Tesco tells chancellor to hit online rivals with sales tax
08/02/2021 | news | business | 669
Boss Ken Murphy has asked Chancellor Rishi Sunak for a "level playing field" when it comes to tax.
1
Bob
08/02/2021 10:28:21 12 17
bbc
People don't want high streets. If they did, they wouldn't be dying.

People want the best price and convenience of delivery. That happens online.

If you introduce an online sales tax to create a level playing field all you will do is raise prices but online will still win out on convenience. It won't abate the demise of physical shopping.
7
08/02/2021 10:32:12 3 13
bbc
Speak for yourself.

Shopping at Amazon is unpatriotic.
49
08/02/2021 10:42:44 2 1
bbc
People do want the high street otherwise all of the shops would close overnight. Don't be fooled by this "on-line convenience" mantra. I have recently had a number of bad experiences with on-line, something which has crept in over recent years (too much demand, not able to cope??). I have been purchasing online for well over 10 years, but it's starting to creak. Always pick high street where I can
65
08/02/2021 10:47:50 0 0
bbc
People used to use high streets until supermarkets moved out of town and started to sell everything.

Sure all of the small bricks and mortar retailers who survive by way of ancillary online sales will be thrilled by another tax burden. And if it's on sales, just remember that quite a high % of Amazon sales aren't actually made by Amazon.
114
08/02/2021 11:08:35 0 0
bbc
People are gluttons for convenience, the question is at what price. Not just for bricks and mortar shops, but other aspects like whether the online store pays taxes fairly, or respects your privacy.
2
08/02/2021 10:28:39 72 28
bbc
No doubt someone will point out that what Amazon / Boots / Branson etc are doing is legal.

Well yes, it may be legal. But it stinks.

Why won't the government change this situation ?
6
08/02/2021 10:31:51 63 65
bbc
The Tories LOVE tax evasion.
8
08/02/2021 10:32:29 12 11
bbc
Because the government stinks.
70
08/02/2021 10:48:39 1 1
bbc
Because they profit from it too.
102
08/02/2021 11:02:57 8 1
bbc
What stinks? Oh, capitalism, right... how dare one company make a profit when another does not.
103
08/02/2021 11:03:14 10 0
bbc
How do they change it? It's massively complex and the whole world needs to change. A company in Germany lists a £500 laptop on Amazon which is then dropshipped from Taiwan, the payment is processed through Canada and the customer lives in Wales. How much tax should be paid in the UK on that transaction then?
122
08/02/2021 11:11:08 2 0
bbc
They lack the talent required but they worry about being out of step with other countries. Should tax on revenue accrued in the UK but the tax charge needs to be fairly small to start with. The issue is transfer pricing where profit is essentially moved to lower tax jurisdictions via charging the target country for HR, Legal, IT development services etc.
173
08/02/2021 11:37:15 2 2
bbc
It is vastly better for us consumers!

No sane person battles out to high streets for goods.
It has zero to do with any tax avoidance it is not even about price like stupid street shops think!
High streets are revolting, impossible places to get to and find any goods you actually want.
198
08/02/2021 11:45:05 0 1
bbc
Because if they tax businesses fairly they lose party donations and upset the voters when prices rise to cover the businesses "loses".
258
08/02/2021 12:14:27 2 0
bbc
Amazon simply has a different business model to Tesco, Morrisons etc. If you don't like what they do then don't use them. We could take the Burma model & just shut the Internet completely & return to a high street of the 1950's.
265
08/02/2021 12:13:31 1 0
bbc
Being in government is about winning votes. Increasing prices for all people across the board is not a vote winner. But it would be typically the sort of policy put forward b y Labour, who would then spend another five years wondering why they have lost yet another general election!
330
08/02/2021 13:00:10 1 0
bbc
Why change it if it isn't broken? Yes Tesco are suffering, so what? Better that they improve their inline presence and adapt. It's not the online stores' fault that Tesco chose to be locked into ridiculously long leases, besides it's not like amazon are completing for their business. Yes they offer fresh fruit etc, but people will still buy from supermarkets.

Learn to adapt!
579
08/02/2021 17:26:59 0 0
bbc
Because Sunak's family is one of the largest shareholders of Amazon
3
08/02/2021 10:29:55 10 10
bbc
Amazon pay their taxes in line with sovereign UK law, under a government which wants a low-tax and low regulation economy.

If you've never shopped on Amazon, feel free to criticise.
22
08/02/2021 10:31:12 4 5
bbc
Don't shop at Amazon. Hate them.
4
08/02/2021 10:30:34 169 18
bbc
That's the same Tesco that sells cards when the card shops are forced to close, sells clothes when clothes shops are forced to close etc etc. All of the supermarkets have profited greatly from the lockdowns and should be included in any windfall tax imposed.
67
08/02/2021 10:48:19 56 10
bbc
You know this tax would apply on their online sales too right?
98
08/02/2021 11:00:33 5 0
bbc
My Tescos has had it's clothes section closed since the lockdown started as it's non-essential.
185
08/02/2021 11:41:00 9 1
bbc
You do know taxes pay for the public services used by the people that live in the country, as more sales transfer to online giants like Amazon how will the public services be paid for, eventually something will have to change.
187
08/02/2021 11:41:02 5 14
bbc
Not relevant.

Old fashioned shops are dying out way before covid. Because they are horrible places to attempt to find and get any goods at all, when and if they are ever open. Unlike on line, open and perfect any hour of the day or night.

High street shops are like the canals, quaint, not useful. Museum, historical, attractions if anything at all.
297
08/02/2021 12:39:29 5 0
bbc
If you kept buying your cards from the local shop they would have stayed in business.
458
08/02/2021 15:09:28 1 1
bbc
Hope they are going to apply this tax to their delivery services too.
5
Bob
08/02/2021 10:30:55 10 4
bbc
Instead of creating another tax that hurts consumers, how about actually doing something about the rates paid. Only only does that help balance things out, but it also removes a barrier to entry that might put off startups and so on.
10
08/02/2021 10:32:41 7 14
bbc
So you think it's OK for Amazon to avoid taxes ?
2
08/02/2021 10:28:39 72 28
bbc
No doubt someone will point out that what Amazon / Boots / Branson etc are doing is legal.

Well yes, it may be legal. But it stinks.

Why won't the government change this situation ?
6
08/02/2021 10:31:51 63 65
bbc
The Tories LOVE tax evasion.
13
Bob
08/02/2021 10:33:21 23 1
bbc
It isn't tax evasion, though, is it.

They are paying full rates for the building in which they operate. Why would they pay rates for a shop when they're not operating from a shop.
18
08/02/2021 10:35:05 25 1
bbc
What taxes are they evading?
46
08/02/2021 10:42:34 18 1
bbc
What tax evasion?
106
08/02/2021 10:59:02 8 0
bbc
If it's legal, it's not evasion. Get your facts right before spouting partisan nonsense.
111
08/02/2021 11:05:20 7 0
bbc
Oh please, tax avoidance is legal, tax evasion is illegal. If you have evidence that Tesco are evading taxes please contact the SFO.
117
08/02/2021 11:10:26 4 0
bbc
No it’s tax evaders who like tax evasion regardless of political persuasion.

