Covid: Antibodies last at least six months in most
03/02/2021 | news | health | 146
The UK Biobank took blood samples from 20,000 people every month - and just under 1,700 had antibodies.
1
MVP
03/02/2021 10:22:33 5 3
bbc
Six months is a short period of time. We do not yet know how much immunity the vaccines give us as it is too early to tell. And the virus is constantly mutating. There is no room for complacency here.
Yes. Such a shame that Capt Tom didn't have the vaccine in December before he and his family traveled to Barbados. Removed
7
03/02/2021 10:30:43 10 2
bbc
Yep - maintain the fear; maintain the control
42
03/02/2021 11:40:09 3 3
bbc
"There is no room for complacency here."

But people like you are very complacent about seeing the jobs, education and mental health of millions of UK citizens wrecked.

Paid up mortgage, and cushy pension, by any chance?
2
03/02/2021 10:22:34 10 4
bbc
Who the hell makes these signs? Can't spell - it's 'PractiSe safe distance' as in a verb. We aren't American (yet). Same with the Holiday Inn with their sandwich boards outside saying 'PractiCe safe ...' Is it too much to ask that people know the difference?
3
03/02/2021 10:27:50 11 3
bbc
For once UK decision making seems to be ahead of the curve.
60
03/02/2021 12:21:10 0 7
bbc
? How ?
Such a shame that Capt Tom didn't have the vaccine in December before he and his family traveled to Barbados. Removed
5
03/02/2021 10:30:26 0 5
bbc
Your post will get removed.
Such a shame that Capt Tom didn't have the vaccine in December before he and his family traveled to Barbados. Removed
5
03/02/2021 10:30:26 0 5
bbc
Your post will get removed.
1
MVP
03/02/2021 10:22:33 5 3
bbc
Six months is a short period of time. We do not yet know how much immunity the vaccines give us as it is too early to tell. And the virus is constantly mutating. There is no room for complacency here.
Yes. Such a shame that Capt Tom didn't have the vaccine in December before he and his family traveled to Barbados. Removed
1
MVP
03/02/2021 10:22:33 5 3
bbc
Six months is a short period of time. We do not yet know how much immunity the vaccines give us as it is too early to tell. And the virus is constantly mutating. There is no room for complacency here.
7
03/02/2021 10:30:43 10 2
bbc
Yep - maintain the fear; maintain the control
31
03/02/2021 11:14:40 4 2
bbc
It’s like Stockholm Syndrome what some of these lockdown lovers have. They must have led very tedious lives before the pandemic I can only assume.

I can accept lockdown as a short term measure to protect the elderly, vulnerable but not one nanosecond longer than that.

And if vaccines prove ineffective, well too bad. We can’t live like this forever, it’s not living at all.
Is Captain Tom really a hero ? Removed
Well one thing's for sure. You really are the apitome of everything he wasn't. Removed
Regardless of what else he did in his life or how the money is spent he raised £33m by his own action for the NHS Charities Together and didn't ask for a thing in return. How many 'heroes' could you name that have done more? Removed
9
03/02/2021 10:35:49 7 7
bbc
In the ENTIRE WORLD there have literally only been a handful of verified reinfections: mostly immunocompromised people. This represents ABSOLUTELY OVERWHELMING EVIDENCE that almost everyone, including the asymptomatic, who recovers from covid-19 DOES have long term immunity. They can no longer catch or spread covid, and they certainly don't need vaccination.

Why try so hard to hide these FACTS?
11
03/02/2021 10:43:19 4 5
bbc
Define long-term.
72
03/02/2021 12:55:40 2 0
bbc
What's your point? Most people have never been infected so are still at risk and it is far far cheaper to give everyone the vaccine than to fart about with tests which are not outstandingly accurate.
10
03/02/2021 10:38:33 10 2
bbc
Positive news about antibodies lasting a decent length of time, along with the effectiveness of the Oxford/AZ jab and new vaccines coming on stream. Let's hope that there's a bold plan to get things up and running again from March.
122
03/02/2021 16:47:51 2 0
bbc
In 6 months time we will get told that antibodies last at least 12 months. Nature is following it's natural course, the human body is amazing.
129
03/02/2021 21:31:10 0 0
bbc
Things are moving in the right direction and lockdown will be eased when it is safe to do so.
9
03/02/2021 10:35:49 7 7
bbc
In the ENTIRE WORLD there have literally only been a handful of verified reinfections: mostly immunocompromised people. This represents ABSOLUTELY OVERWHELMING EVIDENCE that almost everyone, including the asymptomatic, who recovers from covid-19 DOES have long term immunity. They can no longer catch or spread covid, and they certainly don't need vaccination.

Why try so hard to hide these FACTS?
11
03/02/2021 10:43:19 4 5
bbc
Define long-term.
28
03/02/2021 11:09:56 3 0
bbc
As long as Covid has been around. We obviously can’t have evidence for longer than that.
12
03/02/2021 10:43:58 18 4
bbc
Excellent news we can now see that the light at the end of the tunnel is shining brighter today good to get positive news rather than negative thoughts
117
03/02/2021 16:41:31 1 3
bbc
This is excellent news and great evidence that those who have had covid do not need a vaccination therefore herd immunity does have a chance.
Fully expect evidence of antibodies to continue. The vaccine offers 6 months protection, thankfully nature is stronger.
13
03/02/2021 10:44:06 13 3
bbc
"At least," Careful now, you're almost making a case for some herd immunity.
91
03/02/2021 13:32:13 2 2
bbc
Herd immunity to an RNA virus that is constantly mutating isn't a thing... think influenza and the common cold.

The countries who have most successfully tackled CV19 have had a "Zero Covid" strategy. Vaccination has, to-date, played no part in that strategy. Those countries have been able to return to normality and have had a lesser hit to their economy, despite lockdowns.
Is Captain Tom really a hero ? Removed
14
bbc
Well one thing's for sure. You really are the apitome of everything he wasn't. Removed
15
03/02/2021 10:46:33 16 5
bbc
The media incited public opinion to the extent that the herd immunity case was a politically impossible option for the Government.

