How will 'chipageddon' affect you?
05/02/2021 | news | technology | 217
Carmakers and consumer-gadget companies are struggling to source enough computer chips.
1
05/02/2021 10:36:16 35 11
bbc
How will 'chipageddon' affect you?

It won't.
8
05/02/2021 11:04:36 21 8
bbc
This is a shortsighted viewpoint. Whilst you may not be directly affected (job loss/new tech purchases), this is a major multinational industry. Of course it will have knock-on effects. They might not all be negative though - for example, if manufacturing is moved locally, to avoid reliance on Taiwan/S.Korea, this may benefit local incomes and reduce environmental impact, e.g. transport emissions.
46
05/02/2021 12:44:08 3 0
bbc
It will long term, the West happily off shored all it's critical tech manufacture for the sake of cheap labour and those chickens are coming home to roost now the East controls the tap. The same thing also happened in pharmaceuticals with API and excipient production first to go, we'll forget how to make stuff.
64
meh
05/02/2021 13:45:53 7 2
bbc
True it will NOT affect a single child or anyone working from home. After all who the f**k needs a computer to work from home or remote learning. We can use carrier pigeons or maybe typewriters? :)

And let's not forget. Electric cars have zero chips in them so f**k it let's carry on using older diesels because they're chip free.

So yup not a single person will be affected. Happy Days :)
204
06/02/2021 16:42:20 0 0
bbc
well done
either you managed to read an entire article and not understand it or you just skipped on by to the end

bet you voted for brexit too
2
05/02/2021 10:41:25 4 9
bbc
The industry is awash with talk about the latest Xbox, and it's LACK of demand. Microsoft are carefully managing stock levels in retail, so there aren't shelves of unwanted stock. Sony have released their sales numbers, and have sold everything they have made, Microsoft decline to mention sales numbers, as it would uncover the charade.
3
05/02/2021 10:42:26 14 4
bbc
Wait for the shortness of raw food to start, third world struggled to harvest last year, will be the same this year, it will make the shortness of chips look like a small headache
131
05/02/2021 16:49:37 3 0
bbc
Not being able to get a 5G phone or PS5 is such a first world problem. Get over it.
4
05/02/2021 10:42:41 144 9
bbc
The perfect time to keep your car, laptop, iPhone, etc in use and resist the urge to buy a new one.

This relentless cycle of replacing perfectly functional and serviceable items is a major contributor to resource and energy consumption and thus drives climate change.

The time for consumerism to be viewed in a negative light is well overdue.
26
Tom
05/02/2021 11:53:47 61 1
bbc
Couldn't agree more. I've been in the habit of keeping my cars for 10 years at least and, apart from friends ribbing me that I should 'get a newer model,' I've not suffered. The same with white goods, telly etc. which seem to last forever if you give them the chance to. Not like the old days when these things broke at the drop of hat, is it?
27
05/02/2021 11:56:25 5 14
bbc
The problem with your statement is that it doesn't drive climate change. I am not denying that it doesn't contribute in some small part, but drive it? No. On the other hand it does make people feel happier. Not an easy thing these days. Personal well being has to take precedent. Perspective is needed. You could easily say eat less beef or walk to work for a far bigger impact on climate change.
126
05/02/2021 16:35:04 4 0
bbc
all very well but Apple will not upgrade older gadgets I have two perfectly good iPads which are unusable as they will not upgrade and the apps won't work without the new iOS even the NHS app won't work on iPhones without iOS 13
163
05/02/2021 21:49:18 0 0
bbc
thanks for stating my thoughts so clearly!
182
06/02/2021 02:56:01 0 0
bbc
some un named 'news outlets' keep having headlines like "samsung share prices up" in a good way

which means more resources are being used
5
05/02/2021 10:56:13 65 17
bbc
How will 'chipageddon' affect you?

In other words;

How does buying 'Stuff' that you don't really need, affect you?

"New graphics cards, iPhones, the latest Xbox/PlayStation, new cars."

Such an 'Ivory tower' question lol imagine if this pandemic happened in the 80's, kids would have learned using 'books' with the help of Parents maybe?

Maybe buy less cr@p people, you don't really need it!
84
05/02/2021 14:09:00 22 2
bbc
I only bought a new iPad a few years ago because they stopped doing security updates for my old one. Apple didn’t even give me a cash back because the said it was too old! They only want the gullible who must have the latest things.
89
05/02/2021 14:20:20 3 7
bbc
Classic luddite attitude. I need a new GPU for work. Welcome to the 21st century. Tastes and demand change. You can read and still want a playstation gramps, people use online gaming to socialise.
169
06/02/2021 00:24:37 2 1
bbc
"Maybe buy less cr@p people, you don't really need it!"
Virtue signal of the day!

"in the 80's, kids would have learned using 'books'"
Such a modern comment LOL. 1,000 years ago only the rich had books. Btw I started learning on my own computer in 1981.

"In other words; How does buying 'Stuff' that you don't really need"
Those are your words, not the article's. The article is cogent & rational.
184
06/02/2021 02:56:57 2 1
bbc
but. but. but. not buying stuff is bad

BBC news tells us all the time
205
06/02/2021 17:23:02 1 1
bbc
"Such an 'Ivory tower' question lol imagine if this pandemic happened in the 80's, kids would have learned using 'books' with the help of Parents maybe?"

Such remarkable hypocrisy from someone using the internet to post a comment. If this pandemic happened in the 80's you'd have to have used paper and pen to send a letter to the editor. Practice what you preach?
6
05/02/2021 11:00:36 7 0
bbc
Second and third tier auto suppliers have been warning about this at least 3 years ago. Usual story limited supply, all the eggs in 1 basket. No long term strategy at all just lowest current price.
7
05/02/2021 11:06:25 3 7
bbc
As a design consultant I have a high end workstation with a gaming card. It runs a 980ti Strix OC and a overclocked I7-6700k at 4.6ghz.

The question to ask in the PC market is do you actually need an upgrade? 4K gaming still isnt quite there yet and anything from around a 980 upwards (or 1060) can run the latest games pretty well at 1080p....I have no intention of upgrading, even for work.
22
05/02/2021 11:45:27 4 2
bbc
I think you lost about 99.8% of the audience with that comment. Serious gamers will laugh at your 980ti. They are on to 3090 cards now (if they can find one). I have a Radeon RX5700XT that I hardly use, bought for about £350 last year. Price for a 2nd hand one is double that now. Maybe I will sell it!
23
05/02/2021 11:48:46 4 0
bbc
That system was never high end, don't kid yourself.
157
05/02/2021 19:18:25 0 0
bbc
it's not how big it is, it's what you do with it
1
05/02/2021 10:36:16 35 11
bbc
How will 'chipageddon' affect you?

It won't.
8
05/02/2021 11:04:36 21 8
bbc
This is a shortsighted viewpoint. Whilst you may not be directly affected (job loss/new tech purchases), this is a major multinational industry. Of course it will have knock-on effects. They might not all be negative though - for example, if manufacturing is moved locally, to avoid reliance on Taiwan/S.Korea, this may benefit local incomes and reduce environmental impact, e.g. transport emissions.
16
05/02/2021 11:34:20 1 4
bbc
Thank you for your reply but it is irrelevant to the actual question being asked.
103
05/02/2021 15:14:25 1 0
bbc
kerching 50 cents to you courtesy of bejing.
S Korea and Taiwan are firm friends of the free world , unlike your pay masters
9
05/02/2021 11:13:02 0 2
bbc
Chipageddon ..like mine with chips or steak.
Will it affect the supply of French ??as well !
10
05/02/2021 11:15:06 6 6
bbc
All these gagets we crave so fuel climate change. We mostly upgrade because we just want the latest. Do we really need a Diamond Gorilla Gigabit Nasalpin Headpincher Phone? Or are getting it because it is the latest?