The problem is the loopholes of tax avoidance. Large sums of money disappearing to offshore accounts and holding companies taking franchise payments that magically match profits.
263
08/02/2021 12:16:04 1 1
bbc
Yes, that's right ... this sort of thing never happened under Labour.

Oh, wait a minute .....
365
08/02/2021 13:23:40 0 0
bbc
They are experts at it!
380
08/02/2021 13:29:11 0 0
bbc
So point us towards one other country that has managed to tax these companies properly?
If you want to see how Amazon et al avoid tax you should look not at the Tories but at Europhile stalwarts like Luxemburg and Ireland, who boast high nominal tax rates but whose 'sweetheart' deals allow big online retailers to hide their profits from the taxman in all the other EU countries, as well as UK
387
08/02/2021 13:35:16 0 0
bbc
And Labour LOVE high taxes.
654
08/02/2021 23:26:34 0 0
bbc
as do labour, they are all rich looking after the rich
1
Bob
08/02/2021 10:28:21 12 17
bbc
People don't want high streets. If they did, they wouldn't be dying.

People want the best price and convenience of delivery. That happens online.

If you introduce an online sales tax to create a level playing field all you will do is raise prices but online will still win out on convenience. It won't abate the demise of physical shopping.
7
08/02/2021 10:32:12 3 13
bbc
Speak for yourself.

Shopping at Amazon is unpatriotic.
21
08/02/2021 10:35:50 5 2
bbc
Unpatriotic? Oh dear, the "everything is made in Britain and it's top quality" fantasists are on the loose again.
55
08/02/2021 10:44:45 0 0
bbc
Why? Nearly 50% of Amazon's sales in the UK are not actually made by Amazon. Sure some of those sellers may well be English,
2
08/02/2021 10:28:39 72 28
bbc
No doubt someone will point out that what Amazon / Boots / Branson etc are doing is legal.

Well yes, it may be legal. But it stinks.

Why won't the government change this situation ?
8
08/02/2021 10:32:29 12 11
bbc
Because the government stinks.
9
08/02/2021 10:32:36 3 5
bbc
A disability tax. Nice.
5
Bob
08/02/2021 10:30:55 10 4
bbc
Instead of creating another tax that hurts consumers, how about actually doing something about the rates paid. Only only does that help balance things out, but it also removes a barrier to entry that might put off startups and so on.
10
08/02/2021 10:32:41 7 14
bbc
So you think it's OK for Amazon to avoid taxes ?
16
08/02/2021 10:34:24 5 2
bbc
What taxes are they avoiding?
19
Bob
08/02/2021 10:35:06 5 1
bbc
Separate issue. Read the article, it is going on about how shops have to pay much higher rates compared to online outlets. They pay the due rates for the premises in which they operate.

The issues you are on about are separate tax matters.
11
08/02/2021 10:32:52 22 8
bbc
They call it the future?

Tax them then pass it onto the consumers, no free lunches UK has record debts to pay wracked up in 11 years.
29
08/02/2021 10:37:42 5 14
bbc
Quite.

Pandora's Box, in relation to the facility of online shopping, was opened many years - and the in the last year has it has shown that it is a necessity.

If brick and mortar stores can't compete without tax inequality then maybe it's time for them to go.
83
08/02/2021 10:54:36 5 0
bbc
Is your suggestion that taxes should not be charged as they get passed to the consumer? Your wages get passed to the consumer so maybe you shouldnt be paid either? There is an option other than single flat tax for business and people and that is zero tax on business. If you are going down the second that must be ALL business. BUT dividends must be taxed exactly the same way as income.
108
08/02/2021 11:00:26 4 3
bbc
11 years? Labour were handed a booming economy in 1997 and handed it back destroyed in 2010.
12
08/02/2021 10:33:04 2 15
bbc
Taxes are the people's charity.
17
08/02/2021 10:34:58 2 14
bbc
Do the right thing
you know it makes sense
6
08/02/2021 10:31:51 63 65
bbc
The Tories LOVE tax evasion.
13
Bob
08/02/2021 10:33:21 23 1
bbc
It isn't tax evasion, though, is it.

They are paying full rates for the building in which they operate. Why would they pay rates for a shop when they're not operating from a shop.
53
08/02/2021 10:43:54 13 2
bbc
Tesco didn't care about the high street when they massively expanded their range nor did they when they moved out of town, both of which severely hampered the high street. Now they are having to work harder, they don't like it.
14
08/02/2021 10:33:46 11 6
bbc
This should have been implemented years ago - will the government finally get their act together!??
129
08/02/2021 11:15:14 5 0
bbc
Business rates need to be scrapped and replaced with a fee for services that the council provides (basically nothing in reality) and the only modern option - a sales tax. Yes the consumer pays, but we pay for any tax as where does the money come from for the company to pay their taxes - us! A company cannot really fiddle a sales invoice and so a sales tax is the best and fairest option.
15
08/02/2021 10:34:22 22 8
bbc
Agree with having a tax, bricks and mortar sites simply cannot compete with the well oiled Amazon machine.

I'd make the tax higher and only for companies that reach a particular threshold of sales.

Use the proceeds to provide rate relief for small businesses, the unique kind that offer character to a place. Don't want our high streets to be like the homogenised North American ones.
141
08/02/2021 11:23:20 13 6
bbc
So you would have supported horse drawn carriage manufactures getting handouts from the sale of internal combustion engine vehicles? No business has a right to make a profit just because they used to and there are other options for hight streets than retail - why are GP surgeries not on high-streets, and dentists and more cheists etc... people need more than fifty quid jumpers.
10
08/02/2021 10:32:41 7 14
bbc
So you think it's OK for Amazon to avoid taxes ?
16
08/02/2021 10:34:24 5 2
bbc
What taxes are they avoiding?
44
08/02/2021 10:41:37 4 1
bbc
Every article someone parrots this line but no one ever says what they are avoiding. Amazingly, business rates are more onerous for high street/prime out of town retail locations than for warehouses in the middle of nowhere. What annoys me is the nerve of Tesco who didn't bat an eyelid about the plight of the high street when they moved out of it and expanded their range massively.
12
08/02/2021 10:33:04 2 15
bbc
Taxes are the people's charity.
17
08/02/2021 10:34:58 2 14
bbc
Do the right thing
you know it makes sense
6
08/02/2021 10:31:51 63 65
bbc
The Tories LOVE tax evasion.
18
08/02/2021 10:35:05 25 1
bbc
What taxes are they evading?
69
08/02/2021 10:48:38 9 0
bbc
Good luck with getting a reply to that question. If anyone is struggling to see examples of tax evasion in the real world, have a look at the corporate structure of the Guardian.
10
08/02/2021 10:32:41 7 14
bbc
So you think it's OK for Amazon to avoid taxes ?
19
Bob
08/02/2021 10:35:06 5 1
bbc
Separate issue. Read the article, it is going on about how shops have to pay much higher rates compared to online outlets. They pay the due rates for the premises in which they operate.

