Covid infections remain high but stable
29/01/2021 | news | health | 1,572
The Office for National Statistics found infections had hardly shifted compared with the previous week.
1
29/01/2021 14:35:48 18 23
bbc
So much for lockdowns actually working, but at least the rapid vaccine rollout will get the important measures of deaths and hospital admissions down.
3
29/01/2021 14:39:51 32 18
bbc
That's because this is not a lockdown, it is 'some restrictions'. Look outside and it is obviously far too busy.

Proper lockdowns work - what we have does not
5
29/01/2021 14:39:47 20 3
bbc
If we weren't under lockdown the figure would be far, far higher, so it clearly is working to a certain extent.
7
29/01/2021 14:40:24 21 4
bbc
Well without lockdowns. transmission rates would clearly be much higher. Its called science.
9
29/01/2021 14:40:42 18 6
bbc
Lockdowns do work, if everyone sticks to the rules. Wear a mask, keep 2m distance and wash hands. Simple.
18
29/01/2021 14:43:48 17 6
bbc
It’s working slowly but this isn’t a proper lockdown. Too many workplaces open and too many ‘keyworker’ kids in school.
35
29/01/2021 14:50:20 8 1
bbc
Lockdowns should be last resort but some people seem to be almost enjoying it. Failure to use data correctly to reduce the impact is the real failing, look at the office infection rate compared to restaurants and cafes. The data has always been there.
2
29/01/2021 14:38:50 12 16
bbc
This deeper level of ONS data makes the situation painted by the official govt dashboard look far better than it actually is. This likely draws people at large in to a false sense of security, leading to potentially worrying consequences
10
29/01/2021 14:41:06 18 15
bbc
I sense that you are one of these who will accept lockdown forever? Let's say that none of the social restrictions have a significant and lasting effect. What would you want to happen then?
15
mc
29/01/2021 14:41:57 1 3
bbc
ons is just a guestamate and should not be considered as useful
1
29/01/2021 14:35:48 18 23
bbc
So much for lockdowns actually working, but at least the rapid vaccine rollout will get the important measures of deaths and hospital admissions down.
3
29/01/2021 14:39:51 32 18
bbc
That's because this is not a lockdown, it is 'some restrictions'. Look outside and it is obviously far too busy.

Proper lockdowns work - what we have does not
28
29/01/2021 14:47:04 19 3
bbc
We will have to learn to live with this virus, as it's staying.Vaccination will help with that. It will mean far fewer hospitalisations & deaths, so the NHS can then look after everyone needing care, not just Covid patients. We need a plan to get things open again, so we can start to live rather than exist. We need our friends and families. We need a break, a holiday. Kids need their education.
178
JBM
29/01/2021 15:30:37 2 4
bbc
What in heavens name is a 'proper lockdown'? Military enforced house arrest.I'm afraid we do not live in North Korea to your obvious disappointment.
4
29/01/2021 14:39:58 10 37
bbc
New infections on the slide. Time to get schools reopened.
11
29/01/2021 14:41:17 30 11
bbc
are you nuts ?
17
29/01/2021 14:42:30 16 2
bbc
Flattening at best. Certainly not on the slide.
19
29/01/2021 14:44:08 19 3
bbc
yes lets open all those schools, infection rates aren't high enough, just when we start to turn a corner you want full steam ahead. you will be the first if we opened schools to complain if we spiked again.
33
29/01/2021 14:50:10 14 5
bbc
Doh! Lets keep doing exactly the same thing that got us the worst death rate in the world.

The modern equivalent of going over the top and advancing very slowly toward the enemy through machine gun fire. Over and over and over and over...

Criminal incompetence, and those that support it are lemmings being led by donkeys.

Why should Britain tremble eh?
1
29/01/2021 14:35:48 18 23
bbc
So much for lockdowns actually working, but at least the rapid vaccine rollout will get the important measures of deaths and hospital admissions down.
5
29/01/2021 14:39:47 20 3
bbc
If we weren't under lockdown the figure would be far, far higher, so it clearly is working to a certain extent.
6
29/01/2021 14:40:24 16 6
bbc
Time for Scotland to get a shift on with the jaggin'
22
29/01/2021 14:44:16 23 10
bbc
Although if you look at the figures in Scotland the infection rate is half that of the rest of the UK and falling unlike in other parts.
29/01/2021 20:15:24 0 0
bbc
All front line Scottish NHS staff, care home staff and residents have been vaccinated with 60 % of over 80s in the commutity or housebound. Priority categories are more important than chasing a headlines
1
29/01/2021 14:35:48 18 23
bbc
So much for lockdowns actually working, but at least the rapid vaccine rollout will get the important measures of deaths and hospital admissions down.
7
29/01/2021 14:40:24 21 4
bbc
Well without lockdowns. transmission rates would clearly be much higher. Its called science.
8
29/01/2021 14:40:36 56 5
bbc
Looking at the infection rates among different age groups in the survey report, there appears to be a clear decline in rates among school ages (Year 7-11 in particular has practically plummeted since December).

Given how high they were before schools closed and the argument they enable transmission between homes, this reduction should lead to further declines once the lag time passes.
89
29/01/2021 15:07:41 49 41
bbc
I fear Man’s hubris in thinking he can overcome Mother Nature has proved a costly and embarrassing failure.
The only trickier thing than trying to control an endemic airborne virus is getting Man to admit defeat, before all we have left is despair.
582
sw
29/01/2021 16:58:36 0 3
bbc
The teenagers still need to stop mingling, if year 7-11 rates are going down,
1
29/01/2021 14:35:48 18 23
bbc
So much for lockdowns actually working, but at least the rapid vaccine rollout will get the important measures of deaths and hospital admissions down.
9
29/01/2021 14:40:42 18 6
bbc
Lockdowns do work, if everyone sticks to the rules. Wear a mask, keep 2m distance and wash hands. Simple.
41
29/01/2021 14:52:43 5 16
bbc
You're right, lockdowns do work. Lockdowns work to cause people to have their vital operations cancelled, cause record suicide, cause jobs to be lost and cause increase in domestic abuse as well as huge mental health problems.

I will never, ever support lockdowns
2
29/01/2021 14:38:50 12 16
bbc
This deeper level of ONS data makes the situation painted by the official govt dashboard look far better than it actually is. This likely draws people at large in to a false sense of security, leading to potentially worrying consequences
10
29/01/2021 14:41:06 18 15
bbc
I sense that you are one of these who will accept lockdown forever? Let's say that none of the social restrictions have a significant and lasting effect. What would you want to happen then?
53
29/01/2021 14:55:13 6 0
bbc
Not at all @frumpyas, just would like to see a better version of lifting lockdown than last time which wasn’t exactly successful. Vaccines should make a positive diff this time
4
29/01/2021 14:39:58 10 37
bbc
New infections on the slide. Time to get schools reopened.
11
29/01/2021 14:41:17 30 11
bbc
are you nuts ?
44
29/01/2021 14:53:48 3 13
bbc
Let's stay locked up forever. Who needs a job anyway? Or an immune system for that matter
12
29/01/2021 14:41:29 23 22
bbc
The ‘lockdown’ rules this time round are too flexible. The government is incapable of learning from experience. More deaths to come as a result of the government’s criminal neglect. Saying you ‘take full responsibility’ isn’t the same as actually doing it.
39
29/01/2021 14:51:10 9 4
bbc
You missed out any reference to the general public who should have learnt from experience.....
13
Me
29/01/2021 14:41:55 75 29
bbc
The R rate is practically irrelevant until case numbers fall significantly. An R rate of 1 just means we stay at an horrendously high level of infection, which sadly will lead to hospitalisation and deaths for some.

The only way to reduce the number of infections is to stop mixing with other people.
191
29/01/2021 15:35:41 42 38
bbc
Unfortunately mixing with other people is innate in humans. If we stop mixing, we die out.
581
29/01/2021 16:58:35 2 0
bbc
For now perhaps. Getting vaccinated is a longer lasting solution, and that's what's happening.
29/01/2021 19:05:51 0 0
bbc
NO...it isn't. That means life over for eternity.

The only way out is vaccines.
14
mc
29/01/2021 14:41:01 10 25
bbc
what concerns me more is where the govt are going to let business refuse entry if you have not been vacinated. this must not be allowed. some people can not or do not want this vacinne and should not be discriminate against in a democratic society or are we heading towards a police state
27
29/01/2021 14:46:58 19 6
bbc
Whether you have the vaccine or not is your choice - coming into the UK without vaccination is not your choice so grow up or shut up.
40
29/01/2021 14:52:11 8 4
bbc
Too bad. The collective safety of the population requires individuals put their paranoid nonsense on hold. I would advocate mandatory vaccinations for all, excluding only those who are unable due to medical reasons.

Grow up.
2
29/01/2021 14:38:50 12 16
bbc
This deeper level of ONS data makes the situation painted by the official govt dashboard look far better than it actually is. This likely draws people at large in to a false sense of security, leading to potentially worrying consequences
15
mc
29/01/2021 14:41:57 1 3
bbc
ons is just a guestamate and should not be considered as useful
16
29/01/2021 14:42:25 35 10
bbc
Good news is the vaccine roll out should be taking effect soon to further reduce daily infection numbers. The fall in net hospital occupancy maybe due to a switch to palliative care from active intervention for very long term patients, this is an unfortunate but inevitable consequence of this terrible virus.
56
29/01/2021 14:55:34 22 21
bbc
Sadly, the vaccination roll-out is still incredibly slow in Scotland.
213
Fox
29/01/2021 15:43:43 0 10
bbc
Ah but will it?

