Bebo chief reveals plan to take on Facebook and Twitter
03/02/2021 | news | technology | 149
Michael Birch sold Bebo for $850m in 2008, but now plans to revive it with a focus on profiles.
1
03/02/2021 11:55:34 8 4
bbc
Good to hear that Michael Birch is branching out.
20
03/02/2021 12:22:40 7 0
bbc
Well, he wood, woodn't he?
105
Dee
03/02/2021 16:48:11 2 0
bbc
You should take a leaf out of his book.
2
03/02/2021 11:55:37 47 6
bbc
This guy is a genius.

He has sold the same thing twice for millions and kept the rights to the brand.

BUT

Keep your money and run. We need another social media outlet like a hole in the head.
106
03/02/2021 17:02:40 7 2
bbc
$874 million for a failed product.
Bebo's theme tune should be "Three Wheels on my Wagon".
112
03/02/2021 20:31:30 2 0
bbc
We need another social media outlet like a hole in the head? What is needed is a social media outlet that fulfills the original intent. My sons use "Group chat" to keep in contact with their real friends. Bebo could fill that real-time element of "meeting up at the pub" we did back in the 70s long before social media and mobile phones. Nothing beats a face-to-face 'cept a real-time group chat.
3
03/02/2021 11:55:40 21 7
bbc
Social media is a blight on society.....stop promoting it!
94
03/02/2021 15:45:43 2 2
bbc
you cant control what gets promoted

you can control whether or not to obey eet
113
03/02/2021 20:37:49 1 0
bbc
It's only a "blight" when it is "misused" "overused" and it becomes the be all and end all. I remember a taxi driver telling me the story some years back how he only found out his aunt had died when he saw the obituary in the paper. He called up a cousin to ask why no one had let him know and their answer back was "We put it on Facebook"!
4
03/02/2021 11:57:01 54 3
bbc
When I was young I wished I could read peoples minds.

Since social media came along, I have totally got over that.
93
03/02/2021 15:45:15 31 1
bbc
people used to write in diaries and not want anyone else to read them

now they write online, and get annoyed if no-one else does read it
5
03/02/2021 11:57:30 0 0
bbc
Excellent. Can he give me back my old Bebo profile & photos etc?
91
03/02/2021 15:44:35 0 0
bbc
1st and second rule of social media club. never use some internet site as the only place to store your stuff.

2 words

external hard disk
6
GC
03/02/2021 11:58:56 9 5
bbc
It's a dead brand and a fool's errand.
He's wrong to think it's a blank sheet of paper. The brand belongs in the past with the Daily Sketch.
Same as trying to resuscitate Ask Jeeves, Lycos, Friends Reunited.
121
03/02/2021 21:10:28 3 0
bbc
It may well not be either. It's a recognised "brand" as in "name", and could well take off and be re-sold a third time. When you've got enough money "in the bank" not to be "bothered" then it's only a "fools errand" if it turns into a bottomless drain on your finances. For some, a couple of million is like a fiver in the back pocket.
123
03/02/2021 21:26:34 0 0
bbc
He's profited $874m on his errand so I don't think the word fool applies here!

Will Bebo topple Facebook? I doubt it.

Is there a good chance he could make himself a few million dollars? Seems highly likely.
7
03/02/2021 12:00:02 1 2
bbc
Keep it simple stupid

Like Tesco's (and any number of examples) which came a cropper both Facebook and Amazon have extended their tentacles and lost some business focus

Product focus is the first name of the game - is joining Facebook worth the hassle of working out what's actually going on - I'm guessing for the young the answer is actually no and that means it's M&S - slowly dying customers
25
03/02/2021 12:30:18 2 0
bbc
2019/2020 Tesco’s annual revenue £53 billion. In the UK with profit of £360 million pounds. Amazon was $290 billion and Facebook $71 billion.

Not my idea of coming a cropper.

But our problem is not that. Our problem is that we rely on all social media as our primary source of interaction and information gathering. It doesn't matter which app.
90
03/02/2021 15:43:26 0 0
bbc
the interface should be as simple as possible to accomplish the task you want.

the gubbins behind it? now that gets codey
8
jon
03/02/2021 12:02:06 5 1
bbc
These social media sites come and go like the prevailing wind. Anyone still using My Space?
76
03/02/2021 13:57:55 4 0
bbc
Trump?
9
03/02/2021 12:02:49 23 4
bbc
I specifically remember joining Facebook in 2009.. Do you know who drove that? It wasn't young people. It was the Farmville 40+ somethings!

I was told by my Gen X mother that our relatives wanted to wish me a happy birthday on the platform, and that it was anti-social for me not to use the site.

Fast forward to now, and my peers hardly use Facebook. Loadarubbish.
36
03/02/2021 12:53:39 4 4
bbc
FARMVILLE....you legened RIP.
88
03/02/2021 15:41:59 0 0
bbc
quite a while ago, somewhere else, I once contacted facebook. I got a reply, by email. from a personhuman.
10
03/02/2021 12:03:17 11 7
bbc
Anyone that sets out with the attitude a particular person is banned is not fit to own or run such a social media system.

