Covid vaccine: Single-dose Johnson & Johnson jab is 66% effective
29/01/2021 | news | health | 3,713
An international trial shows the jab gives complete protection against hospitalisation and death.
1
29/01/2021 14:34:30 7 20
bbc
Soon there will be more vaccines than people, if the eu allows us to have any
6
29/01/2021 14:36:28 2 9
bbc
Like the sheep in New Zealand ... ha ha ha , nice one
2
29/01/2021 14:34:36 73 3
bbc
There's some really good news about these vaccines and the new one being produced in the north-east.
29/01/2021 23:01:39 3 2
bbc
Germany needs some desperately, they had more people die of Covid yesterday than the UK did
3
29/01/2021 14:34:56 3 17
bbc
Only 66%, don't know about you but I think that needs to be a much higher number, otherwise all of the others look like a better option
7
29/01/2021 14:36:38 13 2
bbc
Maybe but this could still be used throughout the world for those countries which are unable to roll-out 2 vaccines. Even the flu vaccine efficacy isn't that high though.
24
29/01/2021 14:40:55 6 2
bbc
Initially, before detailed studies, all the manufacturers were saying the vaccines would have efficacy in the 50 to 60% range, so this is actually quite good.
47
29/01/2021 14:45:01 11 1
bbc
Try & think beyond our borders and 3rd world countries where the logistics of 2 dose vaccines are a logistical nightmare, then you might get an idea of how important it is.
114
29/01/2021 14:54:17 3 2
bbc
Anything over 50% is perfectly acceptable for the working age population.
4
29/01/2021 14:35:14 720 68
bbc
Maybe give the vaccinations with lower effectiveness to the younger people who're less likely to have serious illness from Covid?
11
29/01/2021 14:37:44 271 77
bbc
Sounds logical to me . Uptick please everyone to surface the idea a bit....
131
29/01/2021 14:55:35 82 3
bbc
Its a game changer for 3rd world countries though. A single dose vaccine would be invaluable in terms of mass vaccination in remote areas for example.

A much needed addition to the world armoury.
195
29/01/2021 15:03:40 37 3
bbc
"But nobody needed hospital treatment or died from coronavirus after the vaccine took effect in the international trial."
second line of the report.
If the vaccine allows the body to fight off a covid infection when it comes, along with preventing infection in 2/3 people, it's doing the job.
197
29/01/2021 15:04:08 6 47
bbc
You sound like you are German
201
29/01/2021 15:04:27 21 58
bbc
So this vaccine is made in belgium EU and should not be exported to the UK. According to brexiters mentality
223
29/01/2021 15:06:26 5 6
bbc
It would appear the Scottish Government may already be doing this. 99.5% of all the vaccinations they have administered has been the 98% efficacy Pfizer vaccine, to healthcare workers, the elderly and care home residents/workers.

0.5% have been given the Astrazeneca vaccine of similar efficacy to Novavax

With that, I assume all the AZ vaccines will be given to the less vulnerable.
264
29/01/2021 15:12:10 31 3
bbc
Sounds logical to me. I'm 27 and would sooner the higher efficacy vaccines go to my grandparents and those more at risk.

I still want a vaccine at the end of the day, but between me and an 87 year old let's say, I have a far better chance of getting over it.
278
29/01/2021 15:13:44 2 23
bbc
I'm all right Jack.
424
29/01/2021 15:36:47 8 23
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But young people have their whole lives ahead of them … so have the most to gain from any medical intervention. I would glady go without a vaccine and let my children have mine. It's not difficult to see the logic - whether you agree with it or not
433
xlr
29/01/2021 15:38:25 6 20
bbc
So a healthy immune system partially immunised against a virus strain.

Sounds like an ideal way to force the virus to mutate to me. Which is bad.
496
29/01/2021 15:47:11 2 12
bbc
No give less effective vaccines to people who have recovered. The young people need immunity for longer time periods and because they have more quality life years to lose, it could be argued they are more affected by COVID than older people.
562
Bob
29/01/2021 15:58:49 5 2
bbc
If you look at the detail of a lot of the lower efficacy trials you'll notice that they mostly still have very high effectiveness at preventing severe disease.

Additionally, when supplies are tight of all kinds it really does make more sense to dish out anything you can to the most vulnerable.

In the future when supply is good, or if we end up needing top-ups, then yes, it makes total sense.
637
29/01/2021 16:07:25 1 2
bbc
Plus have reduced dose been tested in younger?
Also continuing issues over Pfizer 5,6 or 7 doses in a vial.
Previously ukgov blamed vial filling issues for shortages.
Why not solve both problems?
Pre fill syringes at 7 per vial level.
That's 40% (7/4=1.4) more doses available.
No vial bottle neck
And faster jabbing.. Syringe prefilled ready to go.
700
29/01/2021 16:16:53 2 1
bbc
Agreed, it would definitely be a start, once we have the most vulnerable protected THEN we can look at getting a more effective vaccine for the rest of us, starting with the main vectors, NHS staff, retail workers, teachers etc.
722
29/01/2021 16:18:29 9 1
bbc
Ironically it is my opinion that deciding these things based upon people's opinions is not the way forward. Leave it to the scientists.
817
29/01/2021 16:28:40 0 1
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But more likely to spread it....
845
29/01/2021 16:32:36 2 3
bbc
maybe the younger people just don't need a Vaccine? How about that revelation?
846
29/01/2021 16:32:45 1 9
bbc
Surely it should be the other way round, no? Give the effective vaccines to the young who have their whole lives ahead, and the less effective vaccines to the old who have lived their lives?
916
29/01/2021 16:43:22 2 0
bbc
If they are not likely to have serious illness then they'll be lucky get the vaccine and id5imagine a larger percentage of them would be less likely to want it compared to der generations. If everyone got off as lightly as the young then I doubt very much that we'd even have a vaccine. 66% is actually very good , far better than the flu vaccine and that's had a good effect
923
29/01/2021 16:44:59 0 0
bbc
It's no less effective, just remove the first 3 weeks of post jab data from the analysis and you get over 80 percent.
951
29/01/2021 16:49:42 2 1
bbc
Younger people are not all the same. Some have serious underlying conditions such as diabetes or asthma, others have extremely vulnerable family members or may be waiting for a jab before they can have an operation.

Who gets what vaccine isn't that simple.
964
29/01/2021 16:52:25 1 2
bbc
Or we could sell it at an exorbitant price to the EU ??
5
29/01/2021 14:36:07 1 10
bbc
Why would you when the other vaccines have higher efficacy rates?
17
29/01/2021 14:39:09 2 1
bbc
Which does not mean it's less effective.
57
29/01/2021 14:46:36 1 1
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Single dose.
1
29/01/2021 14:34:30 7 20
bbc
Soon there will be more vaccines than people, if the eu allows us to have any
6
29/01/2021 14:36:28 2 9
bbc
Like the sheep in New Zealand ... ha ha ha , nice one
18
29/01/2021 14:39:18 5 1
bbc
You had to bring sheep into it, I thought everyone had forgotten about that...
3
29/01/2021 14:34:56 3 17
bbc
Only 66%, don't know about you but I think that needs to be a much higher number, otherwise all of the others look like a better option
7
29/01/2021 14:36:38 13 2
bbc
Maybe but this could still be used throughout the world for those countries which are unable to roll-out 2 vaccines. Even the flu vaccine efficacy isn't that high though.
12
29/01/2021 14:38:28 2 10
bbc
Yeah then 34% can keep spreading it
8
29/01/2021 14:36:54 9 16
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Quick, no one tell the EU!
9
29/01/2021 14:37:10 470 24
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I'm not sure I can handle all this good news as it's been so long! haha. Huge thanks to all the incredibly smart & dedicated people who are giving us hope again.
202
29/01/2021 15:04:28 158 361
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I’m assuming that doesn’t include our hapless leadership? But yes, well done to all the scientists, and to all those who invested billions into the research.
207
29/01/2021 15:04:49 17 71
bbc
So this vaccine is made in belgium EU and should not be exported to the UK. According to brexiters mentality
225
29/01/2021 15:06:34 41 25
bbc
Not like the bbc to overdose on positive news . They’ll find a negative slant, plus a few professors to disagree
10
29/01/2021 14:37:42 87 12
bbc
You'd be forgiven for thinking the government have over ordered on vaccines! Hopefully we'll go from famine to feast. The Oxford jab appears best value for money.. whilst Moderna and Pfizer look to be profiteering. Not the only ones I guess.
186
29/01/2021 15:02:42 15 7
bbc
Like many richer countries, Canada being recorded as one who has ordered far more than is needed, there will be a need to pass on excess ones to other countries (& areas like occupied Territories) who are less fortunate & don't have the connections & finance, & often got the virus from travellers from same countries who over-ordered.
At the moment looks just like the H1N1 pandemic vaccine.
187
29/01/2021 15:02:44 2 13
bbc
Yep, we have many times over the population on order. That may tell us we are going to need regular shots or the government is going to start trading them.
394
VoR
29/01/2021 15:32:29 13 2
bbc
If there's one thing I'd happily forgive the government for, it would be ordering more vaccines than required.
29/01/2021 17:16:31 6 0
bbc
Suppose we don't really know how long the immunity lasts - and we might have to jab people again in a year's time. Also, if we look back six months we didn't know that any of them worked!!! But great news that we have another vaccine though!
pb
29/01/2021 17:24:26 3 3
bbc
Maybe Boris plans on flogging the xs to the EU at inflated rates. Makes you proud to be British.
4
29/01/2021 14:35:14 720 68
bbc
Maybe give the vaccinations with lower effectiveness to the younger people who're less likely to have serious illness from Covid?
11
29/01/2021 14:37:44 271 77
bbc
Sounds logical to me . Uptick please everyone to surface the idea a bit....
137
29/01/2021 14:56:24 10 15
bbc
Cute. But it's s not like they listen to anything good.
158
29/01/2021 14:59:45 44 5
bbc
I've upticked as I agree but it is important people look beyond the headline figure of 66% efficacy as it seems the vaccine has ~100% efficacy against hospitalisation and death

