Covid: New Oxford vaccine 'ready by the autumn' to tackle mutations
03/02/2021 | news | health | 2,382
An improved jab that will be more effective against variants can be made quickly, says Oxford-AstraZeneca.
1
03/02/2021 13:43:52 878 78
bbc
Congratulations to the excellent scientists.
52
03/02/2021 13:50:34 615 93
bbc
Why would anyone down vote you for congratulating the scientists?? Beggars belief !!
68
03/02/2021 13:52:17 5 42
bbc
There are so mene to chose from.
74
03/02/2021 13:52:44 81 8
bbc
I dread to think where we would be without them (well, up the creek without a paddle is the answer...)
235
03/02/2021 14:03:25 12 104
bbc
What they don't mention is that you can't take this vaccine as a booster as your body becomes immune to the vector - the host that carries the covid spike. So anyone who has already had the vaccine already will not be able to get boosted with the update for the new variants. This vaccine might be getting us out of a whole now but a long-term solution it is not.
295
03/02/2021 14:08:01 31 2
bbc
Thanks to the anti-maskers etc. such developments will constantly be needed.
331
03/02/2021 14:11:26 3 45
bbc
Excellent news and reinforces the fact that lockdowns and harmful border restrictions are not needed.

Open all borders and schools now.
336
03/02/2021 14:11:56 1 7
bbc
Don't forget to thank Bashar al-Assad who has kindly stopped having a civil war whilst all this has been going on.

Oh...is that the new normal...
367
DG
03/02/2021 14:14:29 3 16
bbc
One word should describe them, IDIOTS

And to BBC, Don't delete this post. It's fact
595
03/02/2021 14:33:10 5 2
bbc
And scientists started research into a vaccine in mid-January as they could see by the original genome sequencing provided from China, the virus was serious. Done independently of governments, with the UK ones, not taking any remotely serious action until late March.
2
03/02/2021 13:43:53 25 52
bbc
"Control The Population – Stay Scared - Maintain The Fear" is the latest Government snappy 3 line slogan.
12
CJR
03/02/2021 13:45:23 19 7
bbc
My friend why are you posting fake news?
106
03/02/2021 13:55:21 2 1
bbc
Not helpful
3
03/02/2021 13:44:20 2 10
bbc
So 3 weeks after second jab is our exit date for lockdowns? Extend furlough now I guess
166
03/02/2021 13:59:17 4 1
bbc
I very much doubt we will all be in 'lockdown' until September. There may be a few remaining restrictions relating to massive crowds, but I would expect that in the summer all businesses will be open, and soclialising in reasonable numbers will be allowed.

Once the vulnerable have had two jabs, and a couple of weeks after every else who wants it has had the first jab, things will look much better
4
03/02/2021 13:44:30 212 39
bbc
Let's have some cheerful positive comments today please.
51
03/02/2021 13:50:34 94 33
bbc
LoL @ people downvoting your post.
143
03/02/2021 13:49:51 28 7
bbc
You won;t get any from the EU fanboys. They are smarting badly from the disaster that the EU is turning out to be!
708
03/02/2021 14:43:38 3 0
bbc
Sun is shining at the moment.
xlr
03/02/2021 15:21:15 4 4
bbc
No disagreement from me, though too many people are busy using the vaccine to justify Brexit, as if somehow all of the crap we'll have to go through because of it was worth it because the EU's vaccination program sucked.
03/02/2021 15:55:04 0 2
bbc
As immunity to this virus is only expected to persist for 6-9 months after infection, it is quite possible that Boris could get it (or a variant of it) again now, and in some instances the second infection has proven worse than the first.

So there is hope...
03/02/2021 16:32:50 0 1
bbc
No
03/02/2021 16:33:38 1 0
bbc
too many lemon suckers about
5
03/02/2021 13:44:32 9 18
bbc
Amazing news.

And while I'm here - BBC why haven't you done a report on the latest LSE study into Scottish independence? I can see it on the FT but not here? On Brexit you reported on all these studies, surely Scots deserve more info?
97
03/02/2021 13:54:30 4 2
bbc
Oh go on then... because there are lots of issues in Scotland that the incumbent government should deal with as a higher priority - education; healthcare (notwithstanding Covid, standards were falling before; drug deaths).

I understand the SNP (by definition) have an ideological goal for independence, but this should not come at the expense of the basic role of a Government.
6
03/02/2021 13:44:37 293 37
bbc
Good, let’s keep rolling out the vaccines now, get back to normal and if necessary roll out more vaccines in the autumn, like we do with flu, and stop making the issue of mutations (that happen anyway) more of an issue than it needs to be.
33
03/02/2021 13:48:16 128 6
bbc
Indeed, one thing we seem to be doing right.

Great that thoughts are already on the future too.
112
03/02/2021 13:56:03 2 18
bbc
You forgot to add your medical qualifications to your post.
133
03/02/2021 13:57:41 4 12
bbc
Normal is gone. It’s been given away due to panic.
298
03/02/2021 14:08:18 4 6
bbc
The issue of mutations as you put it could be the difference between releasing restrictions and them continuing into next year.

There is emerging evidence that the vaccines suppress transmission of the original virus they are based on. If a mutation reduces the level of suppression, social distancing will have to continue to protect those who cannot have a vaccine (like Captain Sir Tom Moore).
683
03/02/2021 14:41:19 2 8
bbc
Mutations not an issue, just a useful excuse!
03/02/2021 15:30:51 0 1
bbc
HMG needs these variants (they are delighted when another arises) for the spurious justification they provide to continue the "emergency" powers they are coming to love.
03/02/2021 15:39:08 2 0
bbc
The only way we can stop mutations becoming an issue is to get the number of infections down to low numbers to minimise the potential for more mutations.
That means not releasing lockdown prematurely (like the gov did last year) and re-imposing it promptly if/when numbers go up (as the gov failed to do last year)

Failing to do those things will cause more deaths and more economic harm.
03/02/2021 17:08:55 0 0
bbc
only a issue with certain media outlets
03/02/2021 18:28:55 0 0
bbc
It's avery important issue that needs the public to be kept informed of, which each new variant becoming stronger and more potent than the previous ones...

It's sheer ignorance and foolishness that you would rather have such important information swept under the carpet because you personally can't handle it...
04/02/2021 01:25:45 0 1
bbc
We can't afford to think a variant will not cause a 3rd wave. We need to be ready this time. We stood like dodo's when we watched the virus spreading from country to country and said it would never come to my country. We stood in denial and what happened?
7
03/02/2021 13:44:39 21 27
bbc
We need a roadmap out of this crisis.

This is where the politicians step in.

The vast majority of the public are following the guidelines, but I hear no gratitude from No.10. All we get is blame.
26
03/02/2021 13:47:01 6 5
bbc
The ONS confirms that compliance is very high. So anyone using ‘it’s because people aren’t following the rules’ is demonstrably false.
108
03/02/2021 13:55:28 2 2
bbc
You should pay attention to what ministers do say because they give their thanks to us time and time again.
120
03/02/2021 13:48:47 3 2
bbc
Why don't you go and have a word with the virus, ask it what its plans are. Politicians are generally acting on advice of their advisors, who are reacting to a fast changing situation themselves.
8
03/02/2021 13:44:50 10 8
bbc
Vaccines are not a quick fix but our only way back to some semblance of normality
459
03/02/2021 14:22:33 2 0
bbc
Indeed they're not a quick fix but they do help restore a measure of normality. More importantly, they also buy time for the scientists and health professionals to develop long term solutions which are what we need far more than quick fixes and politicians' knee-jerk reactions.
9
03/02/2021 13:44:54 79 10
bbc
Great news - well done everyone.
10
Bob
03/02/2021 13:45:21 5 19
bbc
By which time there will be more mutations and so on.
25
CJR
03/02/2021 13:46:57 8 6
bbc
You actually know that as a fact? Or just ear say
11
03/02/2021 13:45:23 204 21
bbc
What a fantastic job Oxford University is doing, I’m very confident that the UK is well on track to conquer Covid-19
91
03/02/2021 13:54:10 95 8
bbc
We will do enough to live with it, just as we live with flu etc - in other words, good enough
136
03/02/2021 13:57:56 7 0
bbc
It can't be 'conquered' but we can improve things.
152
03/02/2021 13:58:37 6 18
bbc
Oxford and AZ are doing a fantastic job, but let's keep some perspective here.

They're not the only ones, and other people in other countries got more effective vaccines developed in quicker time, and are also tweaking their's for the new variants as well.
687
03/02/2021 14:41:49 1 2
bbc
Needs to be the rest of the world too.
03/02/2021 16:01:28 2 2
bbc
"What a fantastic job Oxford University is doing"

Agreed!