What the lovies want is a self promotion site for them to get applause and more money. The ordinary people want sites they can talk to each other about anything without nanny religious restrictions, impedance. Truth is irrelevant, social sites like the pub not place to look.
21
03/02/2021 12:24:26 10 1
bbc
Crazy idea: People don't actually need social media sites like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Literally any function they provide can be achieved by using alternatives. There are places to share photos, secure privacy focused messaging apps, news apps that have noting to do with social media giants etc....
120
03/02/2021 21:03:38 0 0
bbc
"Closed groups - invitation only" give you that. Otherwise it seems the "ordinary people" you refer may want a "public platform" for all the wrong reasons.
11
bbc
Removed
12
03/02/2021 12:07:37 9 6
bbc
Yay - another social media site. Can't wait for another opportunity to see what my friends are eating & watch the latest fire-juggling cat. Sign me up. Or maybe I'll try this new-fangled tech-free idea of interacting and meeting with real people. I heard investors are about to throw billions at it - and I can see why - it might just be the next big thing.
27
03/02/2021 12:33:45 2 3
bbc
Yes, it would catch on for sure... especially during a GLOBAL PANDEMIC.
57
03/02/2021 13:23:50 1 1
bbc
Yeah, because we've been able to to do soooo much of that in the last year!?
119
03/02/2021 21:00:05 1 0
bbc
Or maybe I'll try this new-fangled tech-free idea of interacting and meeting with real people? Well, good luck with that given "lockdown". There again maybe that is why we still have tens of thousands of new covid cases every day, they're all into this new-fangled tech-free idea of interacting and meeting with real people every day during lockdown!
13
03/02/2021 12:08:29 3 1
bbc
I guess much of its success will depend on whether Section 230 is revoked in the US. If Facebook and Twitter suddenly become legally responsible for all the content on their platform, then having a business model that isn't linked to news feeds will maybe give it enough of an edge to succeed.
55
03/02/2021 13:23:10 2 0
bbc
I don't see how you can be responsible for people's posts, any more than a postal service can be held responsble for what is contained within the packages they transport. The answer is to take away anonymity. Post what you like, but as yourself, with your real name etc.
14
03/02/2021 12:08:37 8 4
bbc
I would be absolutely ecstatic to have a Facebook like service that was focussed on people connecting and not forcing drivel to us to make billions from ads.
72
03/02/2021 13:50:04 4 0
bbc
facebook makes more from selling your data, than it ever could from you paying a subscription
15
03/02/2021 12:09:03 4 2
bbc
Did he build a time machine?
16
03/02/2021 12:10:14 13 8
bbc
What’s the point of these platforms. They have some positives but the negatives far out way them.

I have never done Facebook, Bebo, Twitter or their ilk. I live in the real world. My friends are flesh and blood. The superficial world of influencers are nothing to me.

We all probably need less not more of these sites for our own sanity.
37
03/02/2021 12:53:42 7 1
bbc
There's a variety of people who use these platforms. For some it's vanity, for some it's to make money (businesses), for some it's their main form of social interaction. There are people who were housebound, long before lockdown, and social media gives them a lifeline to the rest of society.
41
03/02/2021 12:57:20 2 0
bbc
madas - totally man. I'd stick to the comment sections on news sites, not the internets
54
03/02/2021 13:20:22 2 4
bbc
If you've never 'done them', you are not really in a position to post a balanced opinion on them. Your position is biased and bigoted. Honestly, this looks like it is little more than virtue signalling! 'Look at me, I'm pure and clean, and untainted by social media'. Try using the damned things, and come back wth a better perspective!
118
03/02/2021 20:56:25 0 0
bbc
"I live in the real world. My friends are flesh and blood."? Not getting to meet up so much in lockdown, right? And when "friends" are scattered distances away? As Nathaniel Garro said "essentially a 'local pub online': you walk in and see who's there to chat to." Makes sense. In my day back in the 70s you'd go down the pub knowing that day was the day you'd meet up down the pub.
17
03/02/2021 12:10:35 10 1
bbc
It's a weird world in which the brand is still his but all the information attached to it can be sold for millions. OUR information. How is that not the focus of any discussion?
26
03/02/2021 12:32:38 8 13
bbc
I'll do you one better: In the absence of GDPR post-Brexit, we in the UK are in the Old West in terms of data protection. This is IMO intentional, it has Cummings written all over it. The data set being accumulated right now on UK citizens, which is unprecedented, is unprotected by any serious regulation.

It will be worth trillions to the government, and sold to the highest bidder.
29
03/02/2021 12:36:27 1 0
bbc
It's called 'big data', and I guarantee your isp utilises it too.
67
03/02/2021 13:42:20 1 1
bbc
what should be the focus, isn't that it's the data being sold, its that the focus on the data is at the expense of the website itself.

ie, if your company aim is to make a website, you make a website
if your company aim is to have the data, then "having a website" is not your primary objective. "having the data - and being the only one to have the data" - is
18
Bob
03/02/2021 12:14:24 6 4
bbc
Who on earth would favour a trackpad over a mouse.
24
03/02/2021 12:27:41 3 3
bbc
Perhaps someone who spends plenty of time using tablets and smartphones - you know, devices where a lot of input is thru touchscreens shaped a lot like a trackpad.
47
03/02/2021 13:13:06 1 1
bbc
I do sometimes. It's pretty good once you get used to it. And that's the man thing, it's what you are used to. Who the hell would write left handed? Well me! I was forced to write right handed at school because back them they thought it was tantamount to a mental deficiency lol. If you had always used a trackpad,, a mous would seem like a ridiculous idea! ;-)
19
03/02/2021 12:15:38 19 1
bbc
I'm still on friends reunited :)
46
03/02/2021 13:10:41 1 0
bbc
Wow! Forgot about that one lol
1
03/02/2021 11:55:34 8 4
bbc
Good to hear that Michael Birch is branching out.
20
03/02/2021 12:22:40 7 0
bbc
Well, he wood, woodn't he?
95
03/02/2021 15:46:45 2 0
bbc
nip these puns in the bud
10
03/02/2021 12:03:17 11 7
bbc
Anyone that sets out with the attitude a particular person is banned is not fit to own or run such a social media system.