For the 33% who will still have some form of symptoms - the vaccines is very likely still boosting their immune response - such that none in the trial have had to be hospitalised. This is similar with the Oxford/AZ vaccine
7
29/01/2021 14:36:38 13 2
bbc
Maybe but this could still be used throughout the world for those countries which are unable to roll-out 2 vaccines. Even the flu vaccine efficacy isn't that high though.
12
29/01/2021 14:38:28 2 10
bbc
Yeah then 34% can keep spreading it
72
29/01/2021 14:49:25 6 1
bbc
We don't know for certain that the other vaccines prevent transmission either.
The important thing is that even this lower efficacy vaccine prevents hospitalisation and death.
Nobody is going to complain if they only get a sore throat, and single-dose is a game changer for poorer/more remote areas of the world.
13
29/01/2021 14:38:41 3 10
bbc
380 million doses, even if all are double application, is enough to give everybody over the age of twelve 4 complete vaccinations.

Hopefully the shelf life on these things are good, or are the government less confident about the efficacy of the current ones than they are letting on?
51
29/01/2021 14:45:47 7 1
bbc
They placed the ordered before any were proved effective, let alone able to be supplied fast enough.
If we have loads left over (and it appears we will, as so far all the vaccines work), we've committed to providing them to poorer countries who'd otherwise struggle to secure them.
A single-dose vaccine is a global game-changer for hard-to-reach areas as medics need only visit once.
55
29/01/2021 14:46:13 2 1
bbc
As has been said many times, the orders were placed before we knew what would work, and funded partly by that hope. If some where no good, then we would have others to fall back on. Its called forward planning.
68
29/01/2021 14:48:54 4 1
bbc
We have yet to find out whether the Valneva or GSK / Sanofi vaccines will work. If it turns out they aren't effective, that takes 120 million doses off the (virtual) shelf straight away.
76
29/01/2021 14:45:52 5 1
bbc
The government ordered the vaccines before they knew which would work and when they would be available. If we have lots of vaccines that work, that's great news! If we have too many, maybe we could give some to countries that can't afford the vaccine?
179
29/01/2021 15:01:33 3 1
bbc
We spread our bets in the hope of finding some winners. So far all of our bets have paid off. If we have over ordered we can donate some suitable ones to third world countries to help with their vaccination efforts. None of us are safe until all of us are safe. It would also help our standing in the World post Brexit.
14
29/01/2021 14:38:44 384 20
bbc
66% is still higher protection than most flu vaccinations.

Maybe give this to the healthier age groups?
44
29/01/2021 14:44:43 126 13
bbc
Yep my thoughts too, best to use on those less at risk. One shot is great news too.
193
nfn
29/01/2021 15:03:07 8 4
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Totally agree. But also remind people that you are getting 89%immunity from one dose of the Pfizer vaccine the second jab tops it up to 94%.
200
29/01/2021 15:04:25 5 2
bbc
well it won't be to the high risk groups, as it won't be ready in time anyway.
29/01/2021 16:58:26 0 2
bbc
yes the virus affects older people more but you cannot assume that younger people are necessarily always healthy
29/01/2021 17:12:32 1 7
bbc
lol what does 66% even mean seriously there are statistics and then theres lies. Now they are saying not as affective against SA strain. So just how effective is 66%?
29/01/2021 17:46:37 2 1
bbc
Absolutely, I'd happily take a 66% effective vaccine now, as opposed to waiting longer for a 90% effective one.
29/01/2021 18:22:27 5 1
bbc
This vaccine stopped 100% of people from needing hospital treatment or becoming quite ill!
This is a great vaccine it appears!

Vaccines are not about stopping you getting the flu but about minimising the effect! This 40%/60%/90% nonsense needs to end! If people are not getting ill from them and only show asymptomatic results then they’re 100% effective!
29/01/2021 19:06:25 0 1
bbc
We should be giving the most effective vaccines to the younger healthier groups to give the best possible chance that the virus will be able to be lived with in future, not just the short term.
29/01/2021 19:22:51 1 1
bbc
66% is a higher rate of effectiveness than the entire Tory cabinet, probably about 65% more effective
29/01/2021 21:44:02 0 2
bbc
66%.........34% fail rate.........not odds I would take. Rather have the ones that are better.
30/01/2021 19:48:45 1 0
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healthy people dont need it though...same as children who are not allowed it due to no long term study data...
15
29/01/2021 14:37:22 52 5
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Well done everyone. Another step nearer getting our lives back.
16
29/01/2021 14:37:24 2 22
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Never even heard of this vaccine, and why have we ordered 367 doses of various vaccines when we have a population of 67 million? 66% efficacy is pretty poor in any case, especially when others are supposed to be 85-95% effective
34
29/01/2021 14:43:07 5 1
bbc
Wrong.
50% efficacy massively reduces transmission. Research multiplying fractions.
38
29/01/2021 14:43:58 4 2
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Your ignorance of the vaccine isn’t really relevant, is it?
39
29/01/2021 14:44:01 7 1
bbc
Beacuse we preorderd and had no idea what would work. Its called hedging your bets. Would you prefer we wait a year see which is best then order 67mil doses.
40
29/01/2021 14:44:12 3 2
bbc
Everyone, Lee hasn’t heard of this vaccine so we shouldn’t bother. Can everyone try harder please
56
29/01/2021 14:46:31 5 2
bbc
The fact that you haven't heard of this vaccine isn't relevant.

The UK ordered doses of the vaccine before there were any indications of whether they would work. We'd have looked pretty stupid if we ordered 70 million (or 140 million, at two doses per person) of one vaccine and it turned out not to be effective at all.

You might want to learn about risk mitigation strategies.
88
29/01/2021 14:50:59 5 2
bbc
You are being very short sighted.

A single dose vaccine is a real game changer for those less developed or large countries where its a logistical nightmare to effectively vaccinate thier populations.

