Lost school time 'could cost pupils £40,000 in earnings'
01/02/2021 | news | education | 1,030
Institute for Fiscal Studies warns the "long-run costs" of the pandemic will hit children disproportionately.
1
01/02/2021 10:01:20 263 33
bbc
May, could, might, perhaps...etc. Please report news, not speculation.
33
01/02/2021 10:09:39 97 34
bbc
Despite the uncertainty they’re sure the poorest will suffer the most?

Surely the poorest wouldn’t be earning anyway - so won’t be any worse off?
83
Bob
01/02/2021 10:20:30 11 3
bbc
Ultimately this has been proven before. Here is just one example. http://barrett.dyson.cornell.edu/NEUDC/paper_179.pdf

And it is not just monetary effects either. Health as well.
188
01/02/2021 10:39:12 7 7
bbc
If you don't want speculation, perhaps news websites aren't for you. News, but it's nature, it largely speculation.
219
01/02/2021 10:42:20 16 4
bbc
I'll chuck a few more "coulds" into the equation - it could make children more self dependent, it could make parents more supportive, not falling back on "it is the school's job" all the time and it could recognised when exam time comes around with adjustments in the grading. We could also find a single parent somewhere who says "my kids have flourished during lockdown" but that's not news.
507
01/02/2021 11:31:22 3 1
bbc
This is the BBC. No news, just speculation.

Have you noticed how half the news headlines on here end with a question mark Facts are followed by a full stop.
649
01/02/2021 12:01:20 2 2
bbc
You are talking about verifiable facts which takes a longer time in most cases .

That isn't possible in the vast majority of News stories by its very nature. ie its News.

It would be somewhat pointless to have a headline then ' can you hang on a bit for the story while we check it out'.

As long as its qualified in the article its fine and lo and behold it is
697
01/02/2021 12:10:35 2 0
bbc
Someone has produced this and you're asking for it not to be reported. You don't believe in a free press? As this is talking about the future, then of course it is "may, could, might" - you can't say with certainty what will happen in the future. The point of this is to try to plan for a better outcome.
701
01/02/2021 12:10:38 2 1
bbc
" the Institute for Fiscal Studies said"

They reported on what someone said, that's not speculation, it happened.
889
01/02/2021 14:20:59 0 1
bbc
The News:

Some people did some thinking and produced some findings, predictions, and an assessment of the impact. As it refers to the future, it is not a historical fact yet.

Please troll elsewhere.
02/02/2021 10:00:12 0 0
bbc
Personally I would say 40k is a bit light
I'd say that an income loss of only 1k pa would be a let off- I lost far more than that after just 2008
Obviously you don't think it is worth a discussion, presumably as one of the I'm-all -right-jack richest pensioners ever, but you might want to talk to your kids......
2
01/02/2021 10:01:44 7 6
bbc
I'm not sure that figure is correct, but estimating is always challenging.

If correct though it highlights that kids should really just repeat a year as 1 year of lost earnings would on average be less than 40,000 (would it not)
30
01/02/2021 10:09:21 3 1
bbc
Not sure its worth the payback. The £40k is over 45 years of working
3
01/02/2021 10:01:45 64 13
bbc
kids in households , where parents don't care , will have just had 6 months off school. They will never make it up.
239
01/02/2021 10:46:24 27 7
bbc
And therein lies the problem that will never go away - parents who are unable, for whatever reason, to parent their children properly. Money should be invested on those who genuinely deserve the support, and this means sorting out the line used to describe ‘poverty’ - those on free school meals who cannot be a*sed to pick stuff up from school and go to McDonalds because it’s easier don’t count!
289
01/02/2021 10:54:59 6 2
bbc
Kids in households where both parents work?
494
01/02/2021 11:32:09 4 2
bbc
Depends. If the teachers had already done a decent job of exciting interest the may have watched the royal institution educational videos and tried experiments and be far ahead of where school would get them. My daughter is that's for sure. An 8 year old who can explain solid liquid gas, hydraulics, how a rocket works demo them and a number of other things, nothing would have happened at schiol
918
01/02/2021 14:53:16 2 1
bbc
A year off. Maybe longer.

Whether the parents care or not is not quite right. We can care all we like, but cannot replace a decent education, partly because we are not skilled, trained, and do not have access to educational resources. That's why we need teachers and schools.
4
01/02/2021 10:02:05 10 4
bbc
The way to tackle that is investment to promote growth, give more and better opportunities to develop skills and provide better opportunities earlier in their careers.
112
01/02/2021 10:25:22 5 0
bbc
Endless growth is not possible; nor is it sustainable. The way to tackle things is to stop assigning arbitrary, invented monetary values to everything and think about the wider picture.
5
01/02/2021 10:02:13 48 10
bbc
"A report suggests ..." What a load of speculative aged shoe repairers.
02/02/2021 11:54:55 0 0
bbc
Shoe makers and repairers were a valued part of society, until cheap imports killed off most of the shoe industry in this country.
6
01/02/2021 10:02:37 13 2
bbc
We are all about that much in debt.

£2trn / population is about £38,000 each.
342
01/02/2021 11:05:04 3 2
bbc
Your figure, while probably correct, shows the utter uselessness of "statistics."
Neither my wife nor I owe anyone any money at all, for instance, so statistically out there is someone who owes £104,000 - their own £38 K and "ours"!

Like so many "facts", figures and percentages, the only response that can properly be applied is "Yes, so you say, but so what?"
7
01/02/2021 10:03:09 11 6
bbc
Better than being dead maybe dunno close call.
19
01/02/2021 10:06:35 5 5
bbc
You are aware everyone dies eventually ("nothing is certain but death and taxes")?
8
01/02/2021 10:03:10 66 11
bbc
Pure guesswork. Nobody knows what the effects will be.
869
Jim
01/02/2021 13:39:22 7 0
bbc
Either the reporting is very poor or the report was written using ridiculous extrapolations that just wouldn't apply in the real world.
922
01/02/2021 14:56:50 0 2
bbc
Yes they do. That's why they wrote a report.
9
01/02/2021 10:03:28 9 4
bbc
Impossible to quantify. I don't actually envisage much jobs will be around for the particularly young children when they leave school.

