5 18
bbc
This isn't entirely true.

Staff turnover is actually very low at the moment - the lowest in a long time in fact - partly driven by a very competitive jobs market.

Recruitment is also very healthy as people look for career changes or even just a job. Many are turning to Initial Teacher Training providers to help them do this. Lots of these ITT providers are reporting high application numbers.
163
09/02/2021 13:46:38 8 51
bbc
Because in Britain the teachers and their unions are always looking for ways to find a negative and put a spanner in the works
171
09/02/2021 13:48:05 22 7
bbc
They drop out because the system of schooling is not what they imagined, it is an appalling system of the steam age. Unfit for a modern world.
284
09/02/2021 14:03:25 3 36
bbc
Because they are lazy and politically dogmatic
333
09/02/2021 14:04:20 13 0
bbc
There's also a culture of focussing on proving that you just taught x rather than spending the time on teaching and ensuring they fully understand and assimilate the knowledge - and it all comes from government. Which is why I didn't become a teacher. Ticking boxes rather than educating children. Which in turn leads to the lack of respect because why would you respect that?
352
09/02/2021 14:11:04 7 2
bbc
Society has to bear some blame so many single parents (by design) and at least two generations of layabouts who pass on to their kids similar thoughts.

So many on here will find this unpalatable but that is because to so many it hits a nerve.
444
09/02/2021 14:22:14 5 2
bbc
Excellent point. And PGCE places at universities have been reduced by the Tories.
70
PJT
09/02/2021 13:31:04 35 5
bbc
I would say that most of us do not want to be put in front of the many students who have made no attempt at online lessons or, if they have joined meetings still not done work. This is especially true if they think we are going to have to work extra hours.

What the situation has told me is that the modern school system and curricula do not meet with many student needs or wants.
71
09/02/2021 13:31:16 95 21
bbc
So basically most of you are saying after the turmoil of the last year that none of us should have a break ....unless you're a politician or celebrity in which case you can have a holiday
88
09/02/2021 13:34:19 15 24
bbc
You dont think politicians or celebrities have children then?
120
sw
09/02/2021 13:39:41 7 9
bbc
I would have thought that teachers would want to help their pupils, with whatever it takes to help them. So having a 2 week holiday in the summer, with the same amount of time off, the rest of the year. So all the demands to open schools fully after 1/2 term, would be less.
262
09/02/2021 14:00:35 4 17
bbc
Most have had a break! Most of the entire last year.
292
09/02/2021 14:05:11 6 8
bbc
My kids are, for the first time in their lives, desperate to get back to school - for them that would be a break. Let the teachers have 2 or 3 weeks off but do they need 6 or 7 in the summer? We always get told they work through this time anyway so what's the problem
72
09/02/2021 13:31:24 194 59
bbc
I just want to know who they expect to do the teaching

