Anger as trading in GameStop shares is restricted
28/01/2021 | news | business | 1,469
Shares in the games firm dive as major trading platforms try to control frenzied buying.
1
28/01/2021 11:53:37 120 3
bbc
It's a clever prank on the short sellers, but it's still a speculative bubble not backed up by any real value, the moment the first people decide to sell out it's going to crash.

Some people have made millions of dollars, they're going to want to keep it. It's a big game of chicken being played with life-changing sums of money.
3
28/01/2021 11:55:46 24 30
bbc
Agreed, bunt lets just hope it doesn’t reduce faith in the markets and leads to other bubbles popping as it’ll just compound the Brexit/covid recession
7
28/01/2021 11:59:07 25 1
bbc
Can't agree this is a speculative play, the value of short positions is known! The hedge funds got greedy and tried to finish off a retailer, holding 140% of available shares in short position is a poor idea to say the least. About time these funds realised they don't hold a monopoly on scalping from others...
145
Dec
28/01/2021 13:51:23 7 1
bbc
"not backed up by any real value"

why do people keep referring to the valuation of GME as if they should be the authority on what it's worth?

the reality is the 140% short is the fundamentals behind the stock, it really is this valuable because everyone knows the short sellers are going to have to cover!!

It's smart research, and your question could be applied to anything in the stock market
310
28/01/2021 15:08:22 2 0
bbc
Like Tesla ?
646
28/01/2021 18:06:18 0 0
bbc
But it is their money and they are perfectly entitled to do exactly what they like with it............................
28/01/2021 21:47:21 0 0
bbc
No different to any other investments/gambling just high stakes.
28/01/2021 21:53:43 0 0
bbc
The big sell wont happen before the shorters margin call. If thwy can keep persuading people to buy then the price keeps going up. I know someone with 10 shares at 80 with a limit of 950, thats his holiday if it hits or a quick sell if not. It is already over 500 now, thats a couple of months wages in 3 days.
28/01/2021 23:51:12 0 1
bbc
Yes. It's called the stock market.
29/01/2021 07:44:47 0 0
bbc
I'll lose everything as long as they do to. I've been broke before I can be broke again, no problem. They haven't
29/01/2021 17:51:17 0 0
bbc
Re. .....the moment the first people decide to sell out it's going to crash.

Does this remind you of the Tulip Bubble/Mania of 1666 ?
2
28/01/2021 11:55:29 80 6
bbc
A less capitalist take on this story can be found at Jacobin magazine by Doug Henwood: "The GameStop Bubble Is a Lesson in the Absurdity and Uselessness of the Stock Market."
8
28/01/2021 11:59:08 9 16
bbc
It doesn't prove that, though, it's just shown that it's possible to gamble with and manipulate it, as with most things in life.
17
28/01/2021 12:04:36 9 2
bbc
Not really a bubble, this was all done on purpose to try to draw attention to immoral shorting.
29/01/2021 01:05:14 1 1
bbc
"Absurdity and Uselessness of the Stock Market"
What's a better way to allocate a country's capital? Central planning sure doesn't work.

Problem isn't with market, problem is with wide boys always finding loopholes & shortcuts.

We saw the same thing with democracy last decade, when it proved Absurd and Useless in delivering good results.

Keep regulating & refining for gradual improvement.
1
28/01/2021 11:53:37 120 3
bbc
It's a clever prank on the short sellers, but it's still a speculative bubble not backed up by any real value, the moment the first people decide to sell out it's going to crash.

Some people have made millions of dollars, they're going to want to keep it. It's a big game of chicken being played with life-changing sums of money.
3
28/01/2021 11:55:46 24 30
bbc
Agreed, bunt lets just hope it doesn’t reduce faith in the markets and leads to other bubbles popping as it’ll just compound the Brexit/covid recession
5
28/01/2021 11:58:34 14 1
bbc
It's faith in the markets that causes all our problems.
382
28/01/2021 15:46:19 7 2
bbc
have no faith in any markets, they are all fake and designed to keep the rich richer and the poor poorer.
850
28/01/2021 19:42:23 1 1
bbc
Covid recession, Brexit just got a massive boost when a German MEP and the EU threatened an EU ban on vaccine exports, and the German MP whinged that the US and UK don't treat the EU with respect and that the EU had weapons! Hard to have any respect after that rant.
4
28/01/2021 11:58:01 126 16
bbc
This article was apparently updated 7 minutes ago. How hard is it for the BBC to fact check the headline? I can go to Google and see in under one minute that the shares are up another 25% in post-market. So why are they claiming they are down 20%?
11
28/01/2021 12:00:54 58 55
bbc
Do you want the BBC to add a stock ticker into the article? You missed the point of the article 100%; it's about pump & dump trade to undermine the corporate short selling.
25
Bob
28/01/2021 12:12:36 16 1
bbc
It fell in after-hours (which is what the article was based upon) and is rising in pre-market.

The fact you don't know the difference in that is telling.
529
28/01/2021 17:03:07 5 0
bbc
You haven't realized the market moves much faster than a news cycle until just now? Unless they timestamp their price references it is pretty much useless data.
3
28/01/2021 11:55:46 24 30
bbc
Agreed, bunt lets just hope it doesn’t reduce faith in the markets and leads to other bubbles popping as it’ll just compound the Brexit/covid recession
5
28/01/2021 11:58:34 14 1
bbc
It's faith in the markets that causes all our problems.
26
28/01/2021 12:12:40 2 0
bbc
True but if they collapse again it’ll cause pain for about 99% of us
6
Hex
28/01/2021 11:58:52 2 9
bbc
Can't just keep buying shares forever, sooner or later there's no more to buy. Once the demand for the shares goes so does their value and the price plummets.
13
28/01/2021 12:01:05 3 7
bbc
You missed the point of the article 100%; it's about pump & dump trade to undermine the corporate short selling.
40
28/01/2021 12:06:06 3 0
bbc
That’s not what this is... is about short sellers naked shorting shorts, which is illegal by the way, which the retail investors have caught onto and now by is buying the stocks and raising the price it’s forcing them into a corner and they don’t like it so they’re moaning. If you want to see something similar then google the 2008 VW short squeeze
1
28/01/2021 11:53:37 120 3
bbc
It's a clever prank on the short sellers, but it's still a speculative bubble not backed up by any real value, the moment the first people decide to sell out it's going to crash.

Some people have made millions of dollars, they're going to want to keep it. It's a big game of chicken being played with life-changing sums of money.
7
28/01/2021 11:59:07 25 1
bbc
Can't agree this is a speculative play, the value of short positions is known! The hedge funds got greedy and tried to finish off a retailer, holding 140% of available shares in short position is a poor idea to say the least. About time these funds realised they don't hold a monopoly on scalping from others...
14
28/01/2021 12:01:19 12 1
bbc
Yes, that part is true which is why it's a clever prank, but the value it's at now is made up of people's real money and the only reason it's holding up is because of strangers trusting each other. Anyone putting in money now to keep it held up risks losing it all, and I'm sure that most who now hold 6 or 7 figure values are becoming very tempted to sell out, as soon as one or two do, they'll all.
16
28/01/2021 12:03:18 11 1
bbc
What is there for the funds to realise? A moral lesson, or the fact - and it is a fact - that their employees get paid to do their jobs, and the firms make big money.

All shorts are speculative. All long positions are speculative. All day trading is speculative. The entire stock market is speculation.
2
28/01/2021 11:55:29 80 6
bbc
A less capitalist take on this story can be found at Jacobin magazine by Doug Henwood: "The GameStop Bubble Is a Lesson in the Absurdity and Uselessness of the Stock Market."
8
28/01/2021 11:59:08 9 16
bbc
It doesn't prove that, though, it's just shown that it's possible to gamble with and manipulate it, as with most things in life.
131
28/01/2021 13:38:48 3 0
bbc
The stock market was always just gambling, only thing is when horse started losing you could cash out and bet on how hard it’s lose
9
28/01/2021 11:59:34 2 1
bbc
There is a good thread on reddit about buying Silver. This precious metal is so undervalued because the markets is manipulated. Silver was twice its current price in early 1980s. Todays price should be much much higher.
18
28/01/2021 12:04:57 1 2
bbc
As an indistrial material, perhaps. Most investment in silver, physical or traded funds, is purely for speculation. So the value is whatever the market pays, and is wholly unrelated to whether the metal actuially exists or not.
10
28/01/2021 12:00:09 1825 92
bbc
Short sellers bet on failure and, in doing so, promote failure.

They are some of the lowest of the low.

And some of the richest of the rich.

What they do is morally criminal and it should be made illegal.

The fact short selling is not illegal says volumes about the lack of decent values of western capitalist governments.
20
28/01/2021 12:07:01 165 874
bbc
"Short sellers bet on failure and, in doing so, promote failure."

How, exactly, does selling shares below their listed value cause the company to fail?

The bet is on market price, not the success or failure of the company.
28
Bob
28/01/2021 12:13:16 47 23
bbc
If you removed immoral people from the stock market you wouldn't have a stock market.

Even the communities who instigated this whole thing are making bets (it is in their name, after all). They're not different from anyone else. They look at the information, they analyse, they make a bet.
31
28/01/2021 12:15:52 32 177
bbc
Should we also outlaw betting on sporting matches, as by placing a bet on a winning team, by implication you are betting on the other team to lose. Should that be made illegal too?
56
28/01/2021 12:45:21 84 9
bbc
Well said ! I think you have 99% of support here - yet Govts DO NOTHING!
63
28/01/2021 12:49:23 12 56
bbc
why are short sellers bad? I dont have much knowledge on subject and i'm genuinely interested.

a quick google just claims it unethical to bet on failure but doesnt mention affecting the company's future. Also apparently its has its benefits in liquidity for the market
Get your self off to the USSR comrade, leave us capitalist in peace, while your there try out your free speech Removed
147
28/01/2021 13:51:59 67 1
bbc
It should be illegal... it's all part and parcel of casino capitalism and has nothing to do with the true worth of a company. It's rich people making money from money, rather than making money from hard work and tangible sold investments.