What the lovies want is a self promotion site for them to get applause and more money. The ordinary people want sites they can talk to each other about anything without nanny religious restrictions, impedance. Truth is irrelevant, social sites like the pub not place to look.
21
03/02/2021 12:24:26 10 1
bbc
Crazy idea: People don't actually need social media sites like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Literally any function they provide can be achieved by using alternatives. There are places to share photos, secure privacy focused messaging apps, news apps that have noting to do with social media giants etc....
38
03/02/2021 12:55:10 3 2
bbc
As you say there are ample ways of avoiding social media giants if you so wish. Families or friends, for example, could easily set up a website of their own for communicating and sharing photos etc...
84
03/02/2021 14:52:34 1 1
bbc
Well clearly you are wrong as billions use them. That says something about the alternatives. Above all else probably those others are closed off silos, reducing contacts. News is useless without the ability to discuss it. No better than tv or radio. Top down official lines.
22
03/02/2021 12:24:43 28 5
bbc
It rather misses the point. We don't need a "better" Facebook, we need to spend less time with "any" Facebook and more time in the real world.

The problem is the 10 hours at your screen on social networks as your major source of people interaction, not which applications you use to do it
45
03/02/2021 13:10:23 8 2
bbc
If someone is spendng 10 hrs a day on SM they have bgger problems than which platform they use! An alternative to FB would be good, especially f offered a different kind of experience. I closed my FB account because I objected to having all my information sold to thousands of companies, my web bowsng tracked, and beng censored from discussing certain subjects.
104
Dee
03/02/2021 16:41:50 1 1
bbc
Absolutely! People need to spend more time in the real world than on social media sites.
23
03/02/2021 12:24:52 14 7
bbc
Who gives a monkey's? Why is this "news"?
28
03/02/2021 12:35:35 14 1
bbc
I think it's more like free advertising.
35
03/02/2021 12:52:10 1 0
bbc
hi Mark
44
03/02/2021 13:06:35 1 1
bbc
Because a lot of people are looking for an alternative to FB because they don't like Suckerborg's censorship policy.
64
03/02/2021 13:31:03 1 2
bbc
What do you mean "why is this 'news'?" News doesn't have to suit what you think news should be, cookiebear.

Just because you don't give a monkeys, doesn't mean others don't. It's relevant to, and tucked away in, the technology page, too.
78
03/02/2021 14:07:35 0 2
bbc
What is news? Well, actually...

FACTS multiplied by IMPORTANCE = NEWS
116
03/02/2021 20:47:05 1 0
bbc
Because BBC News is scraping the barrel day-in day-out in their struggle to be as removed as possible away from a "news" platform. It's now a 24/7 social media platform that trawls social media to build their "content" in the hope we as tax payers will continue funding this "anathema".
18
Bob
03/02/2021 12:14:24 6 4
bbc
Who on earth would favour a trackpad over a mouse.
24
03/02/2021 12:27:41 3 3
bbc
Perhaps someone who spends plenty of time using tablets and smartphones - you know, devices where a lot of input is thru touchscreens shaped a lot like a trackpad.
48
03/02/2021 13:14:39 1 2
bbc
Agreed, we ae movng in the directon of touch screens for everything. Now the idea of usng an old phone seems weird. I use both a mouse and a trackpad, it really depends what I am doing.
126
Bob
03/02/2021 22:54:46 0 0
bbc
But you don't interface with a trackpad in the same way you interface with a tablet. You cannot equate the two.

Trackpads were invented as the next best solution for mouse control for laptops.

Today you can do extra things like scrolling, but they're all still superior with a mouse. Much more precision with a mouse. Much quicker movement with a mouse, etc etc.
7
03/02/2021 12:00:02 1 2
bbc
Keep it simple stupid

Like Tesco's (and any number of examples) which came a cropper both Facebook and Amazon have extended their tentacles and lost some business focus

Product focus is the first name of the game - is joining Facebook worth the hassle of working out what's actually going on - I'm guessing for the young the answer is actually no and that means it's M&S - slowly dying customers
25
03/02/2021 12:30:18 2 0
bbc
2019/2020 Tesco’s annual revenue £53 billion. In the UK with profit of £360 million pounds. Amazon was $290 billion and Facebook $71 billion.

Not my idea of coming a cropper.

But our problem is not that. Our problem is that we rely on all social media as our primary source of interaction and information gathering. It doesn't matter which app.
17
03/02/2021 12:10:35 10 1
bbc
It's a weird world in which the brand is still his but all the information attached to it can be sold for millions. OUR information. How is that not the focus of any discussion?
26
03/02/2021 12:32:38 8 13
bbc
I'll do you one better: In the absence of GDPR post-Brexit, we in the UK are in the Old West in terms of data protection. This is IMO intentional, it has Cummings written all over it. The data set being accumulated right now on UK citizens, which is unprecedented, is unprotected by any serious regulation.