Teachers are salaried with contractuaral holidays and no overtime mechanism

How many other people would be expected to work for free in order to 'catch up' when most have worked full time throughout !
93
09/02/2021 13:34:53 61 134
bbc
Most of the workforce who are doing it now to cover absences etc etc....no excuse i'm afraid!
119
09/02/2021 13:39:40 29 60
bbc
Most of the private sector workforce is the answer. UK workers do more unpaid overtime than just about any other country. Work until the task is completed. I am sick of the bleating of the teaching unions that they are 'key workers' yet put in about 1/3 the shift of a junior doctor. Teachers want kids back in school they say but complain about 'long hours' No complaints about long holidays though!
173
09/02/2021 13:36:00 10 29
bbc
Sorry I thought it was a profession rather just a job.
242
09/02/2021 13:58:26 21 2
bbc
They'll get them from the same place they got all the NHS workers to work in the Nightingale Hospitals.
267
09/02/2021 14:01:13 19 16
bbc
i think you'll find teachers don't contractually have 15 weeks off a year. So they are not being asked to work in their 'holidays' they are being asked to come into school rather than do the work they would presumably normally be doing at home. If these 15 weeks are holiday then can we please never hear the argument again about not getting lots of holiday when pay discussions come up!
362
09/02/2021 14:12:39 12 38
bbc
The people they expect to do the teaching are the teachers. It's not permanent. Just enough to get the kids back on track. I just wish the teachers could be a bit more supportive and proactive about adressing this issue. It feels like every suggestion is immediately knocked back. Doctors and nurses are risking theirs and their families lives every day with no complaints. C'mon teachers.
363
09/02/2021 14:12:50 12 38
bbc
The teaching unions created this situation. My sympathy is nil. My sympathy lies with the excluded children and their parents.
395
09/02/2021 14:15:18 10 18
bbc
If most teachers have been working full time throughout. What have they been doing? Honestly, I have been home schooling my primary school kids. No teaching is provided by the school, just a quick 20 minute class chat in the morning. So if the teachers aren't teaching. What are they doing? Genuinely!
437
09/02/2021 14:20:51 10 2
bbc
They don't want teachers to do it in case they need paying. They want charities to step in and do something or other for free. There is no plan, just a pretense of doing something, anything.
Removed
511
09/02/2021 14:31:13 6 14
bbc
Teachers only get 6 weeks holiday and should be working during the school holidays over and above this i.e. school holidays are 13 weeks so during Covid the school holidays could easily be shortened to make up some of the lost time
609
09/02/2021 14:46:25 1 4
bbc
Most people don't get full pay for working 36/52 of a year.
915
09/02/2021 15:43:46 0 1
bbc
Errs.... other people are salaried and have contractual holidays .. but THEY VOLUNTEER at vaccination centres... we all must do our bit to help through this crisis no matter what we would be doing normally .... these times are not normal times!
09/02/2021 17:21:17 0 0
bbc
Teachers don't have holiday in the same way as most workers. They can be directed where, when and what to do for1265 hours over195 days of the year. But are also obliged to do anything else that is needed (marking, creating lessons/resources, analysing data, writing reports...) outside this time. This is why they actually work 50-60 hr weeks and have little spare time for a 'holiday'.
09/02/2021 17:22:46 0 2
bbc
some have done didly squat during the lockdowns so why shouldn't they have to make the lost time up
09/02/2021 17:42:39 0 1
bbc
lol, and they have only 24 weeks holiday every year
48
09/02/2021 13:27:14 41 22
bbc
No it should be "teachers should not listen to an incompetent government desperately trying any gimmick in the book to look half-competent in the face of the total disaster they have made of COVID handling".
73
09/02/2021 13:31:27 6 11
bbc
Teachers don't listen to anyone except unions who are as incompetent as the govt!
36
09/02/2021 13:24:16 28 25
bbc
The headline should be 'education unions will go against everything suggested by the government'...…………...
74
09/02/2021 13:31:31 2 2
bbc
If, as they are currently suggesting, solutions that are bereft of pragmatism.... yes
31
09/02/2021 13:22:57 173 169
bbc
Not the teachers left wing unions, that's for sure
75
09/02/2021 13:31:35 42 7
bbc
Flook no one asked about Unions. We asked teachers or politicians. Who should we trust to have the best knowledge of what is and isn't a good idea for children?

Should we trust the people who have spent their lives training and working with kids
Or the people who have spent their lives in different sectors entirely?
62
moi
09/02/2021 13:29:34 13 5
bbc
Where is Gavin Williams these days? In hiding or been told to keep quiet, due his unpopularity.
76
09/02/2021 13:32:19 6 8
bbc
Ahhh, our Daily Star reader!
199
09/02/2021 13:52:34 2 0
bbc
An Oxymoron if ever!!
49
09/02/2021 13:27:14 331 36
bbc
When I read these comments, I really do wonder why anyone would want to get into teaching.
77
09/02/2021 13:32:27 48 200
bbc
Good pay, long holidays, short working days, unins that will, on their behalf, oppose any changes to raise standards, generous sick pay, (including payments when the teacher is not ill) etc.
113
09/02/2021 13:39:00 195 11
bbc
Haha oh you do make me chuckle! Would you like to shadow me for a few weeks to see how 'well paid' I am and see how 'short' my working day is? You are clearly commenting on something that you have absolutely no comprehension or understanding of! Perhaps you'd like to come into school with me for a few days during the half term holiday (yes, I'm going in) or sit with me whilst I'm lesson planning?
114
09/02/2021 13:39:26 43 0
bbc
I know of at least one major academy group that are saying that any time taken off following close contact with a covid positive individual is unpaid.