We'll be up to our waist in Black Mirror territory by then.
10
01/02/2021 10:03:43 11 5
bbc
On line teaching is a fantasy that needs to be called out now

Schools are providing lessons where all the pupils are blanked screens because this is a "safeguarding" issue

Apparently unions are not happy that teachers might see something that is "reportable" going on the background and teachers aren't responsible for that

What really happens is no pupils are "present" just logged on
35
01/02/2021 10:09:53 3 3
bbc
Add to that, sending emails at 7pm to inform of on line lessons the next day, and yes most are recorded or 1 way download type, so very little interaction - it's sort of semi live lessons. Not blaming the teachers as I know they are trying hard, but between poor home equipment/safeguarding/school IT capability and classroom teaching the 40% still going..on line is very much a stop gap at best!
11
01/02/2021 10:03:46 19 13
bbc
Any effects are likely to be concentrated among children from disadvantaged backgrounds, the Institute for Fiscal Studies said.

Who, as reported by the BBC are mainly white males.
21
01/02/2021 10:06:58 10 15
bbc
And what does race or colour have to do with it , Take it you not for a poor northern town where their is shedload of poor white people.
12
01/02/2021 10:04:28 5 2
bbc
Comfort worried about "teacher burnout" Hmm
13
bbc
BBC....what a joke! No HYS on the EU vaccine debacle or Article 16 re NI.

Your pro EU stance has never been so apparent!
Removed
28
01/02/2021 10:08:48 17 25
bbc
Not always a defender of the BBC but HYS was open on this for much of the weekend.

Indeed BBC and especially Katie Adler have been more than forthright on EU difficulties with this.
32
01/02/2021 10:09:39 4 27
bbc
yes, need to discus. Problem with Boris ordering 20 doses for each of the population so as to exclude the rest of the world... Dictator
124
01/02/2021 10:27:39 4 2
bbc
The only rhetoric you're ever going to see in political news on here, from now until god knows when, is UK vs EU. I thought we were all meant to 'get over it'?
141
01/02/2021 10:32:48 4 2
bbc
Headline the other week was M&S difficulties with ‘percy pigs’ due to Brexit. Can’t make it up.
181
01/02/2021 10:35:35 3 1
bbc
puhleeeeeeeeeeeez get your facts right! HYS on this at the weekend
200
01/02/2021 10:40:29 3 0
bbc
Just because you didn't see something doesn't mean it didn't happen.

It was on last week & over the weekend. Literally you could have commented in the last 24hrs.
14
01/02/2021 10:05:24 49 12
bbc
"Could." So it might, or it might not and lets be honest it's impossible to know without a crystal ball. Still, nice one for the BBC on a Monday morning.
15
01/02/2021 10:05:44 383 49
bbc
The war time generation lost much of their schooling for 5 years. Somehow they succeeded in producing the industrialists, scientists and professionals that our society thrived on in the 1950s and 1960s. Fighting for what you want in life can be very character building. Ask Captain Tom.
R
Comment posted by Ready, today at 10:12Ready
10:12
The bigger problem is that mass, uncontrolled immigration is costing UK workers £100,000s over their lifetimes!

How about a discussion on that?
Removed
157
01/02/2021 10:32:52 38 33
bbc
Don't use Cap'n Tom as an example which suggests the poor are largely responsible for their own poverty (offensive) the roots of the problems lie in underinvestment of young people via schools and apprenticeships and social mobility was great back in the Boomers' day (thank you Labour) now it's collapsed. The monies being stolen and stashed in the tax dens would be very welcome right now
161
01/02/2021 10:35:11 36 23
bbc
Genuinely saddens me that someone would use Captain Tom to try and get some keyboard-warrior point scoring on young people.

How do you know how he feels? You with him in hospital?
167
01/02/2021 10:36:25 44 6
bbc
Saying "Lost school time 'could cost pupils £40,000 in earnings'" is not helpful to anyone right now, since what is the viable alternative?

And saying that school-kids are not at risk from the virus misses the point too.

The point is that schools are long-proven super-spreaders of all manner of infections to the wider population; many of whom would die as a direct consequence of catching Covid.
292
01/02/2021 10:55:44 5 3
bbc
Ah yes, because something happened in the past we can ignore the present.
296
01/02/2021 10:56:11 11 4
bbc
Why do some idiots insist in comparing our woes to what happened in a war 8 decades ago? I seem to remember that the post war era witnessed a massive decline in our industry through the 60s and steadily continued. Far from thriving we were the "sick man of Europe" until we joined the EEC. Our biggest gains in education were in the early 2000s, but we need opportunities for an educated workforce.
304
01/02/2021 10:58:07 7 2
bbc
"A report suggests" it is so speculative it becomes worthless
402
01/02/2021 11:18:29 7 3
bbc
I would like to know who the hell comes up with all this bull shite.
511
01/02/2021 11:35:53 4 1
bbc
They were entering a new world that the West dominated

Reduced competition from pervious cohorts as many of them had been shot/blown to bits or they were suffering mental/physical injuries.

Also, where did all those success stories come from? The middle/upper middle class?

The modern equivalent kids will again be fine as they have been studying in their spare room, using their mac book pros.
16
01/02/2021 10:05:50 83 7
bbc
While this is a significant and valid issue, these vague 'reports' that attribute a pound value to the impact with little no to no justification are really little more than press releases designed to promote the bodies creating them.
34
01/02/2021 10:09:48 64 5
bbc
Additionally the number is presented in a way to shock. If they'd said £75 per month I'm not sure they'd have gotten the headline they were after. Any point they might have had is completely overshadowed by their disingenuous BS.
17
01/02/2021 10:06:21 27 12
bbc
Do you ever get the feeling that some "inequalities" are at least partially self-imposed?
170
01/02/2021 10:36:50 6 2
bbc
It's because it's so easy to hide behind excuses just like in this BBC "report".
Read this story from 100 years ago and you can see what can be done. This person was a woman and black. Neither of those "excuses" stopped her doing what she wanted to.
https://www.amightygirl.com/fly-high?fbclid=IwAR1kuX7PzK0xW41uOUWqdBiiiufrO3fZnb9OvAewxkYnoJXU8NAXniAbPxM
18
01/02/2021 10:06:33 116 11
bbc
£40,000 ?? Sign of the times. Some "expert", desperate for a few minutes of fame picks a number out of the air and jumps on the "let's milk" covid bandwagon.
238
jon
01/02/2021 10:46:23 24 14
bbc
Yep. All people and businesses are facing losses due to Covid. The government has done everything possible to prioritise education with teachers on full pay, while ignoring musicians, artists and others.
907
01/02/2021 14:46:24 0 2
bbc
Some poster, desparate for something to say, observer on the basis of nothing at all that the researchers just made it up on the spot.