The issues you are on about are separate tax matters.
20
08/02/2021 10:35:28 51 6
bbc
Tesco are simply worried about losing market share to Amazon (and rightly so) but there is a bigger issue at stake - and that is providing sustainable, ethical, affordable and quality produce.

As long as these companies insist on stocking kumquats from China (or whatever), supporting slave labour, wrapping them in plastic and transporting them across the planet our world is not going to improve!
7
08/02/2021 10:32:12 3 13
bbc
Speak for yourself.

Shopping at Amazon is unpatriotic.
21
08/02/2021 10:35:50 5 2
bbc
Unpatriotic? Oh dear, the "everything is made in Britain and it's top quality" fantasists are on the loose again.
3
08/02/2021 10:29:55 10 10
bbc
Amazon pay their taxes in line with sovereign UK law, under a government which wants a low-tax and low regulation economy.

If you've never shopped on Amazon, feel free to criticise.
22
08/02/2021 10:31:12 4 5
bbc
Don't shop at Amazon. Hate them.
32
08/02/2021 10:38:42 1 0
bbc
I think love and freedom are more virtuous.
64
08/02/2021 10:47:19 3 0
bbc
You hate Amazon? Why? I think they are the best thing to happen to retail since ever!
23
08/02/2021 10:33:52 209 16
bbc
Tesco weren't so concerned when supermarkets were killing local shops.
34
08/02/2021 10:38:53 82 8
bbc
And pubs!!! Kettle pot eh??
148
08/02/2021 11:28:22 13 15
bbc
Councils killed Local Shops by charging High Rents. Plus Many in Villages struggle to get to the shops. Thanks to Conservative cuts to Bus Services.
247
08/02/2021 12:09:41 2 7
bbc
No one wanted small shops they were less efficient, in our time and money. Same as now on line is better by being much more convenient. Change to better is good for all an£ never a thing to deter by prejudiced tax.
257
08/02/2021 12:10:38 10 7
bbc
Much indirect tax is paid by online retailers. There is tax/NI on staff wages. Tax on packaging. Tax on fuel for delivery. Tax on vehicles. Rates on warehousing and distribution depots etc. Not to mention VAT.
279
08/02/2021 12:25:40 13 2
bbc
Not a fan of Tesco but the point that Online Tech giants are avoiding £billions in tax is a genuine issue.
The UK economy is moving online (retail, advertising, media, etc) and the tax man is failing collect the same % tax on underlying profits... because the tech giants hide and transfer them off shore. Time to fix this or UK public will loose out and have to fund the gap.
305
08/02/2021 12:42:43 6 2
bbc
Yep, this online tax proposal is incredibly stupid. There are thousands of small online shops run by independents, slapping a 2% tax on them they can't afford that doesn't apply to the likes of Tesco will be their death knell. This won't fix the Amazon problem, councils charging fairer business rates and landlords reducing extortionate city centre rent is what's needed to save the high street.
340
08/02/2021 13:04:51 2 1
bbc
Excellent retort
386
08/02/2021 13:35:13 2 0
bbc
Or when they were involved in price-fixing.
436
08/02/2021 14:09:47 1 0
bbc
SOOOOOOPA comment
522
08/02/2021 16:03:01 1 1
bbc
Don't forget that Tesco has a significant online presence these days. That means that they are voting to tax themselves... Wonderful.
659
09/02/2021 03:34:01 0 0
bbc
Dave
Actually you make a good point and not only Tesco but all other super market chains. So I suppose what goes around comes around. However there is a very serious side to this when a high street dies through lake of support so do the funds which keeps a towns amenities and services alive. So in this case maybe they are right this discrimination in favour of online companies rates should stop.
7
08/02/2021 10:32:12 3 13
bbc
Speak for yourself.

Shopping at Amazon is unpatriotic.
25
08/02/2021 10:36:28 13 6
bbc
What ever they do expect it to be passed on the the consumers, none of these companies will give up the profit the have been raking in for years. Better tax the owners personal wealth.
26
Bob
08/02/2021 10:37:01 27 4
bbc
When shops collapse everyone is very quick to say "oh that is a shame, I remember when... I used to... I loved...".

All past tense.

And you wonder why the high street is dying.
317
08/02/2021 12:51:43 6 0
bbc
The high street dies when the likes of Debenhams and M&S leave (ask Grimsby people about what befell Freeman Street when M&S went). Also when the pubs & cafés are forced to close.
520
08/02/2021 16:01:55 0 0
bbc
Precisely. When some of these high street stores were closing people were saying 'what a shame'. When they were asked if they had shopped in those stores, they became suspiciously quiet and admitted they hadn't.
27
08/02/2021 10:37:35 57 11
bbc
This is just retail evolution. Tesco's put all the other high st retailers in trouble when they bought in megastores selling everything. Now Amazon is doing it to them. Sure one day someone else will come along and beat Amazon.

Retail changes and evolves or we would still be bartering out of caves!
426
08/02/2021 13:54:11 9 1
bbc
And in Victorian times the department stores that we're now mourning must have driven many independent drapers, candlestick-makers and many more out of business.
Government and local authorities always need to adapt ways of taxation to keep up with changing times.
452
08/02/2021 15:05:11 0 0
bbc
Amazon has Web Services (accounting for 58% of profit) offering it's services to the likes of the US government, Alphabet has Deepmind with NHS contracts. The tech companies will weave themselves within government and society to a point where I don't see them failing unless something drastic happens to the way we live.
28
08/02/2021 10:37:37 23 5
bbc
It's interesting that supermarkets are backing this when they are at the same time benefitting as far as alcohol sales are concerned and are probably responsible for the closure of a whole host of pub businesses who are undoubtedley going to be hit even harder with the pandemic
11
08/02/2021 10:32:52 22 8
bbc
They call it the future?

Tax them then pass it onto the consumers, no free lunches UK has record debts to pay wracked up in 11 years.
29
08/02/2021 10:37:42 5 14
bbc
Quite.

Pandora's Box, in relation to the facility of online shopping, was opened many years - and the in the last year has it has shown that it is a necessity.

If brick and mortar stores can't compete without tax inequality then maybe it's time for them to go.
50
08/02/2021 10:43:01 6 0
bbc
Stores are needed for social for social interaction something that's being lost since 2000.
121
08/02/2021 11:11:07 4 4
bbc
Well said, its like horse drawn carriage manufactures demanding increased tax on these darn internal combustion engines. Dont forget the BBC champions the cause for the high-street and cash, #livingInThePast.
323
08/02/2021 12:56:19 2 0
bbc
But aren't they having to compete against tax inequality now? Amazon etc. seem to be quite effective about paying next to nothing on their UK turnover because electronically it happens abroad.

Perhaps we'll see town centre rates fall and out of town rates rise, although that's as likely to getTesco as Amazon.
30
08/02/2021 10:37:53 76 23
bbc
While we're at it,
can local councils cease the habit of incentivising chains to the high street
via £100,000 sweeteners using resident's council taxes?
37
08/02/2021 10:39:47 64 19
bbc
and stop using council taxes to invest in other authorities'
doomed shopping centre vanity projects
414
08/02/2021 13:44:24 2 0
bbc
And incentivising building firms to build "luxury" ant house apartments that add nothing but extra council tax to local govt coffers - and not seen as a benefit to actual residents?
31
08/02/2021 10:38:36 4 4
bbc
Why increase taxes on Amazon etc.