"I’m very confident that the UK is well on track to conquer Covid-19"

England still has a long way to catch up with the success Covid has had due to the unforgivable stupidity and incompetence of our Government resulting in one of the highest per capita fatality rates in the world and uncontrolled infection rates allowing a new variant.
2
03/02/2021 13:43:53 25 52
bbc
"Control The Population – Stay Scared - Maintain The Fear" is the latest Government snappy 3 line slogan.
12
CJR
03/02/2021 13:45:23 19 7
bbc
My friend why are you posting fake news?
402
03/02/2021 14:17:50 0 2
bbc
The real fake news is that the government actually care about you
13
W 6
03/02/2021 13:45:23 113 13
bbc
Important to remember that, as it stands, the vaccines still work very, very well against preventing severe illness. If that keeps up then we'll have a lot more room on relaxing restrictions as hospital pressure eases. Should that change in the future, the UK has been working on a mass vaccine development facility since 2018 to get vaccines manufactured at pace. There are contingency plans afloat.
118
03/02/2021 13:48:06 39 257
bbc
What hospital pressure? They’re not stretched above and beyond any normal winter. Look at the bed use.
162
03/02/2021 13:59:01 0 13
bbc
Except pneumonia.

Too soon?
269
03/02/2021 14:05:45 2 5
bbc
Odd that you say "at pace" (which presumably means quickly") when work on this facility started 3 year ago. It should be up and running by now.
951
03/02/2021 15:03:47 1 3
bbc
Subject to some bright spark at the Treasury. Contingencystocks of PPE were chucked out after some bright spark at the Treasury said that we could rely on legal agreements. Result: Deaths currently runnibg at over 108k.
14
03/02/2021 13:45:41 8 19
bbc
So is this what we can expect? Years of yo-yo'ing in and out of lockdowns or restrictions until vaccines are modified to better tackle every variant that is found?

I'm starting to wonder if those "great reset" nutters are on to something.
40
03/02/2021 13:49:16 3 2
bbc
Probably the same stuff as you are on.
73
03/02/2021 13:52:42 1 1
bbc
no - it does not mean that. Read the article
15
03/02/2021 13:45:52 218 17
bbc
These AZ guys are absolutely amazing and so informative too!
88
03/02/2021 13:53:50 84 8
bbc
Yes, they seem to know their way around.
127
03/02/2021 13:56:42 7 20
bbc
Yep - and some of them are foreign too (but don't tell Brexiteers).
878
03/02/2021 14:56:50 8 1
bbc
Please remember that it is the Oxford Scientists who are doing all the R&D - AZ are a licensee who have done the (official) licensing work (running additional trials where needed - eg US and Japan), making the production quantities and distributing it. The Serum Institute in India are also a licensee and are distributing it under their own brand.
Publications are written by the Oxford scientists.
03/02/2021 15:21:12 0 0
bbc
Be careful. The football people clearly on here will think you’re referring to AZ Alkmaar.
03/02/2021 16:08:06 2 3
bbc
I presume if several countries are not giving the AZ vaccine to over 65s that means more for the UK so we can get done quicker then we can help 3rd world organisations around the world like the EU
16
03/02/2021 13:45:54 134 15
bbc
Congratulations to all involved in the vaccine development and rollout. No doubt we will need vaccinations for years to come, but at least we have a fighting chance.
17
GH
03/02/2021 13:46:00 58 11
bbc
This will be a game of cat and mouse from now on.

I’m glad that OAZ are on the ball.
170
Bob
03/02/2021 13:59:51 10 147
bbc
Saying it will be ready in 7 months, having known about this specific mutation since July last year is hardly being on the ball.

Especially when the current rate of significant mutation is less than 6 months.

Miracle we have a vaccine and blah blah blah - but to truly beat it globally, it needs to be quicker.
18
03/02/2021 13:46:03 107 7
bbc
Good to see some emphasis on how vaccines actually work and can be tweaked to tackle viral mutations, instead of just piling on more fear and panic over those viral mutations (which are standard, natural, and something we are entirely used to in relation, for example, to flu).
19
03/02/2021 13:46:24 4 8
bbc
Good news, but still no one knows just how many have already suffered Covid-19 and are immune but unrecorded across the UK and EU. Antibody testing should be every bit as effective as testing for the disease so vancinations can go to those in need first.
20
03/02/2021 13:46:32 540 42
bbc
Epic work by some very clever scientists. They should be paid more than football players for this work!
Lets hope our country can continue to produce talent at this level.
84
03/02/2021 13:53:24 55 37
bbc
Unless you play for Derby County..
105
03/02/2021 13:55:16 46 5
bbc
EVERYONE should be paid more than footballers!
129
03/02/2021 13:57:08 20 43
bbc
agree Chris, unfortunatley Brexit has made working in the UK for scientists not an attractive place, and from the employment end to bring in the best postdocs from EU is now an admin-paperwork pain, if we want to the UK to "produce" better scientists etc then the Tories lack of education and science school funding, opting out of Erasmus for UK students has put a sure stop to that..but lets hope
141
03/02/2021 13:58:20 16 6
bbc
Fortunately people study and work in science for the love of the subject and not the money, let the footballers keep their ridiculous salaries
167
03/02/2021 13:59:20 14 0
bbc
Until they are paid that much, then everyone will be shouting about "how dare private sector pharmaceuticals earn so much!!!"
205
03/02/2021 14:01:52 17 7
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They are. Oh wait, no it's only the CEO , CFO and board members of Astrazeneca who get the big bucks, not the fine people at the coalface.
464
03/02/2021 14:22:40 5 7
bbc
Why do people have such a problem with Footballer's wages? 0.012% of youth footballers make it to the Premier League. They are the best of the best. Like any other industry the best of the best are millionaires.
559
03/02/2021 14:29:21 1 4
bbc
I'll wager that you and many agreeing with you are capitalists who support the free market.
694
03/02/2021 14:42:24 3 3
bbc
Average Premier League player does pay in excess of £1.2 million Income Tax plus further taxes on image rights etc. That does pay for quite a bit of science.
733
Tom
03/02/2021 14:45:06 4 2
bbc
We had the chance to have a socialist government in the 2019 election. The country didn't voted clearly that they didn't want it.

So if you accept capitalism, you need to accept supply and demand and footballers getting more and more wealthy.
783
03/02/2021 14:49:01 5 1
bbc
This country has always been capable of producing excellent talent.

The problem this country has always had is in recognising, developing, investing and productively deploying this talent.
797
03/02/2021 14:50:32 3 3
bbc
Unfortunately, due to the incoming financial constraints, I don't expect the Oxford scientists will even get a pay rise next year...
957
03/02/2021 15:00:13 4 5
bbc
Why is it always footballers that get bad press? They make sacrifices to get to the top of their game, they work hard and practice to be the best that they can be.

Scientist are amazing but it bugs me that people always use footballers as a put down.

Footballers earn what clubs are prepared to pay them.

How many of you would say no to more money if your employer offered you it?
03/02/2021 15:12:27 3 0
bbc
I wouldn't worry about their bank balance. Leading scientists behind this vaccine, Sarah Gilbert and Adrian Hill are founders and major shareholders in Vaccitech. Vaccitech licensed the chadox1 platform, which is used to make the covid19 vaccine, to Astra Zeneca.
03/02/2021 15:32:41 0 2
bbc
Footballers are paid a fair share of the money they generate for the club. If we were all paid the same way, we would all be better off.
Would you prefer the club owner to take all of the profits and pay the players minimum wage?
There are enough fat cats out there already but I suppose footballers are an easy target.
03/02/2021 15:46:11 3 0
bbc
"Lets hope our country can continue to produce talent at this level."

Not just football players. We must respect the social, intellectual and cultural contributions of all the people who are seen as icons of our great country. We must learn to value the work of such national treasures as Gemma Collins and Joey Essex who do so much to promote modern British values all around the world.
03/02/2021 15:56:49 2 0
bbc
I can't think of many people who should be paid less than footballers and other sports people, or rather the kickers and hitters of balls are paid too much?
03/02/2021 16:28:15 0 2
bbc
The teams behind these triumphs will include many non-Brits and their access to new brexitland may not be so easy.
cba
03/02/2021 16:41:53 0 0
bbc
I have read test and trace consultants are getting £1100 per day
03/02/2021 16:58:41 0 1
bbc
Not that they need it, but hey, give footballers a break. They are entertainers, and their huge wealth is recognition of the rarity of, and demand for their skills.