Very generous.
143
09/02/2021 13:42:32 55 3
bbc
Good pay, not really for the hours they do.
They don't have short working days. 8-4 is on a par with other professions and THEN they do more work at home too
Teachers never object to raising standards. They may oppose govenment changes but these are made by people that have never been a teacher
Sick pay is good
148
09/02/2021 13:43:42 24 2
bbc
All that and yet still applications are plummeting and drop out is increasing.
So how come?
180
09/02/2021 13:49:39 68 2
bbc
If it is that good why don't you become a teacher?
The reason is simple, it is nothing lie you describe........................ havinng been married to a teacher for nearly 25 years I wish they had short working days but they don't and work 7 days a week and holidays are mostly spent planning, writing reports, marking.

Still, you moan at teachers if it makes you feel big.
197
JPK
09/02/2021 13:52:24 18 1
bbc
Guessing that writing fiction may have been your best subject at school.
250
09/02/2021 14:00:01 39 2
bbc
I suspect trolling (or ignorance). Compared with similar training (5+ years min from 18) pay is low, days are long (it's not 9-4 ), holidays often spent working and many think they can do the job better. I trained and left shortly after like many others. Kids are fine, everyone else (gov/parents/society) treats you like dirt. Sadly it means good teachers are leaving and the standard is dropping
313
09/02/2021 14:07:23 35 3
bbc
Try it.
Pay rises based on your spawn's ability to learn, and even spoon fed they can't write their own names.
Start around 8.30, finish around 9/10pm, give up first week of holidays to help your spawn, teach them how to wipe their bottoms.
Constant stress, Ofsted, lost breaks, no family life and no weekends, yeah, easy job.
My 9-5 is so much easier and I get paid for my hours, I'll not go back!
314
09/02/2021 14:07:25 31 2
bbc
Short working days? Don't know any teachers do you? ??
534
09/02/2021 14:32:23 11 1
bbc
Long holidays, good pay, short hours, nice appreciative parents to deal with and small classes of wonderful engaging children…….. then I woke up!
605
09/02/2021 14:45:39 9 0
bbc
Are you a teacher? If not, you should become one.
617
09/02/2021 14:45:55 15 1
bbc
You are so wide of the mark!! My Mrs is a teacher and I have never seen anyone work so hard and for so many hours. If all the hours planning, marking, preping home learning atm are taken into account her pay will work out to be under the legal minimum!! Fact!!! Praise and understand our teachers, they are amazing people!
78
09/02/2021 13:32:37 20 12
bbc
Simple question,where is Williamson G? Is he in detention or having a quick cough and drag behind the bike sheds?
85
09/02/2021 13:33:43 16 8
bbc
Been reading the Daily Star have we?
38
09/02/2021 13:24:27 18 6
bbc
Not all teachers work all through the holidays - nor do they claim to! Preparing for a new school year, or catching up on record keeping is work that teachers do during school breaks (and at night) at times when they're not paid! They don't get paid holidays, unlike some workers.
79
09/02/2021 13:32:46 4 2
bbc
Teachers are paid for the full 52 weeks of the year. Only teaching assistants are paid pro rata, and therefore not for the holidays, so stop preaching. "Some workers"? That'll be me then, who hasn't had a sick day, "working from home (answering emails in pyjamas)" day or a furlough day at all, since before this even started. I EARN my paid holiday thanks, while I help grease the economic wheels.
184
09/02/2021 13:50:34 2 2
bbc
Wrong...teachers are paid for 1265 hours, basically term time, plus 5 INSET days...
202
09/02/2021 13:52:53 2 1
bbc
What a martyr you are. No teachers are not paid for all term holidays their pay is the same as some teaching assistants who can have equal payments over 12 months which is how teachers are paid
09/02/2021 22:14:49 0 0
bbc
No they don't. They are also paid pro rata, and are contracted and paid for 38 .5 weeks of the year which is split into 12 equal portions
33
09/02/2021 13:23:04 16 14
bbc
Whilst the schools have been closed every single teacher should have been going into schools as normal, holding as many online classes as they can, sharing best practice with each other on home to do this and plenty of teacher training. I know some parents that have had some good online classes and support from their schools and some that have had zero, absolutely nothing.
80
09/02/2021 13:32:51 3 5
bbc
Schools in my area have stopped online learning due to the weather. How on earth does the weather stop a teacher from teaching online...….go figure!
124
09/02/2021 13:40:06 5 2
bbc
I call BS. You're making this up - which school & where
33
09/02/2021 13:23:04 16 14
bbc
Whilst the schools have been closed every single teacher should have been going into schools as normal, holding as many online classes as they can, sharing best practice with each other on home to do this and plenty of teacher training. I know some parents that have had some good online classes and support from their schools and some that have had zero, absolutely nothing.
81
09/02/2021 13:33:26 9 2
bbc
What time did you start work this morning? What time will you finish tonight?
I'd wager that the hours you work are far shorter than any teacher.
82
09/02/2021 13:33:32 66 34
bbc
Some teachers are at a breaking point preparing live lessons and teaching kids in school at the same time.