Written on a second hand Samsung S7 - does just what i want it to and i wont cry if the screen cracks as it wont cost a fortune....
11
05/02/2021 11:15:06 44 7
bbc
Do we need Wi-Fi enabled fridges, washing m/c, ovens, hobs, central heating controls and light bulbs, probably not. Each 1 has a chip of some sort in it. Each chip and circuit contains rare earth metals. Computer systems should really only be used in essential machine, a light bulb or fridge is not 1 of them. There should also be incentives to keep you phone, may be free data.
34
05/02/2021 12:19:14 11 23
bbc
No, they do not contain rare earth metals in the main. They are actually made from rock. Like so many others I buy a sim card, having paid for my phone some time ago. Who are you to tell me what is an essential machine? My telephone? The EC device in my aeroplane that warns me of aircraft that I may not have seen ? The radio in my car? This is the twenty first century. We don't live in caves.
125
FT
05/02/2021 16:29:52 0 5
bbc
Please stop posting
153
05/02/2021 19:13:58 0 0
bbc
If we'd not had all the development we'd not be able to do what we are now, and working at home would unlikely have been an option for anybody.
Light bulbs, fridges etc, computer monitoring and control all helps reduce energy wastage.
Problem is that technology evolves...
164
05/02/2021 21:51:48 3 0
bbc
yes! i can totally handle turning lights off and on etc. idk why people are so quick to consume the planet into destruction for the sake of novelty, or due to laziness, or wanting to be the first on their block with silly device.
12
05/02/2021 11:11:08 12 6
bbc
Let's get outside and exercise more, play more board games, enjoy more low tech entertainment and stop buying gadgets we don't need. That way this tech can be put to good use for things that are going to benefit our planet (lower cost renewable energy solutions for example).
13
05/02/2021 11:16:48 39 6
bbc
How many high end graphics cards are being devoted to bitcoin mining?

All that resource and energy to produce a virtual currency that is only as valuable as people think it is. Humans really are sometimes quite insane.
18
05/02/2021 11:42:25 22 8
bbc
All currencies are only as valuable as people think they are. Kinda how it works.
147
05/02/2021 17:44:24 0 2
bbc
Mining Bitcoin using GPUs is no longer profitable, I believe everyone use ASICs now. Fiat currencies float and their value isn't underwritten by anything tangible, certainly no longer by gold which we sold off decades ago.
196
06/02/2021 12:33:34 0 0
bbc
some figure I've heard (not confirmed) is that 1.8% of the worlds entire carbon footprint, is mining bitcoin
14
05/02/2021 11:19:04 56 2
bbc
UK has he potential of being a decent chip manufacturer. We have had wafer fabs in the UK before, no reason why not again.

31
05/02/2021 12:12:04 22 1
bbc
True, wasn't the central belt of Scotland called Silicon Glen. Manufacturing companies included IBM, Texas Instruments, Motorola, Sun, NEC, NCR to name a few.
35
05/02/2021 12:20:04 7 0
bbc
Not as simple as that. We're currently on 5nm, with very low yield until the process is perfected.
It would be madness for anyone to jump into the semiconductor game now in the UK, just look at GlobalFoundries with 7nm.

If it was easy, everyone would be doing it.
43
05/02/2021 12:38:50 7 0
bbc
The first integrated circuits were made in the UK in the 1950's.

The ARM processor which is at the heart of most smartphone and automotive applications is developed in Cambridge. It was a spin-off from the BBC micro.

55
05/02/2021 13:04:06 9 9
bbc
Need a trained/skilled workforce for anything we lost.

Thatcher and successive governments made sure we lost all of that and will take years before we can even think to get that back
183
06/02/2021 02:56:31 2 0
bbc
trouble with chips, is they need oil and beef, to get us hooked on them
15
05/02/2021 11:23:22 3 8
bbc
Sad thing really that we see the latest game, car, TV , self monitoring fridge, phone or wireless home appliance as being the most important goal in life. The sellers of these things are the hunters and the rest of us the hunted. Nothing much has has changed in 200,000 years of human evolution. This is not real life!
20
05/02/2021 11:43:41 6 2
bbc
"Nothing much has has changed in 200,000 years of human evolution. This is not real life!"

Sooo ummm how many more hundreds of thousands of years does that have to go on for before it becomes "Real Life"?

Fact of the matter is humans are a species that has developed a taste for nice things...

Probably goes back to when Gronk totally wanted that Bronze axe over his SO last season flint one...
21
05/02/2021 11:44:49 2 2
bbc
So why waste you time replying on an electronic chat then? Does someone know you're missing?
8
05/02/2021 11:04:36 21 8
bbc
This is a shortsighted viewpoint. Whilst you may not be directly affected (job loss/new tech purchases), this is a major multinational industry. Of course it will have knock-on effects. They might not all be negative though - for example, if manufacturing is moved locally, to avoid reliance on Taiwan/S.Korea, this may benefit local incomes and reduce environmental impact, e.g. transport emissions.
16
05/02/2021 11:34:20 1 4
bbc
Thank you for your reply but it is irrelevant to the actual question being asked.
19
05/02/2021 11:43:19 0 0
bbc
Yeah, I was scratching my head at their reply too.

It prompted me to do some real soul searching, but when all was said and done I too came to the conclusion that I shan't be affected either.

Obviously I'll go and sit myself on the selfish step.
17
05/02/2021 11:32:46 7 1
bbc
I love chips...
13
05/02/2021 11:16:48 39 6
bbc
How many high end graphics cards are being devoted to bitcoin mining?

All that resource and energy to produce a virtual currency that is only as valuable as people think it is. Humans really are sometimes quite insane.
18
05/02/2021 11:42:25 22 8
bbc
All currencies are only as valuable as people think they are. Kinda how it works.
130
05/02/2021 16:48:51 1 0
bbc
But there is more information to judge the strength of a regular currency than there is with bitcoin.
132
05/02/2021 16:49:42 0 2
bbc
I can take my coins and make a useful tool if the market crashes: good luck forging your imaginary money into anything.
16
05/02/2021 11:34:20 1 4
bbc
Thank you for your reply but it is irrelevant to the actual question being asked.
19
05/02/2021 11:43:19 0 0
bbc
Yeah, I was scratching my head at their reply too.

It prompted me to do some real soul searching, but when all was said and done I too came to the conclusion that I shan't be affected either.

Obviously I'll go and sit myself on the selfish step.
15
05/02/2021 11:23:22 3 8
bbc
Sad thing really that we see the latest game, car, TV , self monitoring fridge, phone or wireless home appliance as being the most important goal in life. The sellers of these things are the hunters and the rest of us the hunted. Nothing much has has changed in 200,000 years of human evolution. This is not real life!
20
05/02/2021 11:43:41 6 2
bbc
"Nothing much has has changed in 200,000 years of human evolution. This is not real life!"

Sooo ummm how many more hundreds of thousands of years does that have to go on for before it becomes "Real Life"?

Fact of the matter is humans are a species that has developed a taste for nice things...

Probably goes back to when Gronk totally wanted that Bronze axe over his SO last season flint one...
15
05/02/2021 11:23:22 3 8
bbc
Sad thing really that we see the latest game, car, TV , self monitoring fridge, phone or wireless home appliance as being the most important goal in life. The sellers of these things are the hunters and the rest of us the hunted. Nothing much has has changed in 200,000 years of human evolution. This is not real life!
21
05/02/2021 11:44:49 2 2
bbc
So why waste you time replying on an electronic chat then? Does someone know you're missing?
7
05/02/2021 11:06:25 3 7
bbc
As a design consultant I have a high end workstation with a gaming card. It runs a 980ti Strix OC and a overclocked I7-6700k at 4.6ghz.

The question to ask in the PC market is do you actually need an upgrade? 4K gaming still isnt quite there yet and anything from around a 980 upwards (or 1060) can run the latest games pretty well at 1080p....I have no intention of upgrading, even for work.
22
05/02/2021 11:45:27 4 2
bbc
I think you lost about 99.8% of the audience with that comment. Serious gamers will laugh at your 980ti. They are on to 3090 cards now (if they can find one). I have a Radeon RX5700XT that I hardly use, bought for about £350 last year. Price for a 2nd hand one is double that now. Maybe I will sell it!
7
05/02/2021 11:06:25 3 7
bbc
As a design consultant I have a high end workstation with a gaming card. It runs a 980ti Strix OC and a overclocked I7-6700k at 4.6ghz.