Do you suppose they got a bonus for relating this to covid?
7
01/02/2021 10:03:09 11 6
bbc
Better than being dead maybe dunno close call.
19
01/02/2021 10:06:35 5 5
bbc
You are aware everyone dies eventually ("nothing is certain but death and taxes")?
20
01/02/2021 10:06:38 158 23
bbc
Here we go again, "could" and "a report suggests" another pointless story, get a grip BBC. At least they'll be alive to earn a wage, let me guess someone's bound to suggest we compensate them all with £40,000 when they leave school!
214
01/02/2021 10:41:55 39 65
bbc
Agreed. They should stick with more precise, definitive figures like the £350m pw the NHS will get from Brexit.
421
01/02/2021 11:21:16 5 1
bbc
Not sure how they can quantify anyway. It's more about quality of life, if you are not properly educated
898
01/02/2021 14:36:24 0 2
bbc
Your post is equally a "could" and "suggests", based on your "guess" that "someone" is "bound" to do something.

Guess + Unknown = Certainty?

Unknown number multiplied by unknown variable is 100% certain?

Here we go again.
990
01/02/2021 20:46:11 0 0
bbc
Yes, that would just about pay for 3 years in Uni and enough packet noodles to not starve while studying.
11
01/02/2021 10:03:46 19 13
bbc
Any effects are likely to be concentrated among children from disadvantaged backgrounds, the Institute for Fiscal Studies said.

Who, as reported by the BBC are mainly white males.
21
01/02/2021 10:06:58 10 15
bbc
And what does race or colour have to do with it , Take it you not for a poor northern town where their is shedload of poor white people.
949
01/02/2021 15:58:01 0 0
bbc
flpipmode just wanted to sneak some racism in there, as well as BBC bashing. Best not to try to talk with such types.
22
01/02/2021 10:07:15 159 16
bbc
How can you possibly give a figure like that? Inflation.... change of working practice over the next 50 years. Too many factors.
205
01/02/2021 10:40:51 23 62
bbc
You could read the study & find out.
23
01/02/2021 10:07:47 19 12
bbc
200 years ago the population of the UK was 10 million, now over 60 million - not every child can expect to have a well paid job - with so many on this tiny island a lot will have to accept they will never get a job.
24
01/02/2021 10:07:56 98 11
bbc
So that comes to £1,000 per year over a 40 year career. Hardly earth shattering.
113
01/02/2021 10:25:40 60 4
bbc
Much less than £1,000 per year after deduction of tax and national insurance of course
419
01/02/2021 11:21:04 9 1
bbc
BBC room and gloom and bull shite
645
01/02/2021 12:00:36 5 2
bbc
As the pension age keeps increasing, then most of those will be working closer to 50 years so only £800/year or £15/week.
913
01/02/2021 14:49:19 0 2
bbc
£20 a week. Will you cut your own income by £20 a week? Plenty of charities need your help now.

NB: Headline didn't say "Earth shattering event / report / prediction"
25
01/02/2021 10:08:10 15 7
bbc
So we're all ready blaming the next 2 decades of wage stagnation on a gap of education due to the pandemic, the BBC toting the establishment line cant wait for Goldman Sachs to take over Banker's Broadcasting Company.
26
01/02/2021 10:08:28 6 14
bbc
I'm sure it won't make much difference to the rich kids at Harrow and Eton. Their silver spoons will help. Shame the free laptops and a better tool out of high speed wifi promise was not kept.
27
01/02/2021 10:08:32 165 37
bbc
How do you do it BBC? You always mannage to grab the glass half empty don't you?

Instead of the good news of pupils spending more of their precious childhood with their parents which is something I sure they will look back with appreciation in the future, you monetize it and in a negative way.

Why? Why can you not report positively? Is your version of news always negative?
36
01/02/2021 10:10:00 124 19
bbc
Agreed. The BBC news is gratuitously morbid.
69
01/02/2021 10:17:51 17 16
bbc
Gosh yeah but, have you never read a newspaper- they sell those solely on the basis of how much joy they bring to our lives, no scandal, no backbiting no money grubbing foulness, don’t you find it refreshing the BBC takes a middle line instead of all that positivity from the papers
145
01/02/2021 10:33:12 8 10
bbc
What, exactly, is good about educational disruption? Please be specific. You're clearly not a parent of school aged children, or you would get this. It's not the government's fault, agreed, but it is anything but positive.
178
01/02/2021 10:34:09 14 11
bbc
Yeah but all the parents are doing is whining about the loss of free babysitting.
443
01/02/2021 11:25:04 5 4
bbc
Not to mention some parents teaching much more than the school would have.
505
01/02/2021 11:34:20 8 7
bbc
Oh do stop whining.

The BBC is just reporting on a study from the Institute of Fiscal Studies - like a number of other media are - it's not BBC research.

If you don't like it, don't read it.
716
01/02/2021 12:13:38 2 2
bbc
Because good news does not sell !
901
01/02/2021 14:40:32 0 2
bbc
"good news of pupils spending more of their precious childhood with their parents"

My son is at home, alone, while his parents are at work. He is unable to see anyone he knows at all. Friends, teachers, enemies, family, neighbours. This is worse than solitary confinement for him.

Did you imagine we took the year off work, that he is having a positive experience?
BBC....what a joke! No HYS on the EU vaccine debacle or Article 16 re NI.

Your pro EU stance has never been so apparent!
Removed
28
01/02/2021 10:08:48 17 25
bbc
Not always a defender of the BBC but HYS was open on this for much of the weekend.

Indeed BBC and especially Katie Adler have been more than forthright on EU difficulties with this.
55
01/02/2021 10:15:44 23 3
bbc
What site were you on? Certainly not the Beeb as there has been no HYS this weekend. If so..it would still be there to read...closed OR open!
29
01/02/2021 10:09:11 10 4
bbc
Distorting things based on incomplete data. The govt should say to schools we are adding an extra year (min 6 months) to every child’s education, the kids will hopefully get something back.
2
01/02/2021 10:01:44 7 6
bbc
I'm not sure that figure is correct, but estimating is always challenging.