It will be worth trillions to the government, and sold to the highest bidder.
I doubt the government has much on you that Google and Facefucker don't already have. People focus on FB, but when I deleted all my Google data, suddenly all my apps were clueless! All tagetted ads gone in an instance! Removed
60
03/02/2021 13:25:45 10 0
bbc
Hi JesterGoose ... you may want to look up the DPA 2018 legislation which is exactly a copy of GDPR ... in fact it is the reason we have data adequacy between the EU and the UK at the moment ... just don't let the facts get in the way whilst you ride your high horse down the street.
115
03/02/2021 20:41:17 2 0
bbc
That isn't true. If you operate inside the UK, you need to comply with UK data protection law. The GDPR has been incorporated into UK data protection law as the UK GDPR. In practice there is little change to the core data protection principles, rights and obligations found in the UK GDPR.
12
03/02/2021 12:07:37 9 6
bbc
Yay - another social media site. Can't wait for another opportunity to see what my friends are eating & watch the latest fire-juggling cat. Sign me up. Or maybe I'll try this new-fangled tech-free idea of interacting and meeting with real people. I heard investors are about to throw billions at it - and I can see why - it might just be the next big thing.
27
03/02/2021 12:33:45 2 3
bbc
Yes, it would catch on for sure... especially during a GLOBAL PANDEMIC.
23
03/02/2021 12:24:52 14 7
bbc
Who gives a monkey's? Why is this "news"?
28
03/02/2021 12:35:35 14 1
bbc
I think it's more like free advertising.
117
03/02/2021 20:51:50 0 0
bbc
Yes, I reckon you're right. BBC News looking to become the social media equivalent of "product placement" :)
So many "articles" recently advertising "product" that doesn't yet "actually exist". The other day it was "sheds" promoting a photo of a "product" that didn't exist on the owner's website!
17
03/02/2021 12:10:35 10 1
bbc
It's a weird world in which the brand is still his but all the information attached to it can be sold for millions. OUR information. How is that not the focus of any discussion?
29
03/02/2021 12:36:27 1 0
bbc
It's called 'big data', and I guarantee your isp utilises it too.
30
03/02/2021 12:46:05 2 4
bbc
Good luck. With Millions turning their backs on fb & twitter other platforms are needed. I'm always rooting for the little guy. My interest is picked
34
03/02/2021 12:51:53 0 1
bbc
I'll probably be watching the space...
31
03/02/2021 12:46:19 11 1
bbc
we will be different than Facebook......you will be able to see when your friends are online, and comment under their pictures........wait a minute, that sounds very familiar....
40
03/02/2021 12:56:03 4 6
bbc
you know what 'competition' is, yes?
32
03/02/2021 12:49:43 5 4
bbc
Yet more manure to be spread over the Internet.
39
03/02/2021 12:55:34 1 1
bbc
definitely m8. I'd play it safe if I were you. stick to the BBC comments. safe 'ere, like.
43
03/02/2021 13:04:59 1 4
bbc
These platforms are just a means of spreading, it is we the people who choose to spread manure! We could just as easly spread useful information, positivity, compassion etc. It is up to us. Your negativity doesn't do that cause any good whatsoever!
58
03/02/2021 13:23:52 2 2
bbc
You didn't read the article, did you?

You saw it was about Bebo and then jumped to the comments to make a lazy, judgemental remark about how social media is "manure" and that you're somehow better than the people that use it.

Well, you're not. Sorry!
33
03/02/2021 12:51:24 3 2
bbc
Facebook (sells the data that is created between people when they) connect to each other
49
03/02/2021 13:14:43 4 0
bbc
As will this, if it gains enough traction. The only other way it can go is to ask people to pay for the service, which likely won't happen. Either way, Facebook, Bebo or any of the rest of them, you pay. Just depends if it's with your privacy/data or your money.
30
03/02/2021 12:46:05 2 4
bbc
Good luck. With Millions turning their backs on fb & twitter other platforms are needed. I'm always rooting for the little guy. My interest is picked
34
03/02/2021 12:51:53 0 1
bbc
I'll probably be watching the space...
23
03/02/2021 12:24:52 14 7
bbc
Who gives a monkey's? Why is this "news"?
35
03/02/2021 12:52:10 1 0
bbc
hi Mark
9
03/02/2021 12:02:49 23 4
bbc
I specifically remember joining Facebook in 2009.. Do you know who drove that? It wasn't young people. It was the Farmville 40+ somethings!

I was told by my Gen X mother that our relatives wanted to wish me a happy birthday on the platform, and that it was anti-social for me not to use the site.

Fast forward to now, and my peers hardly use Facebook. Loadarubbish.
36
03/02/2021 12:53:39 4 4
bbc
FARMVILLE....you legened RIP.
16
03/02/2021 12:10:14 13 8
bbc
What’s the point of these platforms. They have some positives but the negatives far out way them.

I have never done Facebook, Bebo, Twitter or their ilk. I live in the real world. My friends are flesh and blood. The superficial world of influencers are nothing to me.

We all probably need less not more of these sites for our own sanity.
37
03/02/2021 12:53:42 7 1
bbc
There's a variety of people who use these platforms. For some it's vanity, for some it's to make money (businesses), for some it's their main form of social interaction. There are people who were housebound, long before lockdown, and social media gives them a lifeline to the rest of society.
56
03/02/2021 13:23:35 3 1
bbc
As I said some good, some bad.
But the bad is horrendous.
21
03/02/2021 12:24:26 10 1
bbc
Crazy idea: People don't actually need social media sites like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Literally any function they provide can be achieved by using alternatives. There are places to share photos, secure privacy focused messaging apps, news apps that have noting to do with social media giants etc....
38
03/02/2021 12:55:10 3 2
bbc
As you say there are ample ways of avoiding social media giants if you so wish. Families or friends, for example, could easily set up a website of their own for communicating and sharing photos etc...
32
03/02/2021 12:49:43 5 4
bbc
Yet more manure to be spread over the Internet.
39
03/02/2021 12:55:34 1 1
bbc
definitely m8. I'd play it safe if I were you. stick to the BBC comments. safe 'ere, like.
31
03/02/2021 12:46:19 11 1
bbc
we will be different than Facebook......you will be able to see when your friends are online, and comment under their pictures........wait a minute, that sounds very familiar....
40
03/02/2021 12:56:03 4 6
bbc
you know what 'competition' is, yes?
16
03/02/2021 12:10:14 13 8
bbc
What’s the point of these platforms. They have some positives but the negatives far out way them.

I have never done Facebook, Bebo, Twitter or their ilk. I live in the real world. My friends are flesh and blood. The superficial world of influencers are nothing to me.

We all probably need less not more of these sites for our own sanity.
41
03/02/2021 12:57:20 2 0
bbc
madas - totally man. I'd stick to the comment sections on news sites, not the internets
42
03/02/2021 13:00:08 6 1
bbc
So who is the next sucker that's going to buy this company for a stupid amount... This guy has been making a killing shorting his own company.
32
03/02/2021 12:49:43 5 4
bbc
Yet more manure to be spread over the Internet.
43
03/02/2021 13:04:59 1 4
bbc
These platforms are just a means of spreading, it is we the people who choose to spread manure! We could just as easly spread useful information, positivity, compassion etc. It is up to us. Your negativity doesn't do that cause any good whatsoever!
133
03/02/2021 23:38:09 0 0
bbc
But shorting your own company twice, and then getting a free ad from the Beeb to try to do it again isn't "negative" is it ?