The question to ask in the PC market is do you actually need an upgrade? 4K gaming still isnt quite there yet and anything from around a 980 upwards (or 1060) can run the latest games pretty well at 1080p....I have no intention of upgrading, even for work.
23
05/02/2021 11:48:46 4 0
bbc
That system was never high end, don't kid yourself.
24
05/02/2021 11:50:35 5 8
bbc
capitalism:anarchic, chaotic, no planning, every man 4 self. alternative? socialist.net
39
05/02/2021 12:23:27 11 6
bbc
Socialism: never worked anywhere at anytime responsible for the death of millions.
74
05/02/2021 13:56:22 1 1
bbc
The trouble with socialism is that some animals are more equal than others.
25
05/02/2021 11:52:36 7 4
bbc
Every 'update' to your smart phone increases battery consumption and reduces performance.

Manufacturers deny it is to make you upgrade. Maybe it is just laziness.

Google, Samsung, Apple, Hwawei... should get their engineers to focus their efforts on improving the performance of firmware on existing handsets and extend the "support period" to cover the shortages.
80
05/02/2021 14:05:56 5 0
bbc
not true - sometimes it does more often though it doesn't. Each & every additional app that you have running does.
However, you should bare in mind that batteries degrade over time and typically can only reach 50% their original capacity after 400-450 charge cycles...
It would make sense to go back to replaceable batteries (and associated coulomb counter/gas gauges).
4
05/02/2021 10:42:41 144 9
bbc
The perfect time to keep your car, laptop, iPhone, etc in use and resist the urge to buy a new one.

This relentless cycle of replacing perfectly functional and serviceable items is a major contributor to resource and energy consumption and thus drives climate change.

The time for consumerism to be viewed in a negative light is well overdue.
26
Tom
05/02/2021 11:53:47 61 1
bbc
Couldn't agree more. I've been in the habit of keeping my cars for 10 years at least and, apart from friends ribbing me that I should 'get a newer model,' I've not suffered. The same with white goods, telly etc. which seem to last forever if you give them the chance to. Not like the old days when these things broke at the drop of hat, is it?
29
05/02/2021 12:05:21 4 3
bbc
Good idea but difficult to put into practice. So many items have microprocessors and that means firmware but manufactures often don't update the firmware after 2 years from launch, so they are vulnerable to hacking (phones, internet enabled cars, home automation etc.). If one gets hacked then all you home devices are then exposed.
30
05/02/2021 12:07:49 7 1
bbc
My Audi A2 is 16 years old and being 95% aluminium has a good many years life left and people remark it looks like new. But parts are no longer stocked in the UK and must be ordered from Germany but Audi Tradition is no longer supplying the UK due to Brexit. 2nd hand parts are not always safe to use.
178
06/02/2021 02:21:02 2 0
bbc
Except that the modern household appliances don't last forever, it's the really old ones that were built like the proverbial brick sh#t houses. Contrast the Kelvinator refrigerator my late uncle bought that was still working the day he died some 30-40 years later with a modern, super expensive Dyson vac that you are lucky if it works for more than 3 years.
193
06/02/2021 11:49:43 0 0
bbc
If your friends rib you for having a 10 year old car, view it as an opportunity to moo at them.
4
05/02/2021 10:42:41 144 9
bbc
The perfect time to keep your car, laptop, iPhone, etc in use and resist the urge to buy a new one.

This relentless cycle of replacing perfectly functional and serviceable items is a major contributor to resource and energy consumption and thus drives climate change.

The time for consumerism to be viewed in a negative light is well overdue.
27
05/02/2021 11:56:25 5 14
bbc
The problem with your statement is that it doesn't drive climate change. I am not denying that it doesn't contribute in some small part, but drive it? No. On the other hand it does make people feel happier. Not an easy thing these days. Personal well being has to take precedent. Perspective is needed. You could easily say eat less beef or walk to work for a far bigger impact on climate change.
192
06/02/2021 11:48:33 2 0
bbc
The resources that go into mining and refining ores, processing oil for polymers, manufacture of products and packaging, logistics of distribution and retail is enormous. Your comment is naive.

If you allow your happiness to be determined by consuming stuff, then that's pretty much a problem right there. If you're under 50, then you have probably spent your entire life being cultivated to consume
199
06/02/2021 13:01:54 2 0
bbc
I keep having this argument. Personal wellbeing does NOT take precedent. All those people "going to the shops", "visiting friends", "buying new things to feel better" are not helping us. We're societally encouraged to do these things for the small pleasure it gives. A bit like eating very tasty but unhealthy food, you can rewire and realise you don't need to do those things....but they are easy.
206
D-D
06/02/2021 17:43:44 1 0
bbc
"Personal well being has to take precedent" is perhaps the most selfish thing I have read on here. The desire to buy a new gadget and climate change are on vastly different scales of importance and if everyone thought only of themselves and screw everyone else, or the planet's future, then we'd be in a really bad shape.
210
06/02/2021 19:29:15 1 0
bbc
Eat less beef? Aw come on! The biggest contributor to global warming from farming is the amount of food we waste, and most of that is from plant based food. If we cut back on what is wasted in our shopping (and don't buy from supermarkets) we wouldn't need to bully meat-eaters.
PS Has anyone on here ever smelt a vegan fart lol?
28
05/02/2021 11:54:28 38 2
bbc
If you need a laptop or desktop for work there are several of places around the UK that refurbish and sell ex company kit. Its normally very good quality, cheap, much better for the planet, and your money goes to small to med businesses in the UK rather than global megacorps
53
05/02/2021 13:02:33 20 1
bbc
I buy Dell refurbished, espcially when on offer. less than 300 for what was last years 1,000 laptop sometimes
65
meh
05/02/2021 13:48:26 1 3
bbc
Yup a refurbished computer will have an insane shelf life. I'm sure a computer (server) that's been running 24x7 for a few years will have no issues on longevity :)
26
Tom
05/02/2021 11:53:47 61 1
bbc
Couldn't agree more. I've been in the habit of keeping my cars for 10 years at least and, apart from friends ribbing me that I should 'get a newer model,' I've not suffered. The same with white goods, telly etc. which seem to last forever if you give them the chance to. Not like the old days when these things broke at the drop of hat, is it?
29
05/02/2021 12:05:21 4 3
bbc
Good idea but difficult to put into practice. So many items have microprocessors and that means firmware but manufactures often don't update the firmware after 2 years from launch, so they are vulnerable to hacking (phones, internet enabled cars, home automation etc.). If one gets hacked then all you home devices are then exposed.
26
Tom
05/02/2021 11:53:47 61 1
bbc
Couldn't agree more. I've been in the habit of keeping my cars for 10 years at least and, apart from friends ribbing me that I should 'get a newer model,' I've not suffered. The same with white goods, telly etc. which seem to last forever if you give them the chance to. Not like the old days when these things broke at the drop of hat, is it?
30
05/02/2021 12:07:49 7 1
bbc
My Audi A2 is 16 years old and being 95% aluminium has a good many years life left and people remark it looks like new. But parts are no longer stocked in the UK and must be ordered from Germany but Audi Tradition is no longer supplying the UK due to Brexit. 2nd hand parts are not always safe to use.
166
05/02/2021 22:22:59 1 4
bbc
You do know that most AUDI, VW, SEAT and SKODA parts Are interchangeable as they are all the SAME COMPANY
189
06/02/2021 07:22:34 2 0
bbc
I've owned my 1999 Audi S4 Avant for 17 years. It has now covered 282k miles and is in as good a condition today as it was when I bought it. The mileage has now become a 'badge of honour' rather than a deprecation nightmare, which is liberating and enjoyable experience. Parts can be an issue but it is challenging and fun to hunt them down.
14
05/02/2021 11:19:04 56 2
bbc
UK has he potential of being a decent chip manufacturer. We have had wafer fabs in the UK before, no reason why not again.

31
05/02/2021 12:12:04 22 1
bbc
True, wasn't the central belt of Scotland called Silicon Glen. Manufacturing companies included IBM, Texas Instruments, Motorola, Sun, NEC, NCR to name a few.
119
05/02/2021 15:50:38 4 0
bbc
There were also Inmos who were researching/developing the Transputer (building a multi core processor system one processor at a time) in the 1980’s. They went and now what are the latest chips, multi core processors on one chip.
32
05/02/2021 12:12:31 4 1
bbc
TSMC and GlobalFoundries must be happy. But really this has been going on for years, with every new process.
174
06/02/2021 02:11:29 0 0
bbc
The reality is also that the massive changes in usage and demand in 2020 has exacerbated the problem. The chip business is highly cyclical anyway (has been since the 1980s and before). The challenge is that the scale of the investment needed for current technology fabrication plant is in the billions, and the timeframe to build it is years. By then market may have contracted significantly.
33
05/02/2021 12:18:26 6 4
bbc
I buy and sell silicone chips on eBay
Britishelectro (check my other items)
Search "CMOS pick", you will find me

I have not noticed any supply disruption

This problem is effecting the latest very small advanced stuff which can only be soldered by robots and thus only the biggest players

DIP and SOIC chips are used by amateurs and bespoke systems manufacturers and are in plentiful supply
42
05/02/2021 12:34:54 8 2
bbc
I'm glad your not having problems with bits of silicone rubber.