Unless we can have an effective vaccination programme for the 3rd world as well, we will never defeat covid.
151
29/01/2021 14:58:54 2 2
bbc
Spreading our bets in case some of them fail. The right thing to do. Better too many than not enough. The EU didn’t enough enough and too late. Also put their money in vaccines which have delivered. So far our vaccine task force team have chosen well. If we ended up with too much we will donate some to Covax for third world countries.
29/01/2021 17:25:21 1 0
bbc
I love to read mis-informed drivel..
5
29/01/2021 14:36:07 1 10
bbc
Why would you when the other vaccines have higher efficacy rates?
17
29/01/2021 14:39:09 2 1
bbc
Which does not mean it's less effective.
6
29/01/2021 14:36:28 2 9
bbc
Like the sheep in New Zealand ... ha ha ha , nice one
18
29/01/2021 14:39:18 5 1
bbc
You had to bring sheep into it, I thought everyone had forgotten about that...
117
29/01/2021 14:54:35 3 2
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You had to bring the EU into it ....
19
29/01/2021 14:39:57 301 11
bbc
two crucial points. nobody died or needed hospital, and only one shot required. Sounds like a win win for a change.
142
29/01/2021 14:57:12 72 522
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Assuming we actually get our hands on it. The the UK is behaving at the moment, I wouldn’t blame the EU for holding on to it.
318
VoR
29/01/2021 15:21:51 20 1
bbc
The "nobody died" bit would be good news, but with only 400-500 covid cases, and a case fatality ratio that's typically a fraction of a percent, this could be random variation that caused us to see no Covid deaths. But no hospitalisations in this number of cases is quite a strong result, even if the most vulnerable groups were not included in the study.
20
29/01/2021 14:40:08 15 17
bbc
Has Nicola demanded we give her allocation to EU for them to distribute?
29/01/2021 20:01:47 0 1
bbc
For all the unionists who say Scotland is dealing poorly with Covid according to ONS infection rates are
NI 1 in 50
England 1 in 55
Wales 1 in 70
Scotland 1 in 110
Just for clarity a low number is bad and the higher the number the better, oh dear no wonder the union is on its knees.
21
29/01/2021 14:40:22 39 4
bbc
A note on efficacy.
100% would be good but let's remember vulgar fractions.
100%: 1 x 1 = 1
50%: 1/2 x 1/2 = 1/4

Theoretically even 50% efficacy reduces transmission by 75%,
(Yes there are vagaries how people mix) but it demonstrates at 50% it still has a big impact.
54
29/01/2021 14:46:10 36 3
bbc
Transmission may still be occurring even when someone is vaccinated. We don’t know enough about that yet.

So far we only know that vaccination helps just the person who has been vaccinated.
29/01/2021 19:04:09 0 1
bbc
Its not 50% though is it? As Johnson is pursuing a one dose per patient.
However the experts say it doesn't reduce transmission as you could still catch covid but not have such severe outcome and pass it on.
22
29/01/2021 14:40:32 120 7
bbc
If it's the case that the 34% who weren't conferred full immunity then have negligible chance of requiring hospitalisation when/if infected, then functionally it'll be almost as good as 100% effective, insofar as you don't really need lockdowns for a mild illness.
46
29/01/2021 14:43:31 121 4
bbc
In many ways the more important bit is that no one needed hospitalisation or died. We all have colds and that's fine because (generally) no one goes to hospital with a cold. If this reduces covid to "just a cold" then that is a great step forward!
101
29/01/2021 14:52:48 19 1
bbc
Yes exactly, if it has the effect of making it a minor illness in the 34% and cuts deaths and hospitalistion to me that is effective.
29/01/2021 21:54:57 0 4
bbc
Haha - no sense what you said at all.
23
29/01/2021 14:40:48 176 10
bbc
People don’t seem to realise. 66% is very very good. This would make a phenomenal difference to the number of people in hospital. We cope much better overall. Remember, covid is never going away, but if we can cope with it same as we cope with other diseases then we’ve a better chance of normality. We just need to convince the governments of the uk to have the spine to choose to open up again
32
29/01/2021 14:42:52 102 12
bbc
Agreed. Remember the 44% that do get it only get mild symptoms too.
129
29/01/2021 14:55:24 13 1
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Yes and 100% did not develop severe disease or required hospitalisation.
355
VoR
29/01/2021 15:26:33 7 3
bbc
Agree that 66% is great if those that do get it aren't needing hospital treatment. At the same time, if half your population won't allow themselves to be vaccinated, you'd rather the 66% was higher, to make up for the covidiots/anti-vaxers.
512
29/01/2021 15:50:30 0 10
bbc
66% will not give us herd immunity.
29/01/2021 21:04:54 0 0
bbc
Agree when the yearly flu jab is around 52%??
29/01/2021 21:53:58 1 1
bbc
66% is not very good compared to others. As for opening up again....it is because of deluded people like you that pushed for opening up too early that we have so many people dead.
29/01/2021 22:32:30 1 1
bbc
Covid is never going away? Amazing how this idea has been pushed. All viruses mutate over time, most mutate to a much less virulent state and many disappear for good.
29/01/2021 23:46:28 0 0
bbc
Such a good post, then you spoil it with your last sentence.
30/01/2021 14:28:49 0 0
bbc
It IS very good, but some places are making Model T Fords, some are making old V12 Lamborghini's, some are making Toyota Prius and some are making VW Polo's.

Yes some may not get on with a faster car, but if everyone can have the cheapest, most reliable, most efficient and easiest to make it is a matter of time until production converges to 3 or 4.

But being spoil for choice is excellent!
3
29/01/2021 14:34:56 3 17
bbc
Only 66%, don't know about you but I think that needs to be a much higher number, otherwise all of the others look like a better option
24
29/01/2021 14:40:55 6 2
bbc
Initially, before detailed studies, all the manufacturers were saying the vaccines would have efficacy in the 50 to 60% range, so this is actually quite good.
25
29/01/2021 14:41:48 2 8
bbc
Single dose I'm happy with, but 66% effectiveness not sure. I know we should be happy with what we can get at a time like this but, if I could pick one (I know we can't) it wouldn't be this one as too close to 50/50.
58
29/01/2021 14:47:00 3 1
bbc
66% population immunity all but nulifies the R-rate.
67
29/01/2021 14:48:54 2 1
bbc
But no one was hospitalised and that makes it worthwhile - perhaps for younger people?
118
29/01/2021 14:54:35 5 1
bbc
It does also say that no one who had the vaccine developed severe disease or required hospitalisation. That’s pretty much how flu jabs work. One dose and normal refrigeration. This could be a game changer for poorer countries with remote communities that are difficult to reach.
313
29/01/2021 15:21:11 0 2
bbc
We have no stats as yet from the current roll out. How many have died or contracted covid 19 post vaccination ? (deathly silence with the exception of Israel and their early results are not as good as expected) Without this data all else is conjecture. I'll wait for some real data before I take the risk a vaccine given a temporary emergency license.
26
29/01/2021 14:41:57 203 10
bbc
Every vaccine, no matter how good it is, is another step on the way back to some form of normal living. It's to be applauded.
185
29/01/2021 15:02:35 19 323
bbc
Hmmm, not 100% sure about the AZ vaccine. I think I’ll wait until one of the EU or US ones comes along...
29/01/2021 17:28:07 3 4
bbc
Normal living LOL it's never going to happen
29/01/2021 17:46:09 3 4
bbc
‘Normal’ died a year ago didn’t it?
Johnson & Johnson knowingly gave people cancer look it up. Removed
29/01/2021 21:42:49 0 0
bbc
lol
30/01/2021 16:33:46 0 0
bbc
You don't get to choose. Whatever is on the shelf or in the fridge on that day at that surgery you will receive that or refuse and go to the back of the queue and spend months more hiding away. They're all effective. They're all free.
27
cjb
29/01/2021 14:42:12 24 14
bbc
And the SNP should remember

IN an independent Scotland we would be at the mercy of Eurpore..

only 3 / 100 vaccinated.