:-D
23
03/02/2021 12:24:52 14 7
bbc
Who gives a monkey's? Why is this "news"?
44
03/02/2021 13:06:35 1 1
bbc
Because a lot of people are looking for an alternative to FB because they don't like Suckerborg's censorship policy.
63
03/02/2021 13:30:25 0 0
bbc
there's quite a lot in the soup. one of the reason's Facebook is verreh rich, is because it's the only company that has the data - hence, can charge more for it. (yes, a m-o-n-o-p-o-l-y). I wouldn't be optimistic that Bebo's one wasn't drawn up into Mark's empire, or didn't end up doing the same thing itself. ah well. muzznt grrrumbel.
22
03/02/2021 12:24:43 28 5
bbc
It rather misses the point. We don't need a "better" Facebook, we need to spend less time with "any" Facebook and more time in the real world.

The problem is the 10 hours at your screen on social networks as your major source of people interaction, not which applications you use to do it
45
03/02/2021 13:10:23 8 2
bbc
If someone is spendng 10 hrs a day on SM they have bgger problems than which platform they use! An alternative to FB would be good, especially f offered a different kind of experience. I closed my FB account because I objected to having all my information sold to thousands of companies, my web bowsng tracked, and beng censored from discussing certain subjects.
19
03/02/2021 12:15:38 19 1
bbc
I'm still on friends reunited :)
46
03/02/2021 13:10:41 1 0
bbc
Wow! Forgot about that one lol
18
Bob
03/02/2021 12:14:24 6 4
bbc
Who on earth would favour a trackpad over a mouse.
47
03/02/2021 13:13:06 1 1
bbc
I do sometimes. It's pretty good once you get used to it. And that's the man thing, it's what you are used to. Who the hell would write left handed? Well me! I was forced to write right handed at school because back them they thought it was tantamount to a mental deficiency lol. If you had always used a trackpad,, a mous would seem like a ridiculous idea! ;-)
24
03/02/2021 12:27:41 3 3
bbc
Perhaps someone who spends plenty of time using tablets and smartphones - you know, devices where a lot of input is thru touchscreens shaped a lot like a trackpad.
48
03/02/2021 13:14:39 1 2
bbc
Agreed, we ae movng in the directon of touch screens for everything. Now the idea of usng an old phone seems weird. I use both a mouse and a trackpad, it really depends what I am doing.
33
03/02/2021 12:51:24 3 2
bbc
Facebook (sells the data that is created between people when they) connect to each other
49
03/02/2021 13:14:43 4 0
bbc
As will this, if it gains enough traction. The only other way it can go is to ask people to pay for the service, which likely won't happen. Either way, Facebook, Bebo or any of the rest of them, you pay. Just depends if it's with your privacy/data or your money.
53
03/02/2021 13:20:06 2 0
bbc
Facebook doesn't have a paid for service, because a "paid for level" is infrastructure it doesn't need. Facebook is doing very well thank you from the business model is already has.

best thing is to be aware when every swipe you make is a $ to whatever website you're on. as long as you're happy to be giving a marketing company money for data
26
03/02/2021 12:32:38 8 13
bbc
I'll do you one better: In the absence of GDPR post-Brexit, we in the UK are in the Old West in terms of data protection. This is IMO intentional, it has Cummings written all over it. The data set being accumulated right now on UK citizens, which is unprecedented, is unprotected by any serious regulation.

It will be worth trillions to the government, and sold to the highest bidder.
50
bbc
I doubt the government has much on you that Google and Facefucker don't already have. People focus on FB, but when I deleted all my Google data, suddenly all my apps were clueless! All tagetted ads gone in an instance! Removed
51
03/02/2021 13:18:37 2 1
bbc
Who are Bebo?
132
03/02/2021 23:35:16 0 0
bbc
Who IS Bebo
52
03/02/2021 13:19:45 0 2
bbc
Nice ??
49
03/02/2021 13:14:43 4 0
bbc
As will this, if it gains enough traction. The only other way it can go is to ask people to pay for the service, which likely won't happen. Either way, Facebook, Bebo or any of the rest of them, you pay. Just depends if it's with your privacy/data or your money.
53
03/02/2021 13:20:06 2 0
bbc
Facebook doesn't have a paid for service, because a "paid for level" is infrastructure it doesn't need. Facebook is doing very well thank you from the business model is already has.

best thing is to be aware when every swipe you make is a $ to whatever website you're on. as long as you're happy to be giving a marketing company money for data
16
03/02/2021 12:10:14 13 8
bbc
What’s the point of these platforms. They have some positives but the negatives far out way them.

I have never done Facebook, Bebo, Twitter or their ilk. I live in the real world. My friends are flesh and blood. The superficial world of influencers are nothing to me.

We all probably need less not more of these sites for our own sanity.
54
03/02/2021 13:20:22 2 4
bbc
If you've never 'done them', you are not really in a position to post a balanced opinion on them. Your position is biased and bigoted. Honestly, this looks like it is little more than virtue signalling! 'Look at me, I'm pure and clean, and untainted by social media'. Try using the damned things, and come back wth a better perspective!
66
03/02/2021 13:41:11 1 2
bbc
No not virtue signalling. I just don’t need these things. Give me your perspective on why you think I must use these things.
The whole idea of this type of forum is to give opinions and debate. Questioning whether we need more of the same is not necessarily wrong. People deserve better. Perhaps if they were better and safer I might have a need for them.
13
03/02/2021 12:08:29 3 1
bbc
I guess much of its success will depend on whether Section 230 is revoked in the US. If Facebook and Twitter suddenly become legally responsible for all the content on their platform, then having a business model that isn't linked to news feeds will maybe give it enough of an edge to succeed.
55
03/02/2021 13:23:10 2 0
bbc
I don't see how you can be responsible for people's posts, any more than a postal service can be held responsble for what is contained within the packages they transport. The answer is to take away anonymity. Post what you like, but as yourself, with your real name etc.
37
03/02/2021 12:53:42 7 1
bbc
There's a variety of people who use these platforms. For some it's vanity, for some it's to make money (businesses), for some it's their main form of social interaction. There are people who were housebound, long before lockdown, and social media gives them a lifeline to the rest of society.
56
03/02/2021 13:23:35 3 1
bbc
As I said some good, some bad.
But the bad is horrendous.
71
03/02/2021 13:49:02 0 1
bbc
stick to the BBC website. it's nice and safe here.
12
03/02/2021 12:07:37 9 6
bbc
Yay - another social media site. Can't wait for another opportunity to see what my friends are eating & watch the latest fire-juggling cat. Sign me up. Or maybe I'll try this new-fangled tech-free idea of interacting and meeting with real people. I heard investors are about to throw billions at it - and I can see why - it might just be the next big thing.
57
03/02/2021 13:23:50 1 1
bbc
Yeah, because we've been able to to do soooo much of that in the last year!?
32
03/02/2021 12:49:43 5 4
bbc
Yet more manure to be spread over the Internet.
58
03/02/2021 13:23:52 2 2
bbc
You didn't read the article, did you?