Extending either the school day or the summer term will kill them off.
158
09/02/2021 13:45:33 51 40
bbc
Yes but some people are working 12 hour shifts with only 4 weeks holiday a year and on minimum wage.
235
09/02/2021 13:57:19 5 10
bbc
Haha please!!
385
09/02/2021 14:14:26 4 5
bbc
Those teachers should speak with their union that created this situation
09/02/2021 17:49:23 1 3
bbc
Teachers don’t know the meaning of hard work. See comment of llan007. Teachers wouldn’t last 5 minutes.
09/02/2021 23:07:06 1 1
bbc
Extend the summer holidays for teachers and they will be really happy ?
51
09/02/2021 13:27:24 34 2
bbc
I don't know a school that hasn't been open - and some with 50% of the kids attending. And the teachers are ALSO providing online lessons. The schools around me could not have done more.
83
09/02/2021 13:33:38 4 1
bbc
Not all schools are providing online lessons. My son has only just started getting in the last 2 weeks a single daily 15 minute video call with his classmates. His teacher isn't at the school either, instead she is working from home, so it's not like she's having to teach an in-school class and remote class at the same time.
562
09/02/2021 14:38:07 1 0
bbc
Perhaps you should read Ofsted's own guide which clearly states

"Some unhelpful myths exist about remote education, which are not based on evidence.

These include that:
the best way to deliver remote education is always through live lessons"

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/ofsted-publishes-short-guide-to-what-works-well-in-remote-education
39
09/02/2021 13:24:41 10 15
bbc
It's quite simple scrap all the totally unnecessary holidays. It's the primary reason parents can't get full time work. And what better way to get children out of poverty than to have their parent (s) working full time.
84
09/02/2021 13:33:43 13 5
bbc
And teachers can work every weekday for the rest of their lives. What a great way to attract talent to an underpaid and undervalued profession already facing shortages.
243
sw
09/02/2021 13:58:27 1 0
bbc
28 days is the usual paid time off for holidays.
78
09/02/2021 13:32:37 20 12
bbc
Simple question,where is Williamson G? Is he in detention or having a quick cough and drag behind the bike sheds?
85
09/02/2021 13:33:43 16 8
bbc
Been reading the Daily Star have we?
44
09/02/2021 13:26:54 8 4
bbc
And why shouldn't teachers complain about loosing their Summer Holiday? They have been working through all of the lock downs to date. Why shouldn't they have the time off in their contracts?
86
09/02/2021 13:33:51 3 4
bbc
Working through all of the lockdowns? Are you sure about that?? Not any that I know. Evidence please.
115
09/02/2021 13:39:28 9 2
bbc
Evidence - try my wife!

Working 10 hour days to cover 2 classes, 1 online and 1 in school

and if thats not enough - ALL of he colleagues trying to keep pace !

Still you sit on your cloud and deny they do anything! IDOT!!!
240
09/02/2021 13:58:01 0 4
bbc
I would like to see the evidence of you working as there cant be a lot you seem to spend more time on here moaning. Id dock your wages if you worked for me.
43
09/02/2021 13:26:49 17 14
bbc
What do they suggest then? I am not hearing any suggestion coming out of the teaching profession.

There is an issue with the public sector in that it has thousands of managers paid more than the Prime Minister yet it still expects to be spoon fed about how to run their service. It's high time that those paid a lot of money to run these services start being accountable for them.
87
09/02/2021 13:33:59 11 2
bbc
Well said. Take the many "Chief Executives" of multi-academy trusts drawing huge salaries for work which local authorities performed more efficiently and at lower cost.
71
09/02/2021 13:31:16 95 21
bbc
So basically most of you are saying after the turmoil of the last year that none of us should have a break ....unless you're a politician or celebrity in which case you can have a holiday
88
09/02/2021 13:34:19 15 24
bbc
You dont think politicians or celebrities have children then?
796
09/02/2021 15:22:45 3 0
bbc
Yes all attending private schools no doubt.
09/02/2021 17:06:59 2 0
bbc
None that they can't palm off with nannies and private schooling.
Besides, we hardly see any politicians earning their money at the moment, celebs are all swanning around abroad and 'influencing' products.
09/02/2021 21:59:18 1 0
bbc
Who cares really?
89
09/02/2021 13:34:20 256 32
bbc
School buildings are open.
Teachers are teaching.
Pupils are learning remotely.
Extending school days and school terms ignores this.
There is no army of teachers and support staff waiting in the wings.
349
09/02/2021 14:10:51 154 77
bbc
"Teachers are teaching.
Pupils are learning remotely."