We are vaccinating those least likely to spread it, unlike in those countries who have done a bit more joined-up thinking.

Plus the current vaccines are less effective with each new variant that springs up.

Only the onset of summer is going to fix this.

Hopefully we'll have vaccinated the spreaders (school children and those going into work) by next winter.
856
29/01/2021 17:55:26 2 0
bbc
The vaccines aim to keep the symptoms light so the infected stay out of hospital - not to prevent it spreading.

They THINK vaccines will also make people less infectious, which will help.

But weaker symptoms might also mean more infected people being less careful, which could spread it faster.
That'll not a problem for the vaccinated, obviously - but when it gets to someone un-jabbed...
865
29/01/2021 17:57:26 4 0
bbc
I don't expect the vaccine roll out to have much impact on case numbers for quite a few months, Those being vaccinated are still a very small percentage of the country, and they are the group least likely to come into contact with other people.
but it should impact on hospitalizations of the over 70s and deaths in a shorter period, as thee are more likely to be from the vaccinated group.
29/01/2021 22:37:51 0 0
bbc
It really is not that terrible is it? The hype and propaganda is what is terrible surely. People do die every year do they not, and just wait for for the mortality rates from lockdown related suicides and non treatment of other illnesses. We must re-set the mindset of what life means to us as individuals.
4
29/01/2021 14:39:58 10 37
bbc
New infections on the slide. Time to get schools reopened.
17
29/01/2021 14:42:30 16 2
bbc
Flattening at best. Certainly not on the slide.
1
29/01/2021 14:35:48 18 23
bbc
So much for lockdowns actually working, but at least the rapid vaccine rollout will get the important measures of deaths and hospital admissions down.
18
29/01/2021 14:43:48 17 6
bbc
It’s working slowly but this isn’t a proper lockdown. Too many workplaces open and too many ‘keyworker’ kids in school.
4
29/01/2021 14:39:58 10 37
bbc
New infections on the slide. Time to get schools reopened.
19
29/01/2021 14:44:08 19 3
bbc
yes lets open all those schools, infection rates aren't high enough, just when we start to turn a corner you want full steam ahead. you will be the first if we opened schools to complain if we spiked again.
20
29/01/2021 14:44:10 29 22
bbc
Lockdowns work. It is the failure of people and businesses to follow the rules correctly, combined with the more virulent strains that have kept the infection rate higher than it might be, combined with pressure groups who simply cannot get their heads round the reality of the situation applying political pressure on all the govts of the UK that have led to the infection rate being higher.
30
29/01/2021 14:48:57 11 2
bbc
Bit wordy but I get the drift.
50
29/01/2021 14:54:46 2 11
bbc
No they don't. And neither do masks
85
29/01/2021 15:06:30 5 3
bbc
It depends what you mean by “lockdowns work”!- they do in the short term but no longer otherwise we wouldn't be in a third one - also there is no correlation between how tough they are and the ultimate outcome - ask Spain or Italy whose lockdowns were longer and far more draconian but have ended up pretty much the same place as us
97
29/01/2021 15:10:00 3 2
bbc
I don't think one can say "lockdown works" but doesn't work in real life. As a public health policy, it should be robust to the public's behaviour.

e.g. My strategy to become a millionaire is that everyone in the country gives me £1. This "works" in the sense that if everyone does, I get £68m, but it is a stupid strategy because not everyone would give me £1
238
29/01/2021 15:50:00 1 2
bbc
Spot on
29/01/2021 23:16:58 0 0
bbc
The efficiency of lockdowns depend on what you are trying to achieve and at what point you are starting from. Taking NZ as an example the lockdown very much worked, but we closed borders early and started from a much lower base rate of case numbers. A 6 week total lockdown with slow easing of restrictions combined with effective track/trace was enough to eliminate the virus.
29/01/2021 23:20:57 0 0
bbc
By the time European countries were locking down they were having to apply a suppression tactic as total lockdowns would have to last far too long to eliminate it. Plus there was a rush to open countries back up to boost the economy and travel was encouraged. Unfortunately that leaves Europe bouncing in and out of lockdowns as the virus surges when restrictions are eased
21
29/01/2021 14:44:20 31 11
bbc
So Christmas was well over a month ago and then lockdown resumed. With an incubation period of less than 2 weeks surely the numbers should have seen a significant improvement?
232
29/01/2021 15:48:25 22 10
bbc
This new variant is the cause of the problem.
483
29/01/2021 16:36:39 2 0
bbc
They have dropped 30%this week and last week, unless we suddenly stop using a consistent and comparable measure, ( the dashboard).
29/01/2021 20:26:43 0 0
bbc
They have. The 7-day rolling average has been dropping rapidly since the 9th Jan.

Hospital admissions are falling.

Deaths are now slowly beginning to reduce on the 7-day rolling average.
30/01/2021 20:05:50 0 0
bbc
The cases are nothing to do with Xmas

They were sky highe in the south of England well before Xmas
6
29/01/2021 14:40:24 16 6
bbc
Time for Scotland to get a shift on with the jaggin'
22
29/01/2021 14:44:16 23 10
bbc
Although if you look at the figures in Scotland the infection rate is half that of the rest of the UK and falling unlike in other parts.
57
29/01/2021 14:56:11 4 2
bbc
Evidence?
500
29/01/2021 16:39:24 2 3
bbc
It's falling virtually everywhere, even though most of England has z much higher populaton dendity
731
29/01/2021 17:33:02 2 2
bbc
The point was about the slow vaccination rate nothing else and it is terribly slow compared with England.
29/01/2021 20:18:44 0 0
bbc
I see the BBC has stopped showing the UK wide map of infection . I wonder why ? Radio 4 News dumbed it's Covid update down as well , like the BBC website. Sounds like the BBC has been got at again. Another 25,000 plus cases today and hardly a mention
23
29/01/2021 14:45:31 13 18
bbc
Not surprising there is no significant change when London's idiots are still flaunting the covid rules. Their ignorance and cretinism has no bounds - goodness knows what monsters they will bring into this world?
60
29/01/2021 14:57:51 12 0
bbc
There is NO part of the country where covidiots are not in evidence. The problem is far from being exclusive to London as you should well know.
I live in Wales so I have no reason to defend London in any way, but the truth is more important than creating meaningless scapegoats.
820
29/01/2021 17:48:17 0 1
bbc
Could you let us know where the utopian village, town or city you live, so we can all avoid plumbs like you and your blame everyone else attitude.
24
29/01/2021 14:45:34 15 17
bbc
Current "restrictions" much more lax than Spring '20 ....result , unending lockdowns. Tighten up big time to let the vaccines kick in!
54
29/01/2021 14:55:36 4 12
bbc
You really hate freedom
25
29/01/2021 14:46:14 274 61
bbc
We are turning a corner after an awful year not helped by some poor decisions but also the poor behaviour of a minority. this is not the time to relax and demand thing be open straight away, lets nail this completely get numbers down as much as possible and give the vaccine enough time to do its' work, anything else would be crazy, we have come this far lets not fall at the final hurdle.
66
29/01/2021 15:01:29 170 65
bbc
Nice idea but you simply can’t nail it completely- mass vaccination will help a lot but as a society we need to be less risk adverse to this otherwise normality will never resume
29/01/2021 18:46:24 2 0
bbc
Covid will always be around and will still affect some folk... Lower numbers but some will never go back to normal.
29/01/2021 19:14:50 1 0
bbc
'Poor minority' can be narrowed down to one Johnson
26
29/01/2021 14:46:23 164 25
bbc
One set of data says one thing, other set of data says the complete opposite, & I'm sorry BBC but "figures may be skewed...numbers of tests falling after first week of Jan" simply isn't true

# of tests each day hasn't fallen since start of Jan

Fact is there were avg of 60k testing positive every day in first week of Jan, past 7 days the avg is 28k

Cases are definitely falling, no q about it
43
29/01/2021 14:53:06 105 22
bbc
The problem with the daily testing is that it requires people to come forward. We likely saw a peak at Christmas because additional people took the test to have re-assurance around Christmas.
People are now in "lockdown" and less interested in taking a test. Therefore we are likely finding a lower % of total cases.
91
29/01/2021 15:07:54 10 35
bbc
This is good news.

Now let's open schools and borders asap and get the economy restarted - for the many not the few.
136
29/01/2021 15:20:49 16 3
bbc
This is what the Office of National Statistics says -

The ONS tests a random sample of people in private residences across the UK for Covid weekly, whether they have symptoms or not.

This means the survey is among the best sources for understanding what's really happening to the virus.

The ONS data (independent of who presents for a test) says there is a fall in cases, but only a small one.
324
29/01/2021 16:07:08 4 3
bbc
Cases are falling but hospital admissions are still high some london boroughs still way above uk average
475
29/01/2021 16:34:37 7 1
bbc
This is what happens when you have a journalist report a 'story', rather than a scientist report and interpret data. There have been several schoolboy/girl errors across the BBC from journalists that have had those of us in the field face-palming frequently.
637
29/01/2021 17:11:43 0 0
bbc
The figures you quote are of the numbers tested which prove positive... and the numbers tested each week is not a fixed number. The ONS figures are a randomised testing of a proportion of people each week which can then be used to model the total number. The only perfect way of knowing how many people have the virus at any one time would be to test the whole population on the same day!
722
29/01/2021 17:30:46 0 0
bbc
Exactly they're not comparing apples with apples

There's bound to be discrepancy. The ONS data is only up to last weekend and based on a sample of 168,000 less than a third of the daily number of people tested
791
29/01/2021 17:42:32 0 1
bbc
bbc is only trying to do its best just because the silent majority dont agree doesnt mean its right ,keep the good work up bbc
29/01/2021 18:42:00 1 0
bbc
The sets of data are consistent.