Furthermore, it's all part of the same malaise that crashed the world economy in 2008, when rich people were constantly reselling bad debt.

Clean up now!!
153
28/01/2021 13:57:26 11 23
bbc
buying and selling stock affects stock price which drives market capitalization.
market cap has absolutely nothing to do with revenue and profit.
Companies operate on revenue and profit, not market cap.

profit affects market value. Market value does not, in any direct way, affect profit.

These are basic concepts that you don't seem to understand with your comment.
169
28/01/2021 14:07:28 13 27
bbc
Your comment show complete ignorance of the issue. ALL stock traders basically bet. Full stop. Having said that, some short sellers do good by defending, us, the market, against bubbles like the mortgage one that caused the 2008 debacle. Or they would have had against the Dutch tulip bubble in 1637. Tulips dearer than a house? Short selling would have stopped that.
185
28/01/2021 14:17:24 26 7
bbc
I don’t think you get it. Stocks mostly rise to pay your future pension. These individuals are rich guys finding a way to get round regulations to essentially take shares off you at a lower price. They are robbing you but you celebrate them?
196
Uzz
28/01/2021 14:20:34 32 2
bbc
I am a capitalist not a communist, however I completely agree with your comments revolution99. Capitalism can only work properly in the interest of society at large, if the market is regulated and controlled by sensible laws, which it currently isn’t because of vested interests. Another failure is the lack of control over monopolies especially in the high-tech sector.
201
28/01/2021 14:23:22 2 12
bbc
Not true. Maybe they just want a balanced (i.e. long / short neutral) portfolio.
234
28/01/2021 14:38:45 2 3
bbc
The shares such companies are shorting can be seen and therefore can help investors. I would agree the number of shares shorted probably should'nt exceed the total issued.
240
28/01/2021 14:41:08 7 0
bbc
Not only promote failure but amplify failure.
265
28/01/2021 14:51:09 9 1
bbc
Massive market manipulation going on by the hedgefunds. Discord bans wallstreetbets for basically made up reasons, robinhoodapp then stops ppl buying the shares.

Never forget the stock market is absolutely corrupt and only there to protect the hedge funds
294
28/01/2021 15:04:03 1 6
bbc
I gather this is your bitterness talking, now that you've missed the boat?
Cheer up, mate. The next BTC cycle will start shortly.
300
28/01/2021 15:06:03 6 0
bbc
Absolutely. And one has to wonder how the wider market gets to know what these short sellers are investing in. It feels like insider dealing and it undermines investor confidence in targeted businesses which contributes to their ability or otherwise to secure finance when required.

It should be criminal but when you have the likes of Rees-Moog in our government it never will be.
319
Bob
28/01/2021 15:11:13 3 8
bbc
That's shortsighted. Short sellers provide a useful function in signalling potentially severe problems in the company to the smaller investors, giving them a chance to get out before it's too late. It's part of price discovery. I've never shorted (wish I could, don't like spread bets) but I always check the short interest before buying stocks. It's a key indicator. If it starts increasing, I sell.
341
dmb
28/01/2021 15:21:00 0 8
bbc
Ignorant nonsense ... I suppose you think you can affect a horse's performance in a race by betting on it to come last ?
4
28/01/2021 11:58:01 126 16
bbc
This article was apparently updated 7 minutes ago. How hard is it for the BBC to fact check the headline? I can go to Google and see in under one minute that the shares are up another 25% in post-market. So why are they claiming they are down 20%?
11
28/01/2021 12:00:54 58 55
bbc
Do you want the BBC to add a stock ticker into the article? You missed the point of the article 100%; it's about pump & dump trade to undermine the corporate short selling.
27
28/01/2021 12:12:45 9 8
bbc
No - I expect them to no lead with a headline that is demonstrably false - and has been for many hours. It's literally the main headline, the sub-headline and it's misinfo.
judging by your choice of username - it seems to be your mission to be the "i know better" goon Removed
279
28/01/2021 14:58:56 7 1
bbc
The falls are being manipulated by the shorters and not the retail investors. They're trying to trigger accounts with stop losses and trigger a panic selling wave.
12
28/01/2021 12:01:02 317 5
bbc
So "pump and dump" is a problem, but "borrow and dump" isn't?
33
28/01/2021 12:19:59 83 0
bbc
There's a great line form the film Kind Hearts and Coronets...

"I feel entitled to point out that we here regard our function as the encouragement of constructive investment and not the financing of mere gambling transactions."
45
28/01/2021 12:33:00 12 2
bbc
Pump and dump is only a problem when the usual people aren't profiting. When share prices and fall because of Wallstreet, well that's just business. When it's retail its the Russians, fraud and breaks the fabric of the economy.
122
28/01/2021 13:32:06 1 1
bbc
The trade whether it be buy or sell is visible to the market and those who read the markets usually have a good sense of why a large trade was made. Pump and dump is a completely different matter.
6
Hex
28/01/2021 11:58:52 2 9
bbc
Can't just keep buying shares forever, sooner or later there's no more to buy. Once the demand for the shares goes so does their value and the price plummets.
13
28/01/2021 12:01:05 3 7
bbc
You missed the point of the article 100%; it's about pump & dump trade to undermine the corporate short selling.
7
28/01/2021 11:59:07 25 1
bbc
Can't agree this is a speculative play, the value of short positions is known! The hedge funds got greedy and tried to finish off a retailer, holding 140% of available shares in short position is a poor idea to say the least. About time these funds realised they don't hold a monopoly on scalping from others...
14
28/01/2021 12:01:19 12 1
bbc
Yes, that part is true which is why it's a clever prank, but the value it's at now is made up of people's real money and the only reason it's holding up is because of strangers trusting each other. Anyone putting in money now to keep it held up risks losing it all, and I'm sure that most who now hold 6 or 7 figure values are becoming very tempted to sell out, as soon as one or two do, they'll all.
261
28/01/2021 14:51:12 3 0
bbc
Why would anyone put their money in now on a high? That would be foolish for any investor.
631
28/01/2021 17:59:46 0 0
bbc
Everyone is always risking their money. Nothing new there.

They are buying and holding as it is a battle between their confidence (diamond hands) and the short sellers greed (it must nearly be over, time for me to short this nonsense). As more people short it, more people buy it. The short sellers pay mark-to-market every single day. The Diamond Hands Rocket 'artists' confidence grows every post
15
28/01/2021 12:02:39 22 3
bbc
Value stocks over the last 5-6 years have 50-100x their annual profit taking. It would take Tesla 1600 years to match an annual income to its current stock valuation.

Put reason over emotion and you'll soon realise the stock market is about to witness a once in a lifetime event that'll bankrupt a lot of speculators out there.
21
28/01/2021 12:07:59 7 2
bbc
It's not just about income, it's about the value of assets and future prospects. The value of Tesla's operation alone is huge, the infrastructure it's built is huge. To build something of equivalence you'd need vast sums of money, and because it's so hard and expensive to compete, it means they're one of the few games in town if not the only game in town.
39
28/01/2021 12:05:19 3 0
bbc
Not another once in a lifetime crash, there's already been a couple since I was born!
44
28/01/2021 12:07:55 2 0
bbc
You don't have an understanding of the short squeeze.
7
28/01/2021 11:59:07 25 1
bbc
Can't agree this is a speculative play, the value of short positions is known! The hedge funds got greedy and tried to finish off a retailer, holding 140% of available shares in short position is a poor idea to say the least. About time these funds realised they don't hold a monopoly on scalping from others...
16
28/01/2021 12:03:18 11 1
bbc
What is there for the funds to realise? A moral lesson, or the fact - and it is a fact - that their employees get paid to do their jobs, and the firms make big money.

All shorts are speculative. All long positions are speculative. All day trading is speculative. The entire stock market is speculation.
2
28/01/2021 11:55:29 80 6
bbc
A less capitalist take on this story can be found at Jacobin magazine by Doug Henwood: "The GameStop Bubble Is a Lesson in the Absurdity and Uselessness of the Stock Market."
17
28/01/2021 12:04:36 9 2
bbc
Not really a bubble, this was all done on purpose to try to draw attention to immoral shorting.
22
28/01/2021 12:09:47 3 4
bbc
A short term pump not backed by future prospects of the actual company, by people who are making a short term point, is exactly a bubble.
228
Bob
28/01/2021 14:34:19 2 2
bbc
Wrong. It was done to make someone very rich by convincing a lot of people who are about to lose money that they're getting one over on the establishment.

A classic move. Pit a group against another group to make them think they're fighting for themselves when in reality they're fighting for the fire starter.
9
28/01/2021 11:59:34 2 1
bbc
There is a good thread on reddit about buying Silver. This precious metal is so undervalued because the markets is manipulated. Silver was twice its current price in early 1980s. Todays price should be much much higher.
18
28/01/2021 12:04:57 1 2
bbc
As an indistrial material, perhaps. Most investment in silver, physical or traded funds, is purely for speculation. So the value is whatever the market pays, and is wholly unrelated to whether the metal actuially exists or not.
506
28/01/2021 16:48:57 0 0
bbc
Silver has been up 6% today thanks to reddit. Silver is so important in green energy it has a great future
19
28/01/2021 12:05:47 586 7
bbc
Was this article written to scare day traders?

Overnight is when daytraders cannot get involved. Means next to nothing to us normies.

Besides, GME is up to $440 in premarket.