In the meantime, back in the Silicon chip business.....
11
05/02/2021 11:15:06 44 7
bbc
Do we need Wi-Fi enabled fridges, washing m/c, ovens, hobs, central heating controls and light bulbs, probably not. Each 1 has a chip of some sort in it. Each chip and circuit contains rare earth metals. Computer systems should really only be used in essential machine, a light bulb or fridge is not 1 of them. There should also be incentives to keep you phone, may be free data.
34
05/02/2021 12:19:14 11 23
bbc
No, they do not contain rare earth metals in the main. They are actually made from rock. Like so many others I buy a sim card, having paid for my phone some time ago. Who are you to tell me what is an essential machine? My telephone? The EC device in my aeroplane that warns me of aircraft that I may not have seen ? The radio in my car? This is the twenty first century. We don't live in caves.
98
05/02/2021 14:42:38 0 1
bbc
Fracgil rock ??
112
05/02/2021 15:31:23 3 0
bbc
They do contain rare earths now, for example oxides of Hafnium are now used as insulators in the latest processes. Add to that the large amounts of others such as Tantalum used in other components such as capacitors.
14
05/02/2021 11:19:04 56 2
bbc
UK has he potential of being a decent chip manufacturer. We have had wafer fabs in the UK before, no reason why not again.

35
05/02/2021 12:20:04 7 0
bbc
Not as simple as that. We're currently on 5nm, with very low yield until the process is perfected.
It would be madness for anyone to jump into the semiconductor game now in the UK, just look at GlobalFoundries with 7nm.

If it was easy, everyone would be doing it.
36
05/02/2021 12:20:51 7 7
bbc
if this is affecting you, you don't need that gadget or that car, you need to get a real life.
49
05/02/2021 12:49:32 4 1
bbc
I can't do my job without the latest 'gadgets' so they are responsible for enabling my real life rather than a necessity to 'get a real life'. Every once in a while it is good to step away from a position of ego driven judgement and consider the needs of others.
37
05/02/2021 12:24:58 3 3
bbc
There are 2 types of people.
1) I acquired the Q4RKX4000i and it’s plenty to run my firm and software

2) I like mine with salt and vinegar... maybe occasionally splash out with some curry sauce...

Can you be both?
38
05/02/2021 12:30:18 9 10
bbc
Chips aren't needed to build cars.

How many chips in a 1970 Ford Cortina? (0)

How many chips in the Mariner 4 spacecraft which flew by Mars in 1965? (0)

IMVHO "modern" cars would be much better if they had fewer or no chips onboard. They make operation of the vehicle confusing and serbicing much more difficult and expensive.
45
05/02/2021 12:42:59 7 2
bbc
The mandatory safety and emissions standards for road vehicles (which are keeping you the driver & pedestrians from getting hurt) require electronic control. Sure, that 1970 Cortina did not have any chips, but it required a service every 5,000 miles, and probably did 15 mpg. Conversely, Mariner 4 'no chips'? I wonder how the radio, tape recorder, solar energy, navigation etc worked with no chips?
50
05/02/2021 12:50:29 3 1
bbc
How many chips in a 1970 Ford Cortina? (0)

Carburettors are a lot less efficient and have much higher emissions than ECUs, that's why we don't use them any more .
24
05/02/2021 11:50:35 5 8
bbc
capitalism:anarchic, chaotic, no planning, every man 4 self. alternative? socialist.net
39
05/02/2021 12:23:27 11 6
bbc
Socialism: never worked anywhere at anytime responsible for the death of millions.
40
05/02/2021 12:33:23 0 4
bbc
Examples? (Don't pick the former Soviet Union or the Peoples Republic of China, both of which are and never have been anything close to "socialist")
68
05/02/2021 13:50:07 1 1
bbc
Communism != Socialism, but you knew that already, but like most,why let the facts get in the way of a good hys rant.
85
05/02/2021 14:09:02 1 2
bbc
Does your country have: Fire departments - socialism. State Police Forces - socialism. Medicare and Medicaid, a Military, Social Security, Minimum wage legislation, Public schools ... The extremes: 100% Private Enterprise - Never Existed (extreme income inequality) and 100% State Owned - USSR Totalitarianism (also extreme income inequality). Somewhere in between is socialism.
39
05/02/2021 12:23:27 11 6
bbc
Socialism: never worked anywhere at anytime responsible for the death of millions.
40
05/02/2021 12:33:23 0 4
bbc
Examples? (Don't pick the former Soviet Union or the Peoples Republic of China, both of which are and never have been anything close to "socialist")
52
05/02/2021 13:02:28 3 1
bbc
Typical reply from the left, if the murderous despotic socialist regimes embarrass or disprove your reasoning just say they were not really socialist after all and move on. How about Pol Pot or Mao??
41
05/02/2021 12:33:28 7 7
bbc
So what about more cars with just the minimum of semiconductors; ignition and fuel injection?

I for one am not keen at all on all the gadgetry. Features like ABS are debatable, my 2C is that new drivers should be sent out onto the kart tracks to learn how to brake properly!
48
05/02/2021 12:47:00 8 0
bbc
There is absolutely no debate around ABS, what a ridiculous statement. There is zero chance of releasing cars with simplified systems due to the safety requirements of NCAP, etc. and the blatantly obvious fact that by the time these companies developed a new simplified model of car the problem with chip supply will have already gone away.
71
05/02/2021 13:54:52 0 0
bbc
I agree completely - yet am always told that "nobody wants this, everyone wants all these extra whistles and bells"
It is about time us nobodies stand up and demand products we actually want not what some marketeer tells us we should want.
33
05/02/2021 12:18:26 6 4
bbc
I buy and sell silicone chips on eBay
Britishelectro (check my other items)
Search "CMOS pick", you will find me

I have not noticed any supply disruption

This problem is effecting the latest very small advanced stuff which can only be soldered by robots and thus only the biggest players

DIP and SOIC chips are used by amateurs and bespoke systems manufacturers and are in plentiful supply
42
05/02/2021 12:34:54 8 2
bbc
I'm glad your not having problems with bits of silicone rubber.

In the meantime, back in the Silicon chip business.....
14
05/02/2021 11:19:04 56 2
bbc
UK has he potential of being a decent chip manufacturer. We have had wafer fabs in the UK before, no reason why not again.

43
05/02/2021 12:38:50 7 0
bbc
The first integrated circuits were made in the UK in the 1950's.

The ARM processor which is at the heart of most smartphone and automotive applications is developed in Cambridge. It was a spin-off from the BBC micro.

107
05/02/2021 15:23:29 8 1
bbc
It was, but the UK gov did not see any value in ARM, so its been sold off to Nvidia, who seem to be planning to move the main R&D outside of the UK to the work along side there GPU R&D teams.
133
05/02/2021 16:52:56 2 0
bbc
Arm never manufactured - design then offshore for manufacture. The investment to create a new factory is staggering.
180
06/02/2021 02:28:24 0 0
bbc
Yes, Texas Instruments who claimed to have made the first integrated circuits and this fallacy has stuck. Actually it was AEI Semiconductors in Lincoln, a defunct UK company who did it about a year earlier.
44
05/02/2021 12:42:33 1 1
bbc
Just as well I've got a few spuds in the garden then??
56
05/02/2021 13:06:20 2 1
bbc
Should have been dug up before now, mine are stored in boxes, so many I have no chance of eating them all.
38
05/02/2021 12:30:18 9 10
bbc
Chips aren't needed to build cars.