The daily updates give the number of *new* cases. This has been falling by around 25% a week since Jan 7.

The ONS data is people who still have virus in their swabs. They may have been infected weeks ago before cases start to fall. So there is a lag. I would expect the ONS data to start falling by 25% a week in a week or too.
29/01/2021 19:15:28 1 0
bbc
Cases a leading indicator - it's 4+ weeks before some of those 'cases' die!
14
mc
29/01/2021 14:41:01 10 25
bbc
what concerns me more is where the govt are going to let business refuse entry if you have not been vacinated. this must not be allowed. some people can not or do not want this vacinne and should not be discriminate against in a democratic society or are we heading towards a police state
27
29/01/2021 14:46:58 19 6
bbc
Whether you have the vaccine or not is your choice - coming into the UK without vaccination is not your choice so grow up or shut up.
84
29/01/2021 15:06:10 1 5
bbc
A bit simplistic really. Some people can't take the vaccine for fear of a serious allergic reaction.
3
29/01/2021 14:39:51 32 18
bbc
That's because this is not a lockdown, it is 'some restrictions'. Look outside and it is obviously far too busy.

Proper lockdowns work - what we have does not
28
29/01/2021 14:47:04 19 3
bbc
We will have to learn to live with this virus, as it's staying.Vaccination will help with that. It will mean far fewer hospitalisations & deaths, so the NHS can then look after everyone needing care, not just Covid patients. We need a plan to get things open again, so we can start to live rather than exist. We need our friends and families. We need a break, a holiday. Kids need their education.
29
29/01/2021 14:47:22 18 20
bbc
Stable is better than rising, but we really should be seeing infections falling and rapidly.

What is going on that allows this to keep spreading?

Perhaps we need to prepare for a PROPER lockdown (as in 2+ weeks notice for businesses and people to stock up as necessary and then absolutely nobody on the streets except for those keeping the lights on).
36
29/01/2021 14:50:21 14 1
bbc
The thing is, we can and did manage a proper lockdown before, and I think most people would prefer an absolute stop for 3 weeks if it meant that we regained our freedoms sooner in the long run.

Winter is the best time to do it when the weather doesn't permit outdoor socialising.

Actually question where people are going. I haven't been questioned once on my way to the shops or work the whole time
38
29/01/2021 14:51:00 5 1
bbc
I would love to see more stats on where it has been caught, Looks like office places have been an issue.
20
29/01/2021 14:44:10 29 22
bbc
Lockdowns work. It is the failure of people and businesses to follow the rules correctly, combined with the more virulent strains that have kept the infection rate higher than it might be, combined with pressure groups who simply cannot get their heads round the reality of the situation applying political pressure on all the govts of the UK that have led to the infection rate being higher.
30
29/01/2021 14:48:57 11 2
bbc
Bit wordy but I get the drift.
31
29/01/2021 14:49:08 83 33
bbc
Hardly surprising when some people think its okay to join hundreds more people in a confined railway arch rave party, or travel hundreds of miles to join a mass birthday party in the Midlands. Numerous shoppers in every supermarket not wearing face masks (if unable to wear mask on health grounds surely they are most vulnerable & should be shielding like my daughter)
NHS is under extreme pressure
87
29/01/2021 15:06:52 88 8
bbc
I do a supermarket shop weekly, and the odd top up at the local Co-op, and I can honestly say I haven’t seen anyone without a face covering whilst in the shops for months.
149
29/01/2021 15:24:13 3 1
bbc
Oh yeah there’s loads of those guys....
343
29/01/2021 16:10:31 6 1
bbc
In the supermarket where I work numbers of shoppers overall are well down on normal levels meaning more space for all. In the last couple of weeks non mask wearers are now extremely rare. So I feel pretty safe at work.
477
29/01/2021 16:34:53 5 1
bbc
So you suggest they stay at home and go silently and invisibly mad?
If all the vulnerable shielded we would not have an issue at all.
579
29/01/2021 16:57:45 3 8
bbc
Stop blaming the public for everything...theres a clown in power
29/01/2021 19:20:18 4 0
bbc
Don't forget politicians like our PM travelling around the country and dragging hundreds with him (drivers, security, secretaries, journalists with camera and sound people and numerous other luvvies), getting in the way pf people doing a tough job just so he (thinks he) can court popularity. Ludicrous and totally counter to the rules!
29/01/2021 20:12:02 0 0
bbc
I totally agree. If they are vulnerable they shouldn’t be out. End of story!
29/01/2021 22:06:51 1 0
bbc
If one cannot wear a mask it is important to dodge all those people talking loudly, often with their masks loose from pulling it around their chins. The term ‘vulnerable’ is overused; the statistical probability of serious infection is greater the older, weaker, or fatter, people are. Given that if you are wearing a mask and I’m not able to, you are a greater risk to me.
29/01/2021 22:17:30 1 0
bbc
If you and your daughter are at least 2m's away from the venue what is your problem? The NHS being under pressure as a totality is no different than any other winter and if you don't believe that then I am sorry you don't understand that the NHS and Gov't are broken institutions seemingly in the grip of Big Pharma's greedy tentacles.
32
29/01/2021 14:49:50 148 33
bbc
It's pretty frustrating these numbers are not coming down faster.

We typically like to focus on the serve breaches of lockdown like parties and weddings.

But the issue is large numbers of people mixing households, making small incremental breaches that they feel are justifiable, extending the size of their bubbles and dragging this out longer.
226
29/01/2021 15:46:31 48 11
bbc
so so true
400
29/01/2021 16:19:59 1 5
bbc
Fully agree. Unfortunately at no point (to my knowledge) have we been explicitly told to minimise contact and interaction with others. Even popping down to the shops to buy a newspaper has a risk attached.
543
29/01/2021 16:47:51 0 0
bbc
Actually I think the data is showing that offices and warehouses are where most of the transmission is occurring at the moment.
719
29/01/2021 17:30:21 1 0
bbc
The number of cases, hospital admissions and number of people in hospital are coming down fast. Deaths are now also falling.
The surveillance studies are likely to show a drop in the next couple of weeks.
937
29/01/2021 18:22:30 7 0
bbc
too many people have multiple bubbles as it suits them, and in turn the members of each of the bubble ALSO have multiple bubbles, in reality there's a large pool of potential spreaders 'all obeying their version of the rules'
How do you know Gash? Removed
29/01/2021 18:49:58 1 1
bbc
Is this another assumption Ash? Maybe the increase initially of positive cases straight after lockdown is expected given that people stay in far more together so it's only natural that the virus will continue to spread inside homes. It's probably inevitable.
29/01/2021 19:00:24 5 0
bbc
It's, as usual, the minority making lives hell for everyone else.....
29/01/2021 19:21:38 1 2
bbc
I don’t think it has as much to do with households mixing. It’s more likely to be supermarkets and open workplaces like distribution warehouses.
29/01/2021 19:38:21 2 1
bbc
You can’t really call this half-hearted approach a “lockdown”.

The slacker the restrictions the slower the cases will fall and the longer this will drag on.
30/01/2021 04:33:10 0 0
bbc
Actually, it is shops/supermarkets, workplaces, schools/pre-schools, public transport and hospitals that are responsible for the vast majority of infections.
That is not to say that everyone shouldn't do their bit but it is important to keep some perspective.
4
29/01/2021 14:39:58 10 37
bbc
New infections on the slide. Time to get schools reopened.
33
29/01/2021 14:50:10 14 5
bbc
Doh! Lets keep doing exactly the same thing that got us the worst death rate in the world.

The modern equivalent of going over the top and advancing very slowly toward the enemy through machine gun fire. Over and over and over and over...

Criminal incompetence, and those that support it are lemmings being led by donkeys.

Why should Britain tremble eh?
34
29/01/2021 14:50:17 13 7
bbc
Timed my daily walk wrong today. Probably due to the poor weather this week. Many, probably to many had the same idea. Genuinely can't blame them. What I can't understand is the lack of effort, to keep distance. Making it worse we had 2 wpc's walking side by side. Talk about leading by example.
45
29/01/2021 14:53:49 10 12
bbc
Can't catch the virus outside walking past people briefly.
47
29/01/2021 14:54:25 5 0
bbc
2 WPC's ? Walking? Wow.... Haven't seen a copper walking for a very long time.
61
29/01/2021 14:59:43 1 0
bbc
Get their badge numbers ??
62
29/01/2021 15:00:38 2 3
bbc
probably on their way to the hair stylists at the nick!!
63
29/01/2021 15:00:39 1 2
bbc
How dare they walk side by side! Whatever next? Walking AND talking? Those crazy, selfish people
1
29/01/2021 14:35:48 18 23
bbc
So much for lockdowns actually working, but at least the rapid vaccine rollout will get the important measures of deaths and hospital admissions down.
35
29/01/2021 14:50:20 8 1
bbc
Lockdowns should be last resort but some people seem to be almost enjoying it. Failure to use data correctly to reduce the impact is the real failing, look at the office infection rate compared to restaurants and cafes. The data has always been there.
29
29/01/2021 14:47:22 18 20
bbc
Stable is better than rising, but we really should be seeing infections falling and rapidly.