Also, would like to know why Trading212 et al. think they can just block share buying? If that's not an attempt at market manipulation (shares can't go up if we can't buy), then what is? Only the big boys can win eh?
163
28/01/2021 14:02:42 206 3
bbc
It is rigged for the big boys. Do you remember in the Big Short how much money one needed to get an ISDA. Those 2 boys made $30,000,000 in 4 years from their garage and that numpty JP Morgan Chase employee sneered at them because they didn't know the needed one billion plus for an ISDA agreement.
195
28/01/2021 14:20:00 19 1
bbc
It should scare day-traders. Once they've successfully forced the short-sellers out of the market, the price will plummet as they themselves take out their money to go for their next target.

Those who pushed it from say 400-500% are going to be absolutely cleaned out.
269
28/01/2021 14:55:01 4 15
bbc
Remember that the people who are buying on Trading 212 etc are also doing it on leverage. If (when) the price drops they can lose more than their initial investment and have to stump up more money.

Any losses that the retail investor cannot pay for has to be absorbed by the broker. The price is so inflated, there numbers could be massive.
451
28/01/2021 16:21:47 23 1
bbc
Rules for thee but not for me. Coroporations and hedge funds can do all the market manipulation they want, yet when amateurs on Reddit do it it's suddenly despicable and in need of regulation.
613
28/01/2021 17:51:25 9 0
bbc
Are there similar groups in the UK looking at UK stocks? It sounds interesting.
I agree that it seems it is ok for the big boys to do it but not a group of individuals!
790
28/01/2021 19:17:38 3 0
bbc
Complete scam, let the people buy if they want. True a few have made a killing but most are not in it for the money this time and have hit the goal of making this a global issue
28/01/2021 23:48:22 0 0
bbc
Of course it was. The Money is desperate to protect itself and will do just about anything it can to a) scare the day traders out of the market and b) push for legislation to protect them against this happening again.
29/01/2021 00:54:22 0 0
bbc
100% with you amongst many.
29/01/2021 10:18:56 0 0
bbc
Yes.

Yes it was.
10
28/01/2021 12:00:09 1825 92
bbc
Short sellers bet on failure and, in doing so, promote failure.

They are some of the lowest of the low.

And some of the richest of the rich.

What they do is morally criminal and it should be made illegal.

The fact short selling is not illegal says volumes about the lack of decent values of western capitalist governments.
20
28/01/2021 12:07:01 165 874
bbc
"Short sellers bet on failure and, in doing so, promote failure."

How, exactly, does selling shares below their listed value cause the company to fail?

The bet is on market price, not the success or failure of the company.
24
28/01/2021 12:10:49 167 12
bbc
So going by your comment you feel that the market price has nothing to do with the success or failure of a company.

Does that not highlight a massive issue with our economy?
143
28/01/2021 13:50:36 34 2
bbc
Because the stock is being shorted market sentiment drives down the stock even further. Any company covenants stipulating the share price must not fall below a certain price, allows a creditor to demand repayment of any debt or take over the firm at that lower price.
152
28/01/2021 13:56:37 34 0
bbc
DidYouEvenReadTheArticle replied:

How, exactly, does selling shares below their listed value cause the company to fail?

--------------------

It's not the selling that's the problem. It's the co-ordination of the selling and publicising of short selling positions that is the problem.
214
Ch
28/01/2021 14:27:24 18 0
bbc
Because it can hinder new investment in the company. Potential investors think its going to fail. Key staff leave the business - and hiring new talent becomes more difficult. Customers may buy elsewhere for fear they are going to lose their money/not receive what they paid for. There are loads of real world consequences to shorting a companies shares. Share price is based on the profitability.
231
TC
28/01/2021 14:35:52 11 0
bbc
Nevertheless, the 'bet' has knock-on effects.

Stock markets must be forced back into their original role. That is as means for new business and established business to raise capital through stock issue and to facilitate holders of extant shares trading among themselves.
292
28/01/2021 15:04:00 4 0
bbc
They win if the company losses
316
28/01/2021 15:10:40 10 0
bbc
That is a naive comment. Short selling is parasitic 'borrowing' shares and then 'returning' them once the price has changed. There is no investment activity whatsoever and it should be illegal. It serves no-one but the hedge fund.
15
28/01/2021 12:02:39 22 3
bbc
Value stocks over the last 5-6 years have 50-100x their annual profit taking. It would take Tesla 1600 years to match an annual income to its current stock valuation.

Put reason over emotion and you'll soon realise the stock market is about to witness a once in a lifetime event that'll bankrupt a lot of speculators out there.
21
28/01/2021 12:07:59 7 2
bbc
It's not just about income, it's about the value of assets and future prospects. The value of Tesla's operation alone is huge, the infrastructure it's built is huge. To build something of equivalence you'd need vast sums of money, and because it's so hard and expensive to compete, it means they're one of the few games in town if not the only game in town.
62
28/01/2021 12:48:06 2 1
bbc
I suspect like most companies their 'assets' are not worth a fraction of what they put on the books, as is shown up at every liquidation of every failed company. You may have paid a fortune to have a mega factory but unless many people want it, in the same place, instantly, instead of building their own, it is near worthless.
114
28/01/2021 13:23:10 1 0
bbc
I remember too well before the dot.com bust, Netscape, Llycos, pets.com all claiming 'value stock' status pricing in yet to come growth. Never happened.

Sure you might pick the 'Amazon' or 'Apple', otherwise you're betting on a future that might never happen. Why not wait until the dust settles?
17
28/01/2021 12:04:36 9 2
bbc
Not really a bubble, this was all done on purpose to try to draw attention to immoral shorting.
22
28/01/2021 12:09:47 3 4
bbc
A short term pump not backed by future prospects of the actual company, by people who are making a short term point, is exactly a bubble.
29/01/2021 10:59:23 0 0
bbc
Jumping on the band waggon trying to profit, or scared of being priced out is a bubble. Making a point isn't.
23
28/01/2021 12:10:28 10 3
bbc
Lol good try. Its just getting started!! GME and AMC To the Moon
20
28/01/2021 12:07:01 165 874
bbc
"Short sellers bet on failure and, in doing so, promote failure."

How, exactly, does selling shares below their listed value cause the company to fail?

The bet is on market price, not the success or failure of the company.
24
28/01/2021 12:10:49 167 12
bbc
So going by your comment you feel that the market price has nothing to do with the success or failure of a company.

Does that not highlight a massive issue with our economy?
116
28/01/2021 13:28:15 62 2
bbc
It's the same on the flip side. How many companies are valued massively above their underlying value. For example, is Tesla really worth it's market value?
4
28/01/2021 11:58:01 126 16
bbc
This article was apparently updated 7 minutes ago. How hard is it for the BBC to fact check the headline? I can go to Google and see in under one minute that the shares are up another 25% in post-market. So why are they claiming they are down 20%?
25
Bob
28/01/2021 12:12:36 16 1
bbc
It fell in after-hours (which is what the article was based upon) and is rising in pre-market.

The fact you don't know the difference in that is telling.
5
28/01/2021 11:58:34 14 1
bbc
It's faith in the markets that causes all our problems.
26
28/01/2021 12:12:40 2 0
bbc
True but if they collapse again it’ll cause pain for about 99% of us
11
28/01/2021 12:00:54 58 55
bbc
Do you want the BBC to add a stock ticker into the article? You missed the point of the article 100%; it's about pump & dump trade to undermine the corporate short selling.
27
28/01/2021 12:12:45 9 8
bbc
No - I expect them to no lead with a headline that is demonstrably false - and has been for many hours. It's literally the main headline, the sub-headline and it's misinfo.
10
28/01/2021 12:00:09 1825 92
bbc
Short sellers bet on failure and, in doing so, promote failure.

They are some of the lowest of the low.

And some of the richest of the rich.

What they do is morally criminal and it should be made illegal.

The fact short selling is not illegal says volumes about the lack of decent values of western capitalist governments.
28
Bob
28/01/2021 12:13:16 47 23
bbc
If you removed immoral people from the stock market you wouldn't have a stock market.

Even the communities who instigated this whole thing are making bets (it is in their name, after all). They're not different from anyone else. They look at the information, they analyse, they make a bet.
260
28/01/2021 14:50:58 7 0
bbc
"... you wouldn't have a stock market."

Great!
11
28/01/2021 12:00:54 58 55
bbc
Do you want the BBC to add a stock ticker into the article? You missed the point of the article 100%; it's about pump & dump trade to undermine the corporate short selling.
judging by your choice of username - it seems to be your mission to be the "i know better" goon Removed
30
28/01/2021 11:58:00 65 2
bbc
To the moon!
28/01/2021 22:35:31 8 0
bbc
DIAMOND HANDS!!
10
28/01/2021 12:00:09 1825 92
bbc
Short sellers bet on failure and, in doing so, promote failure.

They are some of the lowest of the low.

And some of the richest of the rich.

What they do is morally criminal and it should be made illegal.

The fact short selling is not illegal says volumes about the lack of decent values of western capitalist governments.
31
28/01/2021 12:15:52 32 177
bbc
Should we also outlaw betting on sporting matches, as by placing a bet on a winning team, by implication you are betting on the other team to lose. Should that be made illegal too?
38
28/01/2021 12:28:34 263 9
bbc
Betting on teams within a football match doesn't alter the actual value or performance of the team. Your example shows a lack of understanding within the financial sector.
41
28/01/2021 12:31:20 112 5
bbc
When you buys shares, the share price goes up due to demand. When you sell shares the value of the company goes down due to lack of demand (if there are no buyers). If you bet shares fall, you have no interest in the company bettering and being to make other positions, opposite to your bet, to continue the collapse.
67
28/01/2021 12:51:56 59 2
bbc
Your comment is so naive - using your example you are effectively putting half of the opposing team on crutches - this needs to be stopped
309
28/01/2021 15:07:59 8 1
bbc
Difference is that a bet on a match has no bearing on the outcome of a match.