This isn't happening though!!! 20 minutes a day of live lessons does not represent teaching!! Why is everyone treating all teachers as one group who should all be canonised immediately. Standards are massively variable and therefore catch up requirements are massively variable!
440
Kaa
09/02/2021 14:21:56 10 2
bbc
There has never been less support staff either.
542
09/02/2021 14:35:38 9 13
bbc
Online learning is causing misery. It is mind-numbingly boring at the very best.
644
09/02/2021 14:52:57 12 8
bbc
Teachers only get 6 weeks holiday a year but the school holidays are 13 weeks. Summer holidays could be reduced during covid to give extra schooling to the children who have not been doing the usual 6 hours every week day ( with home work) that they would have done in a normal year. Can anyone truthfully say their child has worked Monday to Friday 6 hours a day during the term time when at home
769
09/02/2021 15:14:42 6 2
bbc
Compared to many countries, (including the US) the school days are extremely long in the UK for young children and even teenagers without the extra time added. Many are exhausted already from sitting all day from 9 am in front of the computer. Whoever is coming up with these catch up strategies clearly don't know anything about realities of learning or teaching.
773
09/02/2021 15:18:13 11 1
bbc
What do you know? My daughter is teaching live 4 hours per day, setting and recording work for the next day, marking previous days work, attending 2 evenings virtual parents evening (for those parents who can be bothered) so taking into account the hours she puts in are the same as being at school which equates to minimum wage! Get your facts right before making bland generic statements!
957
09/02/2021 15:54:51 1 0
bbc
At my childs school the online learning is this time not even an hour a day. Shared with the MANY kids who are actually in school too with the teachers attention all day. How is that fair? Why do key workers kids get a better education at his school? Previous lockdown he got no online learning. Zilch. We did it all. Offer treble money and there will be teachers. I would not begrudge them it.
09/02/2021 16:48:52 0 0
bbc
Not according to the people I know. The kids haven’t been doing much of anything in school.
90
09/02/2021 13:34:21 11 9
bbc
I have a child of my own, and I will put her before the children of others, simple as that. I am often asleep before her due to fatigue, as I have been working 60+ hours most weeks, so adding time will just render me less effective in the classroom. The 'holidays' are the times that I can catch up with and spend time with my daughter...so stuff any idea of that time being shortened.
69
09/02/2021 13:30:58 371 33
bbc
Well they don’t. Applications are plummeting. Those who decide to train have a huge drop out rate. Those who make it through and teach, are leaving early. Only in Britain is there this contempt for teachers. Education is really important so why don’t we value teachers?
91
09/02/2021 13:34:31 71 8
bbc
Because the Shazzas and Daves of this world always think they know better.
116
09/02/2021 13:39:34 22 1
bbc
My name is Dave. I don't think I know better.
125
09/02/2021 13:40:09 17 28
bbc
"Because the Shazzas and Daves of this world always think they know better."

Oh nothing like a bit of stereotyping and class prejudice to further your argument.

Don't complain people are mean to you if you are going to take that approach
3
09/02/2021 13:14:45 138 116
bbc
The teaching unions have been a disgrace during the pandemic.
92
09/02/2021 13:34:34 39 22
bbc
Yes. How dare they try and ensure a safe environment for staff and pupils? It's a disgrace I tell you. A total disgrace.
72
09/02/2021 13:31:24 194 59
bbc
I just want to know who they expect to do the teaching

Teachers are salaried with contractuaral holidays and no overtime mechanism

How many other people would be expected to work for free in order to 'catch up' when most have worked full time throughout !
93
09/02/2021 13:34:53 61 134
bbc
Most of the workforce who are doing it now to cover absences etc etc....no excuse i'm afraid!
403
09/02/2021 14:16:25 11 4
bbc
What nonsense - they are being paid.
879
Ben
09/02/2021 15:38:09 5 1
bbc
Except they're not. Over 10% have been on furlough since March. Once this is over they'll have had at least year's pay for doing jack all. This is not the case with teachers who have worked throughout this (as have many millions of others).
Most of the workforce - your term - are not doing weeks of unpaid overtime.
969
09/02/2021 15:58:07 1 1
bbc
Wrong.
09/02/2021 16:53:53 0 0
bbc
Not in my school. We've been an active hub since March 2020. Supply is not used because of infection control.
43
09/02/2021 13:26:49 17 14
bbc
What do they suggest then? I am not hearing any suggestion coming out of the teaching profession.