What is going on that allows this to keep spreading?

Perhaps we need to prepare for a PROPER lockdown (as in 2+ weeks notice for businesses and people to stock up as necessary and then absolutely nobody on the streets except for those keeping the lights on).
36
29/01/2021 14:50:21 14 1
bbc
The thing is, we can and did manage a proper lockdown before, and I think most people would prefer an absolute stop for 3 weeks if it meant that we regained our freedoms sooner in the long run.

Winter is the best time to do it when the weather doesn't permit outdoor socialising.

Actually question where people are going. I haven't been questioned once on my way to the shops or work the whole time
37
29/01/2021 14:50:46 258 13
bbc
As always, hospital admissions are the best judge of the volume and impact of the virus spread, and they are also falling. They may be a week behind infection data, but clearly things are moving in the right direction. Especially as those vaccinated are hopefully being taken out of the firing line.
Yep. Time to open the schools, the shops, the cinemas, restaurants and pubs. Let’s ***k it up one last time! Removed
442
29/01/2021 16:27:22 6 15
bbc
Admissions are barely falling which reflects how close 1 R is. Restrictions need to be tighter for a few weeks to reduce the intense pressure on the NHS. And in case others have not noticed, vaccination numbers are much lower this week.
565
29/01/2021 16:55:13 3 1
bbc
In reality, hospital admissions are the most important statistic. As these numbers determine the pressure on the NHS. The end game for society will be a situation where COVID hospital numbers are low enough for the NHS to cope and deaths are at a level that society deems acceptable.
721
29/01/2021 17:30:36 3 2
bbc
Correct. And hospital admissions in the last 7 days are 14% lower than they were the previous 7 days

Funnily enough that coincides with new cases data which showed that in the 7 days ending 15th Jan new cases were 14% lower than the week ending 8th January. With a roughly 1-2 week lag between new cases being identified and hospitalisations, that indicates the PHE daily figures are infact accurate
839
29/01/2021 17:51:52 0 1
bbc
The positivity ratio is also a good metric and for pillar 1+2 community testing & NHS by PCR tests this has come down from 13 to 8% over the past 3 weeks. So, the drop in cases in not primarily driven by reduced testing.
Bear in mind that PCR tests continue to show positive for some people a few weeks after infection, which could cause rests from systematic surveys to lag behind.
29/01/2021 19:14:25 1 1
bbc
But people are spending much longer in hospital before discharge or death - so beds are still under enormous pressure!
29
29/01/2021 14:47:22 18 20
bbc
Stable is better than rising, but we really should be seeing infections falling and rapidly.

What is going on that allows this to keep spreading?

Perhaps we need to prepare for a PROPER lockdown (as in 2+ weeks notice for businesses and people to stock up as necessary and then absolutely nobody on the streets except for those keeping the lights on).
38
29/01/2021 14:51:00 5 1
bbc
I would love to see more stats on where it has been caught, Looks like office places have been an issue.
46
29/01/2021 14:54:14 8 0
bbc
And the majority of offices can all work remotely. Ours does, we just have one person who visits intermittently to make sure the site has no issues and to sort and forward post to staff working from home.

It's not difficult to do and we've had nearly a year now to get our houses in order.
12
29/01/2021 14:41:29 23 22
bbc
The ‘lockdown’ rules this time round are too flexible. The government is incapable of learning from experience. More deaths to come as a result of the government’s criminal neglect. Saying you ‘take full responsibility’ isn’t the same as actually doing it.
39
29/01/2021 14:51:10 9 4
bbc
You missed out any reference to the general public who should have learnt from experience.....
14
mc
29/01/2021 14:41:01 10 25
bbc
what concerns me more is where the govt are going to let business refuse entry if you have not been vacinated. this must not be allowed. some people can not or do not want this vacinne and should not be discriminate against in a democratic society or are we heading towards a police state
40
29/01/2021 14:52:11 8 4
bbc
Too bad. The collective safety of the population requires individuals put their paranoid nonsense on hold. I would advocate mandatory vaccinations for all, excluding only those who are unable due to medical reasons.

Grow up.
88
29/01/2021 15:07:41 3 1
bbc
I have a serious allergy and won't be able to take the Pfizer vaccine but might be able to have the Oxford one. Still, apart from those unable to take it for medical reasons, I don't agree with mandatory vaccinations in principle. It's a slippery slope. I would hope that education would work better.
9
29/01/2021 14:40:42 18 6
bbc
Lockdowns do work, if everyone sticks to the rules. Wear a mask, keep 2m distance and wash hands. Simple.
41
29/01/2021 14:52:43 5 16
bbc
You're right, lockdowns do work. Lockdowns work to cause people to have their vital operations cancelled, cause record suicide, cause jobs to be lost and cause increase in domestic abuse as well as huge mental health problems.

I will never, ever support lockdowns
55
29/01/2021 14:55:54 4 13
bbc
Well said. The number of deaths attributable to lockdowns will be far higher than the number of covid deaths.
109
29/01/2021 15:11:37 9 0
bbc
?? Without any measures at all, we would be in a far worse place. Hasn't there been enough misery and death for you then? There is not evidence to support that the suicide rate has risen due to the pandemic.
42
Bod
29/01/2021 14:48:54 358 67
bbc
So the Government dashboard was a good enough source of data when the cases were rising dramatically but now the cases are falling it's not such a good indicator after all, strange?
122
29/01/2021 15:16:31 175 86
bbc
What do you suspect is the BBCs agenda?
And head of government the morbidly obese one Bojo breaches essential travel restrictions and goes to Scotland for a propaganda visit! Removed
183
29/01/2021 15:32:12 30 89
bbc
If we all stop getting tested this all goes away. Then they can scare us with global warming, now called climate change, when everyone cottoned on to the fact our summers are getting colder!!
197
29/01/2021 15:37:49 32 17
bbc
Cases are rising again in some areas so please don't get complacent too soon.
304
29/01/2021 16:01:19 2 1
bbc
I think covid is one news story is one where since we are all involved, in many ways each of us know as much as the government or the BBC as to how things are going.
Whether the current infection rate being stable is good news or bad news depends on a personal point of view.
Personally I am hopeful that the end of March will see us in a much better position.
422
29/01/2021 16:23:33 3 6
bbc
And your point is? The article looks at various sources of data which will not always agree. Remember the government dashboard only records those who have taken the trouble to get a test - most people with don't have the symptoms or just don't care if they are infected.
427
29/01/2021 16:24:35 8 1
bbc
They are different statistics, one measure NEW infections (falling) and the other measures proportion of the population CURRENTLY infected so will have people who contracted the infection up to 2 weeks ago.

There is also a slightly bigger lag in the ONS figures
522
29/01/2021 16:41:44 5 3
bbc
Last week the apparently authoritative data set was the Imperial College one, which the BBC prominently reported.

Despite the data glaringly missing most of December!
753
29/01/2021 17:37:21 0 4
bbc
bbc dont be swayed by some negative thoughts on your data ,through out the uk people are right behind you in your efforts
26
29/01/2021 14:46:23 164 25
bbc
One set of data says one thing, other set of data says the complete opposite, & I'm sorry BBC but "figures may be skewed...numbers of tests falling after first week of Jan" simply isn't true

# of tests each day hasn't fallen since start of Jan

Fact is there were avg of 60k testing positive every day in first week of Jan, past 7 days the avg is 28k