Science, unfortunately, is apparently not entertaining enough for the masses. I am a scientific researcher and frankly there's no way I'd pay to watch me sitting in front of a computer all day.

I'm also a football fan :-)
03/02/2021 17:18:04 1 0
bbc
Yes, for some arrogant idiot to walk past Chris Witty today calling him a liar... Beggars belief that these people work so hard only to be abused. Maybe the police should find this man and fine him the maximum allowable...
03/02/2021 17:48:31 0 1
bbc
They stand to make huge money out of the firm they set up
03/02/2021 18:10:41 0 0
bbc
Football players should be paid the same as them
21
03/02/2021 13:46:43 4 11
bbc
"By the autumn" has a familiar ring to it.

So at best it'll take over seven months to even start getting a new vaccine out. Any vaccine escaping variant would be rampant by then. Just have to hope existing vaccines can still have some impact I suppose.
66
03/02/2021 13:52:08 3 1
bbc
It does not mean that. Read the article
22
03/02/2021 13:46:44 449 129
bbc
Unlike the Labour party who only ever thank the NHS for the roll-out, we should also thank the big pharmaceutical companies, our world-beating, first-class scientific community, private enterprise and an agile government. Good news all way around!
62
03/02/2021 13:51:43 166 87
bbc
Let's not forget to thank Dolly Parton and Bill Gates as well
102
03/02/2021 13:55:01 23 26
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Well said, nice to read a constructive and positive opinion
147
03/02/2021 13:58:30 41 38
bbc
I was right with you there until you mentioned the government!
176
SJ
03/02/2021 14:00:08 29 30
bbc
Your opening statement is false.
216
03/02/2021 14:02:21 14 6
bbc
Let's just have all vaccines made at cost for as long as they're needed, then the private sector gets my support. But btw congratulations to the scientists and other hands-on developers and distributors.
353
03/02/2021 14:13:03 29 16
bbc
Oh yes. Good work playing some politics there. A sneaky boot that I'm sure you found very tasty when the Tories gave it to you to clean.
360
03/02/2021 14:13:24 48 9
bbc
Err...
Anneliese Dodds MP, Labour’s Shadow Chancellor said:

Thanks to our brilliant scientists we now have a light at the end of the tunnel.

Still, never let facts get in the way of saying something stupid.
365
03/02/2021 14:14:09 31 3
bbc
Fantastic news and congratulations only spoiled by you making it a political issue of it taken directly from editorials in the Mail & Telegraph.

This was a remnant of the Corbyn era pre covid and related to then spiraling costs of treatments as some Pharma companies took over old patents then loaded the price.

They have thankfully changed policy and moved on as should the out of date rhetoric.
463
03/02/2021 14:22:38 27 10
bbc
You lost me with "agile government".
Really?
Enough to make Matt Hancock cry. Or was it laugh?
518
03/02/2021 14:26:58 11 4
bbc
Astra Zenica is an Anglo Swedish company. we dont have an agile goverment we have 30,000 extra deaths.
632
03/02/2021 14:36:33 10 3
bbc
"an agile government"??!!

Which government do you mean? New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea maybe. Certainly not the UK one.
Scientists started working on a vaccine independently of the government here, in mid-January when they got the genome sequencing from China. Big pharma came in later.
696
03/02/2021 14:42:46 12 2
bbc
Agile government - that is so funny.
759
03/02/2021 14:46:49 12 2
bbc
Agree with you most of the way, replace "agile" with "inept" and it is spot on.
760
Tom
03/02/2021 14:47:00 3 3
bbc
Yes we should and the pharmaceuticals will get very, very rich off the back of a worldwide pandemic where millions of people will not only lose their jobs, potentially, lose their lives.

That doesn't sit well with you?
777
03/02/2021 14:48:40 11 2
bbc
Just be grateful youve still got an NHS to help with the roll out after 10 years of managed decline and asset stripping of the service.
809
03/02/2021 14:51:31 11 3
bbc
Agile government ? Hmm, panic stricken would be more accurate!
961
03/02/2021 15:04:45 1 1
bbc
I think Big Pharma will be profiting from this. Private enterprise has wasted taxpayers money, as have the government. Only thing they've done well surrounds the vaccine...so far.
977
03/02/2021 15:07:19 2 0
bbc
I’d like to thank the producer, the director, and of course you, the public, without whom none of this would have been possible...
980
03/02/2021 15:07:48 4 3
bbc
Unlike the Tories who only pat themselves on the back. World bleaters ??
03/02/2021 15:22:24 7 3
bbc
Unlike the Labour party that set up the NHS in the first place. unlike you fascist tories that want to sell it off
03/02/2021 15:27:35 3 1
bbc
LOL the bit the government has been involved in directly is distributing the vaccines. That has been variously described as 'chaotic', 'disorganized', 'incompetent' and 'farsical'

It has resulted in government ministers turning up for photo ops at vaccination centres where no vaccine has been delivered, amongst other failures.

Fortunately approval and delivery is not down to the governement.
03/02/2021 15:33:25 3 2
bbc
Well done citizen, clap for our glorious leaders (don't mention the tens of thousands they killed ignoring Operation Cygnus in 2016 and subsequent drive for herd immunity as that would be disloyal). Big Pharma doesn't need a clap, it will make trillions.
03/02/2021 15:36:14 3 2
bbc
So you expect the Tory party to get credit for the work of the scientists, the NHS, the MHRA (set up under Labour).
While not to get any blame for failing to take the Advice of SAGE to lock down in September (resulting in 10's of thousands of extra deaths), or for being late to lock down in March, or for multiple actions which caused the R rate to rise above 1 and trigger the 2nd (&3rd) waves...
03/02/2021 15:40:31 4 1
bbc
How can you try to make an unjustified political point out of an article like this? Labour may have knocked the government cronies milking profits out of over-hyped failed track and trace systems but they have always supported the academic research scientists who have developed treatments and vaccines.
03/02/2021 16:27:17 1 0
bbc
Yep, agree with much of that except us having an "agile govt".
Late to the lockdown last March, lack of PPE, algorithms for exams , on & then, definitely off Christmas fiasco.

Mind, they did display some measure of agility when it came to U turns.
03/02/2021 16:29:44 1 0
bbc
Of course, all of these play their part except the gov, who thankfully had effectively nothing to do in this matter
03/02/2021 16:32:28 0 1
bbc
get stuffed :)
cba
03/02/2021 16:44:57 0 0
bbc
Yes thank them all for fleecing us and bleeding us dry over the years.Its about time they gave something back
03/02/2021 17:07:55 0 1
bbc
Petty in the extreme
fos
03/02/2021 17:27:13 0 0
bbc
I think Kate Bingham who refused a salary and used her expertise to order vaccines and back winning contenders putting the U.K. in a position of advantage before being driven from her job by the media over 695k she spent on PR that inc recruiting hard to reach groups like ethnic minorities onto Covid-19 trials and making good impressions to drugs companies for the best deal might deserve thanks.
03/02/2021 17:40:57 1 0
bbc
Quite so.....too many consider the NHS as the "be all and end all ".......it's part of an overall system .
03/02/2021 17:54:59 0 0
bbc
All about to make huge profits. I wonder if tax paid on those profits will be channeled back into our NHS to off set some of the under funding it has suffered for the last 10 years . Some thing the Labour Party has highlighted over those years. Don’t let facts get in the way of your “good news all round” line
03/02/2021 18:24:22 0 0
bbc
And the army, all those who have come out of retirement, and all the volunteer helpers
03/02/2021 19:08:01 0 0
bbc
If the big pharma companies weren't making £bns out of these vaccines, I would be more enthusiastic.
That this is likely to be an ongoing exercise - possibly two or even three vaccines every year for the foreseeable future - billions of doses at £18 each (just for UK) is great news for shareholders but not so good for taxpayers.
23
03/02/2021 13:46:48 5 10
bbc
The groundwork is already being laid to keep the hospitality sector closed until autumn even though it has already been said that the current vaccines work against mutations as mutations are natural for viruses.
37
Bob
03/02/2021 13:49:03 4 4
bbc
Unlikely. We have less virus now than we did in March (and it is receding). All signs point to an open summer.

It may well return again next autumn/winter, like flu and colds do.

Vaccines work on known mutations so far - but much less effective.
42
03/02/2021 13:49:21 1 1
bbc
There will be no UK hospitality sector worth speaking of if we are still locking down in the Autumn.
63
03/02/2021 13:51:44 2 1
bbc
Read the article before spreading fear
71
CJR
03/02/2021 13:52:31 2 1
bbc
Please post your evidence
134
03/02/2021 13:57:44 0 1
bbc
The groundwork is being laid to keep them open.
24
03/02/2021 13:46:52 4 27
bbc
ready by the autumn to tackle mutations

= You must be kidding, by autumn, UK new variants would be born !