Right or wrong, crippling the economy was the only viable solution left to it.
49
37p
03/02/2021 11:56:13 9 1
bbc
Sad that the media have so much influence and report so much unproven opinion.
84
03/02/2021 13:19:49 1 0
bbc
It's what the media do.
That's why we can't have a sensible drug policy, for instance, or a rational discussion about the best way to run the NHS.
93
03/02/2021 13:32:43 2 0
bbc
This about sums up Covid policy discourse.

"I think we should consider exiting this cycle of lockdowns and accepting that deaths will occur. I'm staring at bankruptcy. I can't even find menial jobs because they're flooded with professionals who have already been made redundant. I've had to sell my car, put the house on the market and look at new schools."

yOu wAnT mY gRaN tO dIe YoU pSyChO!!!
128
03/02/2021 21:29:57 0 0
bbc
Herd immunity will be achieved via natural infection and vaccination. It was never removed as an option because it is the only option.
16
03/02/2021 10:52:13 20 6
bbc
Take the vaccine, recent evidence suggests it not only protects you, but others as well. It's would be selfish not to.
37
03/02/2021 11:36:59 6 29
bbc
It's selfish (and unethical) to expect others to undergo medical treatment for YOUR benefit!
41
03/02/2021 11:42:44 0 7
bbc
Monsieur Macron says that this vaccine is quasi innefective. That's good enough for me.
47
37p
03/02/2021 11:54:47 3 3
bbc
That makes little sense saying people are selfish.

If you've had the vaccine you're less likely to catch covid and now less likely to pass it on.
If you haven't had the vaccine you're taking a risk for yourself as those vaccinated won't be affected if they catch it again and are unlikely to pass it on.

So who are you protecting if you opt out? Only those that are willing to take the risk?
116
03/02/2021 16:39:10 1 3
bbc
Perhaps in the interests of balance you should look at deaths since vaccinated within a 28 day period. Then again with no autopsy's we will never know will we.
4 deaths in Israel, Norwegian gov't halts vaccinations until more evidence is seen.
If you have had covid and have antibodies do you want an overdose?
146
04/02/2021 16:15:55 0 0
bbc
Not everyone will need it or want it. Also it's against the law as well as against human rights to make someone take it. It's a choice and will always be a choice!
Is Captain Tom really a hero ? Removed
Regardless of what else he did in his life or how the money is spent he raised £33m by his own action for the NHS Charities Together and didn't ask for a thing in return. How many 'heroes' could you name that have done more? Removed
18
03/02/2021 10:54:04 6 2
bbc
We're buying time at the moment, as someone said, it's the end of the beginning.

This virus is proving to be no pushover and the variant strains have come as an unpleasant reminder even before the first wave of vaccinations have got going.

We need to be grateful that the scientists and medics are vigilant on our behalf and they remain optimistic about being able to adapt to the mutations
21
03/02/2021 10:58:43 5 5
bbc
As a scientist working on sars-cov2 (covid19), I'm not optimistic this is the beginning of the end.
This is just the beginning of an endless cycle.
36
03/02/2021 11:35:16 2 1
bbc
"This virus is proving to be no pushover"

But scaring people about it certainly was.
19
03/02/2021 10:56:02 3 4
bbc
Covid is here to stay, we wont eradicate this.
By the time everyone is vaccinated, the virus will either have mutated to the point the vaccine is ineffective or/and those that were vaccinated first, would have lost their immunity. This is going to be a never ending cycle IMO.
20
03/02/2021 10:56:48 0 8
bbc
So much hope in the vaccines, to clean up allowing this to ravage through communities
Now, because of that choice, they are out in full force to clean up the mutations in those communities to protect the vaccine
If they’d have done this first..?
I don’t care, celebrating buying a vaccine & distribution to protect citizens is a given, not a win
I feel like the whole country is going backwards
25
03/02/2021 11:07:23 1 4
bbc
Dislike what I say, like I said, I don’t care
I do care that had they have organised themselves in the manner they are fully capable of doing, as proven now, our count wouldn’t be sitting at 108,000 deaths
Shameful
Congratulations on pulling your finger out
18
03/02/2021 10:54:04 6 2
bbc
We're buying time at the moment, as someone said, it's the end of the beginning.

This virus is proving to be no pushover and the variant strains have come as an unpleasant reminder even before the first wave of vaccinations have got going.