Cases are definitely falling, no q about it
43
29/01/2021 14:53:06 105 22
bbc
The problem with the daily testing is that it requires people to come forward. We likely saw a peak at Christmas because additional people took the test to have re-assurance around Christmas.
People are now in "lockdown" and less interested in taking a test. Therefore we are likely finding a lower % of total cases.
69
29/01/2021 15:02:50 15 0
bbc
Hospital admissions are also falling, and have been for over a week. I would guess that these are the most accurate indications, but suffer from an even longer delay between virus transmission to hospital admission. The hospital admissions would seem to validate the figures based on positive tests published by PHE.
147
29/01/2021 15:23:41 7 1
bbc
And the worsening weather! Also if the driver in the family tested positive first, there is little incentive on the rest of the family to struggle to a testing station if they develop symptoms. That is why the random surveys are more informative.
202
29/01/2021 15:40:32 2 1
bbc
Also if most people are obeying lockdown restrictions then they are not in the position of needing a test because of fewer points of possible infection.
235
29/01/2021 15:48:52 2 1
bbc
Could also be that fewer people in the community are feeling ill enough to need a test. If so, good: it would suggest that severe Covid is becoming less common outside hospitals and care homes.
420
Tom
29/01/2021 16:23:16 3 0
bbc
I don't believe that is the case. The criteria for testing has not changed. Most people still feel obliged to take a test if they have symptoms. This study will also include asymptomatic people which is the group most likely to be driving new infections and therefore needs to be reported. However, the statistics we should be most concerned about are the tested figures and the hospitalisations.
434
29/01/2021 16:25:41 4 0
bbc
Sorry but that's just rubbish. All teachers and TAs are taking two tests a week for a start. The testing is just as rigerous as it has been, if not more so. Look at the cases graph , when they went up they were soaring, but when they are plummeting at the same rate they are "stabilising".
667
29/01/2021 17:19:02 0 0
bbc
PEOPLE WERE OUT SHOPPING in SOUTHERN part of ENGLAND with nowt better to do , started seeing walk in pop up test stations with virtually no wait and no appointments needed ,without having to go on bloody line, MIGHT AS WELL now get tested , which we did and i came back positive , a month or 2 before this we had to go phone , wait and answer a 100 plus questions and then u might get a test
817
29/01/2021 17:47:48 0 0
bbc
This is a possible explanation. If people have a slight cough, but aren't going to work/school or seeing friends and family the test seems like a hassle.
But it doesn't explain the falling hospital admissions. (down to 3,300 on 22/1 from 4,500 on 12/1)
855
29/01/2021 17:55:14 2 0
bbc
Ash, actually a lot more people are being tested now than they were over Christmas. Testing dipped in the week after Christmas - the last week has seen the highest number of tests so far
29/01/2021 18:45:42 2 0
bbc
Is that your assumption Ash - or is this based on evidence? I'm not certain if I thought I had Covid but was at home instead of work that I would be any less inclined to get a test.
11
29/01/2021 14:41:17 30 11
bbc
are you nuts ?
44
29/01/2021 14:53:48 3 13
bbc
Let's stay locked up forever. Who needs a job anyway? Or an immune system for that matter
34
29/01/2021 14:50:17 13 7
bbc
Timed my daily walk wrong today. Probably due to the poor weather this week. Many, probably to many had the same idea. Genuinely can't blame them. What I can't understand is the lack of effort, to keep distance. Making it worse we had 2 wpc's walking side by side. Talk about leading by example.
45
29/01/2021 14:53:49 10 12
bbc
Can't catch the virus outside walking past people briefly.
59
29/01/2021 14:57:25 6 0
bbc
What's the point of the 2 MTR rule then?
68
29/01/2021 15:02:47 7 0
bbc
Not entire true. IF people were very close and say, shouting towards you, it's still possible, though unlikely....hence the need for social distancing.
94
29/01/2021 15:08:55 7 0
bbc
The risk is lower, because (for most the time) the wind will diffuse what you're both breathing in or exhaling. However, there's still a slight risk.
403
Pip
29/01/2021 16:20:14 1 0
bbc
Are you sure..........?
38
29/01/2021 14:51:00 5 1
bbc
I would love to see more stats on where it has been caught, Looks like office places have been an issue.
46
29/01/2021 14:54:14 8 0
bbc
And the majority of offices can all work remotely. Ours does, we just have one person who visits intermittently to make sure the site has no issues and to sort and forward post to staff working from home.

It's not difficult to do and we've had nearly a year now to get our houses in order.
34
29/01/2021 14:50:17 13 7
bbc
Timed my daily walk wrong today. Probably due to the poor weather this week. Many, probably to many had the same idea. Genuinely can't blame them. What I can't understand is the lack of effort, to keep distance. Making it worse we had 2 wpc's walking side by side. Talk about leading by example.
47
29/01/2021 14:54:25 5 0
bbc
2 WPC's ? Walking? Wow.... Haven't seen a copper walking for a very long time.
48
bbc
Removed
49
29/01/2021 14:50:32 5 11
bbc
If I had written this article the BBC would have censored it on the basis of Covid mis-information. ONS are at odds with proven case statistics, but, BBC is prepared to give ONS preference. There has always been difficulty establishing the exact number of cases but the trend in the proven statistics does not lie. The trend is dramatically downward and this is happening because cases are falling!
76
29/01/2021 15:04:32 9 2
bbc
You are totally wrong and it is you peddling misinformation. The published stats you describe are people who have come forward for testing. The ONS takes a random sample from the population at large which is a more accurate indication of the true infection rate. The sample is calibrated to ensure its statistical significance. Try Statistics for Dummies, £11.75 Amazon.
20
29/01/2021 14:44:10 29 22
bbc
Lockdowns work. It is the failure of people and businesses to follow the rules correctly, combined with the more virulent strains that have kept the infection rate higher than it might be, combined with pressure groups who simply cannot get their heads round the reality of the situation applying political pressure on all the govts of the UK that have led to the infection rate being higher.
50
29/01/2021 14:54:46 2 11
bbc
No they don't. And neither do masks
29/01/2021 20:00:03 0 0
bbc
The statistics show, clearly, that they do. Unfortunately when they are lifted some people act irresponsibly. Round here 2 cafes have put out pavement seats some days this week.
51
29/01/2021 14:54:56 11 8
bbc
HMG's Covid Regulations themselves slow the pace of recovery because they have far too many exemptions allowing activities that draw people together. Since when was a Garden Centre 'Essential' ? Etc.
52
29/01/2021 14:55:10 60 3
bbc
I think the ONS survey figures are probably consistent with the published "confirmed new cases", which have been falling for the past 3 weeks.

The ONS survey is reporting the number of people currently with virus in their swabs. Many of these people would have been infected some weeks ago, so it is to be expected that there will be a delay before the ONS measurement falls as well.
613
29/01/2021 17:06:48 33 54
bbc
They are not really all "cases" though, are they? The vast majority require no medical treatment whatsoever. Just part of the scaremongering to keep this thing ramped up, as the hospitals were again not overwhelmed.
742
29/01/2021 17:33:51 3 0
bbc
Yes I think the number of people testing positive in the ONS survey will always come down more slowly than the daily dashboard because of this lag.

Somebody who had a positive test reported in the daily figures and is also taking part in the ONS survey could return a positive test for ONS, which could be recorded one or two weeks after the first test was reported in the daily dashboard.
29/01/2021 19:18:56 2 0
bbc
You’ve got it! They are measuring different things. One new cases, incidence, the other prevalence, number with. The latter lags behind the former.
10
29/01/2021 14:41:06 18 15
bbc
I sense that you are one of these who will accept lockdown forever? Let's say that none of the social restrictions have a significant and lasting effect. What would you want to happen then?
53
29/01/2021 14:55:13 6 0
bbc
Not at all @frumpyas, just would like to see a better version of lifting lockdown than last time which wasn’t exactly successful. Vaccines should make a positive diff this time
24
29/01/2021 14:45:34 15 17
bbc
Current "restrictions" much more lax than Spring '20 ....result , unending lockdowns. Tighten up big time to let the vaccines kick in!
54
29/01/2021 14:55:36 4 12
bbc
You really hate freedom
75
29/01/2021 15:04:30 8 1
bbc
Most of us actually hate death.
121
29/01/2021 15:16:24 5 1
bbc
And you really hate reality
41
29/01/2021 14:52:43 5 16
bbc
You're right, lockdowns do work. Lockdowns work to cause people to have their vital operations cancelled, cause record suicide, cause jobs to be lost and cause increase in domestic abuse as well as huge mental health problems.

I will never, ever support lockdowns
55
29/01/2021 14:55:54 4 13
bbc
Well said. The number of deaths attributable to lockdowns will be far higher than the number of covid deaths.
103
29/01/2021 15:10:38 7 0
bbc
Almost impossible to be accurate about that claim.
16
29/01/2021 14:42:25 35 10
bbc
Good news is the vaccine roll out should be taking effect soon to further reduce daily infection numbers. The fall in net hospital occupancy maybe due to a switch to palliative care from active intervention for very long term patients, this is an unfortunate but inevitable consequence of this terrible virus.
56
29/01/2021 14:55:34 22 21
bbc
Sadly, the vaccination roll-out is still incredibly slow in Scotland.
80
29/01/2021 15:05:26 2 20
bbc
So many people seem to think the vaccine is the saviour. You're going to be in for a shock when they tell us there's another virus on the way which the vaccine doesn't protect us from so we need to go into lockdown again and again and again...
198
29/01/2021 15:38:57 9 6
bbc
No, it is not. Stop spreading lies.
215
29/01/2021 15:44:26 13 7
bbc
That's because Sturgeon is EU orientated.
381
29/01/2021 16:17:16 15 7
bbc
Maybe if nicola sturgeon concentrated on the job in hand rather than thinking about independence until this is dealt with scotlands vaccination programme would speed up
713
29/01/2021 17:29:26 1 5
bbc
You are so right NHS Highland hardly anyone vaccinated, neighbours over 90 just got jagged yesterday, all the rest of us still waiting, no letters, no appointments. Anyone says different is either fortunate or an SNP fanatic.
778
29/01/2021 17:41:11 6 0
bbc
The target was to vaccinate 560,000 by the end of Jan and that is going to be met. So if by incredibly slowly you mean on target and one of the few countries in the world to have already vaccinated 10% of the population then fine, otherwise you are just spouting party political drivel.
823
29/01/2021 17:48:25 2 6
bbc
It will get worse when Queen Nik sends Scotland's share of the vaccine to Brussels
975
29/01/2021 18:33:42 1 0
bbc
Change you administration then!
29/01/2021 19:52:31 0 0
bbc
You lot should be at the back of the queue
22
29/01/2021 14:44:16 23 10
bbc
Although if you look at the figures in Scotland the infection rate is half that of the rest of the UK and falling unlike in other parts.
57
29/01/2021 14:56:11 4 2
bbc
Evidence?
293
29/01/2021 15:59:25 6 3
bbc
Try reading the article???? It clearly states that Scotland has half the rate of England and is falling unlike the rest of UK
58
29/01/2021 14:57:02 45 7
bbc
Statistically this makes no sense - there is scope for variance between this study which shows little movement and the Govt dashboard figures which sees numbers dropping off a cliff but nothing this extreme - there is something clearly wrong somewhere - from my own experience and as someone working in healthcare I think the dashboard ones are more reflective of the situation on the ground
67
29/01/2021 15:02:34 34 4
bbc
It might be because this study is randomised, so it captures more of those without symptoms (crucial, because they can still spread it). Those choosing to apply for a test will probably do so because they have symptoms. 1 in 3 people have no symptoms.
803
29/01/2021 17:44:56 1 0
bbc
Statistically Dominic Cummings doesn’t make sense
815
29/01/2021 17:46:47 2 2
bbc
They're recording slightly different things.