Terrified !!!!!!!!!!!!!
32
03/02/2021 13:48:04 8 3
bbc
Are you a scientist? No. Thought not.
38
CJR
03/02/2021 13:49:06 0 4
bbc
My friend the only mutations of this virus I am worried about is the next one from China, after the new year celebrations.
moron! Removed
60
03/02/2021 13:51:25 1 1
bbc
Read the article before spreading fear...
10
Bob
03/02/2021 13:45:21 5 19
bbc
By which time there will be more mutations and so on.
25
CJR
03/02/2021 13:46:57 8 6
bbc
You actually know that as a fact? Or just ear say
57
Bob
03/02/2021 13:51:07 5 2
bbc
You believe the virus will stop mutating?
94
03/02/2021 13:54:22 3 1
bbc
It is a fact that viruses mutate. No one has every tried to deny this; so no it isn't just "ear" say.
119
03/02/2021 13:48:37 3 1
bbc
ear say? Maybe he nose what he's talking about.
7
03/02/2021 13:44:39 21 27
bbc
We need a roadmap out of this crisis.

This is where the politicians step in.

The vast majority of the public are following the guidelines, but I hear no gratitude from No.10. All we get is blame.
26
03/02/2021 13:47:01 6 5
bbc
The ONS confirms that compliance is very high. So anyone using ‘it’s because people aren’t following the rules’ is demonstrably false.
192
Bob
03/02/2021 14:01:23 2 1
bbc
Based on what? A survey of asking people 'are you following the rules'. Yes, no doubt everyone is entirely truthful in that.
27
03/02/2021 13:47:29 2 17
bbc
Does it mean existing vaccines are not effective against new mutants?
34
03/02/2021 13:48:46 14 2
bbc
no - it does not mean that. Read the article
36
03/02/2021 13:48:53 0 3
bbc
The green ones, yes.

The purple ones, no evidence yet.
55
03/02/2021 13:50:52 5 1
bbc
Vaccines will need to be adjusted as new mutations emerge within the virus. This is normal and most visible with the annual flu vaccine.

For the current vaccine: "There is still strong evidence existing vaccines work well against the mutations that have emerged"
138
03/02/2021 13:58:07 1 1
bbc
The guy on the radio (professional contributor, not host) said that they didn't have a big enough data set to be able to confirm or refute that statement.
491
03/02/2021 14:25:13 0 0
bbc
Does it mean that you haven't read the article?
28
03/02/2021 13:47:34 13 39
bbc
Accept you don't 'beat' a virus. So let the fit, the healthy, the low risk out of imprisonment immediately.
50
03/02/2021 13:50:34 8 3
bbc
How do you know who won’t get very ill and who won’t ... ?
56
03/02/2021 13:50:57 4 2
bbc
Grow up!
67
CJR
03/02/2021 13:52:09 2 3
bbc
So you can irresponsible spread it quicker then the selfish individuals are doing now.
Face facts my friend we are not going to have anything like normal life until 2022.
69
03/02/2021 13:52:17 2 2
bbc
In English please
72
03/02/2021 13:52:41 1 2
bbc
crazy talk, the vaccine is currently being rolled out, how many lives do you want to endanger for a few weeks
86
03/02/2021 13:53:45 2 2
bbc
In order to let it spread to those who, although now retired, have worked all their lives for us, been incredibly innovative for us, have created the generation that you are now in...you want more? Yes, it's tough, but please, be patient.
510
03/02/2021 14:26:21 1 0
bbc
It doesn't sound like you've really been following this, perhaps you're one of those students who consumes too much C2H5OH and ends up in A&E, guess what happens then if we follow your plan...
551
03/02/2021 14:28:52 1 0
bbc
The fit, the healthy and the low risk have also caught Covid-19 - try thinking before writing.
29
03/02/2021 13:47:37 1 10
bbc
Vaccines will be the future. 4 jabs needed for 4 seasons.
30
03/02/2021 13:47:39 10 7
bbc
I think it should be mandatory to wear a flat-cap whilst getting your vaccine.
31
03/02/2021 13:47:48 20 24
bbc
What the UK Scientific community and our NHS is achieving is truly world beating...in spite of our inept Prime Minister and clueless Govt.
48
03/02/2021 13:50:26 8 12
bbc
The NHS as an instiution is utterly hopeless.

It has squandered a year of preparation time and an unlimiteed budget to end up with less capacity than it had a year ago.

Lions led by donkeys.
24
03/02/2021 13:46:52 4 27
bbc
ready by the autumn to tackle mutations

= You must be kidding, by autumn, UK new variants would be born !

Terrified !!!!!!!!!!!!!
32
03/02/2021 13:48:04 8 3
bbc
Are you a scientist? No. Thought not.
93
03/02/2021 13:54:21 1 3
bbc
Are you? No, so shut up!
6
03/02/2021 13:44:37 293 37
bbc
Good, let’s keep rolling out the vaccines now, get back to normal and if necessary roll out more vaccines in the autumn, like we do with flu, and stop making the issue of mutations (that happen anyway) more of an issue than it needs to be.
33
03/02/2021 13:48:16 128 6
bbc
Indeed, one thing we seem to be doing right.

Great that thoughts are already on the future too.
286
03/02/2021 14:07:30 11 0
bbc
Scientifically the UK has been a large contributor in several fields:
- About 1/2 of the worlds genome sequencing to discover variants
- Researched & identified multiple treatment therapies (e.g. dexamethasone, see https://www.recoverytrial.net/)
- Easily to distribute vaccine available at cost
- Most PCR tests/capita of large nations (help identify trends)
03/02/2021 19:12:09 0 0
bbc
Except that we may have wasted most of our AZ vaccines so far on the very elderly that researchers are saying it doesn't protect.
If so, UK will be lagging behind most other advanced nations.
27
03/02/2021 13:47:29 2 17
bbc
Does it mean existing vaccines are not effective against new mutants?
34
03/02/2021 13:48:46 14 2
bbc
no - it does not mean that. Read the article
35
Jim
03/02/2021 13:48:48 233 16
bbc
Brilliant work from our scientists.

And remember this vaccine has been developed to be cheap and easy to rollout across the globe. These people are human heros.
211
03/02/2021 14:02:11 29 289
bbc
They haven't made it yet, the work has still to be done... and no they are not "hero's" they are simply doing their job!
221
jon
03/02/2021 14:02:35 24 0
bbc
Great news. And brilliant data from Oxford University showing that the AZ vaccine helps to stop transmission.
227
03/02/2021 14:02:59 22 0
bbc
Brilliant work from all the scientists, in all the relevant fields, everywhere. It is an international effort, built on techniques and technologies developed over many years, with expertise and funding from around the world.
247
03/02/2021 14:04:27 1 7
bbc
As opposed to animal or fungi heroes!
869
03/02/2021 14:56:29 6 0
bbc
They are! The UK can hold it's head high on vaccines - one of the largest contributors in the world to COVAX which will vaccinate those in the poorest countries, whilst also investing heavily in vaccines at home.
03/02/2021 16:38:06 0 0
bbc
Good grief, it’s ‘heroes’.
03/02/2021 16:59:03 0 0
bbc
And what a hoot the king of the frogs is, disparages the vaccine and UK strategy at every turn.....but we still want it and we want you to give it to us rather than se it yourself (because we have failed at every turn). Time for his mum to tell him to behave like an adult instead of the tantrums, oh I forgot she's his wife.
03/02/2021 17:33:57 0 1
bbc
Heros?? Everyone is a bloody hero these days just for doing the job they are paid for. Too much hyperbole matey. Some of those scientists will be lazy workshy, obnoxious and racist, just like the cross section of normal society represented by our "heroes" in the NHS which the country is now working to support, instead of the other way around.
03/02/2021 19:18:51 0 0
bbc
Cheap?
AZ is charging £3 ($$) per dose. A lot better than £18 for Pfizer's or £25 for Moderna's.
But the Indian vaccine, Covaxin, at 82p a dose (and effective on the over-65s) might be a better bargain, surely?
27
03/02/2021 13:47:29 2 17
bbc
Does it mean existing vaccines are not effective against new mutants?
36
03/02/2021 13:48:53 0 3
bbc
The green ones, yes.