We need to be grateful that the scientists and medics are vigilant on our behalf and they remain optimistic about being able to adapt to the mutations
21
03/02/2021 10:58:43 5 5
bbc
As a scientist working on sars-cov2 (covid19), I'm not optimistic this is the beginning of the end.
This is just the beginning of an endless cycle.
26
03/02/2021 11:08:49 8 1
bbc
We’ve had pandemics since time immemorial. None of them resulted in an endless cycle of lockdowns. Doing it for a short time to protect elderly/vulnerable is one thing. But if we’re talking decades....I don’t want to live the next 50 years cowering just so that I can die of cancer at 89 instead of covid at 84. I’d probably just throw myself off a building at 40 if this is all life has to offer.
27
03/02/2021 11:08:53 3 1
bbc
Thank you very much for your work, from which even critics will benefit. I wish you a long and successful career, though perhaps not quite what you anticipated when you started the job!
22
03/02/2021 11:04:16 4 4
bbc
I wonder how long it will be before we hear from some bureaucrat in the EU saying the exact opposite.
23
03/02/2021 11:06:20 3 3
bbc
Immunity from vaccines and infection, together with the rate of both, suggest we should hit herd immunity by the spring.
30
03/02/2021 11:13:35 1 3
bbc
Yes, if the vaccine does reduce transmission by around 2/3rds (may be slightly different for Pfizer) that should mean for every million vaccinated R would reduce by around 1%. So already within a couple of weeks it will have reduced by 10% and it’s possible to reach 30% in March which would be enough to relax most restrictions without seeing a resurgence in infections.
35
03/02/2021 11:33:37 0 1
bbc
How dare you! Next thing, you'll be asking to have your normal life and freedoms back.
24
03/02/2021 11:07:12 7 1
bbc
The majority of them are likely to have been infected earlier than May too so the results suggest there would still be high levels of protection after 7 or 8 months.
144
04/02/2021 09:50:36 0 0
bbc
Might have been infected more than once meaning it might not last as long.
20
03/02/2021 10:56:48 0 8
bbc
So much hope in the vaccines, to clean up allowing this to ravage through communities
Now, because of that choice, they are out in full force to clean up the mutations in those communities to protect the vaccine
If they’d have done this first..?
I don’t care, celebrating buying a vaccine & distribution to protect citizens is a given, not a win
I feel like the whole country is going backwards
25
03/02/2021 11:07:23 1 4
bbc
Dislike what I say, like I said, I don’t care
I do care that had they have organised themselves in the manner they are fully capable of doing, as proven now, our count wouldn’t be sitting at 108,000 deaths
Shameful
Congratulations on pulling your finger out
46
37p
03/02/2021 11:49:39 4 1
bbc
I'm not sure what you're saying here. Who should have organised themselves to do what?
21
03/02/2021 10:58:43 5 5
bbc
As a scientist working on sars-cov2 (covid19), I'm not optimistic this is the beginning of the end.
This is just the beginning of an endless cycle.
26
03/02/2021 11:08:49 8 1
bbc
We’ve had pandemics since time immemorial. None of them resulted in an endless cycle of lockdowns. Doing it for a short time to protect elderly/vulnerable is one thing. But if we’re talking decades....I don’t want to live the next 50 years cowering just so that I can die of cancer at 89 instead of covid at 84. I’d probably just throw myself off a building at 40 if this is all life has to offer.
115
03/02/2021 16:14:56 2 0
bbc
I agree.
This is why I'm not optimistic that we will see the end of Covid-19. It will mutate and continue, we will be in a never ending cycle of vaccinations against new strains (like we do with the influenza virus).
I take the same attitude, at 34 I don't want to live in a never ending cycle of lockdowns. We are sooner (I hope) or later going to have to accept that Covid-19 is here to stay.
21
03/02/2021 10:58:43 5 5
bbc
As a scientist working on sars-cov2 (covid19), I'm not optimistic this is the beginning of the end.
This is just the beginning of an endless cycle.
27
03/02/2021 11:08:53 3 1
bbc
Thank you very much for your work, from which even critics will benefit. I wish you a long and successful career, though perhaps not quite what you anticipated when you started the job!
114
03/02/2021 16:09:40 0 0
bbc
Thank you.
I originally started working on developing diagnostics for cancer markers and heart disease (the latter is what I did my PhD in). This quickly changed to developing diagnostics for Covid-19. It is interesting work that I rather enjoy, and hopefully it is of benefit to the world.
I wish you and everyone else well
11
03/02/2021 10:43:19 4 5
bbc
Define long-term.
28
03/02/2021 11:09:56 3 0
bbc
As long as Covid has been around. We obviously can’t have evidence for longer than that.
29
03/02/2021 11:11:03 1 1
bbc
I'd like to see a map of where over70s are being vaccinated. Friends from Birmingham to IOW have had theirs, my GP web page doesn't mention them - are they involved at all or have some opted out? Spouse is keen but has heard nothing.
44
37p
03/02/2021 11:47:35 2 0
bbc
I suppose it depends on how the lists are composed. You need to be registered at a surgery and have an NHS number and then it probably depends on how the vaccine is distributed.
23
03/02/2021 11:06:20 3 3
bbc
Immunity from vaccines and infection, together with the rate of both, suggest we should hit herd immunity by the spring.
30
03/02/2021 11:13:35 1 3
bbc
Yes, if the vaccine does reduce transmission by around 2/3rds (may be slightly different for Pfizer) that should mean for every million vaccinated R would reduce by around 1%. So already within a couple of weeks it will have reduced by 10% and it’s possible to reach 30% in March which would be enough to relax most restrictions without seeing a resurgence in infections.
7
03/02/2021 10:30:43 10 2
bbc
Yep - maintain the fear; maintain the control
31
03/02/2021 11:14:40 4 2
bbc
It’s like Stockholm Syndrome what some of these lockdown lovers have. They must have led very tedious lives before the pandemic I can only assume.

I can accept lockdown as a short term measure to protect the elderly, vulnerable but not one nanosecond longer than that.

And if vaccines prove ineffective, well too bad. We can’t live like this forever, it’s not living at all.
32
03/02/2021 11:24:40 6 1
bbc
At least 6 months, reading reports natural immunity could least years, good news for people that have had covid.
Removed
87
03/02/2021 13:23:42 1 0
bbc
Natural immunity lasts a lifetime. Antibodies wane but the more lethal T-cells and the B-cells that generate Abs don't forget so easily. This is why we should be looking at vaccines that create high levels of these cellular responses, not just high amounts of Abs.
33
03/02/2021 11:27:06 3 3
bbc
Should the government move anyone who has tested positive to covid to the back of the queue for the vaccine - only vaccine those that have not tested positive first then vaccinate the people who have tested positive?
How many people have tested positive in the country and who now have immunity?
Lets only vaccinate those that have not tested positive.
39
03/02/2021 11:39:26 1 0
bbc
There is merit in this idea, as a way to give everyone at least some protection sooner, but I don't think the government will go with it. After 50 year olds, I reckon it will be certain frontline occupations, then continuing down in 5/10 year age groups.
76
03/02/2021 13:01:13 1 0
bbc
3.8m positive cases according to Worldometers data, although that goes back to the start of the pandemic, so immunity may have 'expired' for some. But it's an interesting suggestion and would contribute to a more targeted approach aimed at those with no protection. Some of the non-vaccinated population will have had the virus asymptomatically, but sounds like a good strategy to help prioritise.
32
03/02/2021 11:24:40 6 1
bbc
At least 6 months, reading reports natural immunity could least years, good news for people that have had covid.
Removed
23
03/02/2021 11:06:20 3 3
bbc
Immunity from vaccines and infection, together with the rate of both, suggest we should hit herd immunity by the spring.
35
03/02/2021 11:33:37 0 1
bbc
How dare you! Next thing, you'll be asking to have your normal life and freedoms back.
18
03/02/2021 10:54:04 6 2
bbc
We're buying time at the moment, as someone said, it's the end of the beginning.

This virus is proving to be no pushover and the variant strains have come as an unpleasant reminder even before the first wave of vaccinations have got going.