Don't let Sturgeon and the WM bafoon (Blackwood) forget this. Being part of the union brings our wee insignificant country great benefit

If we were reliant on EU we would be at the back end of the queue for everything

long live the union
53
29/01/2021 14:46:01 9 19
bbc
Long live eh? Shame the 100k killed by BJ incompetence aren't going to.
91
29/01/2021 14:51:36 4 4
bbc
You wearing your full John Bull outfit again?
92
29/01/2021 14:51:53 5 6
bbc
She seems keen on revealing our vaccine contracts and schedules to the EU. Maybe she’s happy to give them Scotland’s share of the U.K. allowance. Scots should remember this when they vote in May.
28
29/01/2021 14:41:06 5 9
bbc
If the EU had thought about this, and noticed the new vaccines coming on board, I think they would have been well advised to stop the threats and seek co-operation instead.
94
29/01/2021 14:52:09 0 3
bbc
Absolutely, but they probably did know this was coming as well as the German one in production. You know the one that the Germans have already invested in and bought but aren't going to share with the rest of the EU!
29
29/01/2021 14:42:24 90 2
bbc
While its effectiveness is slightly lower than the other vaccines, this could be a game changer for mass vaccination in 3rd world countries wparticular here a 2 dose strategy is logistically very difficult.
82
29/01/2021 14:50:28 81 2
bbc
It’s good new that no one who had this vaccine developed sever disease or required hospitalisation. As a single dose, normal refrigeration jab it could be a game changer for hard to reach communities and poorer countries.
156
29/01/2021 14:58:56 1 3
bbc
It is as good as the AZ/Oxford vaccine, which was 62% (ignore the 70% figure which was a dodgy compilation of 2 parts of the phase 3 trials).
194
29/01/2021 15:03:39 10 1
bbc
Good to see somebody thinking of the less fortunate
343
29/01/2021 15:25:08 3 2
bbc
Much is being made of this vaccine being 'one dose'. Yet the other vaccines already being used have some effectiveness at only one dose?
pb
29/01/2021 17:21:45 0 0
bbc
Sick people and care home residents are unlikely to have been numerous in the trial group. And they are the only ones who often get ill even without vaccine.
30
29/01/2021 14:42:33 61 1
bbc
This sounds like a great vaccine for those less at risk ie younger fitter people. One dose also fits in with lifestyles a lot better. Be great to get this out to kids too if thats possible. Hate off again to science !!
75
29/01/2021 14:49:54 58 1
bbc
oops Hats off I meant !!!
31
29/01/2021 14:42:43 32 9
bbc
Ignore the headline efficacy rates ... what’s important is it’s yet another vaccine that prevented 100% of hospitalisations and deaths!

Well done to the UK investing early into this vaccine. Though no doubt the EU will try to muscle in.
61
29/01/2021 14:47:50 26 11
bbc
The EU are still in negotiations to purchase tbis vaccine. Missed the boat again.
29/01/2021 17:23:09 1 4
bbc
Can't resist a dig. Suppose the Govt had a brilliant 12 months. Forgive them everything I suppose. When will there be an inquiry into their handling of this pandemic. Not before the next GE I bet.
23
29/01/2021 14:40:48 176 10
bbc
People don’t seem to realise. 66% is very very good. This would make a phenomenal difference to the number of people in hospital. We cope much better overall. Remember, covid is never going away, but if we can cope with it same as we cope with other diseases then we’ve a better chance of normality. We just need to convince the governments of the uk to have the spine to choose to open up again
32
29/01/2021 14:42:52 102 12
bbc
Agreed. Remember the 44% that do get it only get mild symptoms too.
73
29/01/2021 14:49:30 26 2
bbc
Or even the 34%!
99
29/01/2021 14:52:35 14 2
bbc
34%
100
29/01/2021 14:52:47 21 1
bbc
Maybe you want to recalculate that... unless you are giving 110%. Could be that you are a Sports pundit. ??
108
29/01/2021 14:53:24 4 3
bbc
Absolutely, this is something the mainstream media should stress rather than downplay.
153
29/01/2021 14:57:25 8 2
bbc
Being pedantic (sorry) but it's 34%
357
VoR
29/01/2021 15:26:44 3 2
bbc
34
774
29/01/2021 16:21:45 2 3
bbc
Is the bad maths a new aymptom of Covid, or a symptom of bad education over the years? Hmmm... ;)
813
29/01/2021 16:26:10 3 4
bbc
66 + 44 = 110.

Just sayin.
878
29/01/2021 16:37:18 2 1
bbc
shame Maths isn't your strong point
29/01/2021 18:52:33 1 0
bbc
Do you mean 34%?
29/01/2021 19:02:33 1 0
bbc
Are you Diane Abbott in disguise?
29/01/2021 20:08:26 1 0
bbc
Erm...think you mean 34%
29/01/2021 22:40:53 0 0
bbc
You can't count. 66%+44%=110%
33
29/01/2021 14:42:52 15 3
bbc
Vaccinations will be annual. it's a virus just like flu and there is no permanent cure for that, in fact there has only been 2 permanent virus cures in the history of vaccines
48
29/01/2021 14:45:09 1 18
bbc
aids virus is now cure able.
59
29/01/2021 14:47:11 8 2
bbc
Smallpox and polio.
104
29/01/2021 14:53:06 9 2
bbc
Appreciate your sentiment, about the future, but you are forgetting the successful vaccines for diphtheria, whooping cough, measles TB etc etc
259
Rob
29/01/2021 15:11:30 2 3
bbc
Can you get a vaccine against Boris Johnson?
29/01/2021 17:30:26 0 0
bbc
Vaccinations do not cure diseases, they prevent people from getting them. The one case of tetanus I have seen was in a person who had not been vaccinated, she died.
29/01/2021 18:34:21 0 0
bbc
It's far too early to tell what the future holds.
Hopefully it includes ever more effective vaccines for a multitude of diseases.
16
29/01/2021 14:37:24 2 22
bbc
Never even heard of this vaccine, and why have we ordered 367 doses of various vaccines when we have a population of 67 million? 66% efficacy is pretty poor in any case, especially when others are supposed to be 85-95% effective
34
29/01/2021 14:43:07 5 1
bbc
Wrong.
50% efficacy massively reduces transmission. Research multiplying fractions.
70
29/01/2021 14:49:05 4 1
bbc
Transmission may still be occurring even when someone is vaccinated. We don’t know enough about that yet.

So far we only know that vaccination helps just the person who has been vaccinated.
35
29/01/2021 14:43:09 73 3
bbc
Regardless of efficacy, which is still about the same or better than annual flu jab, a one shot delivery is welcome. This will indeed bolster the overall vaccination programme not only for UK but rest of world.
634
29/01/2021 16:06:34 62 8
bbc
I wonder if the EU have shot themselves in the foot again though paying under the odds for this one too? Instead of it bolstering their supply, the companies will service the countries paying a reasonable rate first, and the EU second.
36
29/01/2021 14:43:33 23 3
bbc
I'll put money on this, because this is a single dose vaccine,this will be the one they will plump for as regards most of us. its quick and easy even if the effectiveness is slightly less. anything that requires less time, less costly trhe govt will jump on
69
29/01/2021 14:49:00 24 2
bbc
This is why we have so many vaccines available and why govt invested in many
29/01/2021 17:06:52 1 0
bbc
But the AZ Oxford vaccine is around half the price of the Noravax one - at least for now. We don't know which will be used long term. Yes cost will no doubt be a deciding factor - and why shouldn't it be? They would be criticised for paying over the odds if they did not take cost into account, along with of course, efficacy, logistics and the company's ability to meet demand.
37
29/01/2021 14:43:33 131 5
bbc
Another vaccine. More good news. Further along the road to getting our lives back.

Go the science geeks!!
620
29/01/2021 16:04:59 9 48
bbc
Why don't we get trials done in children? Although they don't suffer from COVID in the main, the surely transmit it around (see recent lockdown not returning schools to get the R rate down). If the children were immunised, they wouldn't catch it and spread it half as much.
29/01/2021 21:54:11 0 2
bbc
No
16
29/01/2021 14:37:24 2 22
bbc
Never even heard of this vaccine, and why have we ordered 367 doses of various vaccines when we have a population of 67 million? 66% efficacy is pretty poor in any case, especially when others are supposed to be 85-95% effective
38
29/01/2021 14:43:58 4 2
bbc
Your ignorance of the vaccine isn’t really relevant, is it?
16
29/01/2021 14:37:24 2 22
bbc
Never even heard of this vaccine, and why have we ordered 367 doses of various vaccines when we have a population of 67 million? 66% efficacy is pretty poor in any case, especially when others are supposed to be 85-95% effective
39
29/01/2021 14:44:01 7 1
bbc
Beacuse we preorderd and had no idea what would work. Its called hedging your bets. Would you prefer we wait a year see which is best then order 67mil doses.
16
29/01/2021 14:37:24 2 22
bbc
Never even heard of this vaccine, and why have we ordered 367 doses of various vaccines when we have a population of 67 million? 66% efficacy is pretty poor in any case, especially when others are supposed to be 85-95% effective
40
29/01/2021 14:44:12 3 2
bbc
Everyone, Lee hasn’t heard of this vaccine so we shouldn’t bother. Can everyone try harder please
41
29/01/2021 14:44:12 49 1
bbc
This is brilliant news.
7 suppliers (and more expected) is a very prudent approach.
62
29/01/2021 14:47:53 33 2
bbc
The Magnificent Seven , no less
42
29/01/2021 14:44:34 9 6
bbc
Comment posted by Move D, today at 14:35
Maybe give the vaccinations with lower effectiveness to the younger people who're less likely to have serious illness from Covid?
-

We still don’t know the long term effects of Covid. Younger people could still suffer long term damage that could exacerbate serious health issues later on.
43
29/01/2021 14:44:34 261 34
bbc
And when all this is over, scientists will continue to be among the lowest paid of all graduate-level workers.