You saw it was about Bebo and then jumped to the comments to make a lazy, judgemental remark about how social media is "manure" and that you're somehow better than the people that use it.

Well, you're not. Sorry!
62
03/02/2021 13:27:48 2 0
bbc
don't be sorry m8
59
03/02/2021 13:24:29 4 0
bbc
Another attempt for a quick sale. No vision hence will fail. Credit to him for making money and using a British tax haven to seal the deal. Sounds like Jenson button, Lewis Hamilton, the Dyson weasel, etc. Does not sound like Facebook etc
61
03/02/2021 13:26:42 3 1
bbc
your comment needs to be peer reviewed
26
03/02/2021 12:32:38 8 13
bbc
I'll do you one better: In the absence of GDPR post-Brexit, we in the UK are in the Old West in terms of data protection. This is IMO intentional, it has Cummings written all over it. The data set being accumulated right now on UK citizens, which is unprecedented, is unprotected by any serious regulation.

It will be worth trillions to the government, and sold to the highest bidder.
60
03/02/2021 13:25:45 10 0
bbc
Hi JesterGoose ... you may want to look up the DPA 2018 legislation which is exactly a copy of GDPR ... in fact it is the reason we have data adequacy between the EU and the UK at the moment ... just don't let the facts get in the way whilst you ride your high horse down the street.
59
03/02/2021 13:24:29 4 0
bbc
Another attempt for a quick sale. No vision hence will fail. Credit to him for making money and using a British tax haven to seal the deal. Sounds like Jenson button, Lewis Hamilton, the Dyson weasel, etc. Does not sound like Facebook etc
61
03/02/2021 13:26:42 3 1
bbc
your comment needs to be peer reviewed
58
03/02/2021 13:23:52 2 2
bbc
You didn't read the article, did you?

You saw it was about Bebo and then jumped to the comments to make a lazy, judgemental remark about how social media is "manure" and that you're somehow better than the people that use it.

Well, you're not. Sorry!
62
03/02/2021 13:27:48 2 0
bbc
don't be sorry m8
44
03/02/2021 13:06:35 1 1
bbc
Because a lot of people are looking for an alternative to FB because they don't like Suckerborg's censorship policy.
63
03/02/2021 13:30:25 0 0
bbc
there's quite a lot in the soup. one of the reason's Facebook is verreh rich, is because it's the only company that has the data - hence, can charge more for it. (yes, a m-o-n-o-p-o-l-y). I wouldn't be optimistic that Bebo's one wasn't drawn up into Mark's empire, or didn't end up doing the same thing itself. ah well. muzznt grrrumbel.
23
03/02/2021 12:24:52 14 7
bbc
Who gives a monkey's? Why is this "news"?
64
03/02/2021 13:31:03 1 2
bbc
What do you mean "why is this 'news'?" News doesn't have to suit what you think news should be, cookiebear.

Just because you don't give a monkeys, doesn't mean others don't. It's relevant to, and tucked away in, the technology page, too.
65
03/02/2021 13:38:09 5 1
bbc
"Now is a good time to launch another social network. Covid has had a lot of detrimental effects, but I think it sort of opened people's eyes to new things in new ways. And people are craving interaction."

People crave real interaction now! not digital fakery and cakery!
54
03/02/2021 13:20:22 2 4
bbc
If you've never 'done them', you are not really in a position to post a balanced opinion on them. Your position is biased and bigoted. Honestly, this looks like it is little more than virtue signalling! 'Look at me, I'm pure and clean, and untainted by social media'. Try using the damned things, and come back wth a better perspective!
66
03/02/2021 13:41:11 1 2
bbc
No not virtue signalling. I just don’t need these things. Give me your perspective on why you think I must use these things.
The whole idea of this type of forum is to give opinions and debate. Questioning whether we need more of the same is not necessarily wrong. People deserve better. Perhaps if they were better and safer I might have a need for them.
17
03/02/2021 12:10:35 10 1
bbc
It's a weird world in which the brand is still his but all the information attached to it can be sold for millions. OUR information. How is that not the focus of any discussion?
67
03/02/2021 13:42:20 1 1
bbc
what should be the focus, isn't that it's the data being sold, its that the focus on the data is at the expense of the website itself.

ie, if your company aim is to make a website, you make a website
if your company aim is to have the data, then "having a website" is not your primary objective. "having the data - and being the only one to have the data" - is
68
03/02/2021 13:43:51 0 0
bbc
(which means that the functionality of the website might actually be reduced, in order for other people not to have the data")

youtube is not like this
67
03/02/2021 13:42:20 1 1
bbc
what should be the focus, isn't that it's the data being sold, its that the focus on the data is at the expense of the website itself.

ie, if your company aim is to make a website, you make a website
if your company aim is to have the data, then "having a website" is not your primary objective. "having the data - and being the only one to have the data" - is
68
03/02/2021 13:43:51 0 0
bbc
(which means that the functionality of the website might actually be reduced, in order for other people not to have the data")

youtube is not like this
69
03/02/2021 13:45:21 5 2
bbc
What I'm taking from the article is that Mr. Birch sold Bebo for over £600m, then bought it back for £1m, then sold it again for £25m.