We need to be grateful that the scientists and medics are vigilant on our behalf and they remain optimistic about being able to adapt to the mutations
36
03/02/2021 11:35:16 2 1
bbc
"This virus is proving to be no pushover"

But scaring people about it certainly was.
16
03/02/2021 10:52:13 20 6
bbc
Take the vaccine, recent evidence suggests it not only protects you, but others as well. It's would be selfish not to.
37
03/02/2021 11:36:59 6 29
bbc
It's selfish (and unethical) to expect others to undergo medical treatment for YOUR benefit!
59
03/02/2021 12:20:46 8 2
bbc
Just keep your unvaccinated distance.
61
03/02/2021 12:31:53 6 1
bbc
If you don't have it then either keep your self quarantined and get tested if you want to mingle with others, or carry a bell around and ring it saying 'unclean unclean' as you go.
63
03/02/2021 12:32:33 9 1
bbc
Oh dear, ignore this nonsense. I'm happily vaccinated against a host of horrible diseases for the good of my own health and that of others.
38
bbc
Removed
33
03/02/2021 11:27:06 3 3
bbc
Should the government move anyone who has tested positive to covid to the back of the queue for the vaccine - only vaccine those that have not tested positive first then vaccinate the people who have tested positive?
How many people have tested positive in the country and who now have immunity?
Lets only vaccinate those that have not tested positive.
39
03/02/2021 11:39:26 1 0
bbc
There is merit in this idea, as a way to give everyone at least some protection sooner, but I don't think the government will go with it. After 50 year olds, I reckon it will be certain frontline occupations, then continuing down in 5/10 year age groups.
40
03/02/2021 11:40:52 2 1
bbc
So, a bit like the flu virus then?
16
03/02/2021 10:52:13 20 6
bbc
Take the vaccine, recent evidence suggests it not only protects you, but others as well. It's would be selfish not to.
41
03/02/2021 11:42:44 0 7
bbc
Monsieur Macron says that this vaccine is quasi innefective. That's good enough for me.
107
03/02/2021 14:52:46 2 2
bbc
So why are the French and the rest of the EU trying to get their hands on it ?

He just comes over as completely anti UK ... maybe he could get a job at the BBC ?
1
MVP
03/02/2021 10:22:33 5 3
bbc
Six months is a short period of time. We do not yet know how much immunity the vaccines give us as it is too early to tell. And the virus is constantly mutating. There is no room for complacency here.
42
03/02/2021 11:40:09 3 3
bbc
"There is no room for complacency here."

But people like you are very complacent about seeing the jobs, education and mental health of millions of UK citizens wrecked.

Paid up mortgage, and cushy pension, by any chance?
43
03/02/2021 11:46:19 3 1
bbc
The Biobank study has only appeared as Bulletins on their website. It has not been published in BMJ or Lancet. The Covid-19 reinfection tracker site has logged 39 cases of cov-19 reinfection, the mean time interval between infections was 3 months so I would not believe this study until it gets peer reviewed.
48
03/02/2021 11:54:56 1 0
bbc
To update the cov-19 reinfection tracker website has now 47 cases of reinfection logged with a mean interval between infections of 84 days (12 weeks) which is less than the Biobank finding.
29
03/02/2021 11:11:03 1 1
bbc
I'd like to see a map of where over70s are being vaccinated. Friends from Birmingham to IOW have had theirs, my GP web page doesn't mention them - are they involved at all or have some opted out? Spouse is keen but has heard nothing.
44
37p
03/02/2021 11:47:35 2 0
bbc
I suppose it depends on how the lists are composed. You need to be registered at a surgery and have an NHS number and then it probably depends on how the vaccine is distributed.
45
03/02/2021 11:48:06 1 7
bbc
GPs should pre test for natural immunity prior to vaccination, it may be some folk may be vaccinated needlessly adding additional costs to NHS unnecessarily , pre testing for immunity could avoid vaccine overspend.
67
03/02/2021 12:47:08 4 0
bbc
And rack up extra cost and consume extra time by pre-testing.......
100
37p
03/02/2021 13:54:39 0 0
bbc
I wonder if it's cheaper to vaccinate rather than testing first? I don't now the costs but usually the expense is in the organisation not the product.
25
03/02/2021 11:07:23 1 4
bbc
Dislike what I say, like I said, I don’t care
I do care that had they have organised themselves in the manner they are fully capable of doing, as proven now, our count wouldn’t be sitting at 108,000 deaths
Shameful
Congratulations on pulling your finger out
46
37p
03/02/2021 11:49:39 4 1
bbc
I'm not sure what you're saying here. Who should have organised themselves to do what?
16
03/02/2021 10:52:13 20 6
bbc
Take the vaccine, recent evidence suggests it not only protects you, but others as well. It's would be selfish not to.
47
37p
03/02/2021 11:54:47 3 3
bbc
That makes little sense saying people are selfish.

If you've had the vaccine you're less likely to catch covid and now less likely to pass it on.
If you haven't had the vaccine you're taking a risk for yourself as those vaccinated won't be affected if they catch it again and are unlikely to pass it on.

So who are you protecting if you opt out? Only those that are willing to take the risk?
55
03/02/2021 12:21:28 7 1
bbc
Just a thought. Those who don't take the vaccine and who may catch and pass on Covid to others who haven't taken the vaccine provide a platform for further mutations as a result of that 'transfer'. Some mutations may be less virulent; others may evade the protection offered by the current vaccines.
43
03/02/2021 11:46:19 3 1
bbc
The Biobank study has only appeared as Bulletins on their website. It has not been published in BMJ or Lancet. The Covid-19 reinfection tracker site has logged 39 cases of cov-19 reinfection, the mean time interval between infections was 3 months so I would not believe this study until it gets peer reviewed.
48
03/02/2021 11:54:56 1 0
bbc
To update the cov-19 reinfection tracker website has now 47 cases of reinfection logged with a mean interval between infections of 84 days (12 weeks) which is less than the Biobank finding.
15
03/02/2021 10:46:33 16 5
bbc
The media incited public opinion to the extent that the herd immunity case was a politically impossible option for the Government.