How many chips in a 1970 Ford Cortina? (0)

How many chips in the Mariner 4 spacecraft which flew by Mars in 1965? (0)

IMVHO "modern" cars would be much better if they had fewer or no chips onboard. They make operation of the vehicle confusing and serbicing much more difficult and expensive.
45
05/02/2021 12:42:59 7 2
bbc
The mandatory safety and emissions standards for road vehicles (which are keeping you the driver & pedestrians from getting hurt) require electronic control. Sure, that 1970 Cortina did not have any chips, but it required a service every 5,000 miles, and probably did 15 mpg. Conversely, Mariner 4 'no chips'? I wonder how the radio, tape recorder, solar energy, navigation etc worked with no chips?
59
Rob
05/02/2021 13:13:02 2 0
bbc
Transistors, valves and relays?
1
05/02/2021 10:36:16 35 11
bbc
How will 'chipageddon' affect you?

It won't.
46
05/02/2021 12:44:08 3 0
bbc
It will long term, the West happily off shored all it's critical tech manufacture for the sake of cheap labour and those chickens are coming home to roost now the East controls the tap. The same thing also happened in pharmaceuticals with API and excipient production first to go, we'll forget how to make stuff.
47
05/02/2021 12:44:48 1 1
bbc
Thats good that, Chip age don. So whats on the menu, sproats?
41
05/02/2021 12:33:28 7 7
bbc
So what about more cars with just the minimum of semiconductors; ignition and fuel injection?

I for one am not keen at all on all the gadgetry. Features like ABS are debatable, my 2C is that new drivers should be sent out onto the kart tracks to learn how to brake properly!
48
05/02/2021 12:47:00 8 0
bbc
There is absolutely no debate around ABS, what a ridiculous statement. There is zero chance of releasing cars with simplified systems due to the safety requirements of NCAP, etc. and the blatantly obvious fact that by the time these companies developed a new simplified model of car the problem with chip supply will have already gone away.
77
05/02/2021 13:59:31 0 0
bbc
ABS doesn't reduce stopping distance, it does however enable you to control steering without manual cadence braking (something that is very hard to do when you are trying not to hit whatever has jumped out in front of you). No debate ABS is a good thing.
Internet connected foo, predictive driver aids, automatic windscreen washers etc however are just shiney things that we do not need.
36
05/02/2021 12:20:51 7 7
bbc
if this is affecting you, you don't need that gadget or that car, you need to get a real life.
49
05/02/2021 12:49:32 4 1
bbc
I can't do my job without the latest 'gadgets' so they are responsible for enabling my real life rather than a necessity to 'get a real life'. Every once in a while it is good to step away from a position of ego driven judgement and consider the needs of others.
158
05/02/2021 19:22:20 0 0
bbc
agreed: - especially if you are a lovehoney product tester
38
05/02/2021 12:30:18 9 10
bbc
Chips aren't needed to build cars.

How many chips in a 1970 Ford Cortina? (0)

How many chips in the Mariner 4 spacecraft which flew by Mars in 1965? (0)

IMVHO "modern" cars would be much better if they had fewer or no chips onboard. They make operation of the vehicle confusing and serbicing much more difficult and expensive.
50
05/02/2021 12:50:29 3 1
bbc
How many chips in a 1970 Ford Cortina? (0)

Carburettors are a lot less efficient and have much higher emissions than ECUs, that's why we don't use them any more .
51
05/02/2021 13:01:52 3 2
bbc
What a misleading headline. I thought the idiots in charge and so called Jamie Oliver had banned delicious chips for a second. I wouldn’t put it past them.
61
05/02/2021 13:28:23 3 0
bbc
Surely "Chipocolypse" would have been better than "Chipageddon"
Removed
40
05/02/2021 12:33:23 0 4
bbc
Examples? (Don't pick the former Soviet Union or the Peoples Republic of China, both of which are and never have been anything close to "socialist")
52
05/02/2021 13:02:28 3 1
bbc
Typical reply from the left, if the murderous despotic socialist regimes embarrass or disprove your reasoning just say they were not really socialist after all and move on. How about Pol Pot or Mao??
28
05/02/2021 11:54:28 38 2
bbc
If you need a laptop or desktop for work there are several of places around the UK that refurbish and sell ex company kit. Its normally very good quality, cheap, much better for the planet, and your money goes to small to med businesses in the UK rather than global megacorps
53
05/02/2021 13:02:33 20 1
bbc
I buy Dell refurbished, espcially when on offer. less than 300 for what was last years 1,000 laptop sometimes
185
06/02/2021 02:58:18 0 0
bbc
I have to admit I don't buy refurbed. why? because I know the state of something I once sent back. I buy new. when I need it. this computer is at least 8 years old. put in some extra RAM and an SSD, away ya go...
54
05/02/2021 13:03:10 3 4
bbc
Yes really annoying, I had hoped to upgrade my computer but the new good graphics cards are not possible to get. Looks like a year or more wait now.
Do not waste capacity on silly cars! ??
63
05/02/2021 13:37:10 3 1
bbc
I upgraded to a 2080ti last March, concerned that the pandemic was going to lead to hardware shortages.

When the 3000 series were released last Autumn everyone was laughing at the 2080ti owners.

How things change.
14
05/02/2021 11:19:04 56 2
bbc
UK has he potential of being a decent chip manufacturer. We have had wafer fabs in the UK before, no reason why not again.

55
05/02/2021 13:04:06 9 9
bbc
Need a trained/skilled workforce for anything we lost.

Thatcher and successive governments made sure we lost all of that and will take years before we can even think to get that back
105
05/02/2021 15:18:36 6 0
bbc
The far eastern suppliers were simply cheaper - most will flock to the lowest cost supplier
44
05/02/2021 12:42:33 1 1
bbc
Just as well I've got a few spuds in the garden then??
56
05/02/2021 13:06:20 2 1
bbc
Should have been dug up before now, mine are stored in boxes, so many I have no chance of eating them all.
57
05/02/2021 13:10:37 14 1
bbc
It may slow the tide of the throwaway society. Upgrading phones etc so regularly is very wasteful in terms of the planets resources and individual finances. Covid should have taught people to save some for the rainy day and not live beyond ones means.
69
05/02/2021 13:52:06 12 0
bbc
Yes we should keep things longer and not throw them away.

Now if only I could get security updates for my phone. Nothing wrong with it but the last update was 30 months ago - keeping the phone is now a question of when not if it will be compromised :-(
58
05/02/2021 13:11:17 20 2
bbc
High value, specialised items that we are very capable of producing in this country, yet we are extremely reliant on Asia, particularly Korea for these components.

This: high value, low footprint manufacturing is exactly what we should be aiming for here.

We should be an exporter of these components not an importer.
82
05/02/2021 14:06:09 3 1
bbc
Did you read the article? It said: "Most of tier-two foundries have been registering poor earnings, low margins and high debt ratio during the past few years... From the profitability perspective, building a new fab[rication plant] for smaller foundries is difficult to consider." You're in effect advocating taxpayer bailouts in future for an industry we can't sustain. Why did Dyson leave?
83
Soo
05/02/2021 14:08:25 2 1
bbc
The UK's competitive advantage being? Closeness to the client (distance - low transportation costs)? Discounted prime materials costs (local mines)? Intellectual property (might be achieved in the future with the new immigrant wave from Hong Kong)? Tax advantages for the producing company (over their current location)? Low labor cost? Productivity? I'd argue, none of the above...
45
05/02/2021 12:42:59 7 2
bbc
The mandatory safety and emissions standards for road vehicles (which are keeping you the driver & pedestrians from getting hurt) require electronic control. Sure, that 1970 Cortina did not have any chips, but it required a service every 5,000 miles, and probably did 15 mpg. Conversely, Mariner 4 'no chips'? I wonder how the radio, tape recorder, solar energy, navigation etc worked with no chips?
59
Rob
05/02/2021 13:13:02 2 0
bbc
Transistors, valves and relays?
60
05/02/2021 13:18:56 24 3
bbc
It would make more sense for the government to create the environment for some chip making capacity in the UK. These days it should be regarded as a strategic industry like we maintain ship building and steel. The backward steam age attitude in the political class is scary. They are happy to create a new fast steam age train set but not universal broadband. Guess we know what companies mates own!
75
05/02/2021 13:56:11 10 1
bbc
We don't maintain ship building or steel manufacturer. Investment from foreign companies and foreign governments does that for us.
51
05/02/2021 13:01:52 3 2
bbc
What a misleading headline. I thought the idiots in charge and so called Jamie Oliver had banned delicious chips for a second. I wouldn’t put it past them.
61
05/02/2021 13:28:23 3 0
bbc
Surely "Chipocolypse" would have been better than "Chipageddon"
62
05/02/2021 13:34:51 4 5
bbc
Never mind microchips. Farmers should be encouraged to grow as much as they can. Manufacturers should increase output of UK produced electrical goods and be given incentives to fund R&D. Government should be encouraging car production and public services should be instructed to buy UK produced goods. You never see continental public services driving or using stuff that is not produced locally.
73
05/02/2021 13:53:08 5 0
bbc
1) You hardly ever see people buying things that are more expensive, just because they've got a UK flag on it. 2) There are millions of French and German cars in all European countries. 3) Food is distributed across Europe daily, from where it is cheaper to produce to where it is profitable to sell. 4) Electrical goods made in UK still need foreign microchips in them.
54
05/02/2021 13:03:10 3 4
bbc
Yes really annoying, I had hoped to upgrade my computer but the new good graphics cards are not possible to get. Looks like a year or more wait now.
Do not waste capacity on silly cars! ??
63
05/02/2021 13:37:10 3 1
bbc
I upgraded to a 2080ti last March, concerned that the pandemic was going to lead to hardware shortages.