Short selling is a self-fulfilling prophecy: they 'know' that shorting reduces share price... and they know when and to whom they're doing it, so it's not a true bet as much as an expectation of the outcome of their own actions.

More like a player placing a bet on a game in which he's playing... and that's illegal...
32
28/01/2021 12:19:11 1 7
bbc
So we should be allowed to buy shares in companies we think will do well in the future, but not the reverse?

Yes, this is a nice 'win' for the man on the street against big city villains, but surely if you think something is over-valued you can take an opposing view? Not hugely different from betting on sports results is it?
54
28/01/2021 12:42:28 3 0
bbc
I suspect most rightly feel there is a big difference between deciding a share is not worth keeping or buying at a price, and selling a share you do not own, aiming to buy it back for less before giving it back. Perhaps such behaviours should not be possible, those involved can place bets on share prices with gambling companies instead.
80
28/01/2021 12:29:09 1 0
bbc
Sure, but to short 140% of a company is greedy, irresponsible and stupid.

Shorters helped get rid of Enron, they're not all bad. However, this story is nothing like that.
12
28/01/2021 12:01:02 317 5
bbc
So "pump and dump" is a problem, but "borrow and dump" isn't?
33
28/01/2021 12:19:59 83 0
bbc
There's a great line form the film Kind Hearts and Coronets...

"I feel entitled to point out that we here regard our function as the encouragement of constructive investment and not the financing of mere gambling transactions."
199
28/01/2021 14:22:29 6 0
bbc
An utterly perfect quote and a noble goal
436
28/01/2021 16:13:37 3 0
bbc
There's a bit in 'The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo' when the stockmarket plummets. The journalist explains that has no effect in the real world as the GDP is exactly the same as it was.
34
28/01/2021 12:23:40 16 10
bbc
Yeah. Because $500 a share at pre-market, is a 20% loss?

Go away BBC. You bore me.
35
28/01/2021 12:24:44 2 10
bbc
What goes up must come down. It’ll all end in tears.
59
28/01/2021 12:46:32 3 0
bbc
That might be the wisdom for conventional trading, but this is a short squeeze. There is an actual strategy here, and clear winners and losers.
69
28/01/2021 12:28:17 1 0
bbc
Yes, for the brokers.
36
28/01/2021 12:25:49 452 14
bbc
Anyone could spend 30mins researching the subject and see this is misleading story to publish.

In such volatility choosing to publish in a brief moment of after hours trading is not fair on the story developing here, as I speak it is now +40% overnight.

How about the real story, in that the 'retail' investing market found something Wall Strett didn't, and are now beating them at their own game
81
28/01/2021 12:30:11 249 9
bbc
100% agreed - I just made a similar post here saying exactly this. It was as if the writer typed "Gamestop" into google and spent 5 minutes regurgitating headlines from CNBC etc. Highly misleading story - very disappointing for BBC
251
28/01/2021 14:46:24 11 1
bbc
Yep, but 95% of the 'Retail' investors are going to get ruined when the ones who started it decide to take their profits. The later you got in, the more you lose.

The price can't hold once people start selling, it will go back to roughly where it started.
271
Bob
28/01/2021 14:55:48 9 13
bbc
Except that they didn't find something; they made it up and convinced others to buy the stock based on fabricated stories about these failing companies being a hidden success. That's illegal, and called market manipulation.
Agree on the misleading story though. BBC doesn't know a lot about finance. E.g. they don't know that hedge funds aren't Wall Street, as most are not even based in New York.
337
28/01/2021 15:19:32 5 3
bbc
This is bitcoin "investing" moving to the stock market. The share price doesn't reflect any fundamental value. The issue is how you extract your 500% gains
626
28/01/2021 17:59:11 2 2
bbc
It's not like the retail investors found anything, GME is a dog and will fail in a digital world. The price rose so much because Elon Musk bought share, not what i call a retail investor but them my portfolio is only modest.
946
28/01/2021 20:35:36 2 1
bbc
Just wait until they start calling the retail investors 'alt-right' or something to get the programmed reaction from the public that they are the bad guys and not the hedge funds.
37
28/01/2021 12:26:01 4 21
bbc
Whilst it's held up as a victory for the little guys, the reality is it's a short-lived "mania" and the people holding the shares will lose almost all their money - once the share price goes back to where it should be.

The US authorities have failed in their duty, the share should have been suspended immediately it became clear what was happening, to save a lot of mug punters from getting burned.
47
28/01/2021 12:35:59 14 1
bbc
And why don't the SEC investigate shorting stock? More importantly, why hedge funds are allowed to borrow more shares than available on the market?

When you talk about where the share price 'should' be, where is that? When Wall Street firms are the ones who dictate the pricing of the stock. We are doing to them, what they do to us and they don't like it. Simple as.
57
28/01/2021 12:45:34 2 0
bbc
Those of us who are invested are well aware of the potential that we will lose it all. It doesn't matter, this is a war on Wall Street that we are winning.
65
28/01/2021 12:27:54 2 0
bbc
You have no understanding of what is happening.
71
28/01/2021 12:28:44 0 0
bbc
Not helped by main stream news reporting....
74
28/01/2021 12:54:41 4 0
bbc
There is no "Where it Should be" its usually where institutional traders want it to be. For once they don't like it as they weren't in control. You have missed the point with this franchise its not about the little guy making money its about the big guy losing it - these private traders are happy to lose a bit if the big guns lose more. Self-sacrifice is something greedy people never understand.
31
28/01/2021 12:15:52 32 177
bbc
Should we also outlaw betting on sporting matches, as by placing a bet on a winning team, by implication you are betting on the other team to lose. Should that be made illegal too?
38
28/01/2021 12:28:34 263 9
bbc
Betting on teams within a football match doesn't alter the actual value or performance of the team. Your example shows a lack of understanding within the financial sector.
15
28/01/2021 12:02:39 22 3
bbc
Value stocks over the last 5-6 years have 50-100x their annual profit taking. It would take Tesla 1600 years to match an annual income to its current stock valuation.

Put reason over emotion and you'll soon realise the stock market is about to witness a once in a lifetime event that'll bankrupt a lot of speculators out there.
39
28/01/2021 12:05:19 3 0
bbc
Not another once in a lifetime crash, there's already been a couple since I was born!
6
Hex
28/01/2021 11:58:52 2 9
bbc
Can't just keep buying shares forever, sooner or later there's no more to buy. Once the demand for the shares goes so does their value and the price plummets.
40
28/01/2021 12:06:06 3 0
bbc
That’s not what this is... is about short sellers naked shorting shorts, which is illegal by the way, which the retail investors have caught onto and now by is buying the stocks and raising the price it’s forcing them into a corner and they don’t like it so they’re moaning. If you want to see something similar then google the 2008 VW short squeeze
31
28/01/2021 12:15:52 32 177
bbc
Should we also outlaw betting on sporting matches, as by placing a bet on a winning team, by implication you are betting on the other team to lose. Should that be made illegal too?
41
28/01/2021 12:31:20 112 5
bbc
When you buys shares, the share price goes up due to demand. When you sell shares the value of the company goes down due to lack of demand (if there are no buyers). If you bet shares fall, you have no interest in the company bettering and being to make other positions, opposite to your bet, to continue the collapse.
42
28/01/2021 12:31:29 191 2
bbc
Just fantastic. The short-sellers happily bankrupt genuine investors by dumping stock they don't own. To see them out-foxed by the internet users will presumably encourage a little caution in the future.

One wonders how Muddy Waters would have fared if Burford have been 'protected' in this way?
134
28/01/2021 13:39:37 125 2
bbc
Correct, utter hypocrisy. They would ban short selling and corporate buy backs if they actually cared.
43
28/01/2021 12:07:27 429 12
bbc
The share price broke $500 today. This article is misleading.

The shorters are the bad guys here, not the guys who are buying the shares.

Trading platforms stopping people buying shares now is illegal and market manipulation. They are doing this to help the 1%.
49
28/01/2021 12:37:37 235 8
bbc
Trading platforms that aren't allowing buys at this time is nothing short of disgusting. They're being paid a hefty sum to stop buys.
224
Mik
28/01/2021 14:32:29 3 10
bbc
I don't think anyone has said the buyers are the bad guys, just that they should perhaps be more careful. Is a company that was valued at about $200m a few weeks ago really worth over $30bn today? Maybe it is, but what happens to those buying at $400+ if those who bought early decide to take their profits and the price falls (very quickly) back down towards $50 or lower again?
280
TC
28/01/2021 14:59:10 6 5
bbc
The short traders appear correct in their assessment of the fundamentals of the company. The current high trading price didn't arise from anything done (e.g. statement of intent) or achieved (e.g. higher turnover) by GameStop.
305
28/01/2021 15:07:33 1 0
bbc
Did it hit that price before the article was published ?
323
28/01/2021 15:12:49 9 3
bbc
Trading platforms let you buy on leverage, so really you're borrowing money to buy. Losses can outstrip investments and if the customer cannot pay, the platform covers the cost.

That is why they have stopped. You can still buy on any investing platform where you take ownership of the actual shares.
361
28/01/2021 15:31:13 3 22
bbc
Trading platforms stopping people from buying shares have simply been told by the SEC to put a stop to it before the problem gets out of hand. You are looking at a witch hunt where they prey on shorts. It's not something we should be encouraging. It's so easy to manipulate the market with this garbage.

Shorting is not a problem, inflating the value of something is.
637
28/01/2021 18:02:15 2 4
bbc
It should have been stopped earlier there are market breakers in place for a reason. Shares don't increase by 50% a day!
689
HJ
28/01/2021 18:31:52 1 1
bbc
Might want to look at your screen again
29/01/2021 11:57:15 0 0
bbc
Trading platforms providing brokerage firms to an active pump and dump fraud, which those involved are happy to refer to as market manipulation, stopped retail investors from potentially committing further fraud.
15
28/01/2021 12:02:39 22 3
bbc
Value stocks over the last 5-6 years have 50-100x their annual profit taking. It would take Tesla 1600 years to match an annual income to its current stock valuation.