Why not reduce business rates on shops?

Why is the answer always to tax success?

Why not level the playing field by reducing tax for a change?
22
08/02/2021 10:31:12 4 5
bbc
Don't shop at Amazon. Hate them.
32
08/02/2021 10:38:42 1 0
bbc
I think love and freedom are more virtuous.
33
08/02/2021 10:38:49 5 4
bbc
Problem being we have a generation that just think life is all online, using your legs is really good for your health. Tax them.
40
Bob
08/02/2021 10:40:58 5 0
bbc
9 in 10 use Amazon services. https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/mar/07/almost-90-of-uk-shoppers-use-amazon-research-reveals

You think 9 in 10 adults are the young generation?
41
08/02/2021 10:41:01 3 0
bbc
Tax your legs? How are you going to foot the bill?
100
08/02/2021 11:01:45 1 0
bbc
Due to ageing and mobility issues, my life is all online. I'd love to use my legs if they would work!
23
08/02/2021 10:33:52 209 16
bbc
Tesco weren't so concerned when supermarkets were killing local shops.
34
08/02/2021 10:38:53 82 8
bbc
And pubs!!! Kettle pot eh??
35
08/02/2021 10:38:53 1 1
bbc
Yup, seems fair. Also though the likes of Tesco etc. should pay profit tax in the UK like the corner shop does. So single flat tax on all income for people and business works best with a single flat benefit for all legally here. Two numbers, easy to see which gvmt is doing the best job AND the whole dss/tax could be on a single lap top in number 11. All brilliant.
36
08/02/2021 10:39:11 37 8
bbc
Coming from Tesco, that rich.
Personally, I hope it hits them in the pocket.
My town had thriving High Street small food businesses, grocers, bakers etc., but nearly all gone now thanks to Tesco, then by the addition of Aldi.
Maybe Tesco should put some of their profits into regenerating the High street instead of whinging about the competition.
90
08/02/2021 10:56:28 9 1
bbc
But it saved consumers money.
But governments just ignored.
Those that couldn't travel
Cost on environment
and the now replacement of smaller shops with Tesco Local et al that charge higher prices than supermarkets, like well local shops did.

Got to keep that profit up so they can falsely report it you know.
150
08/02/2021 11:28:56 2 0
bbc
Just as bad is that they have they're small Tesco, Sainsburys etc and have the cheek to charge higher prices for the same products.
30
08/02/2021 10:37:53 76 23
bbc
While we're at it,
can local councils cease the habit of incentivising chains to the high street
via £100,000 sweeteners using resident's council taxes?
37
08/02/2021 10:39:47 64 19
bbc
and stop using council taxes to invest in other authorities'
doomed shopping centre vanity projects
38
08/02/2021 10:40:05 23 6
bbc
Who's kidding who? Any on-line tax will be paid by the customer, not the retailer.
58
08/02/2021 10:45:10 20 8
bbc
Which is exactly the point, if online shopping is no cheaper than going to the shops, the shops have a better chance.
39
08/02/2021 10:40:44 27 1
bbc
I own a small shop and this last 10 months or so has been devastating... I will not be able to reopen... 16 years of successful trade destroyed...This pandemic has laid this uneven playing field wide open. It was tough before, with how this has been "managed" and the clear bias demonstrated - this in power may say they want a high street etc, I fear it's too late, the damage is done.
78
08/02/2021 10:53:24 30 1
bbc
The damage was done a long time ago. The problem is that none of us want to take the responsibility, but for all we point at the big boys - Amazon etc, the simple truth is if we had continued to shop on the high street instead of online, the high street would still be thriving. We can blame who we want, but the truth is, the demise of the high street is down to each and every one of us!
553
08/02/2021 16:43:06 0 0
bbc
All it's done is accelerate what was going to happen anyway. The only people I know who still shop on the high street on a regular basis are OAPs.
33
08/02/2021 10:38:49 5 4
bbc
Problem being we have a generation that just think life is all online, using your legs is really good for your health. Tax them.
40
Bob
08/02/2021 10:40:58 5 0
bbc
9 in 10 use Amazon services. https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/mar/07/almost-90-of-uk-shoppers-use-amazon-research-reveals

You think 9 in 10 adults are the young generation?
33
08/02/2021 10:38:49 5 4
bbc
Problem being we have a generation that just think life is all online, using your legs is really good for your health. Tax them.
41
08/02/2021 10:41:01 3 0
bbc
Tax your legs? How are you going to foot the bill?
42
08/02/2021 10:38:43 1 0
bbc
Agree on this : online does have major advantages over physical stores.

'Levelling up' of some kind is required : a mix perhaps of a tax and certainly rates reform. Landlords will also have to be more realistic.
43
08/02/2021 10:39:15 76 8
bbc
High street butchers fishmongers , green grocers and pubs call for supermarkets to pay higher rates on out of town shopping centres .....
16
08/02/2021 10:34:24 5 2
bbc
What taxes are they avoiding?
44
08/02/2021 10:41:37 4 1
bbc
Every article someone parrots this line but no one ever says what they are avoiding. Amazingly, business rates are more onerous for high street/prime out of town retail locations than for warehouses in the middle of nowhere. What annoys me is the nerve of Tesco who didn't bat an eyelid about the plight of the high street when they moved out of it and expanded their range massively.
125
08/02/2021 11:12:06 1 0
bbc
Not only that but nobody seems to understand that avoidance is legal, evasion is not - when you pay into your pension pot you are avoiding income taxes! Perfectly legal, perfectly fair is it not?
45
Bob
08/02/2021 10:41:57 2 0
bbc
And hit the supermarkets who try to con customers with fake goods sources and pricing as shown on BBC this morning, or does that not count eh TESCO and ASDA
6
08/02/2021 10:31:51 63 65
bbc
The Tories LOVE tax evasion.
46
08/02/2021 10:42:34 18 1
bbc
What tax evasion?
47
Tex
08/02/2021 10:42:39 1 1
bbc
If I cannot buy on the High St., clothing, shoes and books, I will just have to start making my own, as I can not buy them on line as I am not able to try them on. They could always bring in a new classification for business rates on the online traders warehouses.
92
08/02/2021 10:57:33 1 0
bbc
Why do you need to try books on?
269
08/02/2021 12:18:29 0 0
bbc
Why can't you read the "sales & returns policy" - are you banned from that, too?

Good luck making you own car; presumably you're also banned from test-drives.
48
08/02/2021 10:42:42 89 16
bbc
Tesco is very lucky, they can still sell clothes, cards etc , whilst many smaller shops only selling these goods are forced to close.

So give it a rest Tesco
97
08/02/2021 10:59:36 18 29
bbc
They don't though as they are non-essential purchases. The clothes section of my local Tescos has been closed since Christmas.
511
08/02/2021 15:53:44 0 0
bbc
The smaller shops all could have bought some tins of beans and put them in the window... then open for selling groceries so could be open. I do know some places where the owner actually did it - its legal and in my opinion totally moral.
1
Bob
08/02/2021 10:28:21 12 17
bbc
People don't want high streets. If they did, they wouldn't be dying.