The daily figure will mostly be people who have a test soon after noticing symptoms.

The ONS figure will record people who they tested for the virus last week, which will probably include some people tested maybe 10 days ago, who caught it weeks before that, when the daily figure was much higher than it is now.
45
29/01/2021 14:53:49 10 12
bbc
Can't catch the virus outside walking past people briefly.
59
29/01/2021 14:57:25 6 0
bbc
What's the point of the 2 MTR rule then?
23
29/01/2021 14:45:31 13 18
bbc
Not surprising there is no significant change when London's idiots are still flaunting the covid rules. Their ignorance and cretinism has no bounds - goodness knows what monsters they will bring into this world?
60
29/01/2021 14:57:51 12 0
bbc
There is NO part of the country where covidiots are not in evidence. The problem is far from being exclusive to London as you should well know.
I live in Wales so I have no reason to defend London in any way, but the truth is more important than creating meaningless scapegoats.
34
29/01/2021 14:50:17 13 7
bbc
Timed my daily walk wrong today. Probably due to the poor weather this week. Many, probably to many had the same idea. Genuinely can't blame them. What I can't understand is the lack of effort, to keep distance. Making it worse we had 2 wpc's walking side by side. Talk about leading by example.
61
29/01/2021 14:59:43 1 0
bbc
Get their badge numbers ??
34
29/01/2021 14:50:17 13 7
bbc
Timed my daily walk wrong today. Probably due to the poor weather this week. Many, probably to many had the same idea. Genuinely can't blame them. What I can't understand is the lack of effort, to keep distance. Making it worse we had 2 wpc's walking side by side. Talk about leading by example.
62
29/01/2021 15:00:38 2 3
bbc
probably on their way to the hair stylists at the nick!!
34
29/01/2021 14:50:17 13 7
bbc
Timed my daily walk wrong today. Probably due to the poor weather this week. Many, probably to many had the same idea. Genuinely can't blame them. What I can't understand is the lack of effort, to keep distance. Making it worse we had 2 wpc's walking side by side. Talk about leading by example.
63
29/01/2021 15:00:39 1 2
bbc
How dare they walk side by side! Whatever next? Walking AND talking? Those crazy, selfish people
64
29/01/2021 15:00:52 13 15
bbc
Time to start imprisoning those that break the lockdown laws or at least tagging them.
70
29/01/2021 15:03:19 8 11
bbc
I think you live in the wrong country. Are you sure you're not from North Korea?
83
drj
29/01/2021 15:05:55 1 5
bbc
Ban them to receive free NHS care!!
98
29/01/2021 15:10:08 3 2
bbc
Yawn
112
29/01/2021 15:12:41 3 1
bbc
Or maybe just shoot People ?? It's seem you love a Dictatorship
65
29/01/2021 15:01:14 45 11
bbc
Busy workplaces (such as factories, buildings sites and call centres) are probably the main spreaders now. With most of them still open and operating as normal it’s unlikely we’ll see infections dropping as fast as they did in March / April when many workplaces closed.

Remember also that in March / April the government was saying that there was little evidence masks provided protection.
349
29/01/2021 16:11:35 38 3
bbc
Re masks, at that time, the WHO was saying that masks not only offered little protection but could actually be harmful.
The government changed it’s message when the WHO did.
453
29/01/2021 16:29:00 2 0
bbc
Don't forget the great weather that we had during March / April and the novelty of it all.

Many people could enjoy the outdoors from their own gardens (not all granted) and did not need to venture out to get some fresh air. Now you see people walking to the shops and going on more regular shopping trips due to being weary of lockdown
544
29/01/2021 16:47:51 5 2
bbc
At last a comment that understands that workplaces are a major source of community transmission.Twice as many working as in the first lockdown because of employers and government policy changes.This needs to change if we are to get numbers down by Spring.
588
29/01/2021 17:00:59 3 0
bbc
It was also sunny and warm. Lots of variables at work here. Respiratory diseases (flu for example) don't do well in warm weather as can be seen by the massive fall in deaths during the summer despite all the massed gatherings.
896
29/01/2021 17:59:51 1 0
bbc
The government were issuing the latest know info from the WHO, and it took a further 6 months before studies confirmed that mask wearing indoors was a help not a hinderance. Anyway forget March/April we are in the here and now so using that as an excuse holds no water!
29/01/2021 19:21:53 1 0
bbc
AND the new strain is MUCH more contagious. For like-for-like infections we'd need far tougher restrictions than the first lockdown.
29/01/2021 19:27:54 0 2
bbc
I'll go further,there is no evidence masks do anything!
25
29/01/2021 14:46:14 274 61
bbc
We are turning a corner after an awful year not helped by some poor decisions but also the poor behaviour of a minority. this is not the time to relax and demand thing be open straight away, lets nail this completely get numbers down as much as possible and give the vaccine enough time to do its' work, anything else would be crazy, we have come this far lets not fall at the final hurdle.
66
29/01/2021 15:01:29 170 65
bbc
Nice idea but you simply can’t nail it completely- mass vaccination will help a lot but as a society we need to be less risk adverse to this otherwise normality will never resume
110
29/01/2021 15:11:37 18 15
bbc
Nicely put beagle
134
29/01/2021 15:20:16 30 19
bbc
Some of you may die, but that’s a risk I’m willing to take?
413
29/01/2021 16:21:50 19 5
bbc
Less risk averse?! Twice as many in hospital as in wave 1. Up to 1800 deaths and 60,000 cases per day. NHS is now effectively the Covid Treatment Service. Prediction is for 30,00 extra cancer deaths as people are not being treated. Thousands of people with heart attacks and strokes not going to hospital when they should and shortening their lives further. Perhaps not risk averse enough.
436
29/01/2021 16:25:59 11 18
bbc
guessing you arent old, vulnerable or work in the health service then so it's as long as it's somebody else's problem,,,
625
29/01/2021 17:09:52 1 0
bbc
Correct, my friend!
Removed
629
29/01/2021 17:10:31 4 1
bbc
If we were more risk adverse covid might have been stopped a long time ago.
644
29/01/2021 17:13:49 0 0
bbc
It will end up to having the Covid jab with the flu jab every year...no big deal!!
701
29/01/2021 17:26:26 2 0
bbc
Less risk averse how?
880
29/01/2021 18:03:01 4 0
bbc
High case numbers will not be a problem if they do not end up queuing for a hospital bed. Covid was downgraded from high-consequence infectious disease by the UK gov't in March but it has a huge negative impact if it causes hospitalisation. Once the more vulnerable get vaccinated, this will be happening less and normality can start to return, but not "free for all" like before - until 2022.
29/01/2021 18:59:26 0 1
bbc
And your 'yardstick' being.....

'Risk Averse' everyone - that's the answer to ALLLLLL our problems...
Rob
29/01/2021 19:27:21 2 0
bbc
Normality not much comfort if you're dead or dying.

Mind you, no-one is more risk averse than someone who craves the predictability of the past. Perhaps you need to be more open to change (bit less of a snowflake).
29/01/2021 20:17:35 1 1
bbc
We need herd immunity to achieve anything like normality. That can only be achieved by people building natural immunity or by being vaccinated. Once herd immunity is achieved (which doesn't mean the virus is eradicated) any risk will be greatly reduced. This will lead to a manageable situation = 'normality'.
29/01/2021 22:22:04 1 0
bbc
It's about the healthcare system. Too many covid infections and hospitalisations means the NHS won't cope. It will lead to NON Covid deaths from treatable medical conditions if the NHS is overwhelmed. It will snowball out of control and both the Covid and non covid death toll will be huge. That's the point behind "protect the NHS". It's not about being afraid of risk of one illness.
58
29/01/2021 14:57:02 45 7
bbc
Statistically this makes no sense - there is scope for variance between this study which shows little movement and the Govt dashboard figures which sees numbers dropping off a cliff but nothing this extreme - there is something clearly wrong somewhere - from my own experience and as someone working in healthcare I think the dashboard ones are more reflective of the situation on the ground
67
29/01/2021 15:02:34 34 4
bbc
It might be because this study is randomised, so it captures more of those without symptoms (crucial, because they can still spread it). Those choosing to apply for a test will probably do so because they have symptoms. 1 in 3 people have no symptoms.
105
29/01/2021 15:10:48 4 1
bbc
Maybe but we also know the asymptotic carry a far lower viral load so are much less likely to pass it to anyone other than those in very close contact - the difficulty is we do not know how statistically relevant that group is to the overall spread
45
29/01/2021 14:53:49 10 12
bbc
Can't catch the virus outside walking past people briefly.
68
29/01/2021 15:02:47 7 0
bbc
Not entire true. IF people were very close and say, shouting towards you, it's still possible, though unlikely....hence the need for social distancing.
43
29/01/2021 14:53:06 105 22
bbc
The problem with the daily testing is that it requires people to come forward. We likely saw a peak at Christmas because additional people took the test to have re-assurance around Christmas.
People are now in "lockdown" and less interested in taking a test. Therefore we are likely finding a lower % of total cases.
69
29/01/2021 15:02:50 15 0
bbc
Hospital admissions are also falling, and have been for over a week. I would guess that these are the most accurate indications, but suffer from an even longer delay between virus transmission to hospital admission. The hospital admissions would seem to validate the figures based on positive tests published by PHE.
64
29/01/2021 15:00:52 13 15
bbc
Time to start imprisoning those that break the lockdown laws or at least tagging them.
70
29/01/2021 15:03:19 8 11
bbc
I think you live in the wrong country. Are you sure you're not from North Korea?
116
29/01/2021 15:14:58 0 0
bbc
Maybe he wants a wall around a city as prison
71
29/01/2021 15:03:25 1 1
bbc
3,140 acute respiratory infection care home outbreaks in England in 4 weeks since weekend post Christmas, reported to PHE - not far off peak 4 weeks April - Faisal Islam (Business)
https://twitter.com/faisalislam/status/1354939266158260224