Now he plans to spend a couple of years building a base then flogging it again for tens or hundreds of millions. Easy money for old rope. Doubt he cares less about content, if he was honest.

That he's saying this from the British Virgin Islands is telling...
102
Dee
03/02/2021 16:36:43 1 3
bbc
It’s not easy money for old rope. If people don’t sign up, he doesn’t care about content & achieve scale, he’ll have no business then he won’t be able to flog it. Where he lives is his choice. As long as he doesn’t spend more than 183 days in the UK then he’s not liable for UK tax.
70
03/02/2021 13:47:34 6 2
bbc
We need more of this stuff like we need a hole in the head.
56
03/02/2021 13:23:35 3 1
bbc
As I said some good, some bad.
But the bad is horrendous.
71
03/02/2021 13:49:02 0 1
bbc
stick to the BBC website. it's nice and safe here.
14
03/02/2021 12:08:37 8 4
bbc
I would be absolutely ecstatic to have a Facebook like service that was focussed on people connecting and not forcing drivel to us to make billions from ads.
72
03/02/2021 13:50:04 4 0
bbc
facebook makes more from selling your data, than it ever could from you paying a subscription
73
03/02/2021 13:51:32 9 1
bbc
It may take off initially. What he's talking about is essentially a 'local pub online': you walk in and see who's there to chat to.

In a pandemic, people may go for that but the pandemic won't last forever, and users will soon vanish once we're free to meet in person. Mike's gambling that that'll be after, not before, he's flogged 'Bebo 3' to another sucker for another fortune.
135
03/02/2021 23:43:51 0 0
bbc
Ah! A chat-room. I remember them from 20 years ago.
74
Mac
03/02/2021 13:43:59 2 4
bbc
Ever feel like your serious thoughts echo out and can effect your reality sometimes?

I have been thinking about creating a new social media platform for the past 6 months, one with enough innovations (I believe) to challenge FB/Twitter etc.

The more time that has passed the more convinced of success I have become. Finally announced it to my family yesterday, woke up and read this today :-/
75
Mac
03/02/2021 13:49:06 1 2
bbc
Anyone know how I can possibly get in touch with Michael?
77
03/02/2021 14:03:48 4 1
bbc
Try Facebook
8
jon
03/02/2021 12:02:06 5 1
bbc
These social media sites come and go like the prevailing wind. Anyone still using My Space?
76
03/02/2021 13:57:55 4 0
bbc
Trump?
89
03/02/2021 15:42:45 1 0
bbc
Trump has the approved version of Netscape Navigator fired up. as per government instructions.
75
Mac
03/02/2021 13:49:06 1 2
bbc
Anyone know how I can possibly get in touch with Michael?
77
03/02/2021 14:03:48 4 1
bbc
Try Facebook
23
03/02/2021 12:24:52 14 7
bbc
Who gives a monkey's? Why is this "news"?
78
03/02/2021 14:07:35 0 2
bbc
What is news? Well, actually...

FACTS multiplied by IMPORTANCE = NEWS
79
03/02/2021 14:12:30 13 0
bbc
This guy is the baddie from Iron Man 3, yes?
82
03/02/2021 14:32:40 4 0
bbc
Yep ! It is Guy Pearce! Uncanny !
80
03/02/2021 14:25:40 4 4
bbc
I will be all for this project IF there are strict privacy protocols and NO advertising. I would be happy to pay for a clean social media platform. Facebook and Insta must end.
81
03/02/2021 14:30:47 3 0
bbc
big thumbs up for the privacy controls; can't see how there would not be advertising though.
85
03/02/2021 14:56:37 1 1
bbc
Ah, you want a silo for the rich! Adverts, just no part of any problem.
80
03/02/2021 14:25:40 4 4
bbc
I will be all for this project IF there are strict privacy protocols and NO advertising. I would be happy to pay for a clean social media platform. Facebook and Insta must end.
81
03/02/2021 14:30:47 3 0
bbc
big thumbs up for the privacy controls; can't see how there would not be advertising though.
79
03/02/2021 14:12:30 13 0
bbc
This guy is the baddie from Iron Man 3, yes?
82
03/02/2021 14:32:40 4 0
bbc
Yep ! It is Guy Pearce! Uncanny !
86
03/02/2021 14:58:49 1 0
bbc
now I'm just feeling naff for having only a 24" monitor
83
03/02/2021 14:41:09 4 2
bbc
Social media is a rotten system, regardless of what you do with it, it goes bad!!
21
03/02/2021 12:24:26 10 1
bbc
Crazy idea: People don't actually need social media sites like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Literally any function they provide can be achieved by using alternatives. There are places to share photos, secure privacy focused messaging apps, news apps that have noting to do with social media giants etc....
84
03/02/2021 14:52:34 1 1
bbc
Well clearly you are wrong as billions use them. That says something about the alternatives. Above all else probably those others are closed off silos, reducing contacts. News is useless without the ability to discuss it. No better than tv or radio. Top down official lines.
80
03/02/2021 14:25:40 4 4
bbc
I will be all for this project IF there are strict privacy protocols and NO advertising. I would be happy to pay for a clean social media platform. Facebook and Insta must end.
85
03/02/2021 14:56:37 1 1
bbc
Ah, you want a silo for the rich! Adverts, just no part of any problem.
82
03/02/2021 14:32:40 4 0
bbc
Yep ! It is Guy Pearce! Uncanny !
86
03/02/2021 14:58:49 1 0
bbc
now I'm just feeling naff for having only a 24" monitor
87
03/02/2021 15:37:53 2 4
bbc
anything to smack facebook down
Its become smug middle class middle aged holidays snaps and terrorists blogs
129
03/02/2021 23:30:07 0 0
bbc
Yep. "Kill Middley". That'll teach 'em to have well kept gardens, a nice car, a dog under control, pleasant kids etc.