Put reason over emotion and you'll soon realise the stock market is about to witness a once in a lifetime event that'll bankrupt a lot of speculators out there.
44
28/01/2021 12:07:55 2 0
bbc
You don't have an understanding of the short squeeze.
12
28/01/2021 12:01:02 317 5
bbc
So "pump and dump" is a problem, but "borrow and dump" isn't?
45
28/01/2021 12:33:00 12 2
bbc
Pump and dump is only a problem when the usual people aren't profiting. When share prices and fall because of Wallstreet, well that's just business. When it's retail its the Russians, fraud and breaks the fabric of the economy.
46
28/01/2021 12:35:45 1355 28
bbc
When the hedge funds do it, its investing, but when the small guys do it its gambling.
132
28/01/2021 13:39:10 47 548
bbc
Um no it isn't.
142
28/01/2021 13:36:07 57 1
bbc
One rule for some...
144
28/01/2021 13:50:57 35 1
bbc
Agree with you.
503
28/01/2021 16:46:58 2 9
bbc
It's always investing but when the small guys get burned they tend to throw themselves off bridges.
That is why the markets implemented stringent requirements to ensure individuals have sufficient capital, income and understanding before they are allowed to trade in derivatives and other complex products.
If cowboy trading Apps are bypassing those protections it needs to be addressed, ASAP.
519
28/01/2021 16:52:53 1 1
bbc
All investing is a gamble. Short selling may drive down share price but when sold back creates a vacuum enabling lower value shares to be bought and by shareholders who seek more profit. Most investers are short term who will buy if shares drop anyway but those who are long term will reap the rewards of that original vision, hopefully, as it is still a gamble nontheless.
Nothing is garanteed.
617
28/01/2021 17:53:28 0 8
bbc
No hedge funds, you know HEDGE not gamble. When day traders, pros and small, speculate it's gambling.
997
28/01/2021 21:07:07 0 1
bbc
Utter rubbish...
29/01/2021 00:06:12 0 0
bbc
Unless you are a long term share holder or investor it's all gambling.

The US might as well come clean. What is the difference between placing a bet on a sporting outcome or a commercial or share outcome.

Not allowing one but allowing the other is at odds with reality and surely goes against their constitutional freedoms.
29/01/2021 00:52:49 1 0
bbc
the entire idea of short selling, is gambling & should be outlawed, as should micro second trades where algorythms buy & sell stocks by the millions in micro seconds. Time for the stock market to return to its original purpose. That bankers are allowed to be manipulating the market for their benefit is criminal, its simply not called that because the politicians they've bought ,do as they're told.
37
28/01/2021 12:26:01 4 21
bbc
Whilst it's held up as a victory for the little guys, the reality is it's a short-lived "mania" and the people holding the shares will lose almost all their money - once the share price goes back to where it should be.

The US authorities have failed in their duty, the share should have been suspended immediately it became clear what was happening, to save a lot of mug punters from getting burned.
47
28/01/2021 12:35:59 14 1
bbc
And why don't the SEC investigate shorting stock? More importantly, why hedge funds are allowed to borrow more shares than available on the market?

When you talk about where the share price 'should' be, where is that? When Wall Street firms are the ones who dictate the pricing of the stock. We are doing to them, what they do to us and they don't like it. Simple as.
48
28/01/2021 12:36:13 2 0
bbc
Let's hope not it is so funny. Strange this fall started after it became wider public news, as in reported here to the non involved.
43
28/01/2021 12:07:27 429 12
bbc
The share price broke $500 today. This article is misleading.

The shorters are the bad guys here, not the guys who are buying the shares.

Trading platforms stopping people buying shares now is illegal and market manipulation. They are doing this to help the 1%.
49
28/01/2021 12:37:37 235 8
bbc
Trading platforms that aren't allowing buys at this time is nothing short of disgusting. They're being paid a hefty sum to stop buys.
979
28/01/2021 21:01:30 0 0
bbc
Its now about closing time. The price has gone down to about USD 200.
50
28/01/2021 12:13:16 73 12
bbc
Nice reporting, pity when you made your update 19 minutes ago you failed to mention that is it trading at 31.27% in pre-market and has been for the past 2 hours so in no way shape or form down.
Disappointing reporting here from the BBC
227
28/01/2021 14:32:04 26 0
bbc
Dave mate its all market manipulation - retail traders cant trade in the pre-market Wall Street running scared HOLD GME
876
28/01/2021 20:01:30 0 0
bbc
Folks in the US cant even buy Dave mate..... HOLD GME
28/01/2021 22:58:16 1 0
bbc
Typical reporting from the BBC.
51
28/01/2021 12:37:48 1 9
bbc
With the gradual move of games slowly moving aware from Disc to Download I am afraid these type of stores are heading the same way as the likes of HMV.
52
28/01/2021 12:41:20 88 3
bbc
Not once has this been referred to as a 'pump and dump' by those in the know. I'm sick of reading this term in relation to $GME.

One rule for them, another for us.
61
28/01/2021 12:48:06 50 14
bbc
And what happens when those holding millions worth of shares decide they want to realise and secure that money? It will fall, and once the trend begins downwards, everyone with any sense will get their money out of it as fast as they can, hence the "dump".

It doesn't matter that the reason for the pump was to screw over dodgy players, it's still fundamentally a pump and dump, a bubble.
211
Bob
28/01/2021 14:26:25 9 5
bbc
Either you believe the current value is a true value for the stock, or you believe this is a pump and dump.

If you think it is a true value - fine. But you won't find much company.
539
28/01/2021 17:10:04 10 0
bbc
A 'pump and dump' involves:
Secretly buying stock - 'Dingbat Minerals'
Making untruthful statements (the pump phase - posting to every forum / spam list that Dingbat Minerals have struck gold BUY NOW !!!!!!)
Letting everyone else buy Dingbat Minerals
Getting out before it turns out Dingbat Minerals do bath salts

This is not a pump and dump - it is all in public
29/01/2021 01:51:10 1 0
bbc
That's because it isn't pump and dump. This is an example of a short squeeze in the market. I don't think you understand the difference.
53
28/01/2021 12:41:50 287 9
bbc
This is fantastic - well done to them - hedging is a curse and yet it is seen by Govts as the victim! Unbelievable
253
28/01/2021 14:47:58 132 2
bbc
It's because the Hedge Funds just bank rolled both candidates at the US election. Their guy is always in power.
270
28/01/2021 14:55:13 14 2
bbc
Hedging is a legitimate business tool used by many exporters (for example to protect future sales revenue against currency movements). Not at all the same as a hedge fund.
508
JT
28/01/2021 16:49:15 6 1
bbc
Hedging and Hedge Funds are two very different things....
This is also not all its seems and the little guys winning against the big. The big guys (institutional investors) have seen the momentum and jumped aboard.
E.g. 1m reddit investors @ $1k each = $1bn
5 institutional investors @ $200m each (mere slush funds to them) = $1bn.....
Its big guys against big guys....
984
28/01/2021 21:03:18 0 0
bbc
Well down to who? They all lost their shirts!
29/01/2021 01:46:16 1 0
bbc
Hedging is a totally different process to short selling and is usually used to minimise risk or volatility by institurional investors. Look up the definition! You clearly haven't got a clue what you are talking about.
32
28/01/2021 12:19:11 1 7
bbc
So we should be allowed to buy shares in companies we think will do well in the future, but not the reverse?

Yes, this is a nice 'win' for the man on the street against big city villains, but surely if you think something is over-valued you can take an opposing view? Not hugely different from betting on sports results is it?
54
28/01/2021 12:42:28 3 0
bbc
I suspect most rightly feel there is a big difference between deciding a share is not worth keeping or buying at a price, and selling a share you do not own, aiming to buy it back for less before giving it back. Perhaps such behaviours should not be possible, those involved can place bets on share prices with gambling companies instead.
76
28/01/2021 12:55:51 0 0
bbc
Yes, fair point. I guess you can only bet so much at a bookies though.
55
28/01/2021 12:44:16 1141 15
bbc
What a horrifically biased piece!

Short sellers had shorted 140% of the available stock in GME... 140%!! They borrowed more than they could physically buy back (unless the stock price kept falling, due to their shorting activities....).

It's the act of shorting that needs regulating, not average Joe's buying whatever stock they like.
119
28/01/2021 13:29:43 23 105
bbc
The act of shorting volumes above number of shares not the act of shorting per se. How many people go long on stocks without a care as to the underlying stock they are buying?
149
28/01/2021 13:52:21 16 4
bbc
Agree shorting does need to be regulated but those at the top are so corrupt. One of the reasons why Trump came to power. The ordinary citizen felt politicians were not on their side.
191
28/01/2021 14:18:47 11 14
bbc
It’s not “average Joe’s”, it’s wealthy people just finding another way to screw normal share dealing that one day hopefully pays your pension. What they are doing is in no one’s interest but their own.
383
28/01/2021 15:46:59 10 0
bbc
No different to what those who made out big time did in the 2008 crisis. There was something like 30x+ the amount of CDS available than the bonds they were actually insuring! Short sales, particularly naked short selling (which is where you are when you have sold more stock short than actually exists!) is just wrong.
864
28/01/2021 19:51:14 0 15
bbc
All those upvotes for a purely ignorant comment. What is this country turning into.
MT
28/01/2021 21:40:23 1 0
bbc
But then should we get on our high horse when governments have been manipulating the gold and silver price for decades, allowing bits of paper to be traded instead, sometimes with 100oz of paper gold only represented by 1oz of physical gold! Same with silver. We know its a con as even BoE was involved in holding down price of gold in 1999 along with USA
MT
28/01/2021 21:41:45 0 0
bbc
"In front of 3 witnesses, Bank of England Governor Eddie George spoke to Nicholas J. Morrell (CEO of Lonmin Plc) after the Washington Agreement gold price explosion in Sept/Oct 1999. Mr. George said "We looked into the abyss if the gold price rose further. A further rise would have taken down one or several trading houses, which might have taken down all the rest in their wake".....more to come
MT
28/01/2021 21:42:02 0 0
bbc
continued.