V.good summary from Lewis Goodall (Newsnight)
https://twitter.com/lewis_goodall/status/1354542712947699713

Triggle & Pym would do well to follow their example
72
29/01/2021 15:04:11 2 0
bbc
The ZOE survey is the one to follow. This is behind the times.
73
29/01/2021 15:04:14 36 7
bbc
Surely to be expected. High numbers of infected have the potential to affect high numbers of others. A reason for the slow fall compared to lockdown 1 is surely obvious, in lockdown 1 lots of people worked from home fewer are now and it has been reported the office is now a major source of transmission. NB it has been a long time since the Gov published data on jobs and associated infection risk.
161
29/01/2021 15:26:49 29 3
bbc
There may be some truth in that WU, but I suspect the early mild weather in April saved us from an even worse catastrophe at that time.
29/01/2021 19:23:37 1 1
bbc
AND it's far more contagious!
29/01/2021 22:29:04 0 1
bbc
One BBC article about office infections deflects completely from the truth that hospitals, care homes and schools are the main spreaders. Don't believe what you read/see in MSM so slavishly. Question the content and look at the alternative view to get balance.
74
29/01/2021 15:04:25 13 10
bbc
The govt should carry a govt health warning. Desmond Swayne infers the data is all wrong, the pandemic's flu and icu's are at normal capacity for this time of year. Meanwhile Gillian Keegan is allowed to prattle at will on Question Time about the success of so many tory interventions without identifying obvious missteps. Until the govt ditch sound bites and spin we're we're on repeat cycle.
54
29/01/2021 14:55:36 4 12
bbc
You really hate freedom
75
29/01/2021 15:04:30 8 1
bbc
Most of us actually hate death.
49
29/01/2021 14:50:32 5 11
bbc
If I had written this article the BBC would have censored it on the basis of Covid mis-information. ONS are at odds with proven case statistics, but, BBC is prepared to give ONS preference. There has always been difficulty establishing the exact number of cases but the trend in the proven statistics does not lie. The trend is dramatically downward and this is happening because cases are falling!
76
29/01/2021 15:04:32 9 2
bbc
You are totally wrong and it is you peddling misinformation. The published stats you describe are people who have come forward for testing. The ONS takes a random sample from the population at large which is a more accurate indication of the true infection rate. The sample is calibrated to ensure its statistical significance. Try Statistics for Dummies, £11.75 Amazon.
77
Ian
29/01/2021 15:05:05 10 15
bbc
Boris Johnson's ?? legacy ...

100000 deaths.

Just think ... 100000.

INCOMPETENT

But of course, there's a lecturn, a suit and every 5pm a posh person splutters hot air

????????????

And people believe it! "Well, he's doing the best he can", the say. Hmmm ??????

One ... hundred ... thousand
78
29/01/2021 15:05:08 8 8
bbc
This is not good news, we need to see them reducing, not just stable, I feel more restrictions are needed. We are still seeing crowded Tube trains (as they are running less - work that one out) and people pushing the rules to their own interpretation and desires. Just like Nightingale hospitals are there to help, we should set up Cromwell prisons to put persistant rule-breakers in.
79
29/01/2021 15:05:13 8 6
bbc
I think Boris Johnson is under a lot of pressure with this divide of people wanting stricter lockdowns and those who want to ignore the restrictions. If half of us know an absolute strict lockdown will rid us of this virus, the other ignorant lot are going to ruin it anyway. Boris is being pulled in two here. What can he do for the best. Cont'd
124
29/01/2021 15:17:50 5 1
bbc
Boris needs to look at what needs to be done, and bloody do it properly.
No half-hearted measures, you can NEVER please all the people all the time, so do what the scientists and NHS recommend, to get the bloody thing under control.
184
29/01/2021 15:32:46 0 1
bbc
Sad that 10 months in people seriously believe that with a a strict lockdown the virus will move on -lockdowns have not eradicated the virus anywhere in the world and odd that you have the arrogance to assume that anybody that thinks otherwise is ignorant -im not a renowned virologist like others on this site , but Anders Tegnal, Ioannides , Wittorski and others the BBC ignore are
56
29/01/2021 14:55:34 22 21
bbc
Sadly, the vaccination roll-out is still incredibly slow in Scotland.
80
29/01/2021 15:05:26 2 20
bbc
So many people seem to think the vaccine is the saviour. You're going to be in for a shock when they tell us there's another virus on the way which the vaccine doesn't protect us from so we need to go into lockdown again and again and again...
538
29/01/2021 16:47:11 1 0
bbc
May as well step get your affairs in order before stepping outside with a revolver Brian. Save yourself the grief. In the meantime, I'll look to the future with a little less negativity. What will be will be but until it's with us I see no need to worry myself ill.
81
29/01/2021 15:05:28 9 8
bbc
In Marks and Spencer this morning.....food hall full....no-one social distancing........husbands and wives shopping together (can't the driver wait in the car park?) Someone pushed in front of me in the queue so I told him he had queue jumped. He mumbled an apology and did the same thing again by moving behind. Staff too frightened to say anything. Security NBG.
29/01/2021 20:56:56 0 0
bbc
M&S are the worst shop I have been to on this. Admittedly, it was once- but once was enough. No other shop has been anything like as lax.
82
29/01/2021 15:05:45 86 41
bbc
Boris didn't cause this virus and I think he is doing his hardest to please everyone. If only the people partying, travelling and not wearing masks would adhere to the rules we might be triumphant.
96
29/01/2021 15:09:35 43 53
bbc
Cummings
107
29/01/2021 15:11:01 11 5
bbc
Sir Desmond Swayne doesn't think any of this Covid thing is true. Boris cannot please his own clown party.
119
29/01/2021 15:15:20 12 6
bbc
BoJo did not cause the virus, but the only ones he should be pleasing are the scientists and the NHS. And all those who continue to party, travel, and do not wear a mask, you are the reason the figures are so high. SHAME on you all.
432
29/01/2021 16:25:10 3 3
bbc
He hasnt caused it but he certainly helped it spread with his xmas plans and eating out subsidies and bowing to pressure from the travel industry if he wants to make a difference he needs to learn from his mistakes his actions have caused countless deaths
620
29/01/2021 17:07:24 3 0
bbc
Yes he didnt, but his poor response led to such a huge deathtoll!
He cant lead and trying to please everyone is no excuse, being a narcissist liar doesnt help either
64
29/01/2021 15:00:52 13 15
bbc
Time to start imprisoning those that break the lockdown laws or at least tagging them.
83
drj
29/01/2021 15:05:55 1 5
bbc
Ban them to receive free NHS care!!
164
29/01/2021 15:27:25 2 0
bbc
Nope. They’ve paid into the system as much as you have.
27
29/01/2021 14:46:58 19 6
bbc
Whether you have the vaccine or not is your choice - coming into the UK without vaccination is not your choice so grow up or shut up.
84
29/01/2021 15:06:10 1 5
bbc
A bit simplistic really. Some people can't take the vaccine for fear of a serious allergic reaction.
20
29/01/2021 14:44:10 29 22
bbc
Lockdowns work. It is the failure of people and businesses to follow the rules correctly, combined with the more virulent strains that have kept the infection rate higher than it might be, combined with pressure groups who simply cannot get their heads round the reality of the situation applying political pressure on all the govts of the UK that have led to the infection rate being higher.
85
29/01/2021 15:06:30 5 3
bbc
It depends what you mean by “lockdowns work”!- they do in the short term but no longer otherwise we wouldn't be in a third one - also there is no correlation between how tough they are and the ultimate outcome - ask Spain or Italy whose lockdowns were longer and far more draconian but have ended up pretty much the same place as us
29/01/2021 18:48:40 1 0
bbc
no, they haven't - UK deaths are highest in Europe both in absolute numbers and as percentage.
86
29/01/2021 15:06:50 10 13
bbc
We are on lockdown, but a lot of people about.
If we all socially distanced etc. properly, we would see the results. But we don't.
8 March for schools is unlikely, with over 25,000 positives/1,000+ deaths a day; get them down to under 3,000/100, maybe, but I doubt we can do that in five weeks.
We are the worst in the world - partly the G, but mainly us. No responsibility nor common sense.
93
29/01/2021 15:08:33 5 2
bbc
What are YOU doing out and about ?
31
29/01/2021 14:49:08 83 33
bbc
Hardly surprising when some people think its okay to join hundreds more people in a confined railway arch rave party, or travel hundreds of miles to join a mass birthday party in the Midlands. Numerous shoppers in every supermarket not wearing face masks (if unable to wear mask on health grounds surely they are most vulnerable & should be shielding like my daughter)
NHS is under extreme pressure
87
29/01/2021 15:06:52 88 8
bbc
I do a supermarket shop weekly, and the odd top up at the local Co-op, and I can honestly say I haven’t seen anyone without a face covering whilst in the shops for months.
192
29/01/2021 15:34:51 10 3
bbc
I must come and shop near you in that case ??. Actually mask wearing compliance has improved near me over the months, but there are still idiots (who don't think it applies) and those with low levels of spatial awareness
281
29/01/2021 15:57:18 4 3
bbc
I could do with shopping where you live then as I see people not wearing them or them hanging off an ear or just on their chin every visit!
752
29/01/2021 17:36:55 2 0
bbc
You probably live somewhere 'nice'. Not that that should matter but it really does. But of course the 'not nice' areas are not nice because of external influence, not behaviour.
29/01/2021 19:29:30 0 0
bbc
I agree. There is a large Sainsbury's and an even larger Tesco near where I live, and the level of compliance is very good. I think Mark Crossley should report this rather than making comments on the BBC (apologies if you already have Mark). No point complaining and not doing anything about it.
30/01/2021 09:51:00 0 0
bbc
It obviously depends where you live & where you shop. Waitrose, everyone has a mask, Lidl some don’t. Nice area everyone wears one, poor area with a bit of diversity (now known as the disadvantaged groups) ooh, there you go, very few masks.
The spread is behavioural and there’s no doubt which groups are letting us all down
40
29/01/2021 14:52:11 8 4
bbc
Too bad. The collective safety of the population requires individuals put their paranoid nonsense on hold. I would advocate mandatory vaccinations for all, excluding only those who are unable due to medical reasons.