If correct though it highlights that kids should really just repeat a year as 1 year of lost earnings would on average be less than 40,000 (would it not)
30
01/02/2021 10:09:21 3 1
bbc
Not sure its worth the payback. The £40k is over 45 years of working
31
01/02/2021 10:09:33 183 12
bbc
In 20 years time you will be hearing “I could have really done something with my life if it wasn’t for coronavirus when I was at school”. Your whole life is an opportunity to learn, I got my maths A-level as a mature student and my sister aged 60 gained a Doctorate from Open University.
180
01/02/2021 10:34:58 16 91
bbc
and how much did she earn from that?
250
01/02/2021 10:48:33 15 2
bbc
Yep, left school with no qualis
Took myself to Uni in my 30s and did my degree
328
01/02/2021 10:59:50 2 14
bbc
Well done now we know your username is appropriate
630
01/02/2021 11:56:54 10 0
bbc
B.Sc. as a mature student in my late 30s. Went on ti become a consultant. and I was useless at school.
Horses for courses.
711
01/02/2021 12:12:51 5 3
bbc
Yep the blame culture . Then they will start to sue the government for it . The big lesson in all of this is taking responsibility for your own learning and parents having to face their responsibilities as well instead of relying on the government to do everything
863
01/02/2021 13:33:12 6 1
bbc
Totally agree, worked as an Engineeer for 33 years until the bottom dropped out of it in the northwest, countless of companies closed. At age 50 decided to go to University, did a maths degree alongside QTS(Qualified Teacher Status) been teaching since 2102. If you want something you have got to put the effort in.
892
01/02/2021 14:25:56 1 3
bbc
DId you understand the article?

Miss a year of school = earn less. Less than if you didn't miss that year.

Unrelated: learning, other education, whatever anecdotal stuff
BBC....what a joke! No HYS on the EU vaccine debacle or Article 16 re NI.

Your pro EU stance has never been so apparent!
Removed
32
01/02/2021 10:09:39 4 27
bbc
yes, need to discus. Problem with Boris ordering 20 doses for each of the population so as to exclude the rest of the world... Dictator
93
01/02/2021 10:22:14 10 1
bbc
Any government's first duty is to protect its citizens and its territory. At last, Boris is doing just that. If we have sufficient vaccines for the entire population, and plenty in reserve, that is something GOOD at last.

It is not and never was the UK's job to look after every other damn country in the world. Long past time our politicians realised and accepted that.
1
01/02/2021 10:01:20 263 33
bbc
May, could, might, perhaps...etc. Please report news, not speculation.
33
01/02/2021 10:09:39 97 34
bbc
Despite the uncertainty they’re sure the poorest will suffer the most?

Surely the poorest wouldn’t be earning anyway - so won’t be any worse off?
179
01/02/2021 10:34:43 9 5
bbc
The poorest WILL be earning they will be doing the jobs no one else wants then they'll join the ONE MILLION and counting who need food banks to stay alive to the most part these people are the working poor
463
01/02/2021 11:27:05 4 1
bbc
The get money from the state. Bankrupt the state, and the poor starve.
16
01/02/2021 10:05:50 83 7
bbc
While this is a significant and valid issue, these vague 'reports' that attribute a pound value to the impact with little no to no justification are really little more than press releases designed to promote the bodies creating them.
34
01/02/2021 10:09:48 64 5
bbc
Additionally the number is presented in a way to shock. If they'd said £75 per month I'm not sure they'd have gotten the headline they were after. Any point they might have had is completely overshadowed by their disingenuous BS.
356
01/02/2021 11:09:39 3 2
bbc
Even £75 per month is on the high side with 50 yrs of work ahead of them. With only 1% inflation this reduces to £55 after 32 years and 2% inflation it reduces to £40. Not exactly a 'wow' story.
642
01/02/2021 11:59:19 1 1
bbc
Gotten? And BS? Are you per chance a Trumpist from over the pond?
10
01/02/2021 10:03:43 11 5
bbc
On line teaching is a fantasy that needs to be called out now

Schools are providing lessons where all the pupils are blanked screens because this is a "safeguarding" issue

Apparently unions are not happy that teachers might see something that is "reportable" going on the background and teachers aren't responsible for that

What really happens is no pupils are "present" just logged on
35
01/02/2021 10:09:53 3 3
bbc
Add to that, sending emails at 7pm to inform of on line lessons the next day, and yes most are recorded or 1 way download type, so very little interaction - it's sort of semi live lessons. Not blaming the teachers as I know they are trying hard, but between poor home equipment/safeguarding/school IT capability and classroom teaching the 40% still going..on line is very much a stop gap at best!
102
01/02/2021 10:24:06 3 0
bbc
Of course it is a stop-gap. What else happening in the country today is NOT a stop-gap? Things are not as they were - hadn't you noticed?
27
01/02/2021 10:08:32 165 37
bbc
How do you do it BBC? You always mannage to grab the glass half empty don't you?

Instead of the good news of pupils spending more of their precious childhood with their parents which is something I sure they will look back with appreciation in the future, you monetize it and in a negative way.

Why? Why can you not report positively? Is your version of news always negative?
36
01/02/2021 10:10:00 124 19
bbc
Agreed. The BBC news is gratuitously morbid.
37
01/02/2021 10:10:05 46 3
bbc
The ones who want to knuckle down and improve their grades, will. Others will use this whole thing as an excuse and try wing their way through.
926
01/02/2021 15:03:43 0 3
bbc
Please read article and make coherent comment, not write nonsense
38
01/02/2021 10:10:06 71 7
bbc
The IFS says its report contains an "illustration, rather than a precise prediction" of what could happen.

In other news, it may rain today, perhaps not.
436
01/02/2021 11:24:14 3 16
bbc
The BBC has provided the article as an illustration. It is not given as a fact. The 40k is very likely to be an average also. A hotel porter, for example, is never going to be on a salary that would 'lose' them that amount, but someone in management would be.
751
01/02/2021 12:18:37 2 1
bbc
Which is exactly what they're reporting....not sure what the issue is.
39
01/02/2021 10:10:19 256 11
bbc
This is one of the worst examples of attaching spurious monetary values that I've read. the headline is gratuitous as even the IFS say that it's a what 'could' happen and acknowledge the speculative nature of the problem. We actually have exactly zero evidence of the long-term impact of this bout of disrupted schooling. Catching up should be a priority but beyond that we simply don't know.
91
Bob
01/02/2021 10:22:02 33 119
bbc
Go read one of the countless papers on REAL data from REAL incidences where schooling was disrupted for a long time - here is one covering long-term strikes in Argentina. http://barrett.dyson.cornell.edu/NEUDC/paper_179.pdf

Lost learning never recovered. Loss of earnings results in poorer health and the need to vote Labour.
190
01/02/2021 10:39:28 8 9
bbc
Agreed. Almost as bad as £350 pw for the NHS
256
01/02/2021 10:49:23 5 11
bbc
Adults don't put children in harm's way; that is a well established evolutionary principle. Yet here we are at the first hint of real danger in living memory, and we're content to throw children under a bus.
349
01/02/2021 11:06:45 2 1
bbc
Sadly, it’s the world we now live in, everything is money orientated.
Just listen - really listen - to any of our government officials answering questions.
Every time they dodge the real question with an answer “we have invested £££££’s”, to deflect the issues.
Same today about education the answer, to reasonable questions about planning recovery for lost schooling was “we’ve invested £££’s”.
578
01/02/2021 11:47:22 4 1
bbc
I agree. Spurious monetary values were also used by the Tony Blair government to justify the idea of sending 50% of each age group to university and bringing in tuition fees. This policy has distorted the higher education system, and resulted in many misled young people acquiring pointless mediocre degrees along with enormous debts.