The purple ones, no evidence yet.
23
03/02/2021 13:46:48 5 10
bbc
The groundwork is already being laid to keep the hospitality sector closed until autumn even though it has already been said that the current vaccines work against mutations as mutations are natural for viruses.
37
Bob
03/02/2021 13:49:03 4 4
bbc
Unlikely. We have less virus now than we did in March (and it is receding). All signs point to an open summer.

It may well return again next autumn/winter, like flu and colds do.

Vaccines work on known mutations so far - but much less effective.
24
03/02/2021 13:46:52 4 27
bbc
ready by the autumn to tackle mutations

= You must be kidding, by autumn, UK new variants would be born !

Terrified !!!!!!!!!!!!!
38
CJR
03/02/2021 13:49:06 0 4
bbc
My friend the only mutations of this virus I am worried about is the next one from China, after the new year celebrations.
39
ian
03/02/2021 13:49:11 63 18
bbc
Immensely proud of the way that the U.K. has led, and continues to lead, the Vaccine fightback against this Virus. We may very well have been “slow off the mark” in other ways, but certainly not in regard to vaccine development and administration. As the late, great, and now much lamented Captain Sir Tom Moore said - “tomorrow WILL be a better day”.
'Late, great, much lameneted'. Get a grip you sychophantic fool. Removed
196
03/02/2021 14:01:34 5 20
bbc
Only propagandists say that the UK is leading the way. The BioNtec / Pfizer vaccine was the first approved and most efficacious so far.
576
03/02/2021 14:31:52 5 2
bbc
Thanks to still having a centralised healthcare system mainly, I hope this puts the drive to privatisation away for good.
14
03/02/2021 13:45:41 8 19
bbc
So is this what we can expect? Years of yo-yo'ing in and out of lockdowns or restrictions until vaccines are modified to better tackle every variant that is found?

I'm starting to wonder if those "great reset" nutters are on to something.
40
03/02/2021 13:49:16 3 2
bbc
Probably the same stuff as you are on.
132
03/02/2021 13:57:35 1 2
bbc
And what am I on? Very narrow minded response which doesn't actually address what I'm asking.
41
03/02/2021 13:49:18 10 8
bbc
I'd love some guidance issued to tell people that humans breathe through their nose. Seems obvious but its amazing every time I'm on public transport multiple people seem completely unaware of that

Unless you pant like a dog, wearing a mask over your mouth only is essentially pointless whilst you're not talking
107
03/02/2021 13:55:24 3 7
bbc
No hard evidence masks are effective.
23
03/02/2021 13:46:48 5 10
bbc
The groundwork is already being laid to keep the hospitality sector closed until autumn even though it has already been said that the current vaccines work against mutations as mutations are natural for viruses.
42
03/02/2021 13:49:21 1 1
bbc
There will be no UK hospitality sector worth speaking of if we are still locking down in the Autumn.
24
03/02/2021 13:46:52 4 27
bbc
ready by the autumn to tackle mutations

= You must be kidding, by autumn, UK new variants would be born !

Terrified !!!!!!!!!!!!!
moron! Removed
I praise and thank God for scientists. Transcendent in Their Being and immanent in Their deed through human beings.
I have no hands but yours says the Lord of Hosts.
Many do not understand God and how They operate but " if God were small enough to be understood then They would not be big enough to be worshipped ".
Thank God, the Divine Healer for science and scientists They have created.
54
03/02/2021 13:50:46 16 5
bbc
Shame God created the virus really.
59
03/02/2021 13:51:16 6 1
bbc
I miss Wetherspoon's too.
145
03/02/2021 13:51:48 5 0
bbc
Thank god, we only have 400 characters.
181
03/02/2021 14:00:31 2 0
bbc
There is no god.
45
TJH
03/02/2021 13:49:52 4 8
bbc
Just think, only three weeks to flatten the curve...
46
DrR
03/02/2021 13:50:02 74 11
bbc
Covid jabs are going to become like Flu jabs, one every year for the rest of your life.
61
03/02/2021 13:51:32 18 143
bbc
And always too late to protect you from the current variant. We need a proper lockdown to clear this thing out for once and for all.
915
03/02/2021 14:59:23 2 8
bbc
I've never had any flu jab. Got some flu bug about 8 years ago. Week off work. Never been off work since it had a cold since.
47
03/02/2021 13:50:25 15 12
bbc
Nice to hear there will be a clap for Sir Tom. What a legend.

Apparently there will also be a clap for delivery drivers - it's this Friday, sometime between 8am and 5pm
75
DrR
03/02/2021 13:52:46 9 7
bbc
We should have had a clap for Tom whilst he was still alive, then he might have heard it, that is the whole point of the clap.
89
03/02/2021 13:54:05 0 3
bbc
Everyone has the clap!
99
03/02/2021 13:54:44 6 5
bbc
Walked round in circles for weeks then flew to Barbados druing lockdown and got ill. Legend?
172
03/02/2021 13:59:57 0 3
bbc
A "nationwide clap", what an insult to the man, he should be recognized far more than just a nationwide clap. This man is a true hero, when football players are referred to as hero's then that is a real insult to those who actually are.
31
03/02/2021 13:47:48 20 24
bbc
What the UK Scientific community and our NHS is achieving is truly world beating...in spite of our inept Prime Minister and clueless Govt.
48
03/02/2021 13:50:26 8 12
bbc
The NHS as an instiution is utterly hopeless.

It has squandered a year of preparation time and an unlimiteed budget to end up with less capacity than it had a year ago.

Lions led by donkeys.
241
03/02/2021 14:03:55 3 1
bbc
The NHS is not utterly hopeless, the conservative government trying to run it as a business and syphon money off to private companies is what is destroying the NHS... but that is also their plan and has been for many years.
483
03/02/2021 14:24:22 1 0
bbc
That's more to with government policies - and why are you insulting people who are currently risking their lives to help others? And maybe try spell checking before you post.
03/02/2021 16:44:22 0 0
bbc
So you won't be accepting any treatment for anything from the NHS then?
49
03/02/2021 13:50:31 4 7
bbc
Along with everyone else with an autoimmune disease, I'm sure, it's of great concern to me that no data is available on how these vaccines interact with autoimmune disorders and immunosuppression. There are millions of us across the globe who are just having to hope for the best. I hope researchers are considering follow up on rheumatology patients post-vaccine at least. Lives could depend on it.
96
Ray
03/02/2021 13:54:26 8 3
bbc
So those with auto immune problems etc are protected by everyone else getting the vaccine and not transmitting it to those with this problem. Another reason it is important to get this vaccine when offered and no reason to refuse it.
111
03/02/2021 13:55:52 2 1
bbc
Hi Lucy, according to my wife who only deals with immunosuppressed patients, there is a lot of data on this and they are not seeing anything unusual.
130
03/02/2021 13:57:12 2 1
bbc
I am sure these data will be forthcoming, as in many other specific populations. Unfortunately it takes time to collect this information, but I am sure it is already being collected (just as with any other new drug)
28
03/02/2021 13:47:34 13 39
bbc
Accept you don't 'beat' a virus. So let the fit, the healthy, the low risk out of imprisonment immediately.
50
03/02/2021 13:50:34 8 3
bbc
How do you know who won’t get very ill and who won’t ... ?
92
03/02/2021 13:54:13 1 6
bbc
Look at the stats. It's the over 70s and the overweight who have a problem. Other than that only a handful are hospitalised.
4
03/02/2021 13:44:30 212 39
bbc
Let's have some cheerful positive comments today please.
51
03/02/2021 13:50:34 94 33
bbc
LoL @ people downvoting your post.
244
03/02/2021 14:04:04 19 1
bbc
The many BBC hys trolls are always out.
03/02/2021 15:23:47 1 6
bbc
Always thought the down vote is idiotic, if you disagree with something that you want to down vote it, you should be forced to reply properly with your reasons and allow debate, but then it would mostly show up the lack of substance in the down voters rationale.
03/02/2021 17:10:49 0 0
bbc
I suspect that's because Fossil's comment is neither cheerful nor positive. In fact the suggestion that people on HYS are generally negative is...well...negative??
1
03/02/2021 13:43:52 878 78
bbc
Congratulations to the excellent scientists.
52
03/02/2021 13:50:34 615 93
bbc
Why would anyone down vote you for congratulating the scientists?? Beggars belief !!
82
03/02/2021 13:53:12 104 7
bbc
Indeed. I did forget to thank all of those who put themselves forward to take part in trials and involved in the logistics and the front line.
Haven't you heard of Scottish Nationalists? They hate anything related to England Removed
187
03/02/2021 14:01:13 185 7
bbc
COVID conspiracy theorists, convinced that vaccines have been developed with the intention of tracking people. These idiots tweet this nonsense from phones that have always tracked them, by the way
316
03/02/2021 14:10:32 25 1
bbc
Looks like the same 15 Covid idiots that down voted you ( and probably me now!)
348
03/02/2021 14:12:52 11 28
bbc
@"Why would anyone down vote you for congratulating the scientists?? Beggars belief !!"
---

This is Brexit Britain ...