People want the best price and convenience of delivery. That happens online.

If you introduce an online sales tax to create a level playing field all you will do is raise prices but online will still win out on convenience. It won't abate the demise of physical shopping.
49
08/02/2021 10:42:44 2 1
bbc
People do want the high street otherwise all of the shops would close overnight. Don't be fooled by this "on-line convenience" mantra. I have recently had a number of bad experiences with on-line, something which has crept in over recent years (too much demand, not able to cope??). I have been purchasing online for well over 10 years, but it's starting to creak. Always pick high street where I can
29
08/02/2021 10:37:42 5 14
bbc
Quite.

Pandora's Box, in relation to the facility of online shopping, was opened many years - and the in the last year has it has shown that it is a necessity.

If brick and mortar stores can't compete without tax inequality then maybe it's time for them to go.
50
08/02/2021 10:43:01 6 0
bbc
Stores are needed for social for social interaction something that's being lost since 2000.
222
08/02/2021 11:56:17 3 0
bbc
certainly true for the high street, not so sure about edge of town supermarkets.
51
08/02/2021 10:43:03 15 1
bbc
The big supermarkets have helped erode the high street, now they sell everything as well as food, small businesses cannot compete.
52
Bob
08/02/2021 10:43:05 20 5
bbc
An online sales tax does not help high street businesses struggling with high rates.

Retail parks would be the ultimate winner as they already pay lower rates vs. the high street.

Fix the rates system - don't create another tax.
162
08/02/2021 11:32:12 5 5
bbc
The solution is obvious, get rid of business rates and increase VAT. The population would not like that (myself included) - then again I dont want to subsidize the high street either. I dont want to use the high street why would I want to pay for it? If nobody wants to pay for it, why subsidise it?
13
Bob
08/02/2021 10:33:21 23 1
bbc
It isn't tax evasion, though, is it.

They are paying full rates for the building in which they operate. Why would they pay rates for a shop when they're not operating from a shop.
53
08/02/2021 10:43:54 13 2
bbc
Tesco didn't care about the high street when they massively expanded their range nor did they when they moved out of town, both of which severely hampered the high street. Now they are having to work harder, they don't like it.
82
08/02/2021 10:54:14 10 0
bbc
I agree with you guys. The High St is gone, lost to superstores, on-line shopping and out-of-town shopping centres. There is no longer any advantage in being in town centres and therefore their rates should be reduced. The only issue is how will the lost Inland Revenue be made-up? Either we all pay more income tax or a new revenue line is needed e.g. on-line sales tax. Discuss :)
54
08/02/2021 10:44:22 1 0
bbc
oh the irony
73
08/02/2021 10:50:22 3 0
bbc
It is rather pot/kettle, when Tesco et al did to small independent shops and smaller supermarket chains what they are complaining about Amazon etc doing now. But then, we're not supposed to remember that are we?
7
08/02/2021 10:32:12 3 13
bbc
Speak for yourself.

Shopping at Amazon is unpatriotic.
55
08/02/2021 10:44:45 0 0
bbc
Why? Nearly 50% of Amazon's sales in the UK are not actually made by Amazon. Sure some of those sellers may well be English,
56
08/02/2021 10:44:56 2 1
bbc
This needs to happen, perhaps an online delivery tax might be the best fit which would allow consumers to order several items at a time reducing the carbon footprint of any delivery too...
57
08/02/2021 10:45:04 6 1
bbc
A business should be able to operate anywhere. Take for instance an app that lives on a server, yet could make millions/billions and pay no business rates as it doesn't have a physical premises. Business rates are based on an outdated 20th century system whereby businesses had physical properties of a certain type, in particular places. It isn't suitable today and needs to be scrapped/replaced.
62
OwO
08/02/2021 10:46:47 1 3
bbc
How does the app get there, George? Who runs and maintains the service? These things just don't happen by themselves.
38
08/02/2021 10:40:05 23 6
bbc
Who's kidding who? Any on-line tax will be paid by the customer, not the retailer.
58
08/02/2021 10:45:10 20 8
bbc
Which is exactly the point, if online shopping is no cheaper than going to the shops, the shops have a better chance.
112
08/02/2021 11:05:25 9 0
bbc
Very few people shop online because it's cheaper I think. It's the convenience more than anything. I can either drive to the local high street, pay for parking and then spend ages walking from shop to shop in the vain hope they have what I want or I can go online and get exactly what I want delivered in 24 hours.
169
08/02/2021 11:35:34 7 0
bbc
Why do the shops have to survive? Did tesco stop selling cards when card shops pointed out they would make less money? Did horse drawn carriage makers get handouts from internal combustion sales? You could put something else on the high street if shops close, e.g. GP surgeries as you have good transport links etc...
262
08/02/2021 12:15:53 6 0
bbc
Actually shop are deluding themselves if they think people shop on line instead of the high street is down to price.

On line is better, easier, more pleasant, you can actually find what you want, it is delivered to the door, you need run no expensive car, it is vastly less polluting than people going to get goods too.

Shops are the 2nd/3rd best way to get any goods. Mail order is poss better.
59
08/02/2021 10:45:12 1 0
bbc
In real terms business rates have been increased by over 37% since their introduction in1990. HMG now takes about 1/3 of the combined rent/rates paid by occupiers so effectively they are getting 1/3rd of the value of all commercial property in the UK. Furthermore if rents fall the rateable value only decreases slowly so many shops are now let at very low rents but the rates stay very high.
60
08/02/2021 10:45:27 26 2
bbc
The online business model has created a far more consumer friendly environment but has left the various tax authorities across the World lagging behind the technology