When the 3000 series were released last Autumn everyone was laughing at the 2080ti owners.

How things change.
90
05/02/2021 14:21:15 2 0
bbc
Yes that is me, the new ones were expected so I waited. They are about twice as good as it turned out, a big improvement, but not available to nobodies like me. Still the wait should have a 3080ti available. Fortunately it is only a hobby for me not life altering.
1
05/02/2021 10:36:16 35 11
bbc
How will 'chipageddon' affect you?

It won't.
64
meh
05/02/2021 13:45:53 7 2
bbc
True it will NOT affect a single child or anyone working from home. After all who the f**k needs a computer to work from home or remote learning. We can use carrier pigeons or maybe typewriters? :)

And let's not forget. Electric cars have zero chips in them so f**k it let's carry on using older diesels because they're chip free.

So yup not a single person will be affected. Happy Days :)
121
05/02/2021 16:04:17 0 2
bbc
Thank you for your strawman reply but again it is irrelevant to the question being asked.
28
05/02/2021 11:54:28 38 2
bbc
If you need a laptop or desktop for work there are several of places around the UK that refurbish and sell ex company kit. Its normally very good quality, cheap, much better for the planet, and your money goes to small to med businesses in the UK rather than global megacorps
65
meh
05/02/2021 13:48:26 1 3
bbc
Yup a refurbished computer will have an insane shelf life. I'm sure a computer (server) that's been running 24x7 for a few years will have no issues on longevity :)
145
05/02/2021 17:30:47 4 0
bbc
Actually the number of times a machine has been switched on or off does have an impact on its life too!
159
05/02/2021 20:46:11 3 0
bbc
You be supprised at the amount of fully working decade old kit out there :)

I did once get asked to fix a server which it turns out had been *powered on* for over a decade without a restart!

In any case most places will supply 1-2 years warranty so you don't really need to worry about it.
66
05/02/2021 13:48:39 4 4
bbc
#1 We have airfields FULL off new cars. Perhaps the manufactures should consider selling what they have rather than complaining they deliver on sales for things they are yet to make.
#2 Forecasting production 12 months out is hard. If you don't want to beholden to an international supply chain you can always make it yourself (yes flexibility to have things when you want them is WHY it costs more)
92
05/02/2021 14:22:23 0 0
bbc
Who is “we”?
67
05/02/2021 13:49:55 10 3
bbc
here is a novel idea, just go back to making simple cars with low technology applied.
cars has way too much electronics in them all of which are distractions from driving , plus the privacy issues like being monitored and bombarded . Engine electronics go back to simple plugs and points, them you can do your own car maintenance !!!
72
05/02/2021 13:52:17 17 0
bbc
Good luck getting your plug and points car to meet current emissions standards...
113
05/02/2021 15:32:43 2 1
bbc
We could do that, but then average mpg would go back to 5 - 10 miles to the gallon and lots of extra people would die as a direct result of the air pollution.

The correct solution is to spend the required 10 -15 billion $ on a new 10nm fab plant. But even that is not a quick fix as Intel are 4 years behind schedule getting the one they own/built working.
117
05/02/2021 15:48:03 1 1
bbc
Why not just upgrade the plugs and points with simple electric ignition - it is a transistor. If your car is 40 years or more old then free tax as well as BC (Before Computers).
124
cb
05/02/2021 16:29:20 2 0
bbc
Governments deem safety more important which is why all new cars are required to have ABS, tyre pressure monitoring etc. You cannot have those features without electronics.
39
05/02/2021 12:23:27 11 6
bbc
Socialism: never worked anywhere at anytime responsible for the death of millions.
68
05/02/2021 13:50:07 1 1
bbc
Communism != Socialism, but you knew that already, but like most,why let the facts get in the way of a good hys rant.
57
05/02/2021 13:10:37 14 1
bbc
It may slow the tide of the throwaway society. Upgrading phones etc so regularly is very wasteful in terms of the planets resources and individual finances. Covid should have taught people to save some for the rainy day and not live beyond ones means.
69
05/02/2021 13:52:06 12 0
bbc
Yes we should keep things longer and not throw them away.

Now if only I could get security updates for my phone. Nothing wrong with it but the last update was 30 months ago - keeping the phone is now a question of when not if it will be compromised :-(
129
05/02/2021 16:47:05 3 0
bbc
The old line that they sell you that there's a coven of Russian/Chinese/North Korean hackers sitting in a room just waiting for your phone to miss an update. It keeps working as the sheep keep buying the 57 varieties of Apple that get released every year. I call bull on the reason being security: it's fashion, plain and simple.
136
Don
05/02/2021 16:59:03 1 0
bbc
Exactly. Deliberate stopping of servicing and updates by manufacturers is also driving and encouraging the throwaway mentality.

It should be possible to keep older devices usable but the manufacturers want you to buy a new one, they should rely on those who will inevitably buy a new one and allow those who wish to keep using perfectly serviceable older or second hand equipment to do so.
70
05/02/2021 13:45:20 3 1
bbc
If you had the capacity before the pandemic it is still there more or less. It is probably repurposed currently and should get back to normal in short order. The problem is greed. Artificial shortage is created to increase prices. HENCE THIS ARTICLE
93
05/02/2021 14:23:23 1 0
bbc
Greed playing games with the supply and demand again!
41
05/02/2021 12:33:28 7 7
bbc
So what about more cars with just the minimum of semiconductors; ignition and fuel injection?