....." Therefore at any price, at any cost, the central banks had to quell the gold price, manage it. It was very difficult to get the gold price under control but we have now succeeded. The US Fed was very active in getting the gold price down. So was the U.K."
29/01/2021 18:00:07 0 0
bbc
Probably both need more regulating. This is undermining faith in the entire system which could bring about economic collapse. Its not just a big game.
10
28/01/2021 12:00:09 1825 92
bbc
Short sellers bet on failure and, in doing so, promote failure.

They are some of the lowest of the low.

And some of the richest of the rich.

What they do is morally criminal and it should be made illegal.

The fact short selling is not illegal says volumes about the lack of decent values of western capitalist governments.
56
28/01/2021 12:45:21 84 9
bbc
Well said ! I think you have 99% of support here - yet Govts DO NOTHING!
37
28/01/2021 12:26:01 4 21
bbc
Whilst it's held up as a victory for the little guys, the reality is it's a short-lived "mania" and the people holding the shares will lose almost all their money - once the share price goes back to where it should be.

The US authorities have failed in their duty, the share should have been suspended immediately it became clear what was happening, to save a lot of mug punters from getting burned.
57
28/01/2021 12:45:34 2 0
bbc
Those of us who are invested are well aware of the potential that we will lose it all. It doesn't matter, this is a war on Wall Street that we are winning.
58
28/01/2021 12:45:44 139 2
bbc
This is a money power shift the world needs, keep pushing people, there's actually nothing they can do regulation wise, other than the usual FUD. Any laws they attempt to pass will just be seen as blatant attempts to protect the wealthy. It's time to get even..
513
28/01/2021 16:51:10 46 4
bbc
Agree - but this is just a giant ponzi scheme? Those in first encourage others to buy - eventually those first in will sell and the price will start to drop leaving the last in with big losses as well?
35
28/01/2021 12:24:44 2 10
bbc
What goes up must come down. It’ll all end in tears.
59
28/01/2021 12:46:32 3 0
bbc
That might be the wisdom for conventional trading, but this is a short squeeze. There is an actual strategy here, and clear winners and losers.
60
28/01/2021 12:23:09 6 2
bbc
I don’t normally post comments here, and BBC is an excellent site. But the quality of this original article was shocking:

Said premarket prices dropped due to retail investors panicking. You realise Robinhood/most retail investors can’t trade futures?

Suggested this was causing shock in wider markets. How - GME is $10-20bn cap vs $50trn US market??

It was as if this writer parroted CNBC blindly
85
Bob
28/01/2021 13:01:11 2 1
bbc
The word 'panic' does not feature in the article. In fact it doesn't even cast speculation on the cause of the after hours fall at all.

You are the fake news merchant, not the article.
52
28/01/2021 12:41:20 88 3
bbc
Not once has this been referred to as a 'pump and dump' by those in the know. I'm sick of reading this term in relation to $GME.

One rule for them, another for us.
61
28/01/2021 12:48:06 50 14
bbc
And what happens when those holding millions worth of shares decide they want to realise and secure that money? It will fall, and once the trend begins downwards, everyone with any sense will get their money out of it as fast as they can, hence the "dump".

It doesn't matter that the reason for the pump was to screw over dodgy players, it's still fundamentally a pump and dump, a bubble.
75
28/01/2021 12:55:47 16 4
bbc
And what do you think Wall Street do when they short stock? Same thing, only isn't labelled as such.
86
28/01/2021 13:01:17 13 1
bbc
That would depend on the logic of those buying being the same as those pros and you. Making money. If they are millions all happy to lose a share or two's worth on money eventually for the fun of participating in harming the greedy money centred lot. Then they may not sell. It is like paying out for entertainment, a holiday, etc. Spending not greed investing.
597
roy
28/01/2021 17:44:06 6 0
bbc
It's not a pump and dump it's about leveraging a short squeeze by forcing the shorts hands, its not our fault in their arrogance they've doubled down this could have been over but they refuse to lose. Look at VW 2008 short squeeze, shorters had to beg porsche to start selling.
21
28/01/2021 12:07:59 7 2
bbc
It's not just about income, it's about the value of assets and future prospects. The value of Tesla's operation alone is huge, the infrastructure it's built is huge. To build something of equivalence you'd need vast sums of money, and because it's so hard and expensive to compete, it means they're one of the few games in town if not the only game in town.
62
28/01/2021 12:48:06 2 1
bbc
I suspect like most companies their 'assets' are not worth a fraction of what they put on the books, as is shown up at every liquidation of every failed company. You may have paid a fortune to have a mega factory but unless many people want it, in the same place, instantly, instead of building their own, it is near worthless.
66
28/01/2021 12:51:50 3 0
bbc
Assets are not always static, for example with Tesla's manufacturing system, they have a machine setup that cost hundreds of millions if not billions, the machines on their own didn't cost that, but the R&D and configuration of them did. When you liquidate you'll get the static assets but not the fluid ones. Monetary value can be as theoretical as positions in the market place or your reputation.
10
28/01/2021 12:00:09 1825 92
bbc
Short sellers bet on failure and, in doing so, promote failure.

They are some of the lowest of the low.

And some of the richest of the rich.

What they do is morally criminal and it should be made illegal.

The fact short selling is not illegal says volumes about the lack of decent values of western capitalist governments.
63
28/01/2021 12:49:23 12 56
bbc
why are short sellers bad? I dont have much knowledge on subject and i'm genuinely interested.

a quick google just claims it unethical to bet on failure but doesnt mention affecting the company's future. Also apparently its has its benefits in liquidity for the market
108
28/01/2021 13:19:19 58 5
bbc
By shorting something you are betting that the company will go down in value. When it starts going down you actually earn money by borrowing someone's shares, selling it at a lower price and then selling it back again to the original person at the original price. Lots of shorts is betting a company will fail and profiting form it.
127
28/01/2021 13:34:39 29 4
bbc
In this context, the Hedge fund in question "borrowed" more stock than existed to sell and buy back later once the price had dropped.

In really simple terms a company has 10 apples they are owned by a few different companies and people, a second company borrows 13 apples (three don't exist) sells them and the value of the apples fall. Anyone who owns apples lose money, the borrower's made money.
331
28/01/2021 15:16:05 6 0
bbc
They leveraged over 100% of the shares and when something is pushed that hard it makes it impossible to raise credit lines to keep a business afloat. This would cause a quick call to bankruptcy and no chance for employees to look for other work or hope for an investor buyout. If they had kept their bets reasonable (if you call any of them that) then this wouldn't even be happening. They got greedy
64
28/01/2021 12:49:29 29 2
bbc
The is the true meaning of taking on the establishment (not the right-wing extremism version spouted by Trump and Farage|) where the real "Little Guy" takes on the leeches of society who trade on emptiness in an industry which has no substance of foundation i.e. London's Financial Services. long may this battle continue and lets see if "Greed is Good" when the little guy gets all the rewards.
77
28/01/2021 12:56:19 33 0
bbc
The little guys will still lose, the company is probably dead sometime in the future stuck on high streets. However millions of them willing to lose a bit each is wrecking the greedy few that abused a system that enriches them. Their losses are concentrated on the few. Serve them right.
37
28/01/2021 12:26:01 4 21
bbc
Whilst it's held up as a victory for the little guys, the reality is it's a short-lived "mania" and the people holding the shares will lose almost all their money - once the share price goes back to where it should be.

The US authorities have failed in their duty, the share should have been suspended immediately it became clear what was happening, to save a lot of mug punters from getting burned.
65
28/01/2021 12:27:54 2 0
bbc
You have no understanding of what is happening.
62
28/01/2021 12:48:06 2 1
bbc
I suspect like most companies their 'assets' are not worth a fraction of what they put on the books, as is shown up at every liquidation of every failed company. You may have paid a fortune to have a mega factory but unless many people want it, in the same place, instantly, instead of building their own, it is near worthless.
66
28/01/2021 12:51:50 3 0
bbc
Assets are not always static, for example with Tesla's manufacturing system, they have a machine setup that cost hundreds of millions if not billions, the machines on their own didn't cost that, but the R&D and configuration of them did. When you liquidate you'll get the static assets but not the fluid ones. Monetary value can be as theoretical as positions in the market place or your reputation.
31
28/01/2021 12:15:52 32 177
bbc
Should we also outlaw betting on sporting matches, as by placing a bet on a winning team, by implication you are betting on the other team to lose. Should that be made illegal too?
67
28/01/2021 12:51:56 59 2
bbc
Your comment is so naive - using your example you are effectively putting half of the opposing team on crutches - this needs to be stopped
68
28/01/2021 12:28:07 1 2
bbc
Lose steam....interesting use of words....investors were lured in in part by news media reports. Then those people in the know got out with their profits. It’s an old trick....and it usually works.
72
28/01/2021 12:54:04 2 0
bbc
I'd open a sell position but the brokers aren't allowing it at the moment, anyone opening sell positions now would break the system the windfall would be so huge, so obviously nobody is prepared to lend money to let that happen.
35
28/01/2021 12:24:44 2 10
bbc
What goes up must come down. It’ll all end in tears.
69
28/01/2021 12:28:17 1 0
bbc
Yes, for the brokers.
70
28/01/2021 12:28:38 3 2
bbc
Why is the BBC so pro-wallstreet? Almost as if the BBC Tory masters are looking after their banker buddies.
82
28/01/2021 12:58:59 3 1
bbc
I'm guessing you'd see any story that didn't demand "death to the money lenders" as being "pro-wallstreet"
37
28/01/2021 12:26:01 4 21
bbc
Whilst it's held up as a victory for the little guys, the reality is it's a short-lived "mania" and the people holding the shares will lose almost all their money - once the share price goes back to where it should be.