Right or wrong, crippling the economy was the only viable solution left to it.
49
37p
03/02/2021 11:56:13 9 1
bbc
Sad that the media have so much influence and report so much unproven opinion.
118
03/02/2021 16:42:35 0 0
bbc
When medical experts such as David Lammy are telling us the vaccine is safe what else is there to disbelieve?
50
03/02/2021 11:56:16 2 1
bbc
If you don’t have top three symptoms, you can’t get a test, you hit red tape, even if a close contact tests positive
People want to do the right thing and can’t
Because track and trace won’t adapt the boxes that need ticking, enabling mutations, undermining its own reason to exist
I hope the vaccine works, because track and trace doesn’t, and there within is the problem
51
37p
03/02/2021 11:59:18 3 2
bbc
That's the problem with the vast numbers we have.
It would be great if everyone gets tested regularly and the results used to isolate and vaccinate. There are just too many to do this and it's difficult to see what other approach could have been taken
50
03/02/2021 11:56:16 2 1
bbc
If you don’t have top three symptoms, you can’t get a test, you hit red tape, even if a close contact tests positive
People want to do the right thing and can’t
Because track and trace won’t adapt the boxes that need ticking, enabling mutations, undermining its own reason to exist
I hope the vaccine works, because track and trace doesn’t, and there within is the problem
51
37p
03/02/2021 11:59:18 3 2
bbc
That's the problem with the vast numbers we have.
It would be great if everyone gets tested regularly and the results used to isolate and vaccinate. There are just too many to do this and it's difficult to see what other approach could have been taken
52
03/02/2021 12:04:17 0 1
bbc
PCR test does not prove infectivity. It only detects viral RNA. A positive PCR result could be it detecting RNA from live virus (Sars-cov-2) OR it could be detecting residual RNA fragments from a previous infection, in which someone has had Cov-19 and recovered and is no longer infectious. In order to distinguish between these you need simultaneous viral cultures to isolate live virus.
53
03/02/2021 12:05:29 0 5
bbc
If the virus is natural phenomenon why would it behave any different to the other virus, why the over precaution taken
65
03/02/2021 12:23:26 3 0
bbc
No idea. maybe it's killing people ?
You'd have to trawl the news for that . . .
54
03/02/2021 12:08:14 23 0
bbc
Dodo Harding says no one could predict that the virus would mutate. That`s simply not true. Scientists were talking about 2nd wave variants from the start. All viruses mutate.
66
03/02/2021 12:46:39 9 1
bbc
Track and Trace is a very difficult task - for instance, a significant number lie about their contacts. But she isn't the right person to head it and she isn't doing a very good job.
Contrast with Kate Bingham. All the necessary technical skills and left alone to get on with it.
47
37p
03/02/2021 11:54:47 3 3
bbc
That makes little sense saying people are selfish.

If you've had the vaccine you're less likely to catch covid and now less likely to pass it on.
If you haven't had the vaccine you're taking a risk for yourself as those vaccinated won't be affected if they catch it again and are unlikely to pass it on.

So who are you protecting if you opt out? Only those that are willing to take the risk?
55
03/02/2021 12:21:28 7 1
bbc
Just a thought. Those who don't take the vaccine and who may catch and pass on Covid to others who haven't taken the vaccine provide a platform for further mutations as a result of that 'transfer'. Some mutations may be less virulent; others may evade the protection offered by the current vaccines.
85
37p
03/02/2021 13:22:38 1 4
bbc
Even if you're vaccinated you can catch the virus. So mutations are likely anyway so I'm not sure what you're saying means very much or has much more risk for non-vaccinated people.
56
03/02/2021 12:24:03 6 0
bbc
Once we we are vaccinated the issue will plummet in this country and we can help others even more. The Spanish flu hung around for about 3 years Globally then vanished/burned itself out so stay positive as the white coats will get us through this.
70
03/02/2021 12:52:29 0 0
bbc
Hope so but it needs each and every country that gets a handle on the virus to close its borders until all other countries also do so - and sure, we can and should help with that when we can.
131
03/02/2021 22:42:47 0 0
bbc
Not quite true. The H1N1 virus that caused the "Spanish Flu" is still around. Those of us who get the Flu vaccine every year, and do a little research, know that it is one of the 3, possibly 4, strains of Flu included in the annual vaccine.
As for Spanish Flu, it actually originated in Kansas but, because of WW!, Spain was the only European country commenting on the outbreak, hence its misnomer.
57
03/02/2021 12:26:59 1 1
bbc
Jus because antibodies were discovered isn’t a reason not to get vaccinated. If we were in the same position as other countries maybe but just this once we are well ahead of most. Please let’s just have the jab and try to get this done as quickly and efficiently as possible. We are then in a better position to help others.
77
03/02/2021 13:01:26 0 0
bbc
Scientists have stated that Pfizer BioNTech vaccine gives less protection (approx 52% efficacy) after the first jab. It is only after the second jab that efficacy rises to 92%.
58
03/02/2021 12:19:46 2 9
bbc
Good.

Conservatives vote down protections for NHS in trade deals on deadliest day in pandemic.

https://www.thelondoneconomic.com/politics/tories-vote-down-protections-for-nhs-in-trade-deals-on-deadliest-day-in-pandemic/19/01/

First act in Pandemic - repay party-donors at cost of public lives and billions.
108
03/02/2021 15:20:46 0 0
bbc
The Guardian is this way -> https://www.theguardian.com/uk
37
03/02/2021 11:36:59 6 29
bbc
It's selfish (and unethical) to expect others to undergo medical treatment for YOUR benefit!
59
03/02/2021 12:20:46 8 2
bbc
Just keep your unvaccinated distance.
3
03/02/2021 10:27:50 11 3
bbc
For once UK decision making seems to be ahead of the curve.
60
03/02/2021 12:21:10 0 7
bbc
? How ?
37
03/02/2021 11:36:59 6 29
bbc
It's selfish (and unethical) to expect others to undergo medical treatment for YOUR benefit!
61
03/02/2021 12:31:53 6 1
bbc
If you don't have it then either keep your self quarantined and get tested if you want to mingle with others, or carry a bell around and ring it saying 'unclean unclean' as you go.
62
03/02/2021 12:31:56 4 2
bbc
Not advocating herd immunity through infection. But I wonder how many people are immune following the second wave? Added to those vaccinated will we hit a magic number for herd immunity before the summer?
74
03/02/2021 12:59:37 3 0
bbc
It is a fair point, the media never tells us clearly how many people have recovered and what effect that has on immunity. Maybe out of fear many of those would not get vaccinated then?
37
03/02/2021 11:36:59 6 29
bbc
It's selfish (and unethical) to expect others to undergo medical treatment for YOUR benefit!
63
03/02/2021 12:32:33 9 1
bbc
Oh dear, ignore this nonsense. I'm happily vaccinated against a host of horrible diseases for the good of my own health and that of others.
86
37p
03/02/2021 13:23:31 1 4
bbc
I'm very pleased for you.