How quickly we (will) forget...
140
29/01/2021 14:56:49 169 56
bbc
Not forgetting NHS staff and their derisory % increase
141
29/01/2021 14:57:06 14 22
bbc
You have two options as far as I can see when you go to university - you either do something that will lead to something highly paid, stressful, boring and not leading to either personal development or the increase in human knowledge, or something interesting but more lowly paid. The choice is yours.
154
29/01/2021 14:58:19 17 9
bbc
And the nurses. And the junior doctors.
211
29/01/2021 15:03:55 18 11
bbc
Yep, so many of them go into finance, a useless industry that produces nothing of value.
340
VoR
29/01/2021 15:24:41 2 5
bbc
I'm pretty sure that those involved in these particular ventures will be very well remunerated in the future though.

Don't forget that a lot of research is relatively routine, the result of applying standard scientific process, and results in v small incremental improvements rather than the transformation change we're seeing the results of here.
492
29/01/2021 15:46:36 3 8
bbc
When they're on zoom calls their houses look a lot nicer than mine. Just saying.
622
29/01/2021 16:05:03 2 5
bbc
Really? Out of interest, which pharma company have you worked in?
29/01/2021 17:09:58 1 1
bbc
Too true, like front., line workers.
29/01/2021 17:26:47 0 5
bbc
I because people will probably be sick from vaccine problems long term. RMNA vaccines have never been tested long term
29/01/2021 17:49:16 1 1
bbc
That's not only not true but utter codswallop.

Science technology graduates have the SECOND HIGHEST average salary & health has the 10th highest.
Languages grad's are(oddly) 1st & engineers 3rd.

Real numbers here: https://www.graduate-jobs.com/gco/Booklet/graduate-salary-salaries.jsp

Despite what's believed, the UK does indeed look after & appreciate it's STEM graduates.
29/01/2021 18:03:06 1 0
bbc
Science can provide all sorts of rewards. Huge job satisfaction and great incomes
29/01/2021 19:32:23 1 0
bbc
Never has so much been owed by so many to so few!
29/01/2021 23:53:19 0 0
bbc
Those eurocrats look well healed though.
30/01/2021 10:18:25 0 0
bbc
Yes, that's because most scientists love the work they do, not the money.

The vaccine developers are some of the most dedicated people going, on a par with the medics.

Science is seen as something for the nerds and geeks, while the shooting stars end up in politics, banking and running large retail conglomerates. The downside is that the latter won't do you any good, but the former will.
14
29/01/2021 14:38:44 384 20
bbc
66% is still higher protection than most flu vaccinations.

Maybe give this to the healthier age groups?
44
29/01/2021 14:44:43 126 13
bbc
Yep my thoughts too, best to use on those less at risk. One shot is great news too.
96
29/01/2021 14:52:24 10 3
bbc
Yes great news, hope fully this will lead to some form of normality by Autumn.
Keep safe pal.
45
29/01/2021 14:44:45 18 2
bbc
A huge step forward for all our futures.
22
29/01/2021 14:40:32 120 7
bbc
If it's the case that the 34% who weren't conferred full immunity then have negligible chance of requiring hospitalisation when/if infected, then functionally it'll be almost as good as 100% effective, insofar as you don't really need lockdowns for a mild illness.
46
29/01/2021 14:43:31 121 4
bbc
In many ways the more important bit is that no one needed hospitalisation or died. We all have colds and that's fine because (generally) no one goes to hospital with a cold. If this reduces covid to "just a cold" then that is a great step forward!
3
29/01/2021 14:34:56 3 17
bbc
Only 66%, don't know about you but I think that needs to be a much higher number, otherwise all of the others look like a better option
47
29/01/2021 14:45:01 11 1
bbc
Try & think beyond our borders and 3rd world countries where the logistics of 2 dose vaccines are a logistical nightmare, then you might get an idea of how important it is.
33
29/01/2021 14:42:52 15 3
bbc
Vaccinations will be annual. it's a virus just like flu and there is no permanent cure for that, in fact there has only been 2 permanent virus cures in the history of vaccines
48
29/01/2021 14:45:09 1 18
bbc
aids virus is now cure able.
71
29/01/2021 14:49:22 14 3
bbc
Aids virus is not cured, suppressed to a point it cannot be transmitted on. But not cured
97
29/01/2021 14:52:26 10 2
bbc
Any virus mutates, the flu jab every year is a guess at what is needed, there will probably never be a cure, so it's annual jabs for everyone from here on in
150
29/01/2021 14:57:59 9 2
bbc
I think you mean HIV and no it isn't 'curable' it's no longer a chronic illness but you cannot be cured.
Aids is the condition you get when HIV is not managed, this is also not curable and is in many cases fatal.
160
29/01/2021 14:59:58 6 1
bbc
I don't think it is. The treatments for it just reduce the viral load to the point it does no harm and there are various other palliative drugs to help as well.
247
nfn
29/01/2021 15:09:54 1 2
bbc
No it's not. It's manageable. Big difference.
435
VoR
29/01/2021 15:38:27 2 1
bbc
And in the real world where we don't believe what dictators tell us they've cured with beetroot or something similar... I thought it was more that HIV has become manageable and chronic, with early indications that it can be cured via extremely invasive measures. HIV is not aids though.
49
29/01/2021 14:45:12 238 30
bbc
more great news and another 30 million doses in the bag. The Governments handling of this pandemic has at times been hugely incompetent, but the vaccine rollout they are getting very right. Lets keep going!!
167
29/01/2021 15:00:34 253 69
bbc
Dont think they have been HUGELY incompetent to be fair, its been a bit of a learning curve for the world generally. Where WE came a bit unstuck was trying to keep an economy ticking over. Was this right or wrong? .. open to debate.
706
29/01/2021 16:17:50 4 16
bbc
why have we got 365 million doses ordered when we only have about 60 million to vaccinate ?
865
29/01/2021 16:35:33 17 2
bbc
I always understood the government guidelines, Sadly, I think that the general public were confused by the media throwing doubt around and encouraging criticism of the precautions all the time.
29/01/2021 19:46:29 0 2
bbc
The vaccine roll out is done by the nhs. Think they deserve the credit.
29/01/2021 21:03:09 0 2
bbc
I'll believe that when we get our second jabs. I'm waiting for Matt Hancock to assure us that a single dose is adequate and it is no longer considered necessary to have the second jab booster
29/01/2021 23:44:35 0 0
bbc
I think they must have left this project to the grown-ups. Maybe they actually realised they had no idea with this one!
50
29/01/2021 14:45:03 59 19
bbc
why is the EU Angry with Britain ? all we v done is get on with things
86
29/01/2021 14:50:53 50 8
bbc
Specifically, they are angry because we showed them it was possible to just get on with things.
107
29/01/2021 14:53:17 17 4
bbc
Cause we did the right thing for once. We didnt buy into the BS that the EU was selling when they asked us to be part of their scheme cause we invested money in the vaccine, created two manufacturing plants off our own back and went against what they wanted us to do. Basically we had our freedom to look after our people without the constraints of the paper pushers in Brussels
110
29/01/2021 14:53:32 17 3
bbc
Normally I'm a EU supporter and remoaner. But in this case - assuming we are getting something resembling the truth, untainted by spin, on the news media, it does look as if the EU has shot itself in the foot.
176
29/01/2021 15:01:20 3 9
bbc
I don't think anyone is angry with the UK, Astra Zennica for maybe being a bit loose with there contract
724
29/01/2021 16:18:36 6 1
bbc
That's why. Shiws the superstare narrative doesn't work as countries, and their press, are starting to say.
29/01/2021 17:28:02 0 6
bbc
Protectionism-think that's what it's called when you keep everything for yourself
13
29/01/2021 14:38:41 3 10
bbc
380 million doses, even if all are double application, is enough to give everybody over the age of twelve 4 complete vaccinations.