I for one am not keen at all on all the gadgetry. Features like ABS are debatable, my 2C is that new drivers should be sent out onto the kart tracks to learn how to brake properly!
71
05/02/2021 13:54:52 0 0
bbc
I agree completely - yet am always told that "nobody wants this, everyone wants all these extra whistles and bells"
It is about time us nobodies stand up and demand products we actually want not what some marketeer tells us we should want.
67
05/02/2021 13:49:55 10 3
bbc
here is a novel idea, just go back to making simple cars with low technology applied.
cars has way too much electronics in them all of which are distractions from driving , plus the privacy issues like being monitored and bombarded . Engine electronics go back to simple plugs and points, them you can do your own car maintenance !!!
72
05/02/2021 13:52:17 17 0
bbc
Good luck getting your plug and points car to meet current emissions standards...
62
05/02/2021 13:34:51 4 5
bbc
Never mind microchips. Farmers should be encouraged to grow as much as they can. Manufacturers should increase output of UK produced electrical goods and be given incentives to fund R&D. Government should be encouraging car production and public services should be instructed to buy UK produced goods. You never see continental public services driving or using stuff that is not produced locally.
73
05/02/2021 13:53:08 5 0
bbc
1) You hardly ever see people buying things that are more expensive, just because they've got a UK flag on it. 2) There are millions of French and German cars in all European countries. 3) Food is distributed across Europe daily, from where it is cheaper to produce to where it is profitable to sell. 4) Electrical goods made in UK still need foreign microchips in them.
86
05/02/2021 14:10:14 1 0
bbc
If you watch the news programmes and see a report from France, Germany or Italy ,the public services are all using vehicles produced in these countries. We need to get as close to self sufficiency in food production as possible to avoid importing. As for microchips, we need to create that industry in this country so we don't have to rely on other countries.
24
05/02/2021 11:50:35 5 8
bbc
capitalism:anarchic, chaotic, no planning, every man 4 self. alternative? socialist.net
74
05/02/2021 13:56:22 1 1
bbc
The trouble with socialism is that some animals are more equal than others.
60
05/02/2021 13:18:56 24 3
bbc
It would make more sense for the government to create the environment for some chip making capacity in the UK. These days it should be regarded as a strategic industry like we maintain ship building and steel. The backward steam age attitude in the political class is scary. They are happy to create a new fast steam age train set but not universal broadband. Guess we know what companies mates own!
75
05/02/2021 13:56:11 10 1
bbc
We don't maintain ship building or steel manufacturer. Investment from foreign companies and foreign governments does that for us.
88
05/02/2021 14:16:18 2 1
bbc
No shipbuilding only survives on warships ordered by government. See the last two carriers, Tridend subs to come, etc. Ownership of the companies can be anyone’s.
51
05/02/2021 13:01:52 3 2
bbc
What a misleading headline. I thought the idiots in charge and so called Jamie Oliver had banned delicious chips for a second. I wouldn’t put it past them.
Removed
48
05/02/2021 12:47:00 8 0
bbc
There is absolutely no debate around ABS, what a ridiculous statement. There is zero chance of releasing cars with simplified systems due to the safety requirements of NCAP, etc. and the blatantly obvious fact that by the time these companies developed a new simplified model of car the problem with chip supply will have already gone away.
77
05/02/2021 13:59:31 0 0
bbc
ABS doesn't reduce stopping distance, it does however enable you to control steering without manual cadence braking (something that is very hard to do when you are trying not to hit whatever has jumped out in front of you). No debate ABS is a good thing.
Internet connected foo, predictive driver aids, automatic windscreen washers etc however are just shiney things that we do not need.
78
05/02/2021 13:59:51 25 4
bbc
I always used to service and maintain my own car.

No more; my new car has a mysterious plastic box (to which other, equally mysterious plastic boxes are attached) under the bonnet from whence the motive power comes, seemingly by some sort of witchcraft. Personally, I wouldn't call it progress: disposable instead of repairable is far from a forward step.

I wouldn't miss not having chips in cars.
128
05/02/2021 16:43:53 10 3
bbc
Unfortunately, modern drivers seem incapable of being able to drive a car without the brainboxes taking over: they stamp on the throttle and the TCS keeps things under control; they stamp on the brakes and the ABS takes over; the car avoids things they're too busy updating snapbookgram to even notice in front of them. As with so much else, remove the safety systems & let nature sort it out.
140
05/02/2021 17:10:34 2 0
bbc
Your fuel efficiency would plummet.
186
06/02/2021 03:01:26 1 1
bbc
it *would* be possible to makes cars with discrete components.

but half the industry income is needing specialists to service them. or get Edd China on it... (but pref not Mike Brewer)
79
bbc
Well, one positive of the ChinaVirus debacle, might be that we start to take back responsibility for our industries, no longer blinded the the awful human rights record of a dictatorship.
Perhaps, it's a new dawn for the world, now we know where not to plant our industries.
Removed
25
05/02/2021 11:52:36 7 4
bbc
Every 'update' to your smart phone increases battery consumption and reduces performance.

Manufacturers deny it is to make you upgrade. Maybe it is just laziness.

Google, Samsung, Apple, Hwawei... should get their engineers to focus their efforts on improving the performance of firmware on existing handsets and extend the "support period" to cover the shortages.
80
05/02/2021 14:05:56 5 0
bbc
not true - sometimes it does more often though it doesn't. Each & every additional app that you have running does.
However, you should bare in mind that batteries degrade over time and typically can only reach 50% their original capacity after 400-450 charge cycles...
It would make sense to go back to replaceable batteries (and associated coulomb counter/gas gauges).
135
05/02/2021 16:57:00 0 2
bbc
So Apple phones are at 50% by the end of the first month going by that?
81
05/02/2021 14:06:02 18 2
bbc
The people glibly saying it won't affect them because they like their ten year old phone... nothing wrong with that, but you may want to take a look at where your pension fund is invested...

You'll find that there's a good portion of it in tech, automotive and other impacted industries.

There is a much bigger picture than your immediate sphere of vision, and it affects (almost) everyone.
91
05/02/2021 14:22:11 15 13
bbc
Welcome to HYS, where everything is boiled down to simplistic reasoning.

It's why we ended up leaving the biggest developed single market in the world. Although, the basic reason we left was because the Tories used the racist card. Ironically, the Tories have agreed to millions of Hong Kong Chinese coming to live here.

The chip shortfall hopefully will be short-lived.
58
05/02/2021 13:11:17 20 2
bbc
High value, specialised items that we are very capable of producing in this country, yet we are extremely reliant on Asia, particularly Korea for these components.

This: high value, low footprint manufacturing is exactly what we should be aiming for here.

We should be an exporter of these components not an importer.
82
05/02/2021 14:06:09 3 1
bbc
Did you read the article? It said: "Most of tier-two foundries have been registering poor earnings, low margins and high debt ratio during the past few years... From the profitability perspective, building a new fab[rication plant] for smaller foundries is difficult to consider." You're in effect advocating taxpayer bailouts in future for an industry we can't sustain. Why did Dyson leave?
100
05/02/2021 14:47:28 2 0
bbc
It's a long term play, a 15+ year horizon, not a 5 year horizon. Of course, it's billions, but the demand is very high and it's not exactly going to wane in the future with everything progressively getting smarter. It's also a huge security concern as these things process all our data yet we have no oversight of their production.

It's not just about a quick buck, it's a whole industry.
58
05/02/2021 13:11:17 20 2
bbc
High value, specialised items that we are very capable of producing in this country, yet we are extremely reliant on Asia, particularly Korea for these components.

This: high value, low footprint manufacturing is exactly what we should be aiming for here.

We should be an exporter of these components not an importer.
83
Soo
05/02/2021 14:08:25 2 1
bbc
The UK's competitive advantage being? Closeness to the client (distance - low transportation costs)? Discounted prime materials costs (local mines)? Intellectual property (might be achieved in the future with the new immigrant wave from Hong Kong)? Tax advantages for the producing company (over their current location)? Low labor cost? Productivity? I'd argue, none of the above...
5
05/02/2021 10:56:13 65 17
bbc
How will 'chipageddon' affect you?

In other words;

How does buying 'Stuff' that you don't really need, affect you?

"New graphics cards, iPhones, the latest Xbox/PlayStation, new cars."

Such an 'Ivory tower' question lol imagine if this pandemic happened in the 80's, kids would have learned using 'books' with the help of Parents maybe?

Maybe buy less cr@p people, you don't really need it!
84
05/02/2021 14:09:00 22 2
bbc
I only bought a new iPad a few years ago because they stopped doing security updates for my old one. Apple didn’t even give me a cash back because the said it was too old! They only want the gullible who must have the latest things.
104
05/02/2021 15:15:08 3 0
bbc
I guess it worked if you bought their newer tablet anyway?
170
06/02/2021 00:35:54 4 0
bbc
"Apple … only want the gullible"

Sorry to hear you're that. Next time consider a non-Apple product—there are many more of them than there are Apple products. Almost all are better value & some are better quality.