Brexit was won because people have had enough of experts.

Michael Gove could . not . have . been . clearer . in the final days of the referendum. It's what won the brexit vote.
356
03/02/2021 14:13:20 50 2
bbc
Probably the same folk who, despite the irrefutable evidence to the contrary; still claim that the virus and lockdown are a hoax, or that the government, scientific community and medical profession should let us all have complete freedom to do as we please; despite the huge surge in deaths that would result.

(sigh)
Because Remoan is a cult of hate and denial. Removed
433
03/02/2021 14:15:21 3 2
bbc
A sorry sign of the country we inhabit unfortunately ??
But I take some solace in knowing that eventually they and their ilk will be the only occupants of these Isles & then they really will be in trouble.
As the old saying goes “ reap as you sow”.
466
03/02/2021 14:22:54 2 24
bbc
Because we know the history of vaccines and manufacturers are not liable... So wake-up
https://fullfact.org/health/unlicensed-vaccine-manufacturers-are-immune-some-not-all-civil-liability/
489
03/02/2021 14:25:00 10 0
bbc
You know why, the fringe on here will vote down anything.
523
03/02/2021 14:27:11 0 4
bbc
And your point is?
541
03/02/2021 14:28:13 2 0
bbc
Sorry Wendi, I misread your post.
552
03/02/2021 14:28:55 3 6
bbc
Obviously jealous, bitter remainers!
615
03/02/2021 14:34:40 3 0
bbc
Against their political narratives.

Engineers and scientists rule their non-enlightened lives.
636
03/02/2021 14:37:03 9 3
bbc
Because this site is full of COVID junkies who perversely want this nightmare to continue.
663
03/02/2021 14:40:11 7 0
bbc
probably still drunk and incapable from an illicit house party
680
03/02/2021 14:41:00 6 0
bbc
Flat earthers do strange things
53
03/02/2021 13:50:36 413 34
bbc
This is all generally as predicted. Like with the flu jab, they’ll be a new one released each year, except we will want a much higher percentage of the population to get it than the flu jab.
If having a needle jabbed in my arm twice a year is the price for no more lockdowns, then I’m more than willing.
345
03/02/2021 14:12:33 142 6
bbc
The annual booster may not need two jabs.
Maybe they could do the flu jab at the same time.
581
03/02/2021 14:32:20 10 19
bbc
The clown & Hancock need to be given jabs every day....... and I'm not talking vaccines
Pip
03/02/2021 15:14:20 8 0
bbc
Won't be long before we just have a 'Fluvid' jab to cover all eventualities...........?
03/02/2021 15:20:11 3 1
bbc
Yes and no. The flu is potentially more dangerous for younger age groups so is probably a more important jab for them than coronavirus. The important part is to protect the vulnerable (like with flu) and keep endemic disease manageable in the rest of the population. This is where an underlying herd immunity (through limited vaccination) comes in
03/02/2021 15:53:36 1 0
bbc
The aim will be to have a combined vaccine with the predicted mutations of both flu and Covid. Note predicted, with a virus nobody can predict how they will mutate.
The combined will be one shot given once/year to at least 75% of the population.
03/02/2021 16:03:05 5 1
bbc
Like the comment above only people not in there right mind would vote it down. as for people not liking Scotland, that is down to Nicola , but if rumours are true she won't be there long. Personally had some great holidays up there and met lovely people.
03/02/2021 17:51:59 2 4
bbc
'If having a needle jabbed in my arm twice a year is the price for no more lockdowns, then I’m more than willing'.

Are you serious?!
03/02/2021 18:58:28 1 1
bbc
Immunity (90%) from 2 jabs lasts 4-5 months.
So maybe 6 jabs a year?
Of course, giving the whole population one jab is going to cost about £20bn.
That might be £120bn a year, then.
The entire NHS budget is about £100bn.
We might have a problem.
04/02/2021 02:23:30 0 0
bbc
That's not going to happen. No lockdown and the virus will still be killing the same type of people it does now. Healthiness is our only security.
I praise and thank God for scientists. Transcendent in Their Being and immanent in Their deed through human beings.
I have no hands but yours says the Lord of Hosts.
Many do not understand God and how They operate but " if God were small enough to be understood then They would not be big enough to be worshipped ".
Thank God, the Divine Healer for science and scientists They have created.
54
03/02/2021 13:50:46 16 5
bbc
Shame God created the virus really.
27
03/02/2021 13:47:29 2 17
bbc
Does it mean existing vaccines are not effective against new mutants?
55
03/02/2021 13:50:52 5 1
bbc
Vaccines will need to be adjusted as new mutations emerge within the virus. This is normal and most visible with the annual flu vaccine.

For the current vaccine: "There is still strong evidence existing vaccines work well against the mutations that have emerged"
28
03/02/2021 13:47:34 13 39
bbc
Accept you don't 'beat' a virus. So let the fit, the healthy, the low risk out of imprisonment immediately.
56
03/02/2021 13:50:57 4 2
bbc
Grow up!
25
CJR
03/02/2021 13:46:57 8 6
bbc
You actually know that as a fact? Or just ear say
57
Bob
03/02/2021 13:51:07 5 2
bbc
You believe the virus will stop mutating?
58
03/02/2021 13:51:10 2 5
bbc
When this Covid thing is over "is starting to sound like... "When Southend United win the Premier League!"
I praise and thank God for scientists. Transcendent in Their Being and immanent in Their deed through human beings.
I have no hands but yours says the Lord of Hosts.
Many do not understand God and how They operate but " if God were small enough to be understood then They would not be big enough to be worshipped ".
Thank God, the Divine Healer for science and scientists They have created.
59
03/02/2021 13:51:16 6 1
bbc
I miss Wetherspoon's too.
24
03/02/2021 13:46:52 4 27
bbc
ready by the autumn to tackle mutations

= You must be kidding, by autumn, UK new variants would be born !