There is an issue with the public sector in that it has thousands of managers paid more than the Prime Minister yet it still expects to be spoon fed about how to run their service. It's high time that those paid a lot of money to run these services start being accountable for them.
94
09/02/2021 13:35:10 0 4
bbc
Think you'll find Boris is paid alot more than most people in this country most politicians are their own businesses and still earn £££outside of their actual job
32
09/02/2021 13:22:57 4 20
bbc
Go out and get a job in the real world and than complain about how hard teaching is
95
09/02/2021 13:35:17 12 0
bbc
Done. Don’t assume every teacher has been in teaching all their life. Oh, and I don’t believe I was complaining. The point of the article is gimmicks are essentially a waste of time and money. Putting proper plans that are properly funded and based on real evidence in place is far more effective.
154
09/02/2021 13:44:12 7 0
bbc
Well said and so true.
64
09/02/2021 13:29:55 7 16
bbc
Should not be grinding out more hours from tired children...?
Really?
Are they the same ones too tired to fire up their games consoles?
96
09/02/2021 13:35:20 5 2
bbc
Children are locked down at home. The last thing they need is being locked up in a classroom all summer.
41
09/02/2021 13:24:43 20 16
bbc
A far simpler solution would be for each child to repeat the school year they have missed. Longer school days would be pointless for younger children, they have a much shorter concentration span.
97
09/02/2021 13:35:29 3 0
bbc
Schools are not large enough to accomodate an extra year group and there aren't 10% spare teachers to teach them!
98
09/02/2021 13:35:48 15 7
bbc
So what about the welfare of Teachers???
126
09/02/2021 13:40:09 6 8
bbc
What about the welfare of children?
09/02/2021 23:50:12 0 0
bbc
Who cares?
99
09/02/2021 13:36:05 15 10
bbc
How do we stop all the children lagging further behind?

Simple.....open the schools!

All the evidence we have shows that open schools, particularly for younger children, are a minimal risk (if any at all).

Many countries in a similar position to us have open schools - and never shut them eg France.

We should do the same.
135
sw
09/02/2021 13:41:29 3 17
bbc
Keep the schools fully open in the summer. Do not open them too early now.
401
09/02/2021 14:16:22 2 0
bbc
Other countries have smaller classes so can socially distance better, we have gone for bigger classes so it’s more problematic. Don’t believe these pictures on tv of a few kids spaced out- I don’t know any class like that! If we can get more spaces like marquees then schools can fully open.
49
09/02/2021 13:27:14 331 36
bbc
When I read these comments, I really do wonder why anyone would want to get into teaching.
100
09/02/2021 13:36:07 31 206
bbc
Judging by the fact that teachers have done little in the last 12 months and it seems doing little in the future do not think they will have a shortage, their are always members of society happy to do little and get paid for it.
112
09/02/2021 13:39:00 111 12
bbc
Done little. Really?
122
09/02/2021 13:39:51 58 2
bbc
Would you care to elaborate? What do you mean by 'done little'?
149
09/02/2021 13:43:42 15 1
bbc
Pull the other one - there's a bell attached!
155
09/02/2021 13:44:24 52 2
bbc
Altal what do you mean "done little" they have been working in incredibly hard through the whole pandemic. They have been creating lessons for both onsite and offsite teaching. Teaching in new methods every day. They have worked insanely hard all pandemic. We should be thanking teachers and not berating them
188
JPK
09/02/2021 13:50:44 18 0
bbc
There are certainly a few who know little but feel qualified to opine on it.
301
09/02/2021 14:06:31 11 0
bbc
You have not got a clue! Btw it is 'there' not their.
324
09/02/2021 14:08:07 7 2
bbc
Do you know what a coherent sentence is?
Removed
603
09/02/2021 14:45:05 4 15
bbc
My guess is a lot of teachers downvoting rather than working, just a thought