And HOLIDAYS .. how very dare they.

What time are seeing the Shrink tomorrow ? Before or after you write your terrorist blog ?
145
04/02/2021 10:17:22 0 0
bbc
It was always intended as such, oh and forget the “dark web” all the paedophiles are on Facebook posting images of children being abused. Safe in their ‘private’ groups that Facebook leaves alone.
9
03/02/2021 12:02:49 23 4
bbc
I specifically remember joining Facebook in 2009.. Do you know who drove that? It wasn't young people. It was the Farmville 40+ somethings!

I was told by my Gen X mother that our relatives wanted to wish me a happy birthday on the platform, and that it was anti-social for me not to use the site.

Fast forward to now, and my peers hardly use Facebook. Loadarubbish.
88
03/02/2021 15:41:59 0 0
bbc
quite a while ago, somewhere else, I once contacted facebook. I got a reply, by email. from a personhuman.
76
03/02/2021 13:57:55 4 0
bbc
Trump?
89
03/02/2021 15:42:45 1 0
bbc
Trump has the approved version of Netscape Navigator fired up. as per government instructions.
7
03/02/2021 12:00:02 1 2
bbc
Keep it simple stupid

Like Tesco's (and any number of examples) which came a cropper both Facebook and Amazon have extended their tentacles and lost some business focus

Product focus is the first name of the game - is joining Facebook worth the hassle of working out what's actually going on - I'm guessing for the young the answer is actually no and that means it's M&S - slowly dying customers
90
03/02/2021 15:43:26 0 0
bbc
the interface should be as simple as possible to accomplish the task you want.

the gubbins behind it? now that gets codey
5
03/02/2021 11:57:30 0 0
bbc
Excellent. Can he give me back my old Bebo profile & photos etc?
91
03/02/2021 15:44:35 0 0
bbc
1st and second rule of social media club. never use some internet site as the only place to store your stuff.

2 words

external hard disk
92
03/02/2021 15:45:04 3 2
bbc
It's a time for governments to act - there is far too much power in the hands of an unaccountable few.

We elect governments in a democracy. They need to protect the public from exploitation and abuse that will only get greater.

Remember - if Facetwitter etc give you something for nothing, it is you they are exploiting!
100
Dee
03/02/2021 16:27:18 2 1
bbc
It’s a free country. Don’t sign up to social media sites.
144
04/02/2021 10:16:02 0 0
bbc
That’s always the truth. If you don’t pay for it – you’re the product.
4
03/02/2021 11:57:01 54 3
bbc
When I was young I wished I could read peoples minds.

Since social media came along, I have totally got over that.
93
03/02/2021 15:45:15 31 1
bbc
people used to write in diaries and not want anyone else to read them

now they write online, and get annoyed if no-one else does read it
140
04/02/2021 10:06:17 1 0
bbc
Do you mean: ‘get annoyed of no one else reads it’?
3
03/02/2021 11:55:40 21 7
bbc
Social media is a blight on society.....stop promoting it!
94
03/02/2021 15:45:43 2 2
bbc
you cant control what gets promoted

you can control whether or not to obey eet
110
03/02/2021 19:55:21 0 0
bbc
Easy to say no when you're an adult. (Well anybody with an IQ over 6).

Easy to follow when you're 13.
20
03/02/2021 12:22:40 7 0
bbc
Well, he wood, woodn't he?
95
03/02/2021 15:46:45 2 0
bbc
nip these puns in the bud
96
03/02/2021 15:46:47 16 6
bbc
Story should say: Billionaire tax dodger living in offshore tax haven plans to try and make more money by reselling revamped social media platform for the third time to another billionaire tax dodger on adjacent tax haven island. Meanwhile user of services seem unaware that their data input is the product. Under 18's still allowed access to adult systems in contravention to all other age laws
99
Dee
03/02/2021 16:25:47 3 6
bbc
As long as Michael Birch does not spend 183 days or more in the UK then he is not resident in the UK for tax purposes. His successful relaunch of Bebo & acquisition of Bebo by another investor/company is not a given as there is fierce competition in the tech sector & much depends on him achieving scale.
97
MVS
03/02/2021 16:16:37 1 4
bbc
It has all the ingredients to succeed. Not least the fact that many individuals are no longer using Facebook for interacting with their real friends. there will not likely be a direct competitor to Facebook for the billions of advertising dollars, but there is a very substantial niche market he has identified.
98
03/02/2021 16:18:23 4 5
bbc
I think there are only chavs left still using Faecebook now. Most people abandoned it years ago.
96
03/02/2021 15:46:47 16 6
bbc
Story should say: Billionaire tax dodger living in offshore tax haven plans to try and make more money by reselling revamped social media platform for the third time to another billionaire tax dodger on adjacent tax haven island. Meanwhile user of services seem unaware that their data input is the product. Under 18's still allowed access to adult systems in contravention to all other age laws
99
Dee
03/02/2021 16:25:47 3 6
bbc
As long as Michael Birch does not spend 183 days or more in the UK then he is not resident in the UK for tax purposes. His successful relaunch of Bebo & acquisition of Bebo by another investor/company is not a given as there is fierce competition in the tech sector & much depends on him achieving scale.
92
03/02/2021 15:45:04 3 2
bbc
It's a time for governments to act - there is far too much power in the hands of an unaccountable few.

We elect governments in a democracy. They need to protect the public from exploitation and abuse that will only get greater.

Remember - if Facetwitter etc give you something for nothing, it is you they are exploiting!
100
Dee
03/02/2021 16:27:18 2 1
bbc
It’s a free country. Don’t sign up to social media sites.