A simple transactional tax at the point of sale (much like the consumer tax on fuel) should be introduced thus overcoming the arguments as to corporate residency and company tax liabilities
81
08/02/2021 10:54:09 14 6
bbc
There already is a transactional tax at point of sale, its called VAT. :-) All very well on-street businesses complaining about the unfairness of online companies, but they failed to adapt to a changing market, and are now facing the consequences. History is full of the skeletons of past businesses that failed as a result.
475
08/02/2021 15:18:35 1 0
bbc
Another layer of VAT you mean that is simply collected by Amazon?
61
08/02/2021 10:45:53 4 2
bbc
Amazon and their like are all about destroying the competition, then they will hike prices and force you to take up Amazon Prime or the alternative will be no free P&P. Don't come on her whinging when that happens, the warning signs are clear to see. As for Tesco, they too grew by blowing away the small independant stores. A bit rich. They also feel the bite from Aldi and Lidl, hence the ads.
86
08/02/2021 10:55:17 0 2
bbc
Except the ads from Aldi (or Lidl, I always mix them up) are blatant lies. They compare a basket of Tesco goods containing all name brands to a basket of their own label products. Compare like for like and there is no difference.
57
08/02/2021 10:45:04 6 1
bbc
A business should be able to operate anywhere. Take for instance an app that lives on a server, yet could make millions/billions and pay no business rates as it doesn't have a physical premises. Business rates are based on an outdated 20th century system whereby businesses had physical properties of a certain type, in particular places. It isn't suitable today and needs to be scrapped/replaced.
62
OwO
08/02/2021 10:46:47 1 3
bbc
How does the app get there, George? Who runs and maintains the service? These things just don't happen by themselves.
75
08/02/2021 10:52:11 4 0
bbc
You're missing the point. It could be people collaborating from home. Why should a business like I used as an example not have to pay taxes (which business rates are) and other businesses have to? Fewer businesses have/need the physical presence that business rates were designed for and that's the issue.
94
08/02/2021 10:58:43 2 0
bbc
So a person in Germany writes the app, it's maintained by a team in India, transactions are processed through Luxembourg and Canada. The virtual cloud it runs on is spread over several different countries. Where does the tax for someone buying that app get paid? That's the reality of the modern world. We need a global tax system but it's not in the interest of many Governments.
99
08/02/2021 11:00:56 3 0
bbc
And of course the server could be physically located in another country altogether.
63
08/02/2021 10:47:02 1 1
bbc
Really people. The situation is simple. Companies are skipping paying taxes (legally, various gvmts have people owning part of these big companies) by offshoring profit. I pay tax on my income, companies should do the same. Money comes from the consumer to the company, they pay the same rate of tax on that as I do. Thats simple and fair. Avoids offshoring profit.
79
08/02/2021 10:53:45 0 0
bbc
It's not that simple. Amazon is a US company and that's where they pay the majority of their tax. Should British companies that sell to Saudi Arabia, India, China etc pay all their tax there rather than here?
110
Bob
08/02/2021 11:04:41 0 0
bbc
Now read the article and see how Tesco et al are citing business rates as the issue.

Online outlets pay full due rates on the locations they have. No one is skipping those taxes.

It is simply that the rates system isn't "fair".
22
08/02/2021 10:31:12 4 5
bbc
Don't shop at Amazon. Hate them.
64
08/02/2021 10:47:19 3 0
bbc
You hate Amazon? Why? I think they are the best thing to happen to retail since ever!
1
Bob
08/02/2021 10:28:21 12 17
bbc
People don't want high streets. If they did, they wouldn't be dying.

People want the best price and convenience of delivery. That happens online.

If you introduce an online sales tax to create a level playing field all you will do is raise prices but online will still win out on convenience. It won't abate the demise of physical shopping.
65
08/02/2021 10:47:50 0 0
bbc
People used to use high streets until supermarkets moved out of town and started to sell everything.

Sure all of the small bricks and mortar retailers who survive by way of ancillary online sales will be thrilled by another tax burden. And if it's on sales, just remember that quite a high % of Amazon sales aren't actually made by Amazon.
66
08/02/2021 10:48:02 73 12
bbc
Ironic that Tesco (along with others having all but ruined high street shopping with out of town superstores) is complaining that on-line trading are putting them out of business!
143
08/02/2021 11:26:40 16 3
bbc
I remember articles with headlines like "high streets too crammed, nowhere to park, too many people" - why would you want everyone to go to the same small place to shop? Its stupid, you end up paying a fiver to park for what? It made sense 100 years ago, when only 5% of the population could afford to buy new things from shops.
211
08/02/2021 11:51:57 5 0
bbc
Yes, it's inevitable. Activity will always flow to where the cost is lowest.

High streets face doom unless they can reinvent themselves.
582
08/02/2021 17:35:52 1 0
bbc
Yes but to a certain extent you still had a choice, it was not a single supermarket.

Unchecked Amazon will be a global monopoly and about the only thing you will still be able to buy from anyone else will be a burger. They are worse than any supermarket and have one goal, global domination. Amazon should never have been permitted to move into food and pharmacy.
4
08/02/2021 10:30:34 169 18
bbc
That's the same Tesco that sells cards when the card shops are forced to close, sells clothes when clothes shops are forced to close etc etc. All of the supermarkets have profited greatly from the lockdowns and should be included in any windfall tax imposed.
67
08/02/2021 10:48:19 56 10
bbc
You know this tax would apply on their online sales too right?
96
08/02/2021 10:59:03 8 3
bbc
Not the point, supermarkets are making storming profits right now and not only because of online.
355
08/02/2021 13:17:52 3 2
bbc
Clearly not as hard, as this is a ploy to try and bankrupt as many of their small competition as possible, they are a joke
68
08/02/2021 10:48:22 1 0
bbc
A Treasury spokesperson said: "We want to see thriving High Streets..." Why?
104
08/02/2021 11:03:53 3 0
bbc
Because that money creates jobs in that local area, more cash spent in that community stays in that community rather that one warehouse 100 miles away...
18
08/02/2021 10:35:05 25 1
bbc
What taxes are they evading?
69
08/02/2021 10:48:38 9 0
bbc
Good luck with getting a reply to that question. If anyone is struggling to see examples of tax evasion in the real world, have a look at the corporate structure of the Guardian.
2
08/02/2021 10:28:39 72 28
bbc
No doubt someone will point out that what Amazon / Boots / Branson etc are doing is legal.

Well yes, it may be legal. But it stinks.

Why won't the government change this situation ?
70
08/02/2021 10:48:39 1 1
bbc
Because they profit from it too.
71
08/02/2021 10:48:45 2 0
bbc
That includes Tesco On Line I am assuming.
72
08/02/2021 10:49:21 1 0
bbc
Not a difficult one to solve, get rid of business rates and then apply a sales tax to all sales, that way larger organisations who sell more will pay more.
74
08/02/2021 10:52:02 2 1
bbc
Sales tax is just like VAT. It's the customer that pays in the end not the business.
88
08/02/2021 10:56:17 1 0
bbc
Business Rates have a function & ensure the best use of retail space using pricing otherwise your town center might just consist of one superstore instead of smaller retail outlets...
54
08/02/2021 10:44:22 1 0
bbc
oh the irony
73
08/02/2021 10:50:22 3 0
bbc
It is rather pot/kettle, when Tesco et al did to small independent shops and smaller supermarket chains what they are complaining about Amazon etc doing now. But then, we're not supposed to remember that are we?
72
08/02/2021 10:49:21 1 0
bbc
Not a difficult one to solve, get rid of business rates and then apply a sales tax to all sales, that way larger organisations who sell more will pay more.
74
08/02/2021 10:52:02 2 1
bbc
Sales tax is just like VAT. It's the customer that pays in the end not the business.
91
08/02/2021 10:56:48 2 0
bbc
The customer pays all tax, sale, rates, corp tax, or anything else - it's all factored in to the price you pay.
A simple sales tax makes more sense, as does a flat rate income tax with lower incomes supported by personal allowances.
95
08/02/2021 10:59:00 0 0
bbc
True. But then, as has been said elsewhere, once Amazon etc have the virtual monopoly, they will start raising prices anyway, so the customer will pay regardless. So many just go straight to Amazon, assume it will be cheaper, and don't even look elsewhere, that it has started already.
62
OwO
08/02/2021 10:46:47 1 3
bbc
How does the app get there, George? Who runs and maintains the service? These things just don't happen by themselves.
75
08/02/2021 10:52:11 4 0
bbc
You're missing the point. It could be people collaborating from home. Why should a business like I used as an example not have to pay taxes (which business rates are) and other businesses have to? Fewer businesses have/need the physical presence that business rates were designed for and that's the issue.
76
08/02/2021 10:52:22 8 2
bbc
Why should online stores pay more tax ? Why do the retailers move their operations more online too ? Reduce the number of similar lines etc and reduce the size of their stores and go back to High Street locations but with better parking - the Councils have a role to play here too - it is not purely down to the retailers - joined up thinking is needed !
77
08/02/2021 10:53:19 5 2
bbc
The UK will do nothing about tax dodging; To many of our top politicians (across all parties) have overseas interests & money hidden away around the globe for tax avoidance purposes.