Terrified !!!!!!!!!!!!!
60
03/02/2021 13:51:25 1 1
bbc
Read the article before spreading fear...
46
DrR
03/02/2021 13:50:02 74 11
bbc
Covid jabs are going to become like Flu jabs, one every year for the rest of your life.
61
03/02/2021 13:51:32 18 143
bbc
And always too late to protect you from the current variant. We need a proper lockdown to clear this thing out for once and for all.
109
03/02/2021 13:55:38 10 3
bbc
This is untrue. Read the article
154
Rob
03/02/2021 13:58:44 3 0
bbc
and if you think will happen ...
212
03/02/2021 14:02:19 21 3
bbc
The first lockdown didn't clear it once and for all neither will any others. It is here, is will stay here and the only chance of any sort of normality are vaccines
259
03/02/2021 14:05:17 6 1
bbc
Go the whole hog why not? Remember how foot-and-mouth was dealt with?...
283
03/02/2021 14:06:58 12 0
bbc
The only way that can work is welding *every* human being indoors and isolating them for 6 weeks while those who are incubating the disease get sick, pass it to their families, let *them* get sick, etc until nobody *anywhere* is actually contagious any more. Since that isn't going to happen, ever, a policy of vaccination and countering variants is necessary.
294
03/02/2021 14:07:38 4 0
bbc
Worldwide?
768
03/02/2021 14:47:52 9 0
bbc
It’s not going anywhere, the scientists are saying this. We will have to live with it forever from now on
912
03/02/2021 14:54:47 9 0
bbc
You gonna lock down the whole world?
03/02/2021 16:05:33 5 0
bbc
You won't 'Clear it out once and for all'. The genie is out of the bottle, and in some form or other it will always be around. It's going to be a case of controlling it. One noticeable thing is the lower than usual winter 'flu hospital admissions, because people have been distancing, wearing masks and more likely to have the flu jab. Is this a sensible future course.
03/02/2021 16:41:04 2 0
bbc
If you want to be in permanent lockdown don't let anyone stop you
22
03/02/2021 13:46:44 449 129
bbc
Unlike the Labour party who only ever thank the NHS for the roll-out, we should also thank the big pharmaceutical companies, our world-beating, first-class scientific community, private enterprise and an agile government. Good news all way around!
62
03/02/2021 13:51:43 166 87
bbc
Let's not forget to thank Dolly Parton and Bill Gates as well
501
03/02/2021 14:25:51 24 4
bbc
The alt-right conspiracy nuts haven't forgotten Dolly and Bill, that's for sure.
641
03/02/2021 14:37:49 10 1
bbc
If the world had taken more notice of Bill Gates we might not be in this mess.
751
03/02/2021 14:46:11 0 7
bbc
No, let's not thank Bill Gates.
03/02/2021 23:50:23 0 0
bbc
For the best in ethnic cleansing?
23
03/02/2021 13:46:48 5 10
bbc
The groundwork is already being laid to keep the hospitality sector closed until autumn even though it has already been said that the current vaccines work against mutations as mutations are natural for viruses.
63
03/02/2021 13:51:44 2 1
bbc
Read the article before spreading fear
64
03/02/2021 13:51:46 59 7
bbc
This is the beginning of 'new normal'. Regular vaccinations for vulnerable, regular tweaking for mutations.
440
03/02/2021 14:21:04 28 3
bbc
I have a regular annual vaccine any way so not a problem
847
03/02/2021 14:54:51 6 1
bbc
Doesn't sound too different to flu to be honest
927
03/02/2021 15:01:46 4 11
bbc
A lot of people have the flu jab every year anyway particularly the vulnerable. I've never had the flu jab and won't have the Covid one either.
65
03/02/2021 13:51:50 3 22
bbc
lift the lockdown and let vaccines deal with the over 70's.
Better to concentrate 4 jabs a year for the over 70's than try to vaccinate younger people that don't need it.
90
03/02/2021 13:54:09 8 1
bbc
With no lockdowns and the virus left completely free to spread exponentially there would still be enough very sick under 70s to overwhelm the NHS.
103
CJR
03/02/2021 13:55:07 3 1
bbc
Don’t think you really know much about how this virus spreads
121
03/02/2021 13:56:27 2 1
bbc
It’s now been proven vaccines also significantly reduce the spread, protecting people who can’t have the vaccine for various reasons. Also long covid is pretty nasty for plenty of people much younger than 70.
Yes because its only the over 70's that have died from Covid isn't? Oh no wait it isn't, people from all age groups have died so your idea goes straight out of the window, you selfish idiot! Removed
131
DrR
03/02/2021 13:57:34 2 1
bbc
Completely wrong, younger people do need it.
395
03/02/2021 14:16:55 1 0
bbc
Are you that keen to watch the NHS get overwhelmed by Covid-19? The lockdown is just part of the plan to try and control the spread of the virus until the vaccinations start to have an effect.
03/02/2021 16:55:48 0 0
bbc
Your comment is beyond ignorant. So there is no one under 70 who is clinically extremely vulnerable?
21
03/02/2021 13:46:43 4 11
bbc
"By the autumn" has a familiar ring to it.

So at best it'll take over seven months to even start getting a new vaccine out. Any vaccine escaping variant would be rampant by then. Just have to hope existing vaccines can still have some impact I suppose.
66
03/02/2021 13:52:08 3 1
bbc
It does not mean that. Read the article
28
03/02/2021 13:47:34 13 39
bbc
Accept you don't 'beat' a virus. So let the fit, the healthy, the low risk out of imprisonment immediately.
67
CJR
03/02/2021 13:52:09 2 3
bbc
So you can irresponsible spread it quicker then the selfish individuals are doing now.
Face facts my friend we are not going to have anything like normal life until 2022.
100
03/02/2021 13:54:52 1 5
bbc
No. The vulnerable stay at home. Those who are not vulnerable are released.
1
03/02/2021 13:43:52 878 78
bbc
Congratulations to the excellent scientists.
68
03/02/2021 13:52:17 5 42
bbc
There are so mene to chose from.
28
03/02/2021 13:47:34 13 39
bbc
Accept you don't 'beat' a virus. So let the fit, the healthy, the low risk out of imprisonment immediately.
69
03/02/2021 13:52:17 2 2
bbc
In English please
104
03/02/2021 13:55:10 1 2
bbc
Which bit did you find too hard to understand?
39
ian
03/02/2021 13:49:11 63 18
bbc
Immensely proud of the way that the U.K. has led, and continues to lead, the Vaccine fightback against this Virus. We may very well have been “slow off the mark” in other ways, but certainly not in regard to vaccine development and administration. As the late, great, and now much lamented Captain Sir Tom Moore said - “tomorrow WILL be a better day”.
'Late, great, much lameneted'. Get a grip you sychophantic fool. Removed
161
ian
03/02/2021 13:58:58 2 5
bbc
He is worthy of all those descriptions. Unlike you. Who clearly can’t even spell either!! ??
Sub-human moron you Removed
23
03/02/2021 13:46:48 5 10
bbc
The groundwork is already being laid to keep the hospitality sector closed until autumn even though it has already been said that the current vaccines work against mutations as mutations are natural for viruses.
71
CJR
03/02/2021 13:52:31 2 1
bbc
Please post your evidence
28
03/02/2021 13:47:34 13 39
bbc
Accept you don't 'beat' a virus. So let the fit, the healthy, the low risk out of imprisonment immediately.
72
03/02/2021 13:52:41 1 2
bbc
crazy talk, the vaccine is currently being rolled out, how many lives do you want to endanger for a few weeks
14
03/02/2021 13:45:41 8 19
bbc
So is this what we can expect? Years of yo-yo'ing in and out of lockdowns or restrictions until vaccines are modified to better tackle every variant that is found?

I'm starting to wonder if those "great reset" nutters are on to something.
73
03/02/2021 13:52:42 1 1
bbc
no - it does not mean that. Read the article
126
03/02/2021 13:56:41 0 2
bbc
I did read the article. No where does it say that lockdowns won't be used in future to control the spread of mutations. All it says is vaccines are the route out of lockdown - if a strain comes that current vaccines are ineffective against are you suggesting lockdowns won't happen? The article doesn't say that.
1
03/02/2021 13:43:52 878 78
bbc
Congratulations to the excellent scientists.
74
03/02/2021 13:52:44 81 8
bbc
I dread to think where we would be without them (well, up the creek without a paddle is the answer...)
47
03/02/2021 13:50:25 15 12
bbc
Nice to hear there will be a clap for Sir Tom. What a legend.

Apparently there will also be a clap for delivery drivers - it's this Friday, sometime between 8am and 5pm
75
DrR
03/02/2021 13:52:46 9 7
bbc
We should have had a clap for Tom whilst he was still alive, then he might have heard it, that is the whole point of the clap.
76
03/02/2021 13:52:47 2 4
bbc
This is great news, but now the public need to know what the end plan is. What levels of transmission, infection and deaths are acceptable. Without this we will be stuck where some believe lockdowns should remain until the virus is eradicated and those that believe we will always have some low levels of transmission, infection and death but this the same with many viruses.
236
03/02/2021 14:03:25 0 0
bbc
from what is touted on reptuable sources, health care sites, scientist. typically you want 80% of a country vaccinated, more than likley acceptable will be the same as the flu, so a couple of deaths no real hosptal impact, deaths that are not daily but anually
77
03/02/2021 13:52:59 2 7
bbc
Yes good news but before we get ahead of ourselves, there is still a question about its effectiveness on the over 65's. A 30,000 person test is currently being done in the USA on the Astra jab to sort this out. Results due in Feb. Hope it comes in positive, till then no licence in USA and a question out there.
78
03/02/2021 13:44:31 1 6
bbc
Ye, whatever...
79
03/02/2021 13:53:00 4 13
bbc
Had we locked down properly and closed borders the volume of cases would be lower, less instances for mutations to have arisen delaying their appearance.

The vaccination programme would have reduced virus circulation further - fewer cases, fewer hospitalisation and deaths.