Hopefully the shelf life on these things are good, or are the government less confident about the efficacy of the current ones than they are letting on?
51
29/01/2021 14:45:47 7 1
bbc
They placed the ordered before any were proved effective, let alone able to be supplied fast enough.
If we have loads left over (and it appears we will, as so far all the vaccines work), we've committed to providing them to poorer countries who'd otherwise struggle to secure them.
A single-dose vaccine is a global game-changer for hard-to-reach areas as medics need only visit once.
52
29/01/2021 14:45:52 4 2
bbc
more good news. The issue now seems to be production, and I think the leading countries will have to get these companies to allow other manufacturing sites to make under licence to keep up with demand
27
cjb
29/01/2021 14:42:12 24 14
bbc
And the SNP should remember

IN an independent Scotland we would be at the mercy of Eurpore..

only 3 / 100 vaccinated.

Don't let Sturgeon and the WM bafoon (Blackwood) forget this. Being part of the union brings our wee insignificant country great benefit

If we were reliant on EU we would be at the back end of the queue for everything

long live the union
53
29/01/2021 14:46:01 9 19
bbc
Long live eh? Shame the 100k killed by BJ incompetence aren't going to.
Removed
199
29/01/2021 15:03:36 3 4
bbc
Revelling in a 100k dead is bad form. Proving the cause of the 100k dead should be paramount and should not be done whilst wearing a red hat.
21
29/01/2021 14:40:22 39 4
bbc
A note on efficacy.
100% would be good but let's remember vulgar fractions.
100%: 1 x 1 = 1
50%: 1/2 x 1/2 = 1/4

Theoretically even 50% efficacy reduces transmission by 75%,
(Yes there are vagaries how people mix) but it demonstrates at 50% it still has a big impact.
54
29/01/2021 14:46:10 36 3
bbc
Transmission may still be occurring even when someone is vaccinated. We don’t know enough about that yet.

So far we only know that vaccination helps just the person who has been vaccinated.
301
29/01/2021 15:19:11 6 3
bbc
yeah and it may not be transmitted , but who wants good news eh
315
29/01/2021 15:21:19 4 1
bbc
It helps the person vaccinated by stopping them coughing and spluttering, thus spreading it, surely?
359
29/01/2021 15:27:27 3 1
bbc
So if everyone is vaccinated it doesn't matter if they pass it on
29/01/2021 17:16:07 1 0
bbc
There is a lot we don't know yet. Keeping my fingers crossed.
29/01/2021 18:18:34 2 0
bbc
Vaccines reduce viral load, so will almost certainly reduce expressed viruses, thus reducing infections.
29/01/2021 19:10:36 1 0
bbc
Dhuuur.......
13
29/01/2021 14:38:41 3 10
bbc
380 million doses, even if all are double application, is enough to give everybody over the age of twelve 4 complete vaccinations.

Hopefully the shelf life on these things are good, or are the government less confident about the efficacy of the current ones than they are letting on?
55
29/01/2021 14:46:13 2 1
bbc
As has been said many times, the orders were placed before we knew what would work, and funded partly by that hope. If some where no good, then we would have others to fall back on. Its called forward planning.
16
29/01/2021 14:37:24 2 22
bbc
Never even heard of this vaccine, and why have we ordered 367 doses of various vaccines when we have a population of 67 million? 66% efficacy is pretty poor in any case, especially when others are supposed to be 85-95% effective
56
29/01/2021 14:46:31 5 2
bbc
The fact that you haven't heard of this vaccine isn't relevant.

The UK ordered doses of the vaccine before there were any indications of whether they would work. We'd have looked pretty stupid if we ordered 70 million (or 140 million, at two doses per person) of one vaccine and it turned out not to be effective at all.

You might want to learn about risk mitigation strategies.
5
29/01/2021 14:36:07 1 10
bbc
Why would you when the other vaccines have higher efficacy rates?
57
29/01/2021 14:46:36 1 1
bbc
Single dose.
25
29/01/2021 14:41:48 2 8
bbc
Single dose I'm happy with, but 66% effectiveness not sure. I know we should be happy with what we can get at a time like this but, if I could pick one (I know we can't) it wouldn't be this one as too close to 50/50.
58
29/01/2021 14:47:00 3 1
bbc
66% population immunity all but nulifies the R-rate.
33
29/01/2021 14:42:52 15 3
bbc
Vaccinations will be annual. it's a virus just like flu and there is no permanent cure for that, in fact there has only been 2 permanent virus cures in the history of vaccines
59
29/01/2021 14:47:11 8 2
bbc
Smallpox and polio.
182
29/01/2021 15:01:59 12 2
bbc
Polio, except in those parts of the world where the local preachers have persuaded people that it's designed to make people infertile. A bit like the idiocy of Covid deniers here.
60
29/01/2021 14:47:45 11 1
bbc
Fantastic news, hopefully we’ll end up in a situation where there is a vaccine surplus. Well done to all those working hard to develop and test these life saving vaccines.
164
29/01/2021 15:00:16 9 1
bbc
Well said. Nice to see there are still positive people about. We will get herd immunity very early compared with many places which really are lagging behind. Good foresight! Gov have got some things right......
29/01/2021 17:54:22 0 0
bbc
Maybe sell some to the EU if they can get their act together in 2022.

Or anyone next week if they see sense and leave too
31
29/01/2021 14:42:43 32 9
bbc
Ignore the headline efficacy rates ... what’s important is it’s yet another vaccine that prevented 100% of hospitalisations and deaths!

Well done to the UK investing early into this vaccine. Though no doubt the EU will try to muscle in.
61
29/01/2021 14:47:50 26 11
bbc
The EU are still in negotiations to purchase tbis vaccine. Missed the boat again.
93
29/01/2021 14:51:55 2 7
bbc
Yawn
608
29/01/2021 16:03:32 9 2
bbc
EU don't need to negotiate they just go to the front of the queue, did you not see the towel on the door
29/01/2021 17:23:56 0 0
bbc
But they have a huge Moderna order.
41
29/01/2021 14:44:12 49 1
bbc
This is brilliant news.
7 suppliers (and more expected) is a very prudent approach.
62
29/01/2021 14:47:53 33 2
bbc
The Magnificent Seven , no less
275
ps
29/01/2021 15:14:49 2 3
bbc
In the film, most of the magnificent seven died..........I hope that's not an omen
63
29/01/2021 14:47:55 2 5
bbc
66%? Significantly bolster? What's the science behind that one????
89
29/01/2021 14:51:00 5 1
bbc
Much the same as the science behind the 'flu vaccination, whch has a lower effectiveness rate.
138
29/01/2021 14:56:30 1 1
bbc
You may have a LongMemory but you seem to lack something on understanding.
64
29/01/2021 14:48:01 8 6
bbc
So of the 6 vaccines the UK originally backed, 4 have come good, 1 hasn’t worked, and 1 still to come.

Once we’ve vaccinated the nation we should have enough national capacity to revaccinate everyone in case of mutations. Any left over can go to international development.
84
29/01/2021 14:50:53 5 1
bbc
'Revaccinate in case of mutations'? Not really sure you have quite got the idea.
152
29/01/2021 14:58:57 1 1
bbc
remember mostly we have had half a vaccination, the number properly vaccinated is still very low
261
29/01/2021 15:09:41 1 1
bbc
7 that the UK backed/pre-ordered.

Vaccines may need to be reengineered in the case of virus mutations, but, not necessarily (it will depend upon the mutation).

Our great scientists are confident they can quickly produce new vaccines to counter such mutations.
65
29/01/2021 14:48:10 4 3
bbc
The geek shall inherit the earth
66
29/01/2021 14:48:39 2 9
bbc
Straight to the bin this one methinks. 66 v 90 ...... nah, not today thanks. What? It was somebody selling vaccines door to door, 12 for a pound
148
29/01/2021 14:57:48 1 1
bbc
The point is that we need to get 60% immunised and we will have hers immunity. With just one dose, we could (say) immunise 30 million (say) young people quickly. As testing shows that getting covid after this vaccine does not lead to hospitalisation, this vaccine will really help to bring herd immunity quicker. This is a great complementary addition. Anything positive is helpful!
174
29/01/2021 15:01:13 0 1
bbc
66 is actually good ( Better than most flu jabs )
226
29/01/2021 15:06:48 0 1
bbc
I'd take 66% all day long. Unless you personally can come up with 100% vaccine!
296
29/01/2021 15:18:35 0 2
bbc
If you stick your head out of the box you are living in and think globally, you might realise a single dose vaccine is a massive step forward. EG: 3rd world & poorer countries?