The US authorities have failed in their duty, the share should have been suspended immediately it became clear what was happening, to save a lot of mug punters from getting burned.
71
28/01/2021 12:28:44 0 0
bbc
Not helped by main stream news reporting....
68
28/01/2021 12:28:07 1 2
bbc
Lose steam....interesting use of words....investors were lured in in part by news media reports. Then those people in the know got out with their profits. It’s an old trick....and it usually works.
72
28/01/2021 12:54:04 2 0
bbc
I'd open a sell position but the brokers aren't allowing it at the moment, anyone opening sell positions now would break the system the windfall would be so huge, so obviously nobody is prepared to lend money to let that happen.
73
28/01/2021 12:54:37 7 0
bbc
Still a bit (lot?) of steam left yet. It's up 35% pre-market to $470 at 90 minutes before open .......
All a mugs game imo, with some 'innocents' probably going to lose a great deal at some point :(
78
Bob
28/01/2021 12:57:14 2 1
bbc
No probably about it.
992
28/01/2021 21:05:46 0 0
bbc
They'll not be innocents after they lose a great deal, so they'll have paid for an education, better value than a University nowadays.
37
28/01/2021 12:26:01 4 21
bbc
Whilst it's held up as a victory for the little guys, the reality is it's a short-lived "mania" and the people holding the shares will lose almost all their money - once the share price goes back to where it should be.

The US authorities have failed in their duty, the share should have been suspended immediately it became clear what was happening, to save a lot of mug punters from getting burned.
74
28/01/2021 12:54:41 4 0
bbc
There is no "Where it Should be" its usually where institutional traders want it to be. For once they don't like it as they weren't in control. You have missed the point with this franchise its not about the little guy making money its about the big guy losing it - these private traders are happy to lose a bit if the big guns lose more. Self-sacrifice is something greedy people never understand.
61
28/01/2021 12:48:06 50 14
bbc
And what happens when those holding millions worth of shares decide they want to realise and secure that money? It will fall, and once the trend begins downwards, everyone with any sense will get their money out of it as fast as they can, hence the "dump".

It doesn't matter that the reason for the pump was to screw over dodgy players, it's still fundamentally a pump and dump, a bubble.
75
28/01/2021 12:55:47 16 4
bbc
And what do you think Wall Street do when they short stock? Same thing, only isn't labelled as such.
54
28/01/2021 12:42:28 3 0
bbc
I suspect most rightly feel there is a big difference between deciding a share is not worth keeping or buying at a price, and selling a share you do not own, aiming to buy it back for less before giving it back. Perhaps such behaviours should not be possible, those involved can place bets on share prices with gambling companies instead.
76
28/01/2021 12:55:51 0 0
bbc
Yes, fair point. I guess you can only bet so much at a bookies though.
64
28/01/2021 12:49:29 29 2
bbc
The is the true meaning of taking on the establishment (not the right-wing extremism version spouted by Trump and Farage|) where the real "Little Guy" takes on the leeches of society who trade on emptiness in an industry which has no substance of foundation i.e. London's Financial Services. long may this battle continue and lets see if "Greed is Good" when the little guy gets all the rewards.
77
28/01/2021 12:56:19 33 0
bbc
The little guys will still lose, the company is probably dead sometime in the future stuck on high streets. However millions of them willing to lose a bit each is wrecking the greedy few that abused a system that enriches them. Their losses are concentrated on the few. Serve them right.
73
28/01/2021 12:54:37 7 0
bbc
Still a bit (lot?) of steam left yet. It's up 35% pre-market to $470 at 90 minutes before open .......
All a mugs game imo, with some 'innocents' probably going to lose a great deal at some point :(
78
Bob
28/01/2021 12:57:14 2 1
bbc
No probably about it.
79
28/01/2021 12:57:24 16 1
bbc
Regulator William Galvin "contrived" - isn't that what Hedge Funds do matey?
32
28/01/2021 12:19:11 1 7
bbc
So we should be allowed to buy shares in companies we think will do well in the future, but not the reverse?

Yes, this is a nice 'win' for the man on the street against big city villains, but surely if you think something is over-valued you can take an opposing view? Not hugely different from betting on sports results is it?
80
28/01/2021 12:29:09 1 0
bbc
Sure, but to short 140% of a company is greedy, irresponsible and stupid.

Shorters helped get rid of Enron, they're not all bad. However, this story is nothing like that.
36
28/01/2021 12:25:49 452 14
bbc
Anyone could spend 30mins researching the subject and see this is misleading story to publish.

In such volatility choosing to publish in a brief moment of after hours trading is not fair on the story developing here, as I speak it is now +40% overnight.

How about the real story, in that the 'retail' investing market found something Wall Strett didn't, and are now beating them at their own game
81
28/01/2021 12:30:11 249 9
bbc
100% agreed - I just made a similar post here saying exactly this. It was as if the writer typed "Gamestop" into google and spent 5 minutes regurgitating headlines from CNBC etc. Highly misleading story - very disappointing for BBC
343
28/01/2021 15:21:15 5 3
bbc
Not really, the BBC have a habit of doing exactly this in service to the establishment.
658
28/01/2021 18:16:24 1 2
bbc
Sadly this seems to be the new norm with bbc reporting, really lame & and looking like very bad value for money these days. The hedge funds would probably be shorting bbc shares if they had a float now
868
28/01/2021 19:53:29 0 0
bbc
That's all we expect from the BBC.
28/01/2021 22:55:43 1 0
bbc
I don't find find this disappointing for the BBC at all, it's same old BBC.
29/01/2021 08:22:58 0 0
bbc
The BBC do this all the time. This, mixed in with lots of one sentence quote 'could, may, might' articles and sprinkled with a bunch of quota tick boxed drivel to fit their current mandates. The BBC News have not been news worthy for many years now.
70
28/01/2021 12:28:38 3 2
bbc
Why is the BBC so pro-wallstreet? Almost as if the BBC Tory masters are looking after their banker buddies.
82
28/01/2021 12:58:59 3 1
bbc
I'm guessing you'd see any story that didn't demand "death to the money lenders" as being "pro-wallstreet"
83
28/01/2021 12:32:07 9 0
bbc
Err, it's up to $490 pre market, so the old rule of "if the headline is a question the answer is 'no'" is true. I'd imagine they'll suspended trading. Although how that will help the hedge funds I've no idea as they will still be short unless they can find some shares to buy.
84
28/01/2021 13:00:44 221 3
bbc
I thought competition was supposed to be healthy. Obviously, the big boys don't like the little people playing them at their own game and winning. Most of these big traders are just as guilty in manipulating prices between themselves and they don't get hauled over the proverbial coals for it.
262
Jim
28/01/2021 14:52:10 102 0
bbc
Seems to me that the Hedge funds didn't take account of the possibility of just this scenario. That is their bad.
365
28/01/2021 15:32:47 1 8
bbc
So you admit that the amateurs are manipulating the price? great. SEC can fine both reddit and elon musk.
28/01/2021 23:28:55 4 0
bbc
It gets worse. Citadel is the hedge fund that owns Melvin Capital who are the GME short seller predicted to lose BILLIONS due to the people noticing that they are shorting GME shares. Citadel owns the app Robinhood, who have banned purchases of new GME shares to limit losses. It's illegal market manipulation, which the SEC needs to investigate and no doubt will be a class action lawsuit.
60
28/01/2021 12:23:09 6 2
bbc
I don’t normally post comments here, and BBC is an excellent site. But the quality of this original article was shocking:

Said premarket prices dropped due to retail investors panicking. You realise Robinhood/most retail investors can’t trade futures?

Suggested this was causing shock in wider markets. How - GME is $10-20bn cap vs $50trn US market??

It was as if this writer parroted CNBC blindly
85
Bob
28/01/2021 13:01:11 2 1
bbc
The word 'panic' does not feature in the article. In fact it doesn't even cast speculation on the cause of the after hours fall at all.

You are the fake news merchant, not the article.
126
28/01/2021 13:34:28 0 0
bbc
I was referencing the article in its original form published this morning - to its credit the BBC have since updated it. Still disappointed by the article quality though.
61
28/01/2021 12:48:06 50 14
bbc
And what happens when those holding millions worth of shares decide they want to realise and secure that money? It will fall, and once the trend begins downwards, everyone with any sense will get their money out of it as fast as they can, hence the "dump".

It doesn't matter that the reason for the pump was to screw over dodgy players, it's still fundamentally a pump and dump, a bubble.
86
28/01/2021 13:01:17 13 1
bbc
That would depend on the logic of those buying being the same as those pros and you. Making money. If they are millions all happy to lose a share or two's worth on money eventually for the fun of participating in harming the greedy money centred lot. Then they may not sell. It is like paying out for entertainment, a holiday, etc. Spending not greed investing.
216
Bob
28/01/2021 14:28:41 3 13
bbc
Whether you shoot someone in the face for a laugh or shoot someone to be violent you have still committed murder.

No matter if you are doing this for a laugh and happy to potentially lose some money - it is still a pump and dump.
87
28/01/2021 13:01:42 0 2
bbc
Leaving aside the rights & wrongs of the hedge fund / amateur traders involvement in GameStop, would you want your pension invested in a high street consumer electronics retailer that's been losing money for a few years now? I'd love the likes of Currys etc to be on every high street, but in the digital and Amazon age has changed everything.