Virologists know viruses mutate, this must have been discussed and politicians must have ignored facts.
349
03/02/2021 14:12:54 2 0
bbc
?? hindsight is a wonderful thing
80
Rob
03/02/2021 13:53:11 83 18
bbc
Echo all congrats to scientists etc

But Covid is out of the bag now. It will keep mutating and keep coming back so we need to:

1 - adjust to a life where this risk is always lurking (things won't ever be the same)
2 - make sure the whole planet has rapid access to vaccines (mutations can happen anywhere)
3 - stop pushing wildlife into ever smaller corners
4 - smile and enjoy what we've got
300
03/02/2021 14:08:36 60 6
bbc
with you on 2/3/4....cant go with you on point 1) risk is always there anyway we need to learn to live with it 100% not give any space to the idea of SD or masks being any sort of norm...ever!
03/02/2021 15:57:42 4 0
bbc
5 - have a beer
03/02/2021 17:05:46 3 0
bbc
Oh, and the Chinese need to stop their hideous wet markets where all sorts of wildlife suffer intolerable acts to satisfy a nation's insane traditional medicine.
04/02/2021 13:06:14 0 0
bbc
In the UK
81
03/02/2021 13:53:12 2 4
bbc
Shill storm
52
03/02/2021 13:50:34 615 93
bbc
Why would anyone down vote you for congratulating the scientists?? Beggars belief !!
82
03/02/2021 13:53:12 104 7
bbc
Indeed. I did forget to thank all of those who put themselves forward to take part in trials and involved in the logistics and the front line.
83
03/02/2021 13:53:16 1 7
bbc
The story on their latest study has not been opened for comments so we cannot challenge the findings there.
101
DrR
03/02/2021 13:54:55 5 1
bbc
And your qualified to challenge their findings are you?
20
03/02/2021 13:46:32 540 42
bbc
Epic work by some very clever scientists. They should be paid more than football players for this work!
Lets hope our country can continue to produce talent at this level.
84
03/02/2021 13:53:24 55 37
bbc
Unless you play for Derby County..
256
03/02/2021 14:04:54 17 1
bbc
It's "Wayne Rooney's Derby Country" now.
317
03/02/2021 14:10:34 7 1
bbc
No such club....ive heard of Wayne Rooney's Derby County. Are they the same?
408
03/02/2021 14:18:27 4 1
bbc
I understood the humour in your comment as a fellow 'sufferer'! Be lost on many folks.
03/02/2021 15:27:36 0 0
bbc
However much money you pay The Rams, I think they'll be struggling. Or are you commenting on the level of talent at [what used to be] Pride Park?
03/02/2021 16:12:43 0 0
bbc
You a red dog? Up the rams
85
03/02/2021 13:53:42 5 9
bbc
Amazing that Matt Hancock had to be inspired by Contagion. Amazing also that Taiwan were so prepared for this (they knew without doubt it would happen one day) that the action they took immediately has resulted in only 8 deaths. I'm sure it's a question for another day about how we were not prepared, but why oh why were flights not stopped. This is not hindsight.
28
03/02/2021 13:47:34 13 39
bbc
Accept you don't 'beat' a virus. So let the fit, the healthy, the low risk out of imprisonment immediately.
86
03/02/2021 13:53:45 2 2
bbc
In order to let it spread to those who, although now retired, have worked all their lives for us, been incredibly innovative for us, have created the generation that you are now in...you want more? Yes, it's tough, but please, be patient.
87
03/02/2021 13:53:45 3 13
bbc
I've no objections to Sir Tom getting some recognition, but for ''Boris Bandwagon'' to announce yet another hand clap for is a bit cheap.
122
03/02/2021 13:56:27 2 3
bbc
Surprised he hasn't announced a hand clap for the cabinet yet!
137
03/02/2021 13:58:04 1 0
bbc
It’s not just Boris though is it?
The wokerati are working overtime to outdo each other in the sanctimony stakes.
A sad reflection on the way the media have successfully used emotional manipulation to persuade the public what to think and how to react.

None of which is a reflection on dear old Captain Tom who social media randomly decided to support at the start of it all.
15
03/02/2021 13:45:52 218 17
bbc
These AZ guys are absolutely amazing and so informative too!
88
03/02/2021 13:53:50 84 8
bbc
Yes, they seem to know their way around.
03/02/2021 17:56:04 0 0
bbc
Clever, took me a few seconds to work that one out.
47
03/02/2021 13:50:25 15 12
bbc
Nice to hear there will be a clap for Sir Tom. What a legend.

Apparently there will also be a clap for delivery drivers - it's this Friday, sometime between 8am and 5pm
89
03/02/2021 13:54:05 0 3
bbc
Everyone has the clap!
65
03/02/2021 13:51:50 3 22
bbc
lift the lockdown and let vaccines deal with the over 70's.
Better to concentrate 4 jabs a year for the over 70's than try to vaccinate younger people that don't need it.
90
03/02/2021 13:54:09 8 1
bbc
With no lockdowns and the virus left completely free to spread exponentially there would still be enough very sick under 70s to overwhelm the NHS.
11
03/02/2021 13:45:23 204 21
bbc
What a fantastic job Oxford University is doing, I’m very confident that the UK is well on track to conquer Covid-19
91
03/02/2021 13:54:10 95 8
bbc
We will do enough to live with it, just as we live with flu etc - in other words, good enough
376
03/02/2021 14:15:28 18 11
bbc
Flu down to lowest levels since 1880’s. Maybe we should consider good hygiene and masks every winter
50
03/02/2021 13:50:34 8 3
bbc
How do you know who won’t get very ill and who won’t ... ?
92
03/02/2021 13:54:13 1 6
bbc
Look at the stats. It's the over 70s and the overweight who have a problem. Other than that only a handful are hospitalised.
128
03/02/2021 13:56:58 2 2
bbc
How are you even allowed near a keyboard?
32
03/02/2021 13:48:04 8 3
bbc
Are you a scientist? No. Thought not.
93
03/02/2021 13:54:21 1 3
bbc
Are you? No, so shut up!
190
03/02/2021 14:01:18 1 1
bbc
lol
25
CJR
03/02/2021 13:46:57 8 6
bbc
You actually know that as a fact? Or just ear say
94
03/02/2021 13:54:22 3 1
bbc
It is a fact that viruses mutate. No one has every tried to deny this; so no it isn't just "ear" say.
95
03/02/2021 13:54:22 32 6
bbc
Very refreshing to see so many positive comments on this item.
03/02/2021 15:44:18 6 3
bbc
Sadly, too many using it 'as a one over the EU gloat fest' over a bad political decision rather than a celebration of science and our scientists, who I'm pretty certain would be appaled as its the co-operation with thier colleagues in Europe and the world that has got us here.
49
03/02/2021 13:50:31 4 7
bbc
Along with everyone else with an autoimmune disease, I'm sure, it's of great concern to me that no data is available on how these vaccines interact with autoimmune disorders and immunosuppression. There are millions of us across the globe who are just having to hope for the best. I hope researchers are considering follow up on rheumatology patients post-vaccine at least. Lives could depend on it.
96
Ray
03/02/2021 13:54:26 8 3
bbc
So those with auto immune problems etc are protected by everyone else getting the vaccine and not transmitting it to those with this problem. Another reason it is important to get this vaccine when offered and no reason to refuse it.
5
03/02/2021 13:44:32 9 18
bbc
Amazing news.

And while I'm here - BBC why haven't you done a report on the latest LSE study into Scottish independence? I can see it on the FT but not here? On Brexit you reported on all these studies, surely Scots deserve more info?
97
03/02/2021 13:54:30 4 2
bbc
Oh go on then... because there are lots of issues in Scotland that the incumbent government should deal with as a higher priority - education; healthcare (notwithstanding Covid, standards were falling before; drug deaths).

I understand the SNP (by definition) have an ideological goal for independence, but this should not come at the expense of the basic role of a Government.
233
03/02/2021 14:03:16 0 0
bbc
Oh, and "deviation"
98
03/02/2021 13:54:44 5 2
bbc
Good news that they can essentially 'patch' the existing vaccine to work for new variants. The more often they do this, the faster the process will be. The problem is more one of regulation: however fast a vaccine can be developed, drug trials take time and approval won't ever come without trials.

No easy answers, but at least there's continual progress.
47
03/02/2021 13:50:25 15 12
bbc
Nice to hear there will be a clap for Sir Tom. What a legend.

Apparently there will also be a clap for delivery drivers - it's this Friday, sometime between 8am and 5pm
99
03/02/2021 13:54:44 6 5
bbc
Walked round in circles for weeks then flew to Barbados druing lockdown and got ill. Legend?
238
03/02/2021 14:03:49 2 2
bbc
Captain Tom took medical advice before flying to Barbados and tested negative for Covid after he returned. That seems entirely reasonable to me, unlike your sour grapes posting without taking the time to check the facts.

https://www.denbighshirefreepress.co.uk/news/19060650.sir-tom-moores-family-address-criticism-piers-morgan-slams-trolls/
250
03/02/2021 14:01:02 1 2
bbc
Typical remoaner comment. Highly unlikely that you will do anything in your lifetime as remarkable as Captain Sir Tom Moore
67
CJR
03/02/2021 13:52:09 2 3
bbc
So you can irresponsible spread it quicker then the selfish individuals are doing now.
Face facts my friend we are not going to have anything like normal life until 2022.
100
03/02/2021 13:54:52 1 5
bbc
No. The vulnerable stay at home. Those who are not vulnerable are released.