Apple has been a fashion company since 2005—when the droped 'Computer' from the company name—just like Google & Facebook are advertising companies. I prefer to buy from product makers.
39
05/02/2021 12:23:27 11 6
bbc
Socialism: never worked anywhere at anytime responsible for the death of millions.
85
05/02/2021 14:09:02 1 2
bbc
Does your country have: Fire departments - socialism. State Police Forces - socialism. Medicare and Medicaid, a Military, Social Security, Minimum wage legislation, Public schools ... The extremes: 100% Private Enterprise - Never Existed (extreme income inequality) and 100% State Owned - USSR Totalitarianism (also extreme income inequality). Somewhere in between is socialism.
120
05/02/2021 15:58:00 2 0
bbc
Chavez, Ceacusescu, Castro, Kim Jong-il........ all good old socialists. And yes Communism = Socialism.
141
05/02/2021 17:15:09 0 1
bbc
Glad to see someone knows we already have socialism. It is social i.e. for the benefit of everyone in a society.
73
05/02/2021 13:53:08 5 0
bbc
1) You hardly ever see people buying things that are more expensive, just because they've got a UK flag on it. 2) There are millions of French and German cars in all European countries. 3) Food is distributed across Europe daily, from where it is cheaper to produce to where it is profitable to sell. 4) Electrical goods made in UK still need foreign microchips in them.
86
05/02/2021 14:10:14 1 0
bbc
If you watch the news programmes and see a report from France, Germany or Italy ,the public services are all using vehicles produced in these countries. We need to get as close to self sufficiency in food production as possible to avoid importing. As for microchips, we need to create that industry in this country so we don't have to rely on other countries.
94
05/02/2021 14:24:27 0 0
bbc
Who is “we”? I think you’ll find that most of the “we” that are capable of doing such things leave the UK.
138
05/02/2021 17:06:09 1 0
bbc
The only way we could possibly get close to self sufficiency in fresh foods that will grow in our climate is to reduce the population. Having 3 or 4 children won't cut it.
87
05/02/2021 14:15:43 1 1
bbc
Send for Kate Bingham to secure the UK's supplies.
75
05/02/2021 13:56:11 10 1
bbc
We don't maintain ship building or steel manufacturer. Investment from foreign companies and foreign governments does that for us.
88
05/02/2021 14:16:18 2 1
bbc
No shipbuilding only survives on warships ordered by government. See the last two carriers, Tridend subs to come, etc. Ownership of the companies can be anyone’s.
5
05/02/2021 10:56:13 65 17
bbc
How will 'chipageddon' affect you?

In other words;

How does buying 'Stuff' that you don't really need, affect you?

"New graphics cards, iPhones, the latest Xbox/PlayStation, new cars."

Such an 'Ivory tower' question lol imagine if this pandemic happened in the 80's, kids would have learned using 'books' with the help of Parents maybe?

Maybe buy less cr@p people, you don't really need it!
89
05/02/2021 14:20:20 3 7
bbc
Classic luddite attitude. I need a new GPU for work. Welcome to the 21st century. Tastes and demand change. You can read and still want a playstation gramps, people use online gaming to socialise.
63
05/02/2021 13:37:10 3 1
bbc
I upgraded to a 2080ti last March, concerned that the pandemic was going to lead to hardware shortages.

When the 3000 series were released last Autumn everyone was laughing at the 2080ti owners.

How things change.
90
05/02/2021 14:21:15 2 0
bbc
Yes that is me, the new ones were expected so I waited. They are about twice as good as it turned out, a big improvement, but not available to nobodies like me. Still the wait should have a 3080ti available. Fortunately it is only a hobby for me not life altering.
81
05/02/2021 14:06:02 18 2
bbc
The people glibly saying it won't affect them because they like their ten year old phone... nothing wrong with that, but you may want to take a look at where your pension fund is invested...

You'll find that there's a good portion of it in tech, automotive and other impacted industries.

There is a much bigger picture than your immediate sphere of vision, and it affects (almost) everyone.
91
05/02/2021 14:22:11 15 13
bbc
Welcome to HYS, where everything is boiled down to simplistic reasoning.

It's why we ended up leaving the biggest developed single market in the world. Although, the basic reason we left was because the Tories used the racist card. Ironically, the Tories have agreed to millions of Hong Kong Chinese coming to live here.

The chip shortfall hopefully will be short-lived.
101
05/02/2021 14:50:27 10 7
bbc
We didn't want to leave the worlds biggest single market, it has/had huge benefits, which is why we joined in the first place. However, all the attached strings that have since come with it since, has made it a less than desirable entity.
148
05/02/2021 17:59:16 3 5
bbc
The bad 'Tories' backed remain, like all the political class. It was the real people that won brexit.
We might be entering a bigger only trading group soon anyway. The political class are the problem they let anyone in if they can. Their attitudes lost them the brexit issue.

We should have chip fabrication capacity here as security, we have seen the eu attitude to vaccines!
66
05/02/2021 13:48:39 4 4
bbc
#1 We have airfields FULL off new cars. Perhaps the manufactures should consider selling what they have rather than complaining they deliver on sales for things they are yet to make.
#2 Forecasting production 12 months out is hard. If you don't want to beholden to an international supply chain you can always make it yourself (yes flexibility to have things when you want them is WHY it costs more)
92
05/02/2021 14:22:23 0 0
bbc
Who is “we”?
70
05/02/2021 13:45:20 3 1
bbc
If you had the capacity before the pandemic it is still there more or less. It is probably repurposed currently and should get back to normal in short order. The problem is greed. Artificial shortage is created to increase prices. HENCE THIS ARTICLE
93
05/02/2021 14:23:23 1 0
bbc
Greed playing games with the supply and demand again!
86
05/02/2021 14:10:14 1 0
bbc
If you watch the news programmes and see a report from France, Germany or Italy ,the public services are all using vehicles produced in these countries. We need to get as close to self sufficiency in food production as possible to avoid importing. As for microchips, we need to create that industry in this country so we don't have to rely on other countries.
94
05/02/2021 14:24:27 0 0
bbc
Who is “we”? I think you’ll find that most of the “we” that are capable of doing such things leave the UK.
95
05/02/2021 14:27:38 14 1
bbc
ARM. Ltd tells you all the UK governments thinks of protecting "strategic" industries and technology". If it is not worth protecting, what is? Name a company of such importance being allowed by, say US/EU/Japan/south Korea, being sold to UK company. Look at world leading research at our universities, being monetised by foreign countries/companies reeping the economic rewards
146
05/02/2021 17:33:08 3 5
bbc
It is the UK ‘monetisation' that has always been the problem. Look at film. We have the language advantage & great performing traditions and support staff. But we create, fund, own, no proper entertainment films. We get lumbered with 'arty' garbage next to no one wants to watch. Not our own Star Wars, or anything actually. State subsidised utter junk instead. To bbc thinking 6 episodes is a series
96
05/02/2021 14:38:25 3 3
bbc
I've got a slide rule - it does everything you need without chips or electricity. It even put men on the moon.
102
05/02/2021 15:14:01 6 1
bbc
Can it play Doom?
97
05/02/2021 14:38:30 6 2
bbc
Lots of comments on here talking about what ‘we’ should do.
To be clear, a significant number (not all!) of the most creative scientists and engineers leave the UK for other countries that don’t despise ‘experts’.
In the USA, a mediocre engineer easily makes $100k and a good one, double that.
Until the UK recognizes the value of its home grown talent, “we” won’t be doing anything to solve this.
195
06/02/2021 12:09:25 2 0
bbc
As someone who lived & worked in the USA for 8 years, your statement is correct. I worked in the automotive industry & was paid 75% more in the USA than for a comparable job in the UK.
Having said all of that, US society is horrible & just driven by money & consumption. I prefer the European way of life.
34
05/02/2021 12:19:14 11 23
bbc
No, they do not contain rare earth metals in the main. They are actually made from rock. Like so many others I buy a sim card, having paid for my phone some time ago. Who are you to tell me what is an essential machine? My telephone? The EC device in my aeroplane that warns me of aircraft that I may not have seen ? The radio in my car? This is the twenty first century. We don't live in caves.
98
05/02/2021 14:42:38 0 1
bbc
Fracgil rock ??
99
05/02/2021 14:46:30 1 1
bbc
Basically this shows up the fallacy that globalisation and offshoring is good in the long run. It isn't. It leads to exploitation, the creation of dangerous monopolies and puts countries in a strategic hole. The Next century needs to see industry diversify and production and R&D etc diversify. Lots of small local producers rather than a few big global producers. In Everything.
82
05/02/2021 14:06:09 3 1
bbc
Did you read the article? It said: "Most of tier-two foundries have been registering poor earnings, low margins and high debt ratio during the past few years... From the profitability perspective, building a new fab[rication plant] for smaller foundries is difficult to consider." You're in effect advocating taxpayer bailouts in future for an industry we can't sustain. Why did Dyson leave?
100
05/02/2021 14:47:28 2 0
bbc
It's a long term play, a 15+ year horizon, not a 5 year horizon. Of course, it's billions, but the demand is very high and it's not exactly going to wane in the future with everything progressively getting smarter. It's also a huge security concern as these things process all our data yet we have no oversight of their production.

It's not just about a quick buck, it's a whole industry.
109
05/02/2021 15:25:22 0 0
bbc
So, expensive and barely breaking even? I can certainly agree with it not being a quick buck