I'll take your advice and ignore your nonsense.
64
bbc
Removed
53
03/02/2021 12:05:29 0 5
bbc
If the virus is natural phenomenon why would it behave any different to the other virus, why the over precaution taken
65
03/02/2021 12:23:26 3 0
bbc
No idea. maybe it's killing people ?
You'd have to trawl the news for that . . .
54
03/02/2021 12:08:14 23 0
bbc
Dodo Harding says no one could predict that the virus would mutate. That`s simply not true. Scientists were talking about 2nd wave variants from the start. All viruses mutate.
66
03/02/2021 12:46:39 9 1
bbc
Track and Trace is a very difficult task - for instance, a significant number lie about their contacts. But she isn't the right person to head it and she isn't doing a very good job.
Contrast with Kate Bingham. All the necessary technical skills and left alone to get on with it.
45
03/02/2021 11:48:06 1 7
bbc
GPs should pre test for natural immunity prior to vaccination, it may be some folk may be vaccinated needlessly adding additional costs to NHS unnecessarily , pre testing for immunity could avoid vaccine overspend.
67
03/02/2021 12:47:08 4 0
bbc
And rack up extra cost and consume extra time by pre-testing.......
68
03/02/2021 12:51:14 1 4
bbc
Even when all are vaccinated here we must keep our borders shut until the rest of the world (particularly Europe) also has been vaccinated.

The virus was brought to us that way, lest we forget. The Isle of Man, now as good as virus free, still has its borders closed.
88
03/02/2021 13:25:39 0 0
bbc
I don't think you realise the costs of that.

Travel and tourism is worth 214bn per annum. 40% of UK exports travel out of the country on passenger aircraft from LHR. In fact, cargo costs have already increased 5 or 6 times because of the reduced capacity.

Think how long it's going to take to wait for Burkina Faso or Somalia to get in gear. Better to establish corridors with proper testing.
89
37p
03/02/2021 13:26:25 0 0
bbc
It's curious that there are parts of England and Scotland that are virtually free of the virus (have a look at the map on coronavirus.data.gov.uk) without having borders. I wonder why?
113
03/02/2021 15:27:56 0 0
bbc
That would be around 2023 then
69
03/02/2021 12:51:42 2 0
bbc
Scientists have stated that Pfizer BioNTech vaccine gives less protection (approx 52% efficacy) after the first jab. It is only after the second jab that efficacy rises to 92%.
71
03/02/2021 12:55:40 3 1
bbc
But almost the opposite for the AZ vaccine, now said to give 76% protection on the first shot, 82% or so on the second. Also great news, that is reduces transmission by 67%.

For both the issue is new variants. Hence why it is increasingly absurd we keep our borders open in any way, shape or form as doing so already puts pressure on vaccines, many of which have now been given out.
81
03/02/2021 13:10:25 0 0
bbc
Other scientists reach a different conclusion. Pfizer always had a 2-dose strategy, but if you deduct the 15-21 days for the first jab to build up immunity the efficacy is around 90%.
112
03/02/2021 15:27:27 0 0
bbc
And the Germans and French want to give it to their older people. What have they got against people over 65? Thank heavens your not 66 and living in France.
56
03/02/2021 12:24:03 6 0
bbc
Once we we are vaccinated the issue will plummet in this country and we can help others even more. The Spanish flu hung around for about 3 years Globally then vanished/burned itself out so stay positive as the white coats will get us through this.
70
03/02/2021 12:52:29 0 0
bbc
Hope so but it needs each and every country that gets a handle on the virus to close its borders until all other countries also do so - and sure, we can and should help with that when we can.
69
03/02/2021 12:51:42 2 0
bbc
Scientists have stated that Pfizer BioNTech vaccine gives less protection (approx 52% efficacy) after the first jab. It is only after the second jab that efficacy rises to 92%.
71
03/02/2021 12:55:40 3 1
bbc
But almost the opposite for the AZ vaccine, now said to give 76% protection on the first shot, 82% or so on the second. Also great news, that is reduces transmission by 67%.

For both the issue is new variants. Hence why it is increasingly absurd we keep our borders open in any way, shape or form as doing so already puts pressure on vaccines, many of which have now been given out.
75
03/02/2021 13:00:23 1 1
bbc
So you are advocating continuing incarceration of the UK population at home until everyone has had 2 jabs of any vaccine.
9
03/02/2021 10:35:49 7 7
bbc
In the ENTIRE WORLD there have literally only been a handful of verified reinfections: mostly immunocompromised people. This represents ABSOLUTELY OVERWHELMING EVIDENCE that almost everyone, including the asymptomatic, who recovers from covid-19 DOES have long term immunity. They can no longer catch or spread covid, and they certainly don't need vaccination.

Why try so hard to hide these FACTS?
72
03/02/2021 12:55:40 2 0
bbc
What's your point? Most people have never been infected so are still at risk and it is far far cheaper to give everyone the vaccine than to fart about with tests which are not outstandingly accurate.
73
03/02/2021 12:50:45 6 4
bbc
Gingineer
12:31
Not advocating herd immunity through infection.

Why? It's worked OK for a million years. This isn't the first virus we've had to deal with.
78
03/02/2021 13:01:50 1 1
bbc
Why does this keep having to be explain to people?
79
03/02/2021 13:04:14 2 2
bbc
Why, because 100,000s will die if you rely on immunity by infection

Otherwise it would be seasonal flu and we wouldn't be locked down

However some immunity from infection, and most from vaccination will result in herd immunity at some point…

…Until further mutations arise
62
03/02/2021 12:31:56 4 2
bbc
Not advocating herd immunity through infection. But I wonder how many people are immune following the second wave? Added to those vaccinated will we hit a magic number for herd immunity before the summer?
74
03/02/2021 12:59:37 3 0
bbc
It is a fair point, the media never tells us clearly how many people have recovered and what effect that has on immunity. Maybe out of fear many of those would not get vaccinated then?
71
03/02/2021 12:55:40 3 1
bbc
But almost the opposite for the AZ vaccine, now said to give 76% protection on the first shot, 82% or so on the second. Also great news, that is reduces transmission by 67%.