It is a mistake to try to quantify education in this way.
722
01/02/2021 12:14:23 1 0
bbc
Get some private tutors ... works well for child engagement and general wellbeing ... :-))
40
01/02/2021 10:10:52 5 3
bbc
I'm confused, if we had a second 'national lockdown' between this one and the first one why were children at school?
82
01/02/2021 10:20:29 1 0
bbc
Perhaps you'd be less confused if you actually relate your comment to the article?
41
01/02/2021 10:11:51 6 2
bbc
Thought BC in BBC stood for broadcasting corporation not BNC b***** negative corporation.
42
Dil
01/02/2021 10:12:23 7 1
bbc
Excuse me , Excuse me where 70% of students are unable to pay their student loan, This report is going to be totally wrong.
43
01/02/2021 10:12:25 46 9
bbc
Lost £40k in earnings ? Were they hoping to work at the BBC for a few weeks ?
110
01/02/2021 10:25:13 35 3
bbc
Or as a footballer for a day?
44
01/02/2021 10:12:54 13 7
bbc
The bigger problem is that mass, uncontrolled immigration is costing UK workers £100,000s over their lifetimes!

How about a discussion on that?
57
01/02/2021 10:15:52 4 9
bbc
Another racist response. Disgraceful.
45
01/02/2021 10:12:58 15 7
bbc
Complete nonsense. School is largely a mechanism to occupy children to allow the parents to work. Vested interests put so much value on this early years education. What you use at work is a fraction of what is thrown at you at school, completely surpassed by specialising in your late teens, at university and in work training.
46
01/02/2021 10:13:40 52 5
bbc
I just did my own study and the report says that this could also be a load of rubbish......but also, it might not be. In other words, who knows ?????
47
01/02/2021 10:13:48 8 2
bbc
What a waste of effort! A persons 'earning potential' across their lifetime is at the mercy of so many choices/decisions/fate etc - a pandemic is just one more factor.
48
01/02/2021 10:14:21 11 4
bbc
This article is another load of nonsence from the BBC, always ready to exagerate something. i dont think parents will give up there summer and half term holidays alsowho will pay teachers and support staff the overtime, You live in a dream world, print something that is not laughable.
49
01/02/2021 10:14:26 6 1
bbc
Redo the year, restart it in September for all. Those that have been tutored and far enough along move up a year- everyone else redo’s, not just for educational reasons, it takes off pressure getting back into education, stress, mental health etc.
Exams back a year and A levels at 19, no penalty for uni and All get NI credit for year.
Support all effectively throughout
50
01/02/2021 10:14:36 18 5
bbc
There is a reason the Open University for example exists. Many who missed school through illness, other reasons go into further education later in life. This generation will have to do the same. We all face tough times, what do you think happens when children become chronically ill>? They have obstacles stacked against them. Do they sit on their laurels? No they fight back, as you will have to do.
51
01/02/2021 10:14:44 10 3
bbc
All they need to do is seek employment with the BBC
52
01/02/2021 10:14:45 50 7
bbc
£40k over a lifetime is peanuts.
Nothing to see here

'Could, maybe, Ifs'
53
01/02/2021 10:08:06 6 4
bbc
The price of union activity. Who suffers, the ones who need it the most.
54
01/02/2021 10:13:59 10 2
bbc
what a load of absolute balls.
28
01/02/2021 10:08:48 17 25
bbc
Not always a defender of the BBC but HYS was open on this for much of the weekend.

Indeed BBC and especially Katie Adler have been more than forthright on EU difficulties with this.
55
01/02/2021 10:15:44 23 3
bbc
What site were you on? Certainly not the Beeb as there has been no HYS this weekend. If so..it would still be there to read...closed OR open!
182
01/02/2021 10:36:38 2 2
bbc
you never looked at the existing HYS Matt crawling with xenophobes too you'd have loved it
56
01/02/2021 10:15:49 12 4
bbc
Lol, it "might" work out at less than £20 pw over a lifetime "possibly, could do"

Just another doom and gloom story from the BBC with zero hard evidence.
44
01/02/2021 10:12:54 13 7
bbc
The bigger problem is that mass, uncontrolled immigration is costing UK workers £100,000s over their lifetimes!

How about a discussion on that?
57
01/02/2021 10:15:52 4 9
bbc
Another racist response. Disgraceful.
Grow up, I'm actually a LEGAL non white immigrant! Removed
58
01/02/2021 10:15:55 10 2
bbc
Thought provoking article, but really total pants.
Just another one of those ‘wokey’ articles that blandly labels people saying that they are incapable of doing anything for themselves throughout their entire lives. Add the total ***t storm of global overpopulation, climate change, pollution & war fast approaching…. £40000? Get real!
59
01/02/2021 10:16:08 10 1
bbc
Every day, we get an even more preposterous story from these hacks ? 40k in a working lifetime is peanuts. It’s effectively £20 a week. I’ve slashed more up the wall on a weekender.
72
Bob
01/02/2021 10:18:08 2 4
bbc
Yet people are crying about losing £20 a week they never had this time last year.
60
01/02/2021 10:16:34 9 4
bbc
What a load of rubbish kids are loving it learning on line is what they will be doing in the future. Let them catch up by making academic year 47 weeks with 3 weeks off in august 1 week at christmas 1 week at easter and longer school days. let teachers teach and parents be parents which has become a bit of a shock to parents during lockdown BUT they are your kids so take responsibility
61
01/02/2021 10:16:41 9 4
bbc
£40000 over a lifetime?

Small fry compared to the £5000 per year that was predicted for voting to leave the EU!

Any more predictions like this and this generation will be paying to go to work.
62
01/02/2021 10:16:41 18 9
bbc
The Unions will decide when kids go back.