For our leaders to implement anti-tax dodging methods they would have to sacrifice some of their personal wealth.
101
08/02/2021 11:02:35 0 2
bbc
Do they really? You must name them then
39
08/02/2021 10:40:44 27 1
bbc
I own a small shop and this last 10 months or so has been devastating... I will not be able to reopen... 16 years of successful trade destroyed...This pandemic has laid this uneven playing field wide open. It was tough before, with how this has been "managed" and the clear bias demonstrated - this in power may say they want a high street etc, I fear it's too late, the damage is done.
78
08/02/2021 10:53:24 30 1
bbc
The damage was done a long time ago. The problem is that none of us want to take the responsibility, but for all we point at the big boys - Amazon etc, the simple truth is if we had continued to shop on the high street instead of online, the high street would still be thriving. We can blame who we want, but the truth is, the demise of the high street is down to each and every one of us!
124
08/02/2021 11:11:59 3 1
bbc
True but austerity policies has hit the high street badly. Prior to it low income groups would spend a day in town with a bit of cash they had, now people have to pay exorbitant cost of living hikes and live with cuts. No money to go to the high street any more.

Furthermore many people have higher debt today than in the halcyon decades after the War.
216
08/02/2021 11:54:32 5 0
bbc
Sure it is, and why? Because we all want to pay less for what we buy. Besides, how many times can you honestly say you enjoy walking up and down the high street in the rain to 5 different small shops when you can click buy on Amazon? Talk to my mum, she loves everything being delivered!
402
08/02/2021 13:40:15 2 0
bbc
I gave up climbing over drunks/druggies in the shop centre car park with inadequate lighting, and stopped paying excessive fees there to use the shops. That's what killed Croydon, that and greedy Councillors ahnd in glove with developers who fleeced them without mercy.Now town centre is dead, offices have gone, car parks even more squalid, why we don't shop in town any more, that's what killed it.
63
08/02/2021 10:47:02 1 1
bbc
Really people. The situation is simple. Companies are skipping paying taxes (legally, various gvmts have people owning part of these big companies) by offshoring profit. I pay tax on my income, companies should do the same. Money comes from the consumer to the company, they pay the same rate of tax on that as I do. Thats simple and fair. Avoids offshoring profit.
79
08/02/2021 10:53:45 0 0
bbc
It's not that simple. Amazon is a US company and that's where they pay the majority of their tax. Should British companies that sell to Saudi Arabia, India, China etc pay all their tax there rather than here?
80
08/02/2021 10:54:03 3 1
bbc
Stop taxing business premises & profit, simply increase VAT to be the single (variable)tax on goods/services sold and a tax on the value of goods exported, this way it can't be avoided.
200
08/02/2021 11:46:08 1 1
bbc
Problem is, there's no tax on most foods
224
08/02/2021 11:57:24 0 0
bbc
The reason the tax system is so complex in this country is to benefit the HMRC executives and tax firms who are deep in each other’s pockets. all legitimate of course!
60
08/02/2021 10:45:27 26 2
bbc
The online business model has created a far more consumer friendly environment but has left the various tax authorities across the World lagging behind the technology

A simple transactional tax at the point of sale (much like the consumer tax on fuel) should be introduced thus overcoming the arguments as to corporate residency and company tax liabilities
81
08/02/2021 10:54:09 14 6
bbc
There already is a transactional tax at point of sale, its called VAT. :-) All very well on-street businesses complaining about the unfairness of online companies, but they failed to adapt to a changing market, and are now facing the consequences. History is full of the skeletons of past businesses that failed as a result.
142
08/02/2021 11:24:14 7 0
bbc
VAT is value added - a company can reclaim its input VAT cost, whereas a sales/transactional tax would not allow this. There is a difference.
53
08/02/2021 10:43:54 13 2
bbc
Tesco didn't care about the high street when they massively expanded their range nor did they when they moved out of town, both of which severely hampered the high street. Now they are having to work harder, they don't like it.
82
08/02/2021 10:54:14 10 0
bbc
I agree with you guys. The High St is gone, lost to superstores, on-line shopping and out-of-town shopping centres. There is no longer any advantage in being in town centres and therefore their rates should be reduced. The only issue is how will the lost Inland Revenue be made-up? Either we all pay more income tax or a new revenue line is needed e.g. on-line sales tax. Discuss :)
170
08/02/2021 11:35:59 2 0
bbc
A uniform tax rate based on the volume of a commercial property, be it shop or warehouse, would seem to do the trick. The (rateable) value of the property then becomes immaterial, and not subject to dispute.
266
08/02/2021 12:15:26 2 1
bbc
Tax on stinky ICE vehicle fuel. It has not been put up for ages. Whack it up now.
394
08/02/2021 13:37:45 0 0
bbc
NNDR does need an overhaul or at the least a rates revaluation. Problem is, although it may be good for the end retailer, I can't see the landlords going for it as I would hazard a guess that a downward revaluation would absolutely slaughter their balance sheets and breach covenants which would instigate a brand new set of problems.
11
08/02/2021 10:32:52 22 8
bbc
They call it the future?

Tax them then pass it onto the consumers, no free lunches UK has record debts to pay wracked up in 11 years.
83
08/02/2021 10:54:36 5 0
bbc
Is your suggestion that taxes should not be charged as they get passed to the consumer? Your wages get passed to the consumer so maybe you shouldnt be paid either? There is an option other than single flat tax for business and people and that is zero tax on business. If you are going down the second that must be ALL business. BUT dividends must be taxed exactly the same way as income.
84
08/02/2021 10:54:39 5 2
bbc
Sour grapes from 20th century food retail ?
85
08/02/2021 10:55:08 4 2
bbc
I'm sure businesses have objected. Do consumers get a say - I use amazon daily , amazon prime is fantastic value, especially if you watch amazon prime. why would I want to pay another adhoc tax -VAT is bad enough. John Lewis is competitive offering excellent post-purchase surface so I buy TVs, white goods from them in preference to Amazon -food M&S, Sainsburys - horses for courses.
61
08/02/2021 10:45:53 4 2
bbc
Amazon and their like are all about destroying the competition, then they will hike prices and force you to take up Amazon Prime or the alternative will be no free P&P. Don't come on her whinging when that happens, the warning signs are clear to see. As for Tesco, they too grew by blowing away the small independant stores. A bit rich. They also feel the bite from Aldi and Lidl, hence the ads.
86
08/02/2021 10:55:17 0 2
bbc
Except the ads from Aldi (or Lidl, I always mix them up) are blatant lies. They compare a basket of Tesco goods containing all name brands to a basket of their own label products. Compare like for like and there is no difference.
87
08/02/2021 10:56:04 1 0
bbc
"our competitors should pay more tax" - not a new statement and not exactly unexpected, given how much profit supermarkets make this also seems more than a little dishonest. VAT is already 20%, seems high enough to me, this all seems to be a grand plan to force people to drive to physical shops, because "thats what we have always done" -you know its more environmentally friendly to deliver right?
72
08/02/2021 10:49:21 1 0
bbc
Not a difficult one to solve, get rid of business rates and then apply a sales tax to all sales, that way larger organisations who sell more will pay more.
88
08/02/2021 10:56:17 1 0
bbc
Business Rates have a function & ensure the best use of retail space using pricing otherwise your town center might just consist of one superstore instead of smaller retail outlets...
89
08/02/2021 10:56:20 3 1
bbc
I agree that online shops should overall pay more tax (if they are aren't already) but why should they pay property tax if they're not occupying any property?