For both the issue is new variants. Hence why it is increasingly absurd we keep our borders open in any way, shape or form as doing so already puts pressure on vaccines, many of which have now been given out.
75
03/02/2021 13:00:23 1 1
bbc
So you are advocating continuing incarceration of the UK population at home until everyone has had 2 jabs of any vaccine.
80
03/02/2021 13:08:17 2 1
bbc
Sadly yes. Works on the principle we have one long, heavy and true lockdown to endless lockdowns anyhow.

Why would you want to go to a largely unvaccinated country right now anyhow? You can if you want to but then yes, quarantine when back is my suggestion.
33
03/02/2021 11:27:06 3 3
bbc
Should the government move anyone who has tested positive to covid to the back of the queue for the vaccine - only vaccine those that have not tested positive first then vaccinate the people who have tested positive?
How many people have tested positive in the country and who now have immunity?
Lets only vaccinate those that have not tested positive.
76
03/02/2021 13:01:13 1 0
bbc
3.8m positive cases according to Worldometers data, although that goes back to the start of the pandemic, so immunity may have 'expired' for some. But it's an interesting suggestion and would contribute to a more targeted approach aimed at those with no protection. Some of the non-vaccinated population will have had the virus asymptomatically, but sounds like a good strategy to help prioritise.
57
03/02/2021 12:26:59 1 1
bbc
Jus because antibodies were discovered isn’t a reason not to get vaccinated. If we were in the same position as other countries maybe but just this once we are well ahead of most. Please let’s just have the jab and try to get this done as quickly and efficiently as possible. We are then in a better position to help others.
77
03/02/2021 13:01:26 0 0
bbc
Scientists have stated that Pfizer BioNTech vaccine gives less protection (approx 52% efficacy) after the first jab. It is only after the second jab that efficacy rises to 92%.
73
03/02/2021 12:50:45 6 4
bbc
Gingineer
12:31
Not advocating herd immunity through infection.

Why? It's worked OK for a million years. This isn't the first virus we've had to deal with.
78
03/02/2021 13:01:50 1 1
bbc
Why does this keep having to be explain to people?
73
03/02/2021 12:50:45 6 4
bbc
Gingineer
12:31
Not advocating herd immunity through infection.

Why? It's worked OK for a million years. This isn't the first virus we've had to deal with.
79
03/02/2021 13:04:14 2 2
bbc
Why, because 100,000s will die if you rely on immunity by infection

Otherwise it would be seasonal flu and we wouldn't be locked down

However some immunity from infection, and most from vaccination will result in herd immunity at some point…

…Until further mutations arise
90
03/02/2021 13:30:33 2 1
bbc
over 600,000 die from seasonal flu each year ... and that's after many at risk groups have had the flu jab
75
03/02/2021 13:00:23 1 1
bbc
So you are advocating continuing incarceration of the UK population at home until everyone has had 2 jabs of any vaccine.
80
03/02/2021 13:08:17 2 1
bbc
Sadly yes. Works on the principle we have one long, heavy and true lockdown to endless lockdowns anyhow.

Why would you want to go to a largely unvaccinated country right now anyhow? You can if you want to but then yes, quarantine when back is my suggestion.
69
03/02/2021 12:51:42 2 0
bbc
Scientists have stated that Pfizer BioNTech vaccine gives less protection (approx 52% efficacy) after the first jab. It is only after the second jab that efficacy rises to 92%.
81
03/02/2021 13:10:25 0 0
bbc
Other scientists reach a different conclusion. Pfizer always had a 2-dose strategy, but if you deduct the 15-21 days for the first jab to build up immunity the efficacy is around 90%.
82
03/02/2021 13:16:08 2 1
bbc
But does this really matter given that Manaus, Brazil is suffering another wave of infections having already had up to 70% of their population infected?

Should that concern us, or is their situation more of a poverty/health infrastructure issue?
96
You
03/02/2021 13:49:56 0 1
bbc
I read some stuff from a virus scientist that the South Africa/Brazil variant may have adapted to more easily reinfect those who have already had the virus. South Africa also has a high % who have already had the virus and this would explain the prevalence of the current SA variant. It's not prevalent here because less than 15% have had Covid. But it'll come.
83
03/02/2021 13:12:01 1 1
bbc
Didn't know our Healthcare was a charity - clap OFF.
15
03/02/2021 10:46:33 16 5
bbc
The media incited public opinion to the extent that the herd immunity case was a politically impossible option for the Government.

Right or wrong, crippling the economy was the only viable solution left to it.
84
03/02/2021 13:19:49 1 0
bbc
It's what the media do.
That's why we can't have a sensible drug policy, for instance, or a rational discussion about the best way to run the NHS.
55
03/02/2021 12:21:28 7 1
bbc
Just a thought. Those who don't take the vaccine and who may catch and pass on Covid to others who haven't taken the vaccine provide a platform for further mutations as a result of that 'transfer'. Some mutations may be less virulent; others may evade the protection offered by the current vaccines.
85
37p
03/02/2021 13:22:38 1 4
bbc
Even if you're vaccinated you can catch the virus. So mutations are likely anyway so I'm not sure what you're saying means very much or has much more risk for non-vaccinated people.
63
03/02/2021 12:32:33 9 1
bbc
Oh dear, ignore this nonsense. I'm happily vaccinated against a host of horrible diseases for the good of my own health and that of others.
86
37p
03/02/2021 13:23:31 1 4
bbc
I'm very pleased for you.

I'll take your advice and ignore your nonsense.
32
03/02/2021 11:24:40 6 1
bbc
At least 6 months, reading reports natural immunity could least years, good news for people that have had covid.
87
03/02/2021 13:23:42 1 0
bbc
Natural immunity lasts a lifetime. Antibodies wane but the more lethal T-cells and the B-cells that generate Abs don't forget so easily. This is why we should be looking at vaccines that create high levels of these cellular responses, not just high amounts of Abs.
68
03/02/2021 12:51:14 1 4
bbc
Even when all are vaccinated here we must keep our borders shut until the rest of the world (particularly Europe) also has been vaccinated.

The virus was brought to us that way, lest we forget. The Isle of Man, now as good as virus free, still has its borders closed.
88
03/02/2021 13:25:39 0 0
bbc
I don't think you realise the costs of that.