Has the penny dropped yet?
25
29/01/2021 14:41:48 2 8
bbc
Single dose I'm happy with, but 66% effectiveness not sure. I know we should be happy with what we can get at a time like this but, if I could pick one (I know we can't) it wouldn't be this one as too close to 50/50.
67
29/01/2021 14:48:54 2 1
bbc
But no one was hospitalised and that makes it worthwhile - perhaps for younger people?
13
29/01/2021 14:38:41 3 10
bbc
380 million doses, even if all are double application, is enough to give everybody over the age of twelve 4 complete vaccinations.

Hopefully the shelf life on these things are good, or are the government less confident about the efficacy of the current ones than they are letting on?
68
29/01/2021 14:48:54 4 1
bbc
We have yet to find out whether the Valneva or GSK / Sanofi vaccines will work. If it turns out they aren't effective, that takes 120 million doses off the (virtual) shelf straight away.
36
29/01/2021 14:43:33 23 3
bbc
I'll put money on this, because this is a single dose vaccine,this will be the one they will plump for as regards most of us. its quick and easy even if the effectiveness is slightly less. anything that requires less time, less costly trhe govt will jump on
69
29/01/2021 14:49:00 24 2
bbc
This is why we have so many vaccines available and why govt invested in many
29/01/2021 17:19:17 0 2
bbc
And that let's them off with 12 months of incompetence and over 100, 000 deaths does it.
34
29/01/2021 14:43:07 5 1
bbc
Wrong.
50% efficacy massively reduces transmission. Research multiplying fractions.
70
29/01/2021 14:49:05 4 1
bbc
Transmission may still be occurring even when someone is vaccinated. We don’t know enough about that yet.

So far we only know that vaccination helps just the person who has been vaccinated.
48
29/01/2021 14:45:09 1 18
bbc
aids virus is now cure able.
71
29/01/2021 14:49:22 14 3
bbc
Aids virus is not cured, suppressed to a point it cannot be transmitted on. But not cured
12
29/01/2021 14:38:28 2 10
bbc
Yeah then 34% can keep spreading it
72
29/01/2021 14:49:25 6 1
bbc
We don't know for certain that the other vaccines prevent transmission either.
The important thing is that even this lower efficacy vaccine prevents hospitalisation and death.
Nobody is going to complain if they only get a sore throat, and single-dose is a game changer for poorer/more remote areas of the world.
32
29/01/2021 14:42:52 102 12
bbc
Agreed. Remember the 44% that do get it only get mild symptoms too.
73
29/01/2021 14:49:30 26 2
bbc
Or even the 34%!
74
29/01/2021 14:49:31 8 9
bbc
If the UK end up with excess vaccines, can we donate these to third-world countries who didn’t have the resources to procure their own?

Like France and Germany?
105
29/01/2021 14:53:10 5 5
bbc
Pathetic. Both France and Germany have considerably lower death rates and significantly less effected economies than the UK.. Another xenophobic clueless clown.
130
29/01/2021 14:55:25 2 3
bbc
T.W.@.T
248
29/01/2021 15:10:02 1 1
bbc
Grow up.
30
29/01/2021 14:42:33 61 1
bbc
This sounds like a great vaccine for those less at risk ie younger fitter people. One dose also fits in with lifestyles a lot better. Be great to get this out to kids too if thats possible. Hate off again to science !!
75
29/01/2021 14:49:54 58 1
bbc
oops Hats off I meant !!!
347
29/01/2021 15:25:38 12 1
bbc
At least someone on HYS checks their spelling.
13
29/01/2021 14:38:41 3 10
bbc
380 million doses, even if all are double application, is enough to give everybody over the age of twelve 4 complete vaccinations.

Hopefully the shelf life on these things are good, or are the government less confident about the efficacy of the current ones than they are letting on?
76
29/01/2021 14:45:52 5 1
bbc
The government ordered the vaccines before they knew which would work and when they would be available. If we have lots of vaccines that work, that's great news! If we have too many, maybe we could give some to countries that can't afford the vaccine?
77
29/01/2021 14:46:26 2 8
bbc
I am in the young generation category so I would want the oxford vaccine. This belgian one not good enough so the EU can have my one if they please...
121
29/01/2021 14:54:56 2 1
bbc
you get what you are given, you don't get a choice and why should someone else get a lesser vaccine over you, why exactly? you do not have that choice to make. be grateful. show gratitude for what given.
147
29/01/2021 14:57:40 1 1
bbc
no don't bother, I'm sure you are immune, probably indestructible, possible Darwin Award candidate
243
29/01/2021 15:09:37 0 1
bbc
You get what you get. You either like it or lump it!
279
29/01/2021 15:15:36 0 1
bbc
Do you want fries with that sir?
310
29/01/2021 15:16:27 0 1
bbc
Oxford 62% (ignore the composite 70% figure as this was a dodgy combination of 62% and 90% phase 3 results)
Janssen 66%

Both have very similar levels of effectiveness. Janssen has the bonus of only needing a single shot.
Removed
79
29/01/2021 14:50:01 9 7
bbc
As someone who part of the Novovax trial, I am delighted that the minor risk I took is paying off for the general good! In the US the Novovax jab was laughed at, yet our Govt had faith and got to the front of the queue and had built a factory for it- well done Boris and his mates! Thank god we were not left to the real disaster that the EU have made of it - or Corbyn for that matter!
95
Jef
29/01/2021 14:52:13 5 2
bbc
Corbyn ?
149
29/01/2021 14:57:57 2 1
bbc
'Thank god we were not left to the real disaster that the EU have made of it'. 100k dead, worst death rate on planet, not a real disaster. One of the worst hit economies on planet, by far worst in G7, 300% worse than Germany, not a disaster. Are you ill?
217
29/01/2021 15:05:59 2 1
bbc
I,ll second that and my respect you and others like you that are playing an active part in all this.
284
nfn
29/01/2021 15:16:02 4 1
bbc
I am in the same trial, at Norwich hospital. And yes I feel vindicated now after being told by friends who were terrified of dying from the virus, that I was mad to take part in it. Well done you.
80
29/01/2021 14:50:02 4 1
bbc
agreed that this is all great news, but the logistics of vaccinating 65 million people in the UK annually (let alone 7 billion globally) and doing it rapidly enough to keep society functioning when new variants appear (ie not going back into lockdown for months each time it happens) is something that still needs resolving.
123
29/01/2021 14:55:02 1 2
bbc
I'm sure Boris is planning a master stroke, well I hope so
237
29/01/2021 15:06:02 0 1
bbc
It is, and will continue to be. The cost of cheap vaccines will be a lesser price of a closed economy.
338
nfn
29/01/2021 15:24:19 0 1
bbc
We will have to have a winter break like they do in football. Close the country down for two weeks in December... Oh we do, it's called Christmas.
81
29/01/2021 14:50:25 18 3
bbc
As this uses a similar approach to that of the Oxford jab, I am sure that the scientists are already investigating whether or not there is way to merge the two with a hope that the total is greater than a sum of the 2 parts. Especially if the result helps combat the mutated variants.

Keep going Guys and Gals in the labs out there, our futures are in your hands more now than they have ever been.
29
29/01/2021 14:42:24 90 2
bbc
While its effectiveness is slightly lower than the other vaccines, this could be a game changer for mass vaccination in 3rd world countries wparticular here a 2 dose strategy is logistically very difficult.
82
29/01/2021 14:50:28 81 2
bbc
It’s good new that no one who had this vaccine developed sever disease or required hospitalisation. As a single dose, normal refrigeration jab it could be a game changer for hard to reach communities and poorer countries.
29/01/2021 23:48:41 0 1
bbc
So it could help in Wales then?
83
29/01/2021 14:50:40 27 9
bbc
..and this is what the EU fears about Brexit, a UK free of the bureaucratic burdens of the bloc and capable, entrepreneurial competitor on its doorstep. You know ,Brexit just might work after all..
109
29/01/2021 14:53:27 21 2
bbc
as long as we recruit and retain our talent and attract the best and continue to do so,
113
29/01/2021 14:53:55 2 7
bbc
Trolling or just mad, Brexit has no bearing on vaccines at all, all were created before Brexit.
116
29/01/2021 14:54:30 2 3
bbc
Yes, but they'll try to crush us, so it's shoulders to the mill ??
171
29/01/2021 15:01:02 2 6
bbc
Yes, forget the 100k dead, the worst death rate on planet and one of the worst hit economies. We still win?
428
29/01/2021 15:37:52 2 2
bbc
We are one of the worlds leading countries in Vaccine research and biotech, so yes absolutely brilliant and I agree that the EU made a right mess of this.