Guarantee if the PM announces it is safe for schools to go back to normal on 8th March, the Unions (backed by Labour) will tell their members that it is not safe and will demand all staff be vaccinated before full classes resume.
864
01/02/2021 13:33:38 1 1
bbc
Actually Starmer was calling for schools to reopen fully last summer. He wrote about it in the Daily Mail.
63
Pip
01/02/2021 10:16:54 8 1
bbc
How long's a piece of string, where was this measured. Is this Covid and Brexit, as it's so subjective it's all just a tad pointless in reality..........?
64
01/02/2021 10:17:04 12 3
bbc
"...a report suggests".

It must be true then, eh?
65
01/02/2021 10:17:29 7 15
bbc
Bojo's brexit will make it worse, ERASMUS etc
108
01/02/2021 10:24:58 4 0
bbc
Good grief! Only a tiny proportion of UK kids ever accessed Erasmus, and the kind of privileged kids who did are always going to be fine!
You'll be one of those who predicted all scientific research would stop in the UK after 2016 as all the scientists would leave. I think the Oxford vaccine team proved you wrong!
66
01/02/2021 10:17:31 5 0
bbc
i kinda agree as employers will be looking at exam results and may be thinking to themselves that years 20 and 21 were just a waste of time as qualifications were just 'given' by teachers to keep everyone happy. So with that in mind the employer doesn't really know what their true abilities really are do they, brainiac or thicko?
79
01/02/2021 10:20:08 3 2
bbc
If you have a half way decent recruitment process, you should be able to tell.
15
01/02/2021 10:05:44 383 49
bbc
The war time generation lost much of their schooling for 5 years. Somehow they succeeded in producing the industrialists, scientists and professionals that our society thrived on in the 1950s and 1960s. Fighting for what you want in life can be very character building. Ask Captain Tom.
R
Comment posted by Ready, today at 10:12Ready
10:12
The bigger problem is that mass, uncontrolled immigration is costing UK workers £100,000s over their lifetimes!

How about a discussion on that?
Removed
87
01/02/2021 10:21:12 85 35
bbc
"The bigger problem is that mass, uncontrolled immigration is costing UK workers £100,000s over their lifetimes!"

Yeah, that isn't true at all, most migrants add value to the economy of the host country rather than cost us money:

https://www.oecd.org/migration/OECD%20Migration%20Policy%20Debates%20Numero%202.pdf

Get your facts right
114
01/02/2021 10:25:44 59 23
bbc
It's not true. There's your discussion.
115
01/02/2021 10:25:54 50 25
bbc
It's not costing anything as those too are UK workers, or do you just mean white British ones? In any case that immigration is needed because the jobs are beneath the entitled UK workers, as you call them, otherwise there wouldn't be a need for immigrates. Don't confuse immigrants with refugees.
153
01/02/2021 10:28:33 42 25
bbc
If a person who can not speak a word of English is taking your job, you have to ask yourself whose fault that is.
207
01/02/2021 10:41:04 22 15
bbc
We don't have mass, uncontrolled immigration, we never have. These are conspriacy theories. Plus, immigrants contribute to the UK economy eaulkly if not more so that residents, they're a benefit. Only racists and xenophobes deny this.
297
01/02/2021 10:56:25 10 6
bbc
Nice to see those old brexit prejudices against "forriners" haven't gone away.
347
DC
01/02/2021 11:06:37 4 2
bbc
oh dear. You went there didnt you. What uncontrolled immigration are you talking of? The EU one that we signed up to that gave free movement to other EU members from some of the richest economies in the world or the made up one that involves thousands of people entering the govenrment and avoiding our immigration rules?
424
01/02/2021 11:22:18 2 3
bbc
I'm not sure that it is over all. I agree that it should be discussed, and there are some jobs that certainly have lost out to immigrants; builders, plumbers, etc. However they also boost the economy and create other jobs and *increase* income of some, I know a building developer who (pre covid) said that employing immigrants enabled him to grow much quicker than if he waited for UK workers.
433
01/02/2021 11:23:40 3 2
bbc
There are some people who bring immigration into a lot of these discussions. Some immigrants are better educated than some UK people and are assets to the workplace. If I were an employer, I would prefer to have them, rather than some of the Brits I have met.
68
Bob
01/02/2021 10:17:43 11 4
bbc
This is why Labour wants schools to remain closed. They want to build more low earners and layabouts so they can appeal to a larger base.
27
01/02/2021 10:08:32 165 37
bbc
How do you do it BBC? You always mannage to grab the glass half empty don't you?

Instead of the good news of pupils spending more of their precious childhood with their parents which is something I sure they will look back with appreciation in the future, you monetize it and in a negative way.

Why? Why can you not report positively? Is your version of news always negative?
69
01/02/2021 10:17:51 17 16
bbc
Gosh yeah but, have you never read a newspaper- they sell those solely on the basis of how much joy they bring to our lives, no scandal, no backbiting no money grubbing foulness, don’t you find it refreshing the BBC takes a middle line instead of all that positivity from the papers
361
01/02/2021 11:10:57 6 7
bbc
Yes, they obviously read the mail and express, which only peddles their own view of the Tory world.
70
01/02/2021 10:17:56 22 6
bbc
Pointless study. In long run £40,000 hardly means anything (accounting for future inflation), then secondly the schools/college/uni will try their best to catch up on the lost time & finally, kids are getting smarter & smarter and the techonology is moving so fast that this period would be a distant history like any other period

What a waste of money/resources in conducting such pointless studies
71
01/02/2021 10:18:02 12 1
bbc
In today`s episode of Jackanory...
59
01/02/2021 10:16:08 10 1
bbc
Every day, we get an even more preposterous story from these hacks ? 40k in a working lifetime is peanuts. It’s effectively £20 a week. I’ve slashed more up the wall on a weekender.
72
Bob
01/02/2021 10:18:08 2 4
bbc
Yet people are crying about losing £20 a week they never had this time last year.
73
01/02/2021 10:15:53 9 3
bbc
BBC NEWS, hang your head in shame!!!
Completely speculative, not fact based at all as the article tries to profess to be.
Maybe go and speak to headteachers and teachers at schools and the amazing efforts they are putting in place to give pupils an education, not trying to scaremonger and coming up with useless non fact based assumptions!
Something you would expect to read on the Daily Mail!
96
bri
01/02/2021 10:21:55 4 1
bbc
Not even the mail would publish such utter crap, just shows how far the BBC has now fallen!
74
01/02/2021 10:18:48 7 1
bbc
Is the author sure it’s not 39k?
94
01/02/2021 10:22:18 4 0
bbc
I made it 4.5 pence
75
Bob
01/02/2021 10:18:49 7 8
bbc
This is exactly what has been said all along. People who miss out on education never catch up and earn less than those who didn't. It has been documented many times before with long-term strikes in other countries.