Grow up.
88
29/01/2021 15:07:41 3 1
bbc
I have a serious allergy and won't be able to take the Pfizer vaccine but might be able to have the Oxford one. Still, apart from those unable to take it for medical reasons, I don't agree with mandatory vaccinations in principle. It's a slippery slope. I would hope that education would work better.
8
29/01/2021 14:40:36 56 5
bbc
Looking at the infection rates among different age groups in the survey report, there appears to be a clear decline in rates among school ages (Year 7-11 in particular has practically plummeted since December).

Given how high they were before schools closed and the argument they enable transmission between homes, this reduction should lead to further declines once the lag time passes.
89
29/01/2021 15:07:41 49 41
bbc
I fear Man’s hubris in thinking he can overcome Mother Nature has proved a costly and embarrassing failure.
The only trickier thing than trying to control an endemic airborne virus is getting Man to admit defeat, before all we have left is despair.
139
29/01/2021 15:21:43 10 2
bbc
So are you suggesting that there is no point in doing anything? Covid may be dangerous to some people but it is not the Black Death.
154
29/01/2021 15:25:00 6 4
bbc
Your correct. We should all just die.
360
29/01/2021 16:13:39 4 2
bbc
So your now going to walk around naked and renounce all of man kinds inventions and go back to living in a cave then ?
29/01/2021 19:04:55 0 2
bbc
How positive.....thank you for making our day.
90
29/01/2021 15:07:48 9 13
bbc
Who said we had a "strong and stable" conservative government in UK?

Now, instead, we have a "high and stable" coronavirus governing the UK.
153
29/01/2021 15:24:49 7 7
bbc
Thank goodness we did not have weak and unstable Labour government under Corbyn governing the UK.
26
29/01/2021 14:46:23 164 25
bbc
One set of data says one thing, other set of data says the complete opposite, & I'm sorry BBC but "figures may be skewed...numbers of tests falling after first week of Jan" simply isn't true

# of tests each day hasn't fallen since start of Jan

Fact is there were avg of 60k testing positive every day in first week of Jan, past 7 days the avg is 28k

Cases are definitely falling, no q about it
91
29/01/2021 15:07:54 10 35
bbc
This is good news.

Now let's open schools and borders asap and get the economy restarted - for the many not the few.
129
29/01/2021 15:19:04 33 4
bbc
I’m pretty sure “for the many not the few” doesn’t mean “let’s let the vulnerable and old die so the rest of us can go on holiday”
180
29/01/2021 15:31:02 18 6
bbc
So you want to go back to loads more cases, so that you can go out for a beer?

We are getting close to the end of the tunnel, but self-centred folks like you want to drive the train out through the side of the tunnel!

My cynical side would ask whose will you are looking forward to the reading of...
mum
29/01/2021 18:51:35 2 0
bbc
I wish I lived in your simplistic world. You need to think things through? What do you think might happen if everything opened up now?
29/01/2021 20:19:27 1 0
bbc
Yes, let's kill another 100,000 people instead of waiting until April when those most vulnerable to the virus have been vaccinated & had time for the vaccine to become effective...

What an utterly ridiculous thing to suggest.
92
29/01/2021 15:08:19 3 5
bbc
There isn't enough encouragement from govt, for the vast majority of people, who are following the rules.

Where is our thank you ?

All we get is authoritarian willy-waving from Patel and co.
189
29/01/2021 15:34:34 0 2
bbc
I have heard lots of thanks and no authoritarian language. Perhaps we need more.
396
29/01/2021 16:19:41 0 0
bbc
And very silent on coppers breaking rules!!!!
429
Pip
29/01/2021 16:25:04 0 0
bbc
Ah, that's it, always thought that woman a bit strange, now I know why...........?
86
29/01/2021 15:06:50 10 13
bbc
We are on lockdown, but a lot of people about.
If we all socially distanced etc. properly, we would see the results. But we don't.
8 March for schools is unlikely, with over 25,000 positives/1,000+ deaths a day; get them down to under 3,000/100, maybe, but I doubt we can do that in five weeks.
We are the worst in the world - partly the G, but mainly us. No responsibility nor common sense.
93
29/01/2021 15:08:33 5 2
bbc
What are YOU doing out and about ?
45
29/01/2021 14:53:49 10 12
bbc
Can't catch the virus outside walking past people briefly.
94
29/01/2021 15:08:55 7 0
bbc
The risk is lower, because (for most the time) the wind will diffuse what you're both breathing in or exhaling. However, there's still a slight risk.
95
29/01/2021 15:09:02 3 5
bbc
Huge factories,building sites etc all open.Need 2 wk circuit breaker.Give vaccine numbers chance to grow ,then open up slowly after full and proper lockdown.No need for BM ,home bargains etc,most visiting just for something to do.
82
29/01/2021 15:05:45 86 41
bbc
Boris didn't cause this virus and I think he is doing his hardest to please everyone. If only the people partying, travelling and not wearing masks would adhere to the rules we might be triumphant.
96
29/01/2021 15:09:35 43 53
bbc
Cummings
Yawn. Removed
171
29/01/2021 15:29:00 2 3
bbc
Yes, but he is not Boris.
319
29/01/2021 16:06:04 5 4
bbc
Yawn Yawn Yawn
331
29/01/2021 16:08:28 5 3
bbc
So Cummings personally caused over 100,000 deaths, did he?

Did you have anything to say about the Labour politicians, like Stephen Kinnock, who broke the rules?
361
29/01/2021 16:13:44 5 1
bbc
The pointless BLM protests?
408
29/01/2021 16:20:50 2 0
bbc
Coppers having breakfasts and haircuts?
499
29/01/2021 16:39:20 3 0
bbc
Give up on that one for goodness sake!!
623
29/01/2021 17:08:27 1 0
bbc
Scots leader, she was elected by someone, Cummings was not.
946
29/01/2021 18:24:31 1 0
bbc
And Boris & his entourage think it is essential to visit Scotland, not in my books. If he want to meet the public host a Zoom meeting and let people talk to him virtually.
979
29/01/2021 18:34:41 0 0
bbc
Turn the record off !
984
29/01/2021 18:35:20 0 0
bbc
Yes we have our own share of idiots.
29/01/2021 20:15:15 0 0
bbc
Your point is????
20
29/01/2021 14:44:10 29 22
bbc
Lockdowns work. It is the failure of people and businesses to follow the rules correctly, combined with the more virulent strains that have kept the infection rate higher than it might be, combined with pressure groups who simply cannot get their heads round the reality of the situation applying political pressure on all the govts of the UK that have led to the infection rate being higher.
97
29/01/2021 15:10:00 3 2
bbc
I don't think one can say "lockdown works" but doesn't work in real life. As a public health policy, it should be robust to the public's behaviour.

e.g. My strategy to become a millionaire is that everyone in the country gives me £1. This "works" in the sense that if everyone does, I get £68m, but it is a stupid strategy because not everyone would give me £1
64
29/01/2021 15:00:52 13 15
bbc
Time to start imprisoning those that break the lockdown laws or at least tagging them.
98
29/01/2021 15:10:08 3 2
bbc
Yawn
99
29/01/2021 15:10:13 1 3
bbc
perpetual lockdown?
132
29/01/2021 15:20:03 5 4
bbc
Well, in some form of other, unless we can get the infection rate down. And even if we do over the next few months, come Autumn, when the virus is stronger, we will have restrictions back again. Until our behaviour stops the spread, this is the new normal, and we brought it on ourselves by flouting the rules, no common sense, and irresponsibility for each other. The worst in the world, by far.
100
29/01/2021 15:10:28 5 1
bbc
If the study into COVID deaths near busy roads / polluted areas showed a strong correlation, can we all sue VW and other car manufacturers who faked their test results and were actually polluting far more than their tests showed and have contributed to a huge death rate across the world? Just a thought!
318
29/01/2021 16:05:30 0 0
bbc
Shows that German scientists can't be trusted.