Vote up to incl in your pension, or down to avoid.
92
28/01/2021 13:06:15 5 0
bbc
I imagine this is not investing for greed, pension or otherwise. It is more like spending on a holiday or entertainment. Sure you will end up out of pocket, just as you are after a holiday or come out of a cinema. But you 'bought' fun with the money.
88
28/01/2021 13:02:16 1203 23
bbc
If you gamble with £1000, you are a reckless degenerate, crypto fantasist and need to be regulated for your own good - and if you win, we'll ask you why you want to withdraw your money.

If you gamble with a billion, you will have every safety net at your disposal; if you lose, we will bail you out at the cost of 10 years of austerity. If you win, you can pay 2% tax.

The game.
91
28/01/2021 13:05:37 79 287
bbc
Which hedge funds were bailed out in 2008?
324
28/01/2021 15:12:51 11 1
bbc
Great... now I'm losing The Game
443
28/01/2021 16:17:37 26 3
bbc
If you get as rich as Trump you basically pay nothing. The government pays you.
In the classic Randian 'liberal' line, Governments can (should) :-
Control the rich by giving them money.
Control the poor by starvation.
28/01/2021 22:10:57 1 0
bbc
it's pretty disgusting
29/01/2021 00:10:49 1 0
bbc
And if you gamble with people pensions and loose, you are business hero
89
28/01/2021 13:02:33 393 3
bbc
The stock was shorted 140%. The hedge funds' expertise should be in managing risk - in this case they failed to do so appropriately. Private investors noticed this mistake and have taken advantage of this - I don't see what is wrong with this. A hedge fund could have equally taken advantage (and likely are) and they would have been seen as heroes.
125
28/01/2021 13:33:58 235 4
bbc
Well said. It's an efficient market at play. The hedge fund over shorted and someone else realised the weakness and exploited it accordingly.
356
28/01/2021 15:28:36 4 31
bbc
It's not a mistake, they're literally inflating a stock by manipulating the market.

What's wrong with it is that you could just witchhunt anyone who has a short in the market and make them lose a lot of money. The SEC rightfully should be putting a stop to this.
362
28/01/2021 15:31:14 9 1
bbc
Who's to say that the people who started the threads on Reddit aren't other hedge fund managers?
MT
28/01/2021 21:45:26 1 0
bbc
140%. That's nothing compared with the gold and silver manipulated market. For every 293oz of paper gold there is just 1ounce of physical gold, which helps the USA, the BoE and many other countries keep on producing Fiat paper currency.
90
28/01/2021 12:43:32 23 0
bbc
Do the BBC have hedge fund friends? This is in no way slowing down. In pre-market we saw it jump to $500 a share
88
28/01/2021 13:02:16 1203 23
bbc
If you gamble with £1000, you are a reckless degenerate, crypto fantasist and need to be regulated for your own good - and if you win, we'll ask you why you want to withdraw your money.

If you gamble with a billion, you will have every safety net at your disposal; if you lose, we will bail you out at the cost of 10 years of austerity. If you win, you can pay 2% tax.

The game.
91
28/01/2021 13:05:37 79 287
bbc
Which hedge funds were bailed out in 2008?
101
28/01/2021 13:12:37 236 6
bbc
Citadel Investment group and Paloma Partners - two big examples, many others. Do your research.
130
28/01/2021 13:37:41 86 2
bbc
Any organisation that has accessed near zero rate borrowing facilitated by debt monetisation by central banks, for which taxpayers are ultimately on the hook, has been bailed out. That's every organisation by the way.
229
28/01/2021 14:35:04 64 0
bbc
The global money supply was DOUBLED in order to keep the whole system afloat, without this most of these hedge funds would have gone under.
450
28/01/2021 16:20:42 13 0
bbc
Most of the major hedge funds had made all their losses back inside 18 months to two years. Osborne was right when he said "We're all in this together".

They certainly are.
453
28/01/2021 16:22:26 5 0
bbc
Probably most of them in one way or another !!
578
28/01/2021 17:33:02 3 0
bbc
The banks were doing exactly the same thing as the hedge funds.
584
28/01/2021 17:36:45 5 0
bbc
Didn't need to - they earned a fortune shorting the banks that led to the crisis!
636
28/01/2021 18:01:14 6 0
bbc
Long term capital management run by two nobel laureates was bailed out.
694
28/01/2021 18:35:11 7 0
bbc
Not just hedge funds, the banks were at it too. Gambling with other people's money, lying to each other about interest rates etc. and even lying to each other about what they were selling to each other. So busy and desperate to make money they built up a massive house of cards. Then let the taxpayer foot the bill when it all came tumbling down.
807
28/01/2021 19:27:36 2 2
bbc
I can name two at Bear Stearns, and that's in March of 2008 alone...
929
28/01/2021 20:29:32 0 0
bbc
all of them.
28/01/2021 21:27:46 0 1
bbc
Wow you are dumb.
28/01/2021 22:48:54 2 0
bbc
Every one of them were, and again last March. They leverage up massively on bonds. BofE QE kept bond prices high and pumped billions in, inflating hedge funds assets.
28/01/2021 23:01:22 1 0
bbc
Goldman Sachs hedge fund gets $3 billion bailout in 2007
87
28/01/2021 13:01:42 0 2
bbc
Leaving aside the rights & wrongs of the hedge fund / amateur traders involvement in GameStop, would you want your pension invested in a high street consumer electronics retailer that's been losing money for a few years now? I'd love the likes of Currys etc to be on every high street, but in the digital and Amazon age has changed everything.

Vote up to incl in your pension, or down to avoid.
92
28/01/2021 13:06:15 5 0
bbc
I imagine this is not investing for greed, pension or otherwise. It is more like spending on a holiday or entertainment. Sure you will end up out of pocket, just as you are after a holiday or come out of a cinema. But you 'bought' fun with the money.
104
28/01/2021 13:14:49 1 0
bbc
Yep, agree 100%. I'm taking a step back from the noise and emotion though. No different to Blockbuster. I'd love to still have a film store up the road still, but technology has moved to the Netflix era. For my pension though, I'd prefer Netflix shares than Blockbuster (if it were 2012).
93
RT
28/01/2021 12:38:48 2 1
bbc
Losing Steam?

The Pre-Market price is $130 up on yesterdays close.
94
28/01/2021 13:07:11 2 1
bbc
When will the authorities come to their senses and stop this. They are little more than Snake oil salesmen.
95
28/01/2021 13:07:29 10 5
bbc
Another example of how the BBC kisses the wall street arse 24/7 , pathetic reporting by useless journalists. Keep it up people lets help destroy this hedgefund corruption
124
28/01/2021 13:33:27 3 0
bbc
I find the article balanced and informative.

Are you here just for the spot of BBC bashing for the vested interests?....
96
28/01/2021 12:48:28 18 1
bbc
Such disappointing reporting, there has been no mention of a pump and dump by the people involved. The share prices have only fallen after market due to short sellers using extended hours trading to pass shares back and forth at lower and lower prices to try and scare off retail investors. Why don't you cover broker apps stopping people from purchasing shares with no explanation?
684
28/01/2021 18:29:50 6 0
bbc
You really should go and educate yourself as to what a pump and dump is. This is a short squeeze, not a pump and dump. The traders getting squeezed on naked shorts have no one to blame but themselves.
97
28/01/2021 13:08:38 258 4
bbc
Now that hedge funds are losing billions, suddenly there are calls from conservatives in the US for regulation. What did they do after the 2008 crash? Where were the regulators stopping naked shorts? Let alone the immorality of profiting off running companies into the ground. They shouldn't have shorted GME 140%. They gambled and lost to smart and organised retail investors who squeezed them.
99
Bob
28/01/2021 13:12:03 37 1
bbc
There are always calls to outlaw it.

The only reason you see them in the news today is because there is an active event to tie the calls to.
315
28/01/2021 15:06:50 10 2
bbc
Exactly. The "big boys" don't like it when someone beats them at their own games. Typical users and abusers of their position. Short selli g should simy be banned it is just wrong. If they need to gamble go bet on a horse race.
423
28/01/2021 16:07:31 7 2
bbc
Well said. Quite funny that the conservative element in the US (and across the world) don't like it when they're faced with competition and lose out. Doesn't matter what regulation they put in place, people always find a legal workaround.
630
28/01/2021 18:01:03 2 1
bbc
Well said....utterly true. Good on them retailers
28/01/2021 22:51:48 2 0
bbc
Not true, Sean Hannity just had on Steve Morris (Morrison- I'm forgetting the exact name) whom I think was an advisor to Trump and he's for the little guy teaching the Wall Street big guys a lesson. Hannity: "I'm not a big trader at all, but I'm rooting for the little guy here". Charles Paine on FOX Business was just yelling his head off at the greed of the shorters at 140% on GameStop!!
98
28/01/2021 13:11:39 3 2
bbc
Seems to me that Wall Street was fine whilst it was them that was earning money, now that it's normal people it needs regulating or changing. This biased BBC article just panders to the financial elite which is such a surprise for the BBC /s Also, well done to everyone who made money on this transaction.
103
28/01/2021 13:14:31 3 1
bbc
I cannot find the BBC bias you refer to and suspect that is your paranoia.
Pity because it spoiled an otherwise excellent post.
97
28/01/2021 13:08:38 258 4
bbc
Now that hedge funds are losing billions, suddenly there are calls from conservatives in the US for regulation. What did they do after the 2008 crash? Where were the regulators stopping naked shorts? Let alone the immorality of profiting off running companies into the ground. They shouldn't have shorted GME 140%. They gambled and lost to smart and organised retail investors who squeezed them.
99
Bob
28/01/2021 13:12:03 37 1
bbc
There are always calls to outlaw it.

The only reason you see them in the news today is because there is an active event to tie the calls to.
100
28/01/2021 13:12:27 13 0
bbc
"This isn't investing, this is gambling," LMAO!!!