With teachers half as likely to die vs. the working age population it is shameful that pressure is applied to shirk out of work.
76
01/02/2021 10:18:53 18 5
bbc
What a load of utter carp. The same jobs will still need doing whether they miss school or not! Including a lot of over paid jobs at useless "think tanks"!!
I think we all underestimate the ability of children to bounce back. The generation whose world was turned upside down by war and evacuation (sometimes to the other side oft he world) some how managed to rebuild the country afterwards.
77
01/02/2021 10:18:55 19 5
bbc
Massively unlikely as the average wage isn't even that. could the BBC please stop reporting unverified statistics from pressure groups self interested "charities" who appear to be mainly interested in paying their senior staff. If OIlver Barnes could maybe do is own copy less based on facebook scare stories? Try checking a fact before you report
941
01/02/2021 15:42:27 0 2
bbc
Massively unlikely as you can't do reading. £40k average, not each.
57
01/02/2021 10:15:52 4 9
bbc
Another racist response. Disgraceful.
Grow up, I'm actually a LEGAL non white immigrant! Removed
66
01/02/2021 10:17:31 5 0
bbc
i kinda agree as employers will be looking at exam results and may be thinking to themselves that years 20 and 21 were just a waste of time as qualifications were just 'given' by teachers to keep everyone happy. So with that in mind the employer doesn't really know what their true abilities really are do they, brainiac or thicko?
79
01/02/2021 10:20:08 3 2
bbc
If you have a half way decent recruitment process, you should be able to tell.
80
01/02/2021 10:20:10 5 2
bbc
Loss of earnings is possible.

Extra taxation to pay for government spending is inevitable
407
01/02/2021 11:19:03 0 0
bbc
And THAT is the real loss of earnings. Unless, of course, you are already super-rich when of course you don't have to pay any tax at all.
81
01/02/2021 10:20:18 12 5
bbc
Utter rubbish. There are years for most children to catch up on education and earn if the economy rebounds.
But we do need to stop waste such as ridiculous reports such as this and BBC wasting time reporting on it.
107
01/02/2021 10:24:38 3 1
bbc
Main problem is that ALTHOUGH schools could make up the lost time, a lot of schools simply AREN'T up to it. For instance, Johnson would have got nowhere NEAR Downing St., without going to Eton college. Bright working class kids who are willing to work and learn achieve NOTHING if we don't invest in the young generation PROPERLY.
40
01/02/2021 10:10:52 5 3
bbc
I'm confused, if we had a second 'national lockdown' between this one and the first one why were children at school?
82
01/02/2021 10:20:29 1 0
bbc
Perhaps you'd be less confused if you actually relate your comment to the article?
1
01/02/2021 10:01:20 263 33
bbc
May, could, might, perhaps...etc. Please report news, not speculation.
83
Bob
01/02/2021 10:20:30 11 3
bbc
Ultimately this has been proven before. Here is just one example. http://barrett.dyson.cornell.edu/NEUDC/paper_179.pdf

And it is not just monetary effects either. Health as well.
154
01/02/2021 10:31:12 8 18
bbc
Yes, but Tories don't like facts.
84
bri
01/02/2021 10:19:42 14 5
bbc
What a pointless article, why would the BBC even consider publishing such trash ? Maybe they will take up smoking & drinking & lose £100,000 in their lifetime!
85
01/02/2021 10:20:44 3 2
bbc
The price of everything, the value of nothing.

This is what horrifies me about the government logic on student loans - the monetary gain of having a degree means they can afford to pay back. That never used to be the measure of a degree, but there you go.
86
Pso
01/02/2021 10:20:46 3 16
bbc
Don't bother writing anything about the harm caused to young people and children by the lockdown for a disease that does not really affect them.

No one on HYS cares they just want to extend the lockdown and shout abuse at covidiot 'youngsters and students'.
116
Pso
01/02/2021 10:26:00 2 3
bbc
Of course the downvotes, just proves it really
R
Comment posted by Ready, today at 10:12Ready
10:12
The bigger problem is that mass, uncontrolled immigration is costing UK workers £100,000s over their lifetimes!

How about a discussion on that?
Removed
87
01/02/2021 10:21:12 85 35
bbc
"The bigger problem is that mass, uncontrolled immigration is costing UK workers £100,000s over their lifetimes!"

Yeah, that isn't true at all, most migrants add value to the economy of the host country rather than cost us money:

https://www.oecd.org/migration/OECD%20Migration%20Policy%20Debates%20Numero%202.pdf

Get your facts right
151
01/02/2021 10:34:20 38 19
bbc
While you are right that there is a benefit to the economy from migration, but that was not their statement which is that uncontrolled immigration is costing workers £100,000 in their lifetime (amount debatable) but uncontrolled immigration lowers wages which was the point being made far more than approx. £1000 per year for a working life time
There is clearly a left wing agenda at work, only half the facts are reported. Most migrants do contribute. However thanks to migration, Britain has to spend £8Billion every year on counter terrorism trying to prevent migrants or the children of migrants blowing us up, hacking us to death or deliberately running us over. Removed
221
01/02/2021 10:43:15 15 2
bbc
Well done in answering a different question, Ready has not put his question in the most eloquent of ways but they are correct. Immigration drives down wages for certain sectors, however on the other side the economy benefits, the question you need to answer if you're going to rudely slap them down is where the money goes ;)
340
01/02/2021 11:04:46 6 4
bbc
It is not the true migrant you should be focused on it is the generations of scroungers - that is those that physically and mentally that could work but instead TAKE from the mouths of those that do, that is an area that needs looking into along with girls who have kids with no accountability from the "donor" just to get state support and housing.
447
01/02/2021 11:25:36 0 1
bbc
Leading the way in industry, innovation, healthcare or perhaps more suited to maritime careers?
523
01/02/2021 11:38:39 5 2
bbc
The OECD report is a "one size fits all" claim & one the UK government itself has found to be untrue in our case.
572
01/02/2021 11:47:00 3 2
bbc
From the BBC, based on a UCL study
"over the longer term, immigrants to the UK have been a burden on the state.
They estimate that between 1995 and 2011, all immigrants to the UK - from outside the EU and inside - were a net drain on public resources of between £114bn and £31bn.."
EU migrants were a net positive- non-EU immigration was negative
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-29912945
88
01/02/2021 10:21:23 5 1
bbc
Firstly, the pandemic has been a life changing event for everyone, let’s acknowledge that and move forward. The problem can be dealt with through the tax system by allowing those who have been impacted to pay less tax. In many ways the current situation isn’t any different to that faced by people after a war or natural disaster.
101
01/02/2021 10:23:56 3 0
bbc
Actually everyone is going to see a tax increase as someone has to pay for the costs of the pandemic.
89
01/02/2021 10:21:29 6 0
bbc
Neoliberal nonsense
90
01/02/2021 10:21:55 9 3
bbc
What a load of rubbish. At the school my grandchildren attend the headteacher sent a letter to all parents explaining that course education packs will be provided. However when the pupils return to school if they have fallen behind its the parents fault! Now even when they have received the vaccine the unions are saying keep schools closed. Shocking abdication of responsibility!!
39
01/02/2021 10:10:19 256 11
bbc
This is one of the worst examples of attaching spurious monetary values that I've read. the headline is gratuitous as even the IFS say that it's a what 'could' happen and acknowledge the speculative nature of the problem. We actually have exactly zero evidence of the long-term impact of this bout of disrupted schooling. Catching up should be a priority but beyond that we simply don't know.
91
Bob
01/02/2021 10:22:02 33 119
bbc
Go read one of the countless papers on REAL data from REAL incidences where schooling was disrupted for a long time - here is one covering long-term strikes in Argentina. http://barrett.dyson.cornell.edu/NEUDC/paper_179.pdf