Running an online shop comes with a different cost structure (returns, cloud hosting etc) that physical shops don't incur, should Tesco etc, be forced to pay those too to create a "level playing field"?
36
08/02/2021 10:39:11 37 8
bbc
Coming from Tesco, that rich.
Personally, I hope it hits them in the pocket.
My town had thriving High Street small food businesses, grocers, bakers etc., but nearly all gone now thanks to Tesco, then by the addition of Aldi.
Maybe Tesco should put some of their profits into regenerating the High street instead of whinging about the competition.
90
08/02/2021 10:56:28 9 1
bbc
But it saved consumers money.
But governments just ignored.
Those that couldn't travel
Cost on environment
and the now replacement of smaller shops with Tesco Local et al that charge higher prices than supermarkets, like well local shops did.

Got to keep that profit up so they can falsely report it you know.
74
08/02/2021 10:52:02 2 1
bbc
Sales tax is just like VAT. It's the customer that pays in the end not the business.
91
08/02/2021 10:56:48 2 0
bbc
The customer pays all tax, sale, rates, corp tax, or anything else - it's all factored in to the price you pay.
A simple sales tax makes more sense, as does a flat rate income tax with lower incomes supported by personal allowances.
47
Tex
08/02/2021 10:42:39 1 1
bbc
If I cannot buy on the High St., clothing, shoes and books, I will just have to start making my own, as I can not buy them on line as I am not able to try them on. They could always bring in a new classification for business rates on the online traders warehouses.
92
08/02/2021 10:57:33 1 0
bbc
Why do you need to try books on?
93
08/02/2021 10:58:25 8 0
bbc
Taxation has two purposes

1. To provide gov’t revenue to fund our services
2. To encourage certain types of behaviour (sticks & carrots).

Our system penalises city centre bricks and mortar sales over online and out of town - this is no accident.

It is also no accident that it benefits big business over small independents.

Our taxation system is not fit for purpose and it's time for a rethink!
62
OwO
08/02/2021 10:46:47 1 3
bbc
How does the app get there, George? Who runs and maintains the service? These things just don't happen by themselves.
94
08/02/2021 10:58:43 2 0
bbc
So a person in Germany writes the app, it's maintained by a team in India, transactions are processed through Luxembourg and Canada. The virtual cloud it runs on is spread over several different countries. Where does the tax for someone buying that app get paid? That's the reality of the modern world. We need a global tax system but it's not in the interest of many Governments.
74
08/02/2021 10:52:02 2 1
bbc
Sales tax is just like VAT. It's the customer that pays in the end not the business.
95
08/02/2021 10:59:00 0 0
bbc
True. But then, as has been said elsewhere, once Amazon etc have the virtual monopoly, they will start raising prices anyway, so the customer will pay regardless. So many just go straight to Amazon, assume it will be cheaper, and don't even look elsewhere, that it has started already.
67
08/02/2021 10:48:19 56 10
bbc
You know this tax would apply on their online sales too right?
96
08/02/2021 10:59:03 8 3
bbc
Not the point, supermarkets are making storming profits right now and not only because of online.
48
08/02/2021 10:42:42 89 16
bbc
Tesco is very lucky, they can still sell clothes, cards etc , whilst many smaller shops only selling these goods are forced to close.

So give it a rest Tesco
97
08/02/2021 10:59:36 18 29
bbc
They don't though as they are non-essential purchases. The clothes section of my local Tescos has been closed since Christmas.
126
08/02/2021 11:12:34 19 1
bbc
My local Tesco supermarket has continued to sell clothes and all 'non essential' items, as has the huge M&S next door to it
133
08/02/2021 11:17:47 17 0
bbc
In the Tesco stores around Manchester the clothing and greeting cards sections are still open, as are all other aisles containing non-essential goods .

It seems as if there's no conformity throughout the stores if your local store closed the above lanes.
I wonder why that is
313
08/02/2021 12:48:12 1 1
bbc
You don't need clothes?
331
08/02/2021 13:00:34 6 0
bbc
All the tesco superstores in Chester are still open for 'non essential' items and have been all the way through the lockdowns
358
08/02/2021 13:18:35 5 0
bbc
Must be the only one, I've been in one in Lancashire and nothing is closed off
419
08/02/2021 13:49:37 3 0
bbc
I think you must live in Wales - in the rest of the UK there have been no restrictions on selling "non-essential" goods. Although in the weather we're having, I think even nudists would consider clothes essential!
501
08/02/2021 15:41:31 0 0
bbc
You are aware that its tax on amazon boohoo etc the companies that are killing the high street and local jobs do you think its fare that John Lewis who employs local people should pay 170 million business rates while amazon pays 14 million.
561
08/02/2021 16:58:24 0 0
bbc
Only one in the UK by the sound of it. Ours in Essex were roped off for the first lockdown but have been open right through this time.
4
08/02/2021 10:30:34 169 18
bbc
That's the same Tesco that sells cards when the card shops are forced to close, sells clothes when clothes shops are forced to close etc etc. All of the supermarkets have profited greatly from the lockdowns and should be included in any windfall tax imposed.
98
08/02/2021 11:00:33 5 0
bbc
My Tescos has had it's clothes section closed since the lockdown started as it's non-essential.
140
08/02/2021 11:22:21 7 0
bbc
Mine hasn't. All sections open including clothing and homeware. Same with the huge M&S next door to it
62
OwO
08/02/2021 10:46:47 1 3
bbc
How does the app get there, George? Who runs and maintains the service? These things just don't happen by themselves.
99
08/02/2021 11:00:56 3 0
bbc
And of course the server could be physically located in another country altogether.
33
08/02/2021 10:38:49 5 4
bbc
Problem being we have a generation that just think life is all online, using your legs is really good for your health. Tax them.
100
08/02/2021 11:01:45 1 0
bbc
Due to ageing and mobility issues, my life is all online. I'd love to use my legs if they would work!
614
08/02/2021 19:19:21 0 0
bbc
Good Point, I am sorry your right,