However, to equate this with all the other post Brexit issues is to say the least premature.
29/01/2021 17:46:47 0 1
bbc
Seems to have made a bad start. And Where's this US trade deal.
64
29/01/2021 14:48:01 8 6
bbc
So of the 6 vaccines the UK originally backed, 4 have come good, 1 hasn’t worked, and 1 still to come.

Once we’ve vaccinated the nation we should have enough national capacity to revaccinate everyone in case of mutations. Any left over can go to international development.
84
29/01/2021 14:50:53 5 1
bbc
'Revaccinate in case of mutations'? Not really sure you have quite got the idea.
163
29/01/2021 15:00:15 1 1
bbc
You know, with a vaccine tweaked for the new strain. Like we do for ‘flu.

Not really sure you have quite got the idea.
85
29/01/2021 14:50:53 8 3
bbc
About the same as the 'flu vaccine most years then.
29/01/2021 19:38:13 0 0
bbc
No, because people still end up in hospital or dead even after having the flu vaccine.
In this case, nobody did.
50
29/01/2021 14:45:03 59 19
bbc
why is the EU Angry with Britain ? all we v done is get on with things
86
29/01/2021 14:50:53 50 8
bbc
Specifically, they are angry because we showed them it was possible to just get on with things.
230
29/01/2021 15:07:09 16 5
bbc
Precisely, they represent a bureaucratic incompetent nightmare of an organisation. Why are they short of vaccines ? Oh yes they were three months behind the UK in ordering them!
29/01/2021 17:29:48 1 16
bbc
Like how to achieve over 100,000 deaths. Find me a country in the EU with that number. And it's still going up.
87
29/01/2021 14:50:56 0 8
bbc
66% efficacy isn't very confidence-inspiring, especially when there's already vaccines available with 90-95%.
115
29/01/2021 14:54:26 4 1
bbc
Its as good as the seasonal flu jab. I would be quite happy to take those odds as a diabetic. Every little helps..
122
29/01/2021 14:55:00 1 1
bbc
But it isn't just about stopping it, it is about reducing the impact of the virus, and if it stops people developing serious complications then it is way better than the 'Flu' jab
136
29/01/2021 14:56:22 0 1
bbc
depends what you are measuring for efficacy
66% reduction in detectable virus?
66% reduction in symptoms?
66% reduction in hospitalisation?
66% reduction in deaths?
The astra Zeneca trial declared 70% efficacy but there were no serious cases among the vaccine groups
382
29/01/2021 15:30:09 0 1
bbc
Logic - 66% is better than 0%.
16
29/01/2021 14:37:24 2 22
bbc
Never even heard of this vaccine, and why have we ordered 367 doses of various vaccines when we have a population of 67 million? 66% efficacy is pretty poor in any case, especially when others are supposed to be 85-95% effective
88
29/01/2021 14:50:59 5 2
bbc
You are being very short sighted.

A single dose vaccine is a real game changer for those less developed or large countries where its a logistical nightmare to effectively vaccinate thier populations.

Unless we can have an effective vaccination programme for the 3rd world as well, we will never defeat covid.
63
29/01/2021 14:47:55 2 5
bbc
66%? Significantly bolster? What's the science behind that one????
89
29/01/2021 14:51:00 5 1
bbc
Much the same as the science behind the 'flu vaccination, whch has a lower effectiveness rate.
90
29/01/2021 14:51:03 6 6
bbc
Headlines are all essentially misleading

If the world or any situation could be summarised in a sentence it would be extraordinarily simple

C19 vaccines have generally not really be tested on the people who need them most - people with comorbidities would be explicitly excluded from trial and very few over 70's and nearly no over 80's would pass the healthiness test to be included
274
29/01/2021 15:14:30 0 1
bbc
Healthiness test?

Wow. You're a real expert aren't you?
27
cjb
29/01/2021 14:42:12 24 14
bbc
And the SNP should remember

IN an independent Scotland we would be at the mercy of Eurpore..

only 3 / 100 vaccinated.

Don't let Sturgeon and the WM bafoon (Blackwood) forget this. Being part of the union brings our wee insignificant country great benefit

If we were reliant on EU we would be at the back end of the queue for everything

long live the union
91
29/01/2021 14:51:36 4 4
bbc
You wearing your full John Bull outfit again?
27
cjb
29/01/2021 14:42:12 24 14
bbc
And the SNP should remember

IN an independent Scotland we would be at the mercy of Eurpore..

only 3 / 100 vaccinated.

Don't let Sturgeon and the WM bafoon (Blackwood) forget this. Being part of the union brings our wee insignificant country great benefit

If we were reliant on EU we would be at the back end of the queue for everything

long live the union
92
29/01/2021 14:51:53 5 6
bbc
She seems keen on revealing our vaccine contracts and schedules to the EU. Maybe she’s happy to give them Scotland’s share of the U.K. allowance. Scots should remember this when they vote in May.
61
29/01/2021 14:47:50 26 11
bbc
The EU are still in negotiations to purchase tbis vaccine. Missed the boat again.
93
29/01/2021 14:51:55 2 7
bbc
Yawn
28
29/01/2021 14:41:06 5 9
bbc
If the EU had thought about this, and noticed the new vaccines coming on board, I think they would have been well advised to stop the threats and seek co-operation instead.
94
29/01/2021 14:52:09 0 3
bbc
Absolutely, but they probably did know this was coming as well as the German one in production. You know the one that the Germans have already invested in and bought but aren't going to share with the rest of the EU!
79
29/01/2021 14:50:01 9 7
bbc
As someone who part of the Novovax trial, I am delighted that the minor risk I took is paying off for the general good! In the US the Novovax jab was laughed at, yet our Govt had faith and got to the front of the queue and had built a factory for it- well done Boris and his mates! Thank god we were not left to the real disaster that the EU have made of it - or Corbyn for that matter!
95
Jef
29/01/2021 14:52:13 5 2
bbc
Corbyn ?
291
nfn
29/01/2021 15:17:56 2 2
bbc
Yes you remember him. Dithering politician who had a massive dislike of the English.
809
29/01/2021 16:25:14 0 1
bbc
I think Corbyn was some nonentity who somehow became leader of the Labour anti Semitic party.
44
29/01/2021 14:44:43 126 13
bbc
Yep my thoughts too, best to use on those less at risk. One shot is great news too.
96
29/01/2021 14:52:24 10 3
bbc
Yes great news, hope fully this will lead to some form of normality by Autumn.
Keep safe pal.
120
29/01/2021 14:54:52 3 3
bbc
Nice one pal.
48
29/01/2021 14:45:09 1 18
bbc
aids virus is now cure able.
97
29/01/2021 14:52:26 10 2
bbc
Any virus mutates, the flu jab every year is a guess at what is needed, there will probably never be a cure, so it's annual jabs for everyone from here on in
417
29/01/2021 15:36:09 3 1
bbc
Small price to pay...to keep on living.
98
29/01/2021 14:52:28 2 3
bbc
There is a God and the human brain can achieve anything, especially these scientist types. Go the geeks.! and the great British bird watch!
125
29/01/2021 14:55:05 3 2
bbc
If there's a god then they have to take responsibility for creating the virus as well.

My opinion is that nature made it and science found out how to kill it. No spiritual involvement either way.
32
29/01/2021 14:42:52 102 12
bbc
Agreed. Remember the 44% that do get it only get mild symptoms too.
99
29/01/2021 14:52:35 14 2
bbc
34%
32
29/01/2021 14:42:52 102 12
bbc
Agreed. Remember the 44% that do get it only get mild symptoms too.
100
29/01/2021 14:52:47 21 1
bbc
Maybe you want to recalculate that... unless you are giving 110%. Could be that you are a Sports pundit. ??