Lost learning never recovered. Loss of earnings results in poorer health and the need to vote Labour.
142
01/02/2021 10:32:55 20 2
bbc
I would also state that given the Argentinian economy is a basket case that is more than like to be the cause of those issues.
160
01/02/2021 10:34:54 20 3
bbc
Labour would have kept the schools open throughout the pandemic then, would they Bob?
240
01/02/2021 10:46:37 12 6
bbc
You did read the study?
During the period it covers, most of the time the Gov was centralist socialist or left leaning
Voting 'Labour' in Argentina is what caused a lot of the problems with teachers strikes
397
01/02/2021 11:17:52 3 1
bbc
Well you would have to be stupid to vote Labour in Argentina. There is no such party.

Then again as a lifetime Labour voter it is surprising that I can even spel wirds propaly.
498
01/02/2021 11:33:08 6 4
bbc
I don't know what your experience of Labour governments is, but having lived through every failed Labour government since Harold Wilson I cannot understand why anyone would vote Labour: unless of course you just want handouts for layabouts?
696
01/02/2021 12:10:11 3 1
bbc
Don't think they had teachers working full time teaching online in Argentina . Context mate , context
714
01/02/2021 12:13:15 2 1
bbc
The most corrupt country in the Americas. Not many parallels to be drawn I'm afraid. I have a large Argentine family and most of that generation left in their teens to seek work in Europe. Italy and Spain mostly.
811
01/02/2021 12:39:06 1 0
bbc
Muppet.
92
01/02/2021 10:22:09 4 10
bbc
100% Inheritance tax for the next 10 years should cover it
130
01/02/2021 10:29:00 3 1
bbc
The politics of envy is back I see.
162
01/02/2021 10:35:43 4 0
bbc
You do realise that would empoverish the younger generation? They are the ones who would loose out in case you hadn`t realised it judging by your name
32
01/02/2021 10:09:39 4 27
bbc
yes, need to discus. Problem with Boris ordering 20 doses for each of the population so as to exclude the rest of the world... Dictator
93
01/02/2021 10:22:14 10 1
bbc
Any government's first duty is to protect its citizens and its territory. At last, Boris is doing just that. If we have sufficient vaccines for the entire population, and plenty in reserve, that is something GOOD at last.

It is not and never was the UK's job to look after every other damn country in the world. Long past time our politicians realised and accepted that.
155
01/02/2021 10:32:18 2 2
bbc
but a contract is a contract.
183
01/02/2021 10:37:22 2 2
bbc
Tell that one to the "commonwealth" who have been promised much but have to wait
74
01/02/2021 10:18:48 7 1
bbc
Is the author sure it’s not 39k?
94
01/02/2021 10:22:18 4 0
bbc
I made it 4.5 pence
95
01/02/2021 10:23:13 9 2
bbc
And this speculative load of tosh is the only article with a HYS on BBC home page. LOL.
73
01/02/2021 10:15:53 9 3
bbc
BBC NEWS, hang your head in shame!!!
Completely speculative, not fact based at all as the article tries to profess to be.
Maybe go and speak to headteachers and teachers at schools and the amazing efforts they are putting in place to give pupils an education, not trying to scaremonger and coming up with useless non fact based assumptions!
Something you would expect to read on the Daily Mail!
96
bri
01/02/2021 10:21:55 4 1
bbc
Not even the mail would publish such utter crap, just shows how far the BBC has now fallen!
97
01/02/2021 10:23:22 2 2
bbc
Agree this is off topic but as mentioned by others why no HYS on the EU vaccine or NI debacle, or how Mr Macron has been so UK negative...obviously does not fit the agenda
597
01/02/2021 11:49:29 0 1
bbc
Your agenda you mean.
98
01/02/2021 10:23:08 5 6
bbc
That's nothing compared to the vast amount of damage that's being visited upon the education and the mental health of so many kids.

A couple of days ago, Katharine Birbalsingh, a well known headmistress from the Michaela Community School, stated that she "doesn't think there is any such thing as good online learning".

Sadly, for our children, a lot of cowardly people won't accept this truth.
149
01/02/2021 10:33:51 5 2
bbc
There is nothing cowardly about choosing to educate your child at home in order to prevent a virus spreading, which has already been a contributing factor in the death of 105,000 people.
99
01/02/2021 10:23:44 6 2
bbc
Oh god. Not another pointless might happen report.Is there someone who lies in bed thinking "what report can we invent today"
Lots of things might happen. They also might not.
111
01/02/2021 10:25:16 2 1
bbc
There are whole teams that think about this, then produce meaningless reports, when you break it is down £40,000 over a 40 year career is less than £20/week.
100
01/02/2021 10:23:50 2 2
bbc
Mass repetition of school years just won't work. Think of that down the line. Will there be double sized classes until the kids leave school, potentially 10 years for the youngest? Will the UK universities have no British intake for a year, then a double dose of applicants the next?