Travel and tourism is worth 214bn per annum. 40% of UK exports travel out of the country on passenger aircraft from LHR. In fact, cargo costs have already increased 5 or 6 times because of the reduced capacity.

Think how long it's going to take to wait for Burkina Faso or Somalia to get in gear. Better to establish corridors with proper testing.
68
03/02/2021 12:51:14 1 4
bbc
Even when all are vaccinated here we must keep our borders shut until the rest of the world (particularly Europe) also has been vaccinated.

The virus was brought to us that way, lest we forget. The Isle of Man, now as good as virus free, still has its borders closed.
89
37p
03/02/2021 13:26:25 0 0
bbc
It's curious that there are parts of England and Scotland that are virtually free of the virus (have a look at the map on coronavirus.data.gov.uk) without having borders. I wonder why?
94
03/02/2021 13:32:50 1 2
bbc
It's because they have a lower proportion of selfish imbeciles who think it's fun to spread it about.
79
03/02/2021 13:04:14 2 2
bbc
Why, because 100,000s will die if you rely on immunity by infection

Otherwise it would be seasonal flu and we wouldn't be locked down

However some immunity from infection, and most from vaccination will result in herd immunity at some point…

…Until further mutations arise
90
03/02/2021 13:30:33 2 1
bbc
over 600,000 die from seasonal flu each year ... and that's after many at risk groups have had the flu jab
13
03/02/2021 10:44:06 13 3
bbc
"At least," Careful now, you're almost making a case for some herd immunity.
91
03/02/2021 13:32:13 2 2
bbc
Herd immunity to an RNA virus that is constantly mutating isn't a thing... think influenza and the common cold.

The countries who have most successfully tackled CV19 have had a "Zero Covid" strategy. Vaccination has, to-date, played no part in that strategy. Those countries have been able to return to normality and have had a lesser hit to their economy, despite lockdowns.
127
03/02/2021 21:28:23 4 1
bbc
So New Zealand and Australia just have to keep their borders closed for ever?
92
03/02/2021 13:32:30 2 2
bbc
Herd immunity to an RNA virus that is constantly mutating isn't a thing... think influenza and the common cold.

The countries who have most successfully tackled CV19 have had a "Zero Covid" strategy. Vaccination has, to-date, played no part in that strategy. Those countries have been able to return to normality and have had a lesser hit to their economy, despite lockdowns.
15
03/02/2021 10:46:33 16 5
bbc
The media incited public opinion to the extent that the herd immunity case was a politically impossible option for the Government.

Right or wrong, crippling the economy was the only viable solution left to it.
93
03/02/2021 13:32:43 2 0
bbc
This about sums up Covid policy discourse.

"I think we should consider exiting this cycle of lockdowns and accepting that deaths will occur. I'm staring at bankruptcy. I can't even find menial jobs because they're flooded with professionals who have already been made redundant. I've had to sell my car, put the house on the market and look at new schools."

yOu wAnT mY gRaN tO dIe YoU pSyChO!!!
104
37p
03/02/2021 14:02:43 2 0
bbc
I think you've just shown that the original post is correct with your final emotional statement that adds little to the discussion nor does it help to get a consensus.
89
37p
03/02/2021 13:26:25 0 0
bbc
It's curious that there are parts of England and Scotland that are virtually free of the virus (have a look at the map on coronavirus.data.gov.uk) without having borders. I wonder why?
94
03/02/2021 13:32:50 1 2
bbc
It's because they have a lower proportion of selfish imbeciles who think it's fun to spread it about.
98
37p
03/02/2021 13:52:08 1 0
bbc
So you think people deliberately spread the virus?

I think there might be a different explanation
95
You
03/02/2021 13:47:29 1 0
bbc
It may be the case the South African variant thrives in populations who have already had the virus indicating it has a superior ability to reinfect people. The UK hasn't had that many people who have had Covid so we're some months away from being in the scenario where the SA variant could cause some havoc.
82
03/02/2021 13:16:08 2 1
bbc
But does this really matter given that Manaus, Brazil is suffering another wave of infections having already had up to 70% of their population infected?

Should that concern us, or is their situation more of a poverty/health infrastructure issue?
96
You
03/02/2021 13:49:56 0 1
bbc
I read some stuff from a virus scientist that the South Africa/Brazil variant may have adapted to more easily reinfect those who have already had the virus. South Africa also has a high % who have already had the virus and this would explain the prevalence of the current SA variant. It's not prevalent here because less than 15% have had Covid. But it'll come.
110
03/02/2021 15:23:36 2 0
bbc
That’s a cheerful thought.
97
03/02/2021 13:50:26 1 6
bbc
The UK government has totally failed to control Cov-19 because it did not have a proper pandemic plan in place, nor local supplies of PPE and failed the basic requirement of Public Health ie containment. The Isle of Man imprisons folk who break lockdown etc they have managed to get rid of it. Close airports/ports to passengers should have been done last March. Vaccines alone will not fix cov-19.
102
03/02/2021 13:56:59 0 5
bbc
Agreed. Also selfish people who can't accept the seriousness of the situation. They reel off the same old tripe about, flu numbers, death certificates, masks makes us a police state, Jeremy Corbyn and so on.
94
03/02/2021 13:32:50 1 2
bbc
It's because they have a lower proportion of selfish imbeciles who think it's fun to spread it about.
98
37p
03/02/2021 13:52:08 1 0
bbc
So you think people deliberately spread the virus?

I think there might be a different explanation
99
03/02/2021 13:54:25 3 3
bbc
I have received many medicines and vaccines in the past, all had full regulatory approval and were on the market for years/decades, with proven efficacy and known adverse reactions. These novel cov-19 vaccines only have temporary emergency approval for 1 year, they have no previous regulatory approval history, their efficacy is unproven, adverse reactions are unknown.
111
03/02/2021 15:25:25 1 0
bbc
Are you unsure as to whether you should trust it?
45
03/02/2021 11:48:06 1 7
bbc
GPs should pre test for natural immunity prior to vaccination, it may be some folk may be vaccinated needlessly adding additional costs to NHS unnecessarily , pre testing for immunity could avoid vaccine overspend.
100
37p
03/02/2021 13:54:39 0 0
bbc
I wonder if it's cheaper to vaccinate rather than testing first? I don't now the costs but usually the expense is